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robertogreco : goal-setting   4

'Children Succeed' With Character, Not Test Scores : NPR
"the scientists, the economists and neuroscientists and psychologists who I've been studying and writing about are really challenging the idea that IQ, that standardized test scores, that those are the most important things in a child's success."

"There are two stages [of parenthood] and it's hard to tell where the transition goes from one to the other. When kids are really young — when they're in their first year or two of life — my sense from the research is you can't be too loving. ... What kids need at that point is just support, attention, parents who are really attuned to the child's needs. But at some point somewhere around 1, or 2 or 3, that really starts to change and what kids need is independence and challenge. And certainly as kids get into middle childhood and into adolescence, that's exactly what they need. They need less parenting. ... They need parents to really stand back, let them fall and get back up, let them fight their own battles."
cognitiveskill  iq  sucess  stressmanagement  stress  goal-setting  curiosity  grit  books  paultough  challenge  assessment  testing  confidence  childhood  adolescents  adolescence  independence  via:steelemaley  2012  parenting  learning  children  character  education 
september 2012 by robertogreco
In Praise Of Vagueness | Wired Science | Wired.com
"Vagueness is hard to defend. To be vague is to be imprecise, unclear, ambiguous. In an age that worships precise information, vagueness feels like willfull laziness.

And yet, as William James pointed out, vagueness is not without virtues. Sometimes, precision is dangerous, a closed door keeping us from imagining new possibilities. Vagueness is that door flung wide open, a reminder that we don’t yet know the answer, that we might still get better, that we have yet to fail."
jonahlehrer  2011  uncertainty  vagueness  problemsolving  precision  goals  goal-setting  performance  motivation  divergentthinking 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Borderland › On Regrets
"There are a lot of ups and downs in the job of teaching. More downs than ups, lately, it seems. But still, I’m glad I got into it and have had an occasional glimpse of the good that can come from influencing someone to set goals and reach for things that might at first seem difficult to attain. When you teach elementary school, it takes a few years before the kids come back to tell you about these things. These visits are hugely meaningful to me since on a day-to-day level, it’s hard to see growth in so many things that really matter, like empathy, confidence, persistence, and goal-setting. And I wonder about the kids that don’t return with stories to tell – the ones who might have gained nothing meaningful from our time together. What could I have done differently to make that chemistry work? This question nags me…"
dougnoon  teaching  vocation  testing  standardizedtesting  values  empathy  confidence  persistence  goals  goal-setting  idealism  money  salaries 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Teacher Magazine: Teaching Commission Pushes Collaborative Learning Teams
While this article is primarily about teachers collaborating, the same approach works well for students in the classroom. Of course, modeling the approach is the most effective way of getting student buy-in/understanding. The sidebar ("NCTAF’s Six Principles of Success for Professional Learning Teams") describes the TCSNMY class experience. For example: "Self-Directed Reflection: Teams should establish a feedback loop of goal-setting, planning, standards, and evaluation, driven by the needs of both teachers and students."
via:lukeneff  tcsnmy  collaboration  teaching  goals  goal-setting  planning  standards  evaluation  self-directedlearning  student-centered  howwework  collaborative  classroom  professionallearningcommunities  professionallearningteams  lcproject  modeling  cv  feedback  reflection  responsibility  values  leadership  classrooms 
july 2010 by robertogreco

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