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robertogreco : google20%   15

Hogwarts for Hackers: Inside the Science and Tech School of Tomorrow | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
"“I had to learn what the programming language was, learn what a compiler was,” he remembers. “I found books on it and talked to upperclassmen. But basically had to learn it on my own.”

The IMSA Wednesdays are like Google’s “20 percent time” — only better. “At Google, 20 percent time is actually tacked on to the rest of your job. ” says Daniel Kador, another former IMSA student. “At IMSA, it really is built into your schedule.” And though Kador and other students admit that they spent more than a few Wednesdays just goofing off — as high school students so often do — they say the environment at IMSA ends up pushing many of them towards truly creative work. And it pays off."



"That’s IMSA in a nutshell. IMSA students help each other learn, and they continue to help each other, even after they graduate. Alums are invited back to teach mini-courses during the first week of the winter semester, and this has become of one of the highlights of the year — for everyone involved. “As a student, it was the most fun thing,” says Wild, “and as an alum, it’s even more fun.”"
imsa  illinois  education  schooldesign  schools  learning  google20%  technology  robotics  stem  collaboration  projectbasedlearning  cv  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  openstudioproject  lcproject  pbl 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Ursula Franklin Academy
"Ursula Franklin is a small community of learners that offers integrated liberal arts and science packages, preparing students for academic programs at post-secondary level. The learning experiences offered at Ursula Franklin Academy will reflect not only the learning expectations identified by the Province and the Toronto District School Board, but also the students' own interests, developing a sense of responsibility and individual accomplishment. Integrated and cross-curricular future-oriented skills related to electronic research and conferencing, conflict resolution and problem solving, global and social justice issues, and student leadership will be emphasized."

[via: http://www.designculturelab.org/2012/07/17/from-the-plsj-archives-an-extraordinary-mind/ ]
[See also: http://theagenda.tvo.org/blog/agenda-blogs/qa-my-alternative-schooling-ursula-franklin-academy and http://www.ufacademy.org/v5/school/wednesday.php ]
cv  tcsnmy  responsibility  conflictresolution  learningculture  learningcommunities  education  learning  google20%  schooldesign  ontario  toronto  schools  ursulafranklinacademy  ursulafranklin 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Personal Learning and Creation Time in Middle School
"Children are often unfamiliar with the concept of selecting and pursuing a topic or project of their choice that has very few rules or bounds associated with it. As a result, they are often at a loss as to how to proceed. They can have difficulty with the concept of doing something at school that is not for a "grade."

This Instructable provides a framework for implementing personal learning and project time in a middle school setting, although it could easily be adapted for use at any grade level.

By participating in personal learning and creation time, learners will gain first hand knowledge and experience in bringing an original idea from concept to final product, which will serve them well for the rest of their lives."
google20%  via:rushtheiceberg  openstudio  tcsnmy  cv  howwelearn  learning  unstucturedtime  plp  grades  grading  freedom  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  2012 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Workplace experiments: A month to yourself - (37signals)
"Some companies are famous for their 20% time where employees get 1/5th of their time to work on their own projects. In spirit I like this idea, but usually it’s executed by carving out a day here or a day there – or every Friday, for example – to work on your own projects.

But all time isn’t equal. I’d take 5 days in a row over 5 days spread out over 5 weeks. So our theory is that we’ll see better results when people have a long stretch of uninterrupted time. A month includes time to think, not just time to squeeze in some personal work around the edges."
uninterruptedtime  timeoff  creativity  attention  howwework  howwecreate  glvo  startups  rework  sabbatical  makerstime  interruption  interruptions  2012  yearoff2  yearoff  distraction  time  google20%  makertime  makersschedule 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Occupy your classroom « Cooperative Catalyst
"If you would occupy your statehouse to keep your job, pay, and benefits, please also consider occupying your classroom.

Give your students at least a day a week to follow their passions.
Get rid of your furniture. Help kids borrow, bring, or build their own.
Get rid of your textbooks. Or redact them.
Ask kids to make sense of the world as it happens across media and technologies.
Build communities instead of reinforcing expectations.

It will be very scary, but not as scary as what others face. It will be very uncomfortable, but not as uncomfortable as remaining silent. It will cost us some, but without making some sacrifice we shouldn’t expect or ask our students to save us or our world."
chadsansing  education  occupywallstreet  pedagogy  unschooling  deschooling  community  media  technology  activism  textbooks  schooldesign  lcproject  learning  furniture  google20%  unstructuredtime 
october 2011 by robertogreco
The Answer Sheet - Why schools should try things not "research-based"
"if we want to see real change in our schools and move the needle on closing the achievement gap, we need to try some things that aren’t “proven.” We need to experiment with practices we intuitively think are good ideas and can deliver results but haven’t been subject to exhaustive research yet.

Education leaders insist that they want their schools to be innovative, yet if a teacher offers a new idea, a common response is: "That’s sounds like a good idea, but where is the data that proves it will work?"

Introducing truly novel ideas means considering something so new that it has not been proven to work…

But if the current system isn’t working, then we should do what innovators and entrepreneurs have done since the dawn of humanity — try something different. Any educator knows that some of the latest research-based best practices come out of a 20th century classroom…"
education  change  teaching  tcsnmy  classroomlaboratory  lcproject  bestpractices  reform  gamechanging  google20%  policy  stasis  cv  learning  experimentation  innovation  research  proof  stuckinarut  setupforfailure  2011 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Stump The Teacher: Innovation Day 2011
"Today was the actual “Innovative Day” as students came to school with their supplies, resources, and an abundance of enthusiasm. We broke the students into working areas based on their topics of choice and the resources needed. There was a section for building, art, music, technology, videos, cooking, physical education, and more. Variety was the name of the game as there were over 200 different learning projects being worked on over the course of the day. Many students were working independently but there were plenty of learning groups that developed throughout the day as well. Students started helping each other with projects and ended up learning more than they even originally planned. Here is just a sample of the great work that was done."
unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  cv  openstudio  interestdriven  studentdirected  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  schools  curriculumisdead  curriculum  innovationday  2011  students  google20%  unstructuredtime 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Don’t tell me what you’re passionate about « Re-educate Seattle
"School can help facilitate this process. One of the best things we can do is to give kids autonomy in how they spend their time, including time in which they’re not required to do anything in particular.

As educators we can stand back & observe how they spend that time. Students will fill those unscheduled slots w/ activities that give them joy. (This is the part that many people have a hard time believing. They think kids are lazy & unless they’re told what to do, they’ll just sit around…not true.) Then we don’t have to ask them what they want to be when they grow up. Instead, we can say things like, “I’ve noticed you’re spending a lot of time drawing superhero characters. Would you like to meet a professional illustrator?”

The way traditional schools are structured causes kids miss out on these opportunities. They spend their days sitting through required classes, then it’s home to decompress from the stress of school w/ video games or YouTube videos, then it’s homework time…"
openstudio  unschooling  deschooling  stevemiranda  pscs  pugetsoundcommunityschool  progressive  democratic  freeschools  autonomy  motivation  choice  entrepreneurship  identity  self  productivity  google20%  education  schools  schooliness  trust  learning  teaching  passion  unstructuredtime 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Running Head: Self-Directed Student Attitudes (JUAL)
[Quote references: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct01/vol59/num02/The-Benefits-of-Exploratory-Time.aspx ]

"…also less tangible benefits of self-directed learning. Wolk outlines the benefits of exploratory time, which he defines as an hour or more per day in which students pursue projects & topics of their own choosing. Among these benefits he states that exploratory time "nurtures a love for learning, encourages meaningful learning through intrinsic motivation, creates true communities of learners, nurtures creativity, develops self-esteem & celebrates uniqueness"…Wolk recommends teachers turn over at least 20% of school day to students in order to achieve these benefits. He states that trusting students is paramount to the success of such time. "We must trust that students have educational & intellectual interests & curiosities, deeply meaningful questions about the world, & an innate desire to know & understand. We must trust that students want to learn & that they are willing to work hard in that learning. The next step is ours. We must give them time to own their learning"…"
stevenwolk  schools  openstudio  google20%  unstructuredtime  learning  self-directedlearning  tcsnmy  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  sudburyschools  sudbury  progressive  freeschools  democratic  children  intrinsicmotivation  lcproject 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Exploration | Brain Rules |
"The desire to explore never leaves us despite the classrooms and cubicles we are stuffed into. Babies are the model of how we learn—not by passive reaction to the environment but by active testing through observation, hypothesis, experiment, and conclusion. Babies methodically do experiments on objects, for example, to see what they will do.

Google takes to heart the power of exploration. For 20 percent of their time, employees may go where their mind asks them to go. The proof is in the bottom line: fully 50 percent of new products, including Gmail and Google News, came from “20 percent time.”"

[via: http://twitter.com/adversarian/status/29358290395725824 ]
exploration  google20%  unschooling  deschooling  brainrules  learning  invention  curiosity  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudio  experimentation  teaching  education  brain 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Thoughts on Google’s 20% time « Scott Berkun
Google’s 20% time is more of an attitude and culture than a rule…It’s worth noting that people at Google work very hard on their 80% time. It’s not as if every Friday is 20% day and work shuts down on all existing projects so people can do their 20% things…The 20% time concept isn’t new. 3M developed a 15% time rule in the 1950s with the same exact intentions and basic philosophy. Masking tape and Post-it notes are two notable products that were concieved and developed by individual engineers working without formal budgets, plans or management support…the Google founders mention at their talk at TED that Montessori school philosophy influenced their ideas on 20% time…Google’s culture has a resistance, or even distrust, of hierarchy – they often use voting, peer review, and debate to make decisions or decide which new projects and features to add."
google  innovation  management  productivity  culture  google20%  tcsnmy  openstudio  lcproject  freedom  autonomy  authority  montessori  3m  work  philosophy  creativity  unschooling  unstructuredtime  via:rushtheiceberg 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Konstantin Novoselov Interview - Special Topic of Graphene - ScienceWatch.com
"The style of Geim's lab (which I'm keeping and supporting up to now) is that we devote ten percent of our time to so-called "Friday evening" experiments. I just do all kinds of crazy things that probably won’t pan out at all, but if they do, it would be really surprising. Geim did frog levitation as one of these experiments, and then we did gecko tape together. There are many more that were unsuccessful and never went anywhere (though I still had a good time thinking about and doing those experiments, so I love them no less than the successful ones).

This graphene business started as that kind of Friday evening experiment. We weren’t hoping for much, and when I gave it to a student, it initially failed. Then we had what you could call a stream of coincidences that basically brought us some very remarkable results quite quickly—within a week or so. Then we decided to continue on a more serious basis."
google20%  tcsnmy  graphene  science  physics  materials  play  research  fun  serendipity  experimentation  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  konstantinnovoselov  interviews 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Steven Johnson: Where good ideas come from | Video on TED.com
"People often credit their ideas to individual "Eureka!" moments. But Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story. His fascinating tour takes us from the "liquid networks" of London's coffee houses to Charles Darwin's long, slow hunch to today's high-velocity web."
stevenjohnson  art  creativity  ideas  innovation  thinking  connectivity  hunches  interconnectivity  youtube  philosophy  cafeculture  incubation  timberners-lee  web  online  internet  lcproject  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  generalists  coffeehouses  ted  enlightenment  networks  space  place  thirdspaces  patterns  behavior  evolution  systems  systemsthinking  liquidnetowork  collaboration  tcsnmy  learning  theslowhunch  slowhunches  slow  darwin  eurekamoments  google20%  openstudio  cv  gps  sputnik  thirdplaces  charlesdarwin  interconnected 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Classroots.org - “What drives curriculum?”
"I’m not convinced we can’t get away w/ greater flexibility & student choice...There are compromises we can make in how we choose to use classtime: Google time. Negotiating state curriculum w/ students (you give me 3 standards, & we’ll get you a blog & trip/Skype call to aquarium for or action research). Subverting the state curriculum (A People’s Textbook of Algebra, anyone?). Ignoring the state curriculum (gulp).

I feel keenly conflict btwn my vocation as educator to help others learn & my occupation as public school teacher to cover state curriculum... I have positive evaluations, but my test scores have dropped since I stopped obsessively teaching to test. People walk through few times a year & offer me a few complimentary generalities about what they see...at end of year, talk to me about all kinds of #s in great specificity. I am confused in so many ways by this, but remain convinced that leaving public education to escape this confusion is self-serving."
curriculum  teaching  google20%  publicschools  vocation  standardizedtesting  standards  whatmatters  subversion  activism  policy 
july 2010 by robertogreco
TEDxNYed: This is bullshit « BuzzMachine [video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTOLkm5hNNU]
"lecturing [is] bullshit...remind of us of? classroom...entire structure of ed system built for industrial age...old media: 1-way, 1-size-fits-all...we must question this very form...enable students to question [it]...lecture does have place...But not be-all-end-all of ed...Do what you do best & link to rest...we need to move students up edu chain. They don’t always know what they need to know, but why don’t we start by finding out?...test to find out what they don’t know [not what they have learned]. Their wrong answers aren’t failures, they're needs & opportunities...must stop culture of standardized testing & teaching...stop looking at ed as product...turn out every student giving same answer – to process...every student looks for new answers...every school [should] copy Google’s 20%...encouraging & enabling creation & experimentation...Rather than showing diplomas...show portfolios...far better expression of thinking & capability?...school becomes not factory but incubator."
lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learning  schools  schooling  jeffjarvis  teaching  lectures  tedxnyed  unconferences  criticalthinking  plp  tcsnmy  google20%  openstudio 
march 2010 by robertogreco

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