recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : gmail   46

Old memories, accidentally trapped in amber by our digital devices
"Part of what humans use technology for is to better remember the past. We scroll back through photos on our phones and on Instagram & Flickr — “that was Fourth of July 5 years ago, so fun!” — and apps like Swarm, Timehop, and Facebook surface old locations, photos, and tweets for us on the regular. But sometimes, we run into the good old days in unexpected places on our digital devices.

Designer and typographer Marcin Wichary started a thread on Twitter yesterday about “UIs that accidentally amass memories” with the initial example of the “Preferred Networks” listing of all the wifi networks his computer had ever joined, “unexpected reminders of business trips, vacations, accidental detours, once frequented and now closed cafés”.

[image: screeshot of macOS wi-fi panel]

Several other people chimed in with their own examples…the Bluetooth pairings list, the Reminders app, the list of alarms, saved places in mapping apps, AIM/iChat status message log, chat apps not used for years, the Gmail drafts folder, etc.

John Bull noted that his list of former addresses on Amazon is “a massive walk down memory line of my old jobs and places of residence”. I just looked at mine and I’ve got addresses in there from almost 20 years ago.

Steven Richie suggested the Weather app on iOS:
I usually like to add the city I will be travelling to ahead of time to get a sense of what it will be like when we get there.

I do this too but am pretty good about culling my cities list. Still, there are a couple places I keep around even though I haven’t been to them in awhile…a self-nudge for future travel desires perhaps.

Kotori switched back to an old OS via a years-old backup and found “a post-breakup message that came on the day i switched phones”:
thought i moved on but so many whatifs flashed in my head when i read it. what if i never got a new phone. what if they messaged me a few minutes earlier. what if we used a chat that did backups differently

Similarly, Richard fired up Google Maps on an old phone and was briefly transported through time and space:
On a similar note to both of these, a while ago I switched back to my old Nokia N95 after my iPhone died. Fired up Google Maps, and for a brief moment, it marked my location as at a remote crossroads in NZ where I’d last had it open, lost on a road trip at least a decade before.

Matt Sephton runs into old friends when he plays Nintendo:
Every time my friends and I play Nintendo WiiU/Wii/3DS games we see a lot of our old Mii avatars. Some are 10 years old and of a time. Amongst them is a friend who passed away a few years back. It’s always so good to see him. It’s as if he’s still playing the games with us.

For better or worse, machines never forget those who aren’t with us anymore. Dan Noyes’ Gmail holds a reminder of his late wife:
Whenever I open Gmail I see the last message that my late wife sent me via Google chat in 2014. It’s her standard “pssst” greeting for me: “aye aye”. I leave it unread lest it disappears.

It’s a wonderful thread…read the whole thing. [https://twitter.com/mwichary/status/996056615928266752 ]

I encounter these nostalgia bombs every once in awhile too. I closed dozens of tabs the other day on Chrome for iOS; I don’t use it very often, so some of them dated back to more than a year ago. I have bookmarks on browsers I no longer use on my iMac that are more than 10 years old. A MacOS folder I dump temporary images & files into has stuff going back years. Everyone I know stopped using apps like Path and Peach, so when I open them, I see messages from years ago right at the top like they were just posted, trapped in amber.

My personal go-to cache of unexpected memories is Messages on iOS. Scrolling all the way down to the bottom of the list, I can find messages from numbers I haven’t communicated with since a month or two after I got my first iPhone in 2007.

[image: screenshot of Messages in iOS]

There and elsewhere in the listing are friends I’m no longer in touch with, business lunches that went nowhere, old flames, messages from people I don’t even remember, arriving Lyfts in unknown cities, old landlords, completely contextless messages from old numbers (“I am so drunk!!!!” from a friend’s wife I didn’t know that well?!), old babysitters, a bunch of messages from friends texting to be let into our building for a holiday party, playdate arrangements w/ the parents of my kids’ long-forgotten friends (which Ella was that?!), and old group texts with current friends left to languish for years. From one of these group texts, I was just reminded that my 3-year-old daughter liked to make cocktails:

[screenshot]

Just like Sally Draper! Speaking of Mad Men, Don’s correct: nostalgia is a potent thing, so I’ve got to stop poking around my phone and get back to work.

Update: I had forgotten this great example about a ghost driver in an old Xbox racing game.
Well, when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together — until he died, when i was just 6.

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years.

but once i did, i noticed something.

we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came.

and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST.

See also this story about Animal Crossing. (via @ironicsans/status/996445080943808512)"
digital  memory  memories  2018  jasonkottke  kottke  traces  animalcrossing  videogames  games  gaming  flickr  wifi  marcinwichary  death  relationships  obsolescence  gmail  googlhangouts  googlechat  iphone  ios  nostalgia  xbox  nintendo  messages  communication  googlemaps  place  time  chrome  mac  osx 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Automate emotional labor in Gmail messages. [emotional-labor.email]
"emotional-labor.email
Automate emotional labor in Gmail messages.

Lighten up your email with the Emotional Labor extension. Works on any email sent through Gmail.

First write an email. Then click the smiley face to brighten up the tone of the email before sending."

[Describes in this post:
https://medium.com/message/canned-email-eb6f4ba843d9

"I feel more acutely aware of the strain of feigned enthusiasm when I am writing email. I guess it is not much different than day to day interactions like answering “things are going good” when asked, when actually things are not so great. But some email correspondence feels like a race to collect and dispense exclamation marks and xoxos. As if we could cash them all in for prizes upon achieving — Darth Vader voice, flashlight under chin — inbox zero.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Xoxooxoxooxooxoooooooooxooxoxoxooxoxo!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Xoxooxoxooxooxoooooooooxooxoxoxooxoxo!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Xoxooxoxooxooxoooooooooxooxoxoxooxoxo!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Xoxooxoxooxooxoooooooooxooxoxoxooxoxo!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Xoxooxoxooxooxoooooooooxooxoxoxooxoxo!!!!!!!!!!!

That paragraph I just wrote appears more cynical than I intended. But that’s my point. It is hard to communicate in words. It is work. What was once the concern of professional writers is now a burden we all share, as we communicate all day long over email and texts.

We might garnish our messages with emoticons and emojis like strewing garland and bunting to demonstrate emotion. Sometimes that comes out naturally. But that fake smile, “yeah, things are going good,” way of deflecting attention, and containing unhappiness, plays out differently in written correspondence. When I attempt to display an emotion I don’t actually feel over email, I fret over sounding insincere or abrupt or otherwise upsetting someone unintentionally.

That’s why I made this: the Emotional Labor email extension. Install it in Chrome, then click on the smiley face after composing an email in Gmail to brighten up the mood of the letter. It replaces serious words with playful ones, swaps out periods for exclamation marks, and a adds cheerful introductory text.

Everyone has a story you tell again and again. But you alter it a bit upon each re-telling don’t you? You edit it for length, you play up certain details depending upon company. Customer service is where that line blurs. It can be impossible to tell whether a voice on the phone is automated or a real person speaking committedly to a script.

I was inspired to create the extension after many futile attempts to start using canned responses. “Canned responses” — email written in advance to send again and again — is a common bullet point on content listicles suggesting ways someone might improve their productivity. Canned responses are kind of like a one-on-one FAQ. If people often ask directions to your office, you can write a canned response to send rather than writing the directions out over and over. Or, if you are a vendor that often receives the same question from customers, you can send a canned response with the answer instead of cutting-and-pasting again and again. I have a few shortcuts for texting on my phone (autocorrect “OMW” to “On my way!” has saved me precious seconds when I’ve needed to remove my gloves to text someone in the cold.) But I never found a reason to use canned answers. Nothing in my life is structured for its use.

The Emotional Labor extension is also a response to an app released last year: Romantimatic. It automates sending texts like “I love you” and other sweet nothings to a person’s love interest. While canned answers were developed for professional use, the Romantimatic app less ambiguously demonstrates where credence to authenticity should outweigh urgency and obligation. One of the suggested messages to send is “I can’t get you off my mind,” which is ridiculously untrue if this app is in use.

The Emotional Labor email extension looks fake. That’s the point. I wanted to reveal my exhaustion, my fatigue in needing to attend to so much correspondence. Until there is an emoticon for “Things are kind of not great but I don’t want to disturb you let’s just pretend things are fine,” that’s the grey area where this project resides. I made this to reveal the friction in my indecisiveness — how many xs do I normally sign off — one, two, three?

Perhaps it may be of some use!!!! Or, at the very least, I hope you find it amusing!!!!!

XOXO"]
extensions  gmail  email  joannemcneil  writing  communication  2015  tone  correspondence  automation  emotions  emotionallabor  cannedresponses  productivity 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Official Gmail Blog: Download a copy of your Gmail and Google Calendar data
"Having access to your data and being able to take it with you is important, especially if that data contains precious memories like old love letters, your first job offer, or that 100-message thread discussing the merits of various cat videos. Starting today we're rolling out the ability to export a copy of your Gmail and Google Calendar data, making it easy to back up your data or move to another service.

You can download all of your mail and calendars or choose a subset of labels and calendars. You can also download a single archive file for multiple products with a copy of your Gmail, Calendar, Google+, YouTube, Drive, and other Google data.

The ability to download your Gmail messages will be rolled out over the next month while Calendar data is available to download for everyone today."
google  gmail  export  data  calendar  googlecalendar  dataportability  2013 
december 2013 by robertogreco
LazyTruth
"LazyTruth is a free Gmail gadget that automatically triggers fact-checked content when you receive a misleading email forward."
lazytruth  truth  factchecking  gmail 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Gmvault: gmail backup
"Backup all your emails on disk.
Use the full sync mode to backup your entire gmail account in a unique directory. Your email backup repository can then be easily tar and moved from one machine to the other.

Update your backup in minutes.
Gmvault can run a quick sync mode regularly (ie. every day) to keep your backup up to date.`

Restore emails in any Gmail acc.
With the restore command Gmvault can recreate your gmail mailboxes in any Gmail account. All attributes such as Gmail labels are preserved and recreated. With restore, you will recover your Gmail account exactly as it was.

Handle all Gmail IMAP hiccups.
Even being the world best ever email service, Gmail and especially its IMAP service is not without bugs. Gmvault handles all these issues to provide the smoothest experience to the user. Gmvault deals with the most common issues and always let the user with an uncorrupted email database."
windows  osx  mac  linux  google  data  restore  software  python  opensource  backup  gmail  gmvault 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Scheduled sending and email reminders | Boomerang for Gmail
"Schedule an email to be sent later. Easy email reminders.
Boomerang for Gmail is a Firefox / Chrome plugin that lets you take control of when you send and receive email messages."
scheduling  productivity  firefox  chrome  plugins  email  gmail  extensions 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Why I do not want to work at Google
"I believe that warehouse-scale client-server computing will, in the end, undermine the kind of democratic freedom of communication that we need to deal with today’s global menaces. It’s more practical than peer-to-peer computing at the moment, but that pendulum has swung back & forth several times over the decades…The proper response to the current impracticality of decentralized computing is not to sigh and build centralized systems. The proper response is to build the systems to *make decentralized computing practical again*.

Google is not institutionally opposed to this; they’ve funded substantial and important work on it. Nevertheless, because of their overall orientation toward centralized solutions with undemocratically-imposed policies, I believe working there would be a further distraction from that goal. Worse, with every advance that companies like Google and Apple make, the higher is the bar that decentralized systems must leap to achieve real adoption."

[via: http://www.odonnellweb.com/2011/08/is-google-becoming-the-next-iteration-of-aol/ ]
internet  web  media  google  peertopeer  p2p  decentralization  democracy  freedom  computing  decentralizedcomputing  kragenjaviersitaker  email  gmail  spam  control  2011  google+ 
august 2011 by robertogreco
tins ::: Rick Klau's weblog: Google Account security best practices
"A family member recently had some questions about how to keep their Google account secure, and I wrote up a bunch of recommendations for how to stay safe... realized after I sent the e-mail that this was probably good stuff to share for people who might not know about all of the options when it comes to protecting their account. Hope some of you find this helpful!" [Great advice, but evidence as to why so many people have insecure accounts. Too complicated.]
security  google  privacy  gmail  passwords  broken  2011  rickklau 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Setup: Frank Chimero
"I’d like a more flexible, faster all-in-one inbox for my digital detritus. For some reason, DevonThink, Yojimbo, & Evernote aren’t cutting it for me. Tumblr is close, but not quite it. I’d like something that successfully handles images in tandem w/ text, because that’s how my brain works. I have this dream of having a management interface very similar to a hybrid of LittleSnapper & Yojimbo, & then a “serendipity engine” application for iPad. It’d be a bit like Flipboard where things are served up at random from your collection for browsing. That’s the flaw of all of these things, in my mind: they encourage you to get things in, but aren’t optimized for revisiting it in a way that lacks linearity or classification. If you’re looking to make constellations of content, I think the way your collection is presented back to you matters. I guess what I’m asking for is a digital rendition of the commonplace book, & serious rethinking of what advantages digital could provide…"
frankchimero  hardware  software  thesetup  tools  howwework  commonplacebooks  dropbox  devonthink  yojimbo  evernote  macbookair  photoshop  illustrator  muji  notebooks  tumblr  serendipity  discovery  iphone  kindle  lumixgf1  appletv  netflix  texteditor  gmail  instapaper  simplenote  rdio  itunes  reeder  2011  usesthis 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Print from your phone with Gmail for mobile and Google Cloud Print - Official Gmail Blog
"Let’s say you need to print an important email attachment on your way to work so that it’s waiting for you when you walk in the door. With Gmail for mobile and Google Cloud Print — a service that allows printing from any app on any device, OS or browser without the need to install drivers — you can.

To get started, you’ll first need to connect your printer to Google Cloud Print. For now, this step requires a Windows PC but Linux and Mac support are coming soon. Once you’re set up, just go to gmail.com from your iPhone or Android browser and choose “Print” from the dropdown menu in the top right corner. You can also print eligible email attachments (such as .pdf or .doc) by clicking the “Print” link that appears next to them."
google  mobile  cloud  gmail  printing  googlecloudprint  printers 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Rapportive
"Rapportive shows you everything about your contacts right inside your inbox."
gmail  social  plugin  firefox  chrome  safari  email 
december 2010 by robertogreco
A New System For Synthesizing : Transdisciplinary Design Transblog | Parsons The New School for Design
"In lectures, I jotted the speaker’s critical ideas prefaced with their initials and noted my ideas, prefaced with “me:”. I saved the full articles in Evernote, instead of saving just links to them in Delicious. With these, I tagged only the keywords that have the meaning of the article that are not actually in the article. For example, tagging a criticism of Freakonomics with “failure, lesson, complexity, outsider, transdisciplinary, ripple, effects”.

The serendipitous moment came when it was time to write my first paper: I realized I already had much of the ‘raw footage’, and instead of generating, I need to synthesize as Tim Brown explains in Change By Design. Searching ‘complexity’ and ‘systems’ in Evernote gave me specific ideas I had previously noted from 4 lectures, 3 articles and a systems diagram I’d created. It was the answer to the question: What use is an excellent note I’ve taken when it’s forgotten and scribbled somewhere in one of my notebooks?"
evernote  del.icio.us  gmail  notetaking  tagging  bookmarking  synthesis  transdisciplinary 
november 2010 by robertogreco
B.A.S.A.A.P. – Blog – BERG [Be As Smart As A Puppy]
"Imagine a household of hunchbots.

Each of them working across a little domain within your home. Each building up tiny caches of emotional intelligence about you, cross-referencing them with machine learning across big data from the internet. They would make small choices autonomously around you, for you, with you – and do it well. Surprisingly well. Endearingly well.

They would be as smart as puppies. …

That might be part of the near-future: being surrounded by things that are helping us, that we struggle to build a model of how they are doing it in our minds. That we can’t directly map to our own behaviour. A demon-haunted world. This is not so far from most people’s experience of computers (and we’re back to Byron and Nass) but we’re talking about things that change their behaviour based on their environment and their interactions with us, and that have a certain mobility and agency in our world."
berg  berglondon  mattjones  hunch  priorityinbox  gmail  biomimicry  design  future  intelligence  uncannyvalley  adamgreenfield  everyware  ubicomp  internetofthings  data  ai  machinelearning  spimes  basaap  biomimetics  iot 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Paperworks / Padworks | the human network
"We know that children learn by exploration – that’s the foundation of Constructivism – but we forget that we ourselves also learn by exploration. The joy we feel when we play with our new toy is the feeling a child has when he confronts a box of LEGOs, or new video game – it’s the joy of exploration, the joy of learning. That joy is foundational to us. If we didn’t love learning, we wouldn’t be running things around here. We’d still be in the trees."
education  future  ipad  paper  sharing  technology  web  markpesce  gmail  google  cloudcomputing  computing  play  constructivism  twitter  facebook  dropbox  paperless  learning  unschooling  deschooling  2010  schools  tcsnmy  curriculum  wikipedia  cloud  lego 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Syphir
"Rules beta » turbo-charged filters for your Gmail
* Powerful. Filter emails by arrival time, age, importance, and more.
* Effective. Save time, stay organized, and defeat email overload.
SmartPush » intelligent email alerts on your iPhone
* Focused. SmartPush knows which emails need your attention.
* Flexible. Receive alerts for all your emails, or only the important ones."
syphir  applications  iphone  email  filtering  filters  gmail  gtd  productivity  ios 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Official Google Mobile Blog: Google services on the iPad and tablet computers
"While surfing the web on your iPad, we expect many of you will want to check your Gmail. If you go to gmail.com in your browser, you’ll see something different than what you’re used to on the desktop. We’re releasing an experimental user interface for the iPad built on the Gmail for mobile HTML5 web app that we launched last year for the iPhone and Android devices. Those devices have large screens compared to other phones, and tablets like the iPad give us even more room to innovate. To take advantage of the iPad’s large display, we’ve created a two-pane view with your list of conversations on the left and messages to the right."
ipad  internet  html5  google  gmail  webapps  applications 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Backupify :: Secure Online Backup and Archiving for Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, and Wordpress
"Your company has important data locked up in cloud based applications. Backupify provides daily automatic backups, archiving, and export for all your social media and SaaS data. Take back control of your online data with Backupify."
backup  cloud  data  facebook  flickr  gmail  google  googledocs  del.icio.us  wordpress  picasa  webservice  twitter  lifestream  media  online  services 
april 2010 by robertogreco
What Do We Want? Our Data. When Do We Want It? Now! | Epicenter | Wired.com
"Data portability is a rapidly growing movement among cloud-computing supporters. The idea that the online services we’ve herded ourselves into should let us at least pass from one pen to the next is key, although the nuts and bolts of how open standards will work are still being hammered out.
dataportability  cloud-computing  cloud  privacy  socialmedia  google  data  portability  gmail  googledocs  picasa  youtube  amazon  kindle  itunes  apple  kodak 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Cool Tools: Google Apps Mail
"Before Google starting offering this free "custom Gmail app" as part of their App suite including Google Docs and Google Calendar (which are also fantastic cool tools), I gained some of these similar results by forwarding all my mail through my free ordinary Gmail account and then back to me at my own servers. That hack worked, but this new custom mail app is much easier to setup, maintain and use. I first became aware of it when my wife's work (Genentech) moved their entire 10,000 employees' mail to a custom Google Apps system. Now you can too. It is part of the migration onto the "cloud," especially for small businesses."

[education program at: http://www.google.com/a/help/intl/en/edu/index.html ]
google  googlemail  gmail  email  smallbusiness  technology 
january 2010 by robertogreco
History's New Gatekeepers - Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect
"Most people assume the past to be a fixed, known entity whereas the future is there for shaping. Except that the past is in fact pleasantly malleable - not in the sense of wanting to rewrite history which is interesting enough, but simply in terms of being able to recall history. Increasingly we offload the need to remember the minutiae our day-to-day lives to services such as Gmail, Dopplr, Evernote, Reader, and Facebook and the trend will only continue in this direction as we are increasingly able to draw new rich streams of data such as location and transactions.

What happens when these services become the front-end to a life-times worth of memories?

Recollection through the oh-so-monetisable Facebook interface? Welcome to history's newest gatekeepers."
janchipchase  evernote  memory  forgetting  facebook  gmail  googlereader  dopplr  remembering  future  history  trends  privacy 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Gmail: Tips
"Become a Gmail Ninja

Learn tips and tricks to save time, increase your productivity, and manage your email efficiently. Start with the tips that are right for you, based on how much email you get each day."
gmail  tips  howto  gtd  tutorial  productivity  tutorials  tricks  support  email  shortcuts 
june 2009 by robertogreco
When Gmail Fails, Users Adapt
"Thanks to free (but less reliable) web services, we can face a failure and move on to the next tool in our arsenal with only a few minutes of complaining. Yes, it’s a lowering of standards to accept nothing but the fabled “five nines” provided by the wireline phone business, but it’s a road we’ve been on for years. Think about what you will accept from a cell phone in terms of lost connections and dropped calls. Reliability is not keeping us tethered to our landlines by any stretch of the imagination."
gmail  twitter  diversification  cloud  reliability  adaptability 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The End of Alone - The Boston Globe
"At our desk, on the road, or on a remote beach, the world is a tap away. It's so cool. And yet it's not. What we lose with our constant connectedness." ... "DESCARTES, NEWTON, LOCKE, Spinoza, Kant, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard -- they share the distinction of having been some of the greatest thinkers the world has known. They also share this: None of them ever married or had their own families, and most of them spent the bulk of their lives living alone. In his provocative 1989 book Solitude: A Return to the Self, British writer and psychiatrist Anthony Storr made a persuasive case for the value of deep, uninterrupted alone time. He found it in ample supply in the lives of not just philosophers and physicists, but also some of the greatest poets, novelists, painters, and composers."
technology  solitude  society  facebook  email  gmail  bogs  online  internet  connectivity  mobile  phones  twitter  slow  well-being  idleness  boredom  quiet  etiquette  missedconnections  anxiety  strangers  life  philosophy  thoreau  reflection  via:hrheingold 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Gmail SMS
"At some point, the virtual phone number could be the same as the GrandCentral number and Gmail could become a centralized communication system, where you can send email messages, SMS, make phone calls, use video chat, share files and archive your entire communication flow."
google  gmail  sms  texting  grandcentral  communication  im  mobile  phones 
december 2008 by robertogreco
To Do: Check Out Remember The Milk Gmail Gadget - ReadWriteWeb
"What RTM offers - in gadget form - is the to-do list that Gmail users have been asking Google to build, and RTM does an admirable job of satisfying those requests.

Using the new gadget, Remember The Milk users get task and to-do functionality in the Gmail sidebar, allowing them to review, add, edit, and manage tasks, without ever leaving the comfort of the Gmail interface."
google  productivity  rememberthemilk  todo  gmail  gtd  readwriteweb 
november 2008 by robertogreco
GOOLASH: anti-google firefox plugin
"GOOLASH keeps you logged out from the search engine of Google, regardless of any other "G" services you might be using, like Gmail for example. GOOLASH keeps your web searches disassociated from your Google username, meaning that the results are not being filtered according to the profile Google has on you, neither the context of your requests is being attached to your persona. Doing some trickery with cookies GOOLASH cuts the tentacles of monstrous corporation away from your brain and CPU. Say NO to augmented reality of Google empire, embrace unfiltered content!"
via:preoccupations  google  tracking  privacy  firefox  addons  extensions  gmail  search  internet  hack  plugins 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Users can automatically encrypt Gmail traffic | News - Digital Media - CNET News.com
"Gmail now can be set to encrypt communications e-mail by default, an option that makes the e-mail service harder to snoop on but also potentially slower. Users already could encrypt communications with Gmail servers (by going to https://mail.google.com),
gmail  security  encryption 
july 2008 by robertogreco
New Gmail Features Protect from Snooping - Webmonkey
"Gmail added protection from unauthorized logins Monday through new features allowing you to monitor usage and sign out remotely. The features allow you to police your account from snooping family members, stalkers or those who take advantage when you for
gmail  email  privacy  security 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Bradley Allen [on relationships, social networks, friending, Gmail, Facebook, etc.]
"I don’t want to reduce the people I care about to checkboxes and radio buttons for all the world to see. Shouldn’t that stuff be reserved for a little black book… or character sheets in a role playing game or something? I know you guys are lovely i
socialsoftware  socialnetworks  facebook  del.icio.us  flickr  myspace  relationships  gamechanging  time  tumblr  friendfeed  gmail 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Exclusive Sneak Preview: Gmail Gets 13 Experimental New Features Tonight
"Once your Gmail account is Labs-enabled, you'll get a Labs tab in the Settings area of your account where you can enable 13 new experimental Gmail features, including signature tweaks, mouse gestures, keyboard shortcuts, and even a game."
gmail  email  google 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Encrypt your Gmail Email! - Instructables - DIY, How To, tech
"In this Instructable, I'll walk you through the simple process of setting up GPG and then installing a Firefox plugin that will make it easy to encrypt your Gmail."
encryption  gmail  security  email  privacy  howto  cryptography  instructables 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Official Gmail Blog: How to find any email with Gmail search
"The sight of someone scrolling through hundreds of email messages trying to find a specific one is like fingers on a chalkboard for me. With a few tricks, you can use Gmail to find the exact message you're looking for, without all the scrolling."
gmail  search  tips  howto  email  google 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Google Email Uploader
"open source desktop utility for Windows...uploads email & contacts from desktop email programs into Google Apps mailbox...preserves information such as sent dates and sender/recipient data, as well as the folder structure used by email programs."
email  googleapps  google  gmail  datamigration  via:preoccupations  tools  windows  software 
april 2008 by robertogreco
mail-trends - Google Code
"lets you analyze and visualize your email (as extracted from an IMAP server). You can see: * Distribution of messages by year, month, day, day of week and time of day * Distribution of messages by size and your top 40 largest messages * The top senders,
gmail  google  api  charts  visualization  email  statistics  graphics  imap 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Official Gmail Blog: 2 hidden ways to get more from your Gmail address
"1. Append a plus ("+") sign and any combination of words or numbers after your email address 2. Insert one or several dots (".") anywhere in your email address."
email  gmail  tips  productivity  hacks 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Wow! All Gmail Users Are Given Two Separate Email Addresses
"When you create a Gmail account, you actually get two email addresses - one is the regular @gmail.com while the second email address has @googlemail.com in the domain."
email  gmail  spam  tips  howto  via:preoccupations 
february 2008 by robertogreco
GMail Plus - A Smart Trick to Find & Block the Source of Email Spam - Digital Inspiration
"When you share your email with some non familiar service, like a newsletter, you can supply your existing email with a plus sign. If you ever receive spam addressed to that email alias, you know the exact source that's sending the spam and can easily blo
gmail  google  hacks  howto  spam  email  tips  via:preoccupations 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Remember The Milk: Online to do list and task management
"We created Remember The Milk so that you no longer have to write your to-do lists on sticky notes, whiteboards, random scraps of paper, or the back of your hand. Remember The Milk makes managing tasks an enjoyable experience."
gmail  googleapps  iphone  aggregator  todo  organization  gtd  workflow  productivity  web2.0  calendar  applications  twitter  webapps  sms  software  planning  management  scheduling  schedule  extension  email  addons  ios 
february 2008 by robertogreco
evhead: Running your company on web apps
"The improved efficiency of having these apps available, and not having to install and maintain servers for them is huge."
twitter  webapps  business  tools  onlinetoolkit  web2.0  webdev  via:preoccupations  gmail  basecamp  webdesign 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Fluid - Free Site Specific Browser for Mac OS X Leopard
"create Site Specific Browsers to run each of your favorite webapps as a separate desktop application...gives any webapp a home on your desktop complete with Dock icon, standard menu bar, & logical separation from your other web browsing activity."
free  mac  osx  utilities  downloads  browser  flickr  firefox  applications  tumblr  gmail  gui  webapps  software  onlinetoolkit  workflow  interface  safari  webapp  macosx  freeware  browsers 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Spammers Giving Up? Google Thinks So
"Google won't disclose numbers, but says that spam attempts, as a percentage of e-mail that's transmitted through Gmail, have waned over the last year...could indicate some spammers have gotten discouraged, stopped trying to get through Google’s spam fi
google  gmail  email  spam  trends 
november 2007 by robertogreco
43 Folders Series: Inbox Zero | 43 Folders
"These are posts from a special 43 Folders series looking at the skills, tools, and attitude needed to empty your email inbox — and then keep it that way. You can visit each of the posts by clicking the title."
email  lifehacks  howto  tutorials  tips  technology  productivity  efficiency  gmail  gtd 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Salted Wound » Blog Archive » Import Mail from Mac OS X into Gmail
"wouldn’t it be nice if you could get all of your old email messages into Gmail from your Mac OS X Mail.app without forwarding the thousands of messages you’ve accumulated over the years by hand?"
apple  email  google  gmail  howto  osx  mac  tutorials 
july 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read