recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : googledocs   41

Overleaf: Real-time Collaborative Writing and Publishing Tools with Integrated PDF Preview
"Overleaf is an online LaTeX and Rich Text collaborative writing and publishing tool that makes the whole process of writing, editing and publishing scientific documents much quicker and easier."
onlinetoolkit  collaboration  writing  latex  texteditors  googledocs  editing  via:vruba 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Google Docs have quietly revolutionized document editing.
"But Google’s update is far more than just a ploy to lure Office users away from Microsoft’s apps. Google is eliminating the need for distinct file types, making it easier to sign or edit documents regardless of the applications you have downloaded on your phone or desktop. It’s a novel idea, really—just being able to open a file, work on it, and not think about “what” it is. While Microsoft, Apple, and others continue to work in walled gardens, Google is making interoperability one of its primary focuses. For consumers inundated with ever more work but no additional hours in the day, it’s the kind of time and stress savings that are exceedingly worthwhile."
google  googledocs  googledrive  files  2018  christinabonnington  fileformats  filetypes  interoperability  pdf 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Publish good looking Google Docs
"Google Docs are nice, but they look ugly when published to the web. Well... not anymore!"



1 Edit your document in the google doc A4/Letter document interface
2 Publish it to the web...
3 Ohhh snap, the style is completely broken
4 Thanks to gdoc.pub, you get to publish it decently"



"YOUR ARTICLE
Google Docs becomes a WYSIWYG editor instantly

YOUR RESUME
Bring your good looking resume online instantly

YOUR COVER LETTER
Edit it as a document and changes apply immediately

YOUR SPREADSHEET NEW
Works with a live dashboard or any table you like

This project is open source"

[via: https://gdoc.pub/doc/e/2PACX-1vTkYJ0qIfbMDSSPYiRoIkwcags8BV610Qf7Rt0P83Y91j2o1u9eVzcqcyNA3AYr0nf1b8UjnrvSJtaD ]
webdev  onlinetoolkit  googledocs  opensource  formatting  web  online  wysiyg  publishing  epublishing 
january 2018 by robertogreco
When disability tech is just a marketing exercise | The Outline
"This cycle is a common one. Companies know that accessibility projects can garner great press. They also probably know that many journalists are unlikely to follow up and see whether the big promises are actually coming true. So they flaunt their minimal or nonexistent ties to accessibility, reap the glowing media coverage, and let the projects slip quietly into the night.

BMW got great press for making four special chairs for the Paralympics, but it seems to have stopped at those four. The Dot, a braille smartwatch, is a darling among journalists who call it the “first smartwatch for the blind,” but all it does is display some text from your phone in braille. Apple’s smartwatch is actually far more useful for blind users. Companies also advertise products as being accessible, but these claims are rarely put to the test.

Google is a repeat offender when it comes to claiming accessibility brownie points while failing to provide truly accessible tech, said Kit Englard, an assistive technology specialist. “If you read anything from Google it says: Google is accessible, it works with screen readers. Eh, it doesn’t really,” she says. Google Docs and Google Drive are both notoriously hard to use with a screen reader (a system, usually incorporating audio, that blind and low-vision people use to access visual content). “The way to force a screen reader to work with Google Docs, you have to go into your screen reader, turn it off in some ways, and then go back into Google Doc,” Englard said. “You have to memorize a whole series of commands that are completely different from any other commands you’d be used to.”

Vaporware — the term for products and features touted to the press that never materialize — is endemic in tech. When that non-existent product is a smartwatch or a sex robot, the harm is minimal. But when companies claim they are building products for people with disabilities and then don’t, Englard says that does real damage. More and more big companies are adopting systems like Google Drive, thinking that they are accessible, when in fact they’re not, which could lock disabled people out of jobs and promotions. “When they ask ‘is our equipment accessible to you?’ and the answer is no, that person can’t have that job. It’s not okay to lock people out of educational opportunities or social engagements or research,” Englard said. “Think of how many surveys are done on Google Docs these days.”"
disabilities  disability  edtech  marketing  google  googledocs  googledrive  2017  roseeveleth  wheelchairs  deankamen  segwy  ibot  toyota  bmw  vaporare 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Meet Me in the Google Doc For, Uh… a Performance? | KQED Arts
"For many — myself included — Google Docs is more than just an online word processing platform, it’s a way of life. Why save files to a clunky old hard drive when you can access your documents from something as wonderfully nebulous as a cloud? Why send a Microsoft Word document back and forth with a coworker when you can collaborate on a piece of writing in real time, adorably finishing each other’s sentences?

In the back of our minds, diehard Docs users wonder if we should be worried about Google having all-seeing access to our words, thoughts and vital pieces of information. Probably, but it’s just so darn convenient, you know?

Even for those who believe wholeheartedly in the software’s claim to “bring documents to life,” Google Docs remains for the most part a working space, a place for orderly rows of facts and figures on a white piece of digital paper.

But artists are here to challenge that conventional use — and, let’s be honest, all conventions — with a knowing nod to the document’s inherent power. Documents of the Future: Invitation to Edit, a one-night-only event on Sept. 9 at Oakland’s CTRL+SHFT Collective, presents individual performances (some on-site, some live streaming) and one collaborative performance all addressing the “unstable and transformative nature of documents.”

Most exciting of these is the Performance Document Working Group, which turns a shared Google Doc into a platform for conversation, co-writing, editing and experimentation for seven artists sitting at computers all over the world.

Frances Fleetwood, an Oakland-based curator and producer — and one of the seven — took part in a previous incarnation of the Google Doc as shared canvas. “We had no idea how it would develop,” she says. “Over three hours, the doc took on a life of its own. It grew from 1 page to 80 pages.”

The archived version of that performance, A Work in Progress, resembles something like a Geocities site crossed with the early days of Facebook, when writing on a friend’s wall meant you could edit all previous messages left on its surface. (See it, in Google Docs, here.) “Is anyone else feeling FOMO about other convos happening elsewhere in the document?” a participant writes at one point, hinting at the chaos unfolding within the doc’s headers, footnotes and pages of super-sized text. Even in its static archived form, the meandering, multi-hued conversation — free of authorship or organization and punctuated by screenshots of itself — is still completely exciting.

The good news is you too can feel the FOMO from within Saturday’s Performance Document Working Group. “When you think about it, documents really are condensations of power,” Fleetwood says. “And this is a dispersal of that power. Anyone who’s interested is invited to edit.”

Want to participate? Simply email hello@inter-val.org for an advance invitation to the doc. A screen of Performance Document Working Group will be projected live within the CTRL+SHFT space, but viewers with access and their own laptops or smartphones can scroll freely throughout the document, visiting the performative conversations evolving within its ever-expanding digital pages.

Presented by New York and Melbourne-based arts organization Interval as part of Australia’s Channels Festival (a biennial dedicated to new contemporary moving images), this weekend’s Documents of the Future also, wonderfully, takes place in the actual future: in the form of a simultaneous event at Melbourne’s Australian Center for Moving Image on Sunday, Sept. 10.

Maybe don’t think too hard on that one. Just accept the invitation to edit."
sarahhotsckiss  googledocs  2017  carolinesinders  francesfleetwood  art 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Introducing WordPress.com for Google Docs: A New Way Forward for Collaborative Editing — The WordPress.com Blog
"We are happy to announce WordPress.com for Google Docs, a new add-on that lets you write, edit, and collaborate in Google Docs, then save it as a blog post on any WordPress.com or Jetpack-connected WordPress site. Your images and most formatting will carry over too. No more copy-and-paste headaches!"
googledocs  wordpress  2017  cms 
march 2017 by robertogreco
Liberio | Simple eBook creation and publishing.
"Make eBooks.Really simple.Right fromGoogle Drive.Dropbox.OneDrive.GitHub.anywhere.

Easy as 1, 2, 3
Write, design, publish for free
No more complicated exports or data handling with ePub files. Create your own eBooks for free with only one click right from the cloud or your computer, and start publishing with Liberio.

1. Write your Text
Liberio integrates seamlessly with Google Drive, Dropbox, OneDrive, Github and more. Any text-based document can be converted into an eBook — including LaTex and Markdown! Write your book wherever you please and import directly into Liberio.

2. Import to Liberio
Liberio imports (nearly) all features of your eBook’s documents: Text formatting, fonts and images are available to style and create your eBook. Easily generate an imprint, upload your own cover image or choose from a variety of free cover templates.

3. Publish your eBook
Liberio produces ePubs compliant to the official standard. Your books will be ready for all major eBook stores like Amazon™, Google Play™ Books or the iBooks™ Store. Share your books on Facebook™, Twitter™ and Google+™ directly from Liberio.

Liberio is for everyone
Publish for education, design or just for fun
We want to make the publishing of eBooks easy for everyone. No matter if you are a teacher, student, designer, artist, engineer or tinkerer, creating and publishing your own books is now only a push of a button away."

Liberio for Teachers
Create course materials for your students, publish your own books about your field of expertise or use Liberio as a platform to publish student essays. There’s so much knowledge to share – Now you can, for free, with one click!

Liberio for Creatives
Write and publish your own essays, novels, poems or create a collection of your best artwork. Share your stories, knowledge and ideas with others around the world. Liberio makes it super easy to create beautifully unique books.

Liberio for Engineers
Create technical manuals, write scientific papers or publish transcripts of conference talks. Easy import and processing of Markdown and LaTex with Liberio’s one click publishing lets you share your work with everyone, for free.

From your thoughts to the world
Liberio’s one-click publishing is incredibly simple
Sharing your ebooks with the rest of the world should not be a difficult task. From writing, editing and design to publishing and sharing on social networks — publishing an eBook has never been simpler than with Liberio.

Send to Google Play
Send your latest publication to your Google Play Books account where both Android smartphones and tablets alike can download them, with a push of a button in Liberio.

Publish & share online
Share your latest eBook with your family, friends, others around the world on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks with one click right from Liberio.

Send to your Kindle
Send your books to your Kindle. Whether it be the Kindle Paperwhite, HD, Fire, or previous models, you always have your eBooks with you in just seconds, with Liberio."
ebooks  publishign  googledrive  googledocs  cloud  epub 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Google Released An Amazing Speech to Text Feature in Google Docs ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning
"Voice Typing is another interesting new feature Google released a few day ago. Google Docs’ users can now type with their voice. You can write an entire essay without having to touch the keyboard. You can even use punctuation with voice typing. There are several phrases you can choose from to punctuate your text (e.g ‘period’,’comma’, ‘exclamation mark’, ‘question mark’, ‘new line’, ‘new paragraph’.

Voice tying for Google Docs is only available on computers using a Chrome browser. To start using Voice typing, you need to have a working microphone then open a document in your Chrome browser and click on Tools and select Voice typing as shown in the screenshot below."
assistivetechnology  classideas  speechrecognition  voice  googledocs  dictation  2015  via:ablerism  chrome 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Binder
"About
Binder is a simple web template.
It allows users to connect a series of already-existing web pages into one home-base with a customizable navigation. Binder is built using Javascript and JQuery, and uses iFrames.

Get Binder:
Binder is on github here. [https://github.com/clementvalla/binder/ ]
Binder can be downloaded as a .zip here.

Binder can be used with:
• Google Docs
• Tumblr
• NewHive
• PDF’s
• Wikipedia
• Youtube (using embed link)
• Vimeo (using embed link)
• and more

Binder can’t be used with:
• Twitter
• Facebook
• Sites that don’t allow iframes

Questions
Please direct any questions about Binder to: info@thisisourwork.net

Credits
This is our work with Clement Valla"

[Used for: http://printedweb.org/ ]
binder  clementvalla  webdev  googledocs  via:soulellis  pdfs  tumblr  wikipedia  youtube  vimeo  newhive  github  webdesign  pdf 
september 2015 by robertogreco
The Internet of Things You Don’t Really Need - The Atlantic
"We already chose to forego a future of unconnected software. All of your devices talk constantly to servers, and your data lives in the Cloud because there’s increasingly no other choice. Eventually, we won’t have unconnected things, either. We’ve made that choice too, we just don’t know it yet. For the moment, you can still buy toasters and refrigerators and thermostats that don’t talk to the Internet, but try to find a new television that doesn’t do so. All new TVs are smart TVs, asking you to agree to murky terms and conditions in the process of connecting to Netflix or Hulu. Soon enough, everything will be like Nest. If the last decade was one of making software require connectivity, the next will be one of making everything else require it. Why? For Silicon Valley, the answer is clear: to turn every industry into the computer industry. To make things talk to the computers in giant, secured, air-conditioned warehouses owned by (or hoping to be owned by) a handful of big technology companies.

But at what cost? What improvements to our lives do we not get because we focused on “smart” things? Writing in The Baffler last year, David Graeber asked where the flying cars, force fields, teleportation pods, space colonies, and all the other dreams of the recent past’s future have gone. His answer: Technological development was re-focused so that it wouldn’t threaten existing seats of power and authority. The Internet of Things exists to build a market around new data about your toasting and grilling and refrigeration habits, while duping you into thinking smart devices are making your lives better than you could have made them otherwise, with materials other than computers. Innovation and disruption are foils meant to distract you from the fact that the present is remarkably similar to the past, with you working even harder for it.

But it sure feels like it makes things easier, doesn’t it? The automated bike locks and thermostats all doing your bidding so you can finally be free to get things done. But what will you do, exactly, once you can monitor your propane tank level from the comfort of the toilet or the garage or the liquor store? Check your Gmail, probably, or type into a Google Doc on your smartphone, maybe. Or perhaps, if you’re really lucky, tap some ideas into Evernote for your Internet of Things startup’s crowdfunding campaign. “It’s gonna be huge,” you’ll tell your cookout guests as you saw into a freshly grilled steak in the cool comfort of your Nest-controlled dining room. “This is the future.”"
2015  ianbogost  iot  internetofthings  design  davidgraeber  labor  siliconvalley  technology  power  authority  innovation  disruption  work  future  past  present  marketing  propaganda  google  cloud  cloudcomputing  computers  code  googledocs  ubicomp  ubiquitouscomputing  everyware  adamgreenfield  amazon  dropbox  kickstarter 
june 2015 by robertogreco
A “No to” Poem — The Message — Medium
"This self-contradiction happens many times, presumably the result of the poem being written collectively. It’s also possible a given pair of such lines represents the mental state of an individual who holds two opposing views at once. In any case, many times the work asks you, the reader, to hold two opposing views, which is unusual in a manifesto (less unusual in a poem).

The poem is angry and it is exhausted. It is angry at many things, some of them related to sexual assault, some of them related to how people enact their activism. It is exhausted by the same things. The poem is 3,712 words of free verse, an average of 14 words per line. 243 of those lines are tweetable and 28 are too long to tweet."



"The manifesto is author-less; it was written collectively. Its authors are identified only by geography:



So it’s impossible to know how many people were involved. At least 11, and since there are 271 lines to the poem and each line seems to represent an individual thought, then 271 is probably the upper potential limit of the collective. So: I’d estimate somewhere between 11 and 271 people wrote the poem. They all identify as feminists but that doesn’t specify anything about gender or anything else. I made a little chart of the number of people involved by country:"



"I think this poem is fascinating today but I think it will also be fascinating 85 years from now, to one or more people, after many of the things to which it refers— the reading series, the people and places — cease to exist. It will define something specific about this moment in history. I doubt that 85 years will eradicate the cultural need for feminism, activism, or poetry. So this poem will help people understand how things have changed, or not, in the year 2100. They will be able to compare it to things that came before and to things that followed and know something about how things change in general."



"There are some things about this poem.

First, that it was written collectively and internationally via the Internet. Before this poem when you told me about collectively generated digital creative activist work my first thoughts were of 4Chan and Gamergate — of memes, not poems. So this poem changed that for me, it broadened the scope of what anonymous collectives can do online.

The idea of unidentified individuals collaborating and creating things has been understood by many people as a dangerous, bad thing connected to harassment. But this poem is the product of people working collaboratively and anonymously to create art that they hope will have a positive social impact. It is also a public policy statement, from a group without a name (even Anonymous has a name). Maybe this “No Collective” has already ceased to exist."

********

I don’t know how to read this thing. I mean, I could read it from beginning to end. But I burned out on that. Instead I’ve been coming back to it over a couple of weeks, digging out the PDF, and thinking it through.

It’s pretty much without imagery and metaphor. It’s incantatory. It acknowledges a diversity of opinion on some things (Melville House) and refuses a diversity of opinion on others (the reality of sexual assault).

The fact that it was written collectively makes it unclear to me, at any point of the poem, whether I am reading something that was written by an individual and then glued together, or if each line was collaboratively edited. How was it edited by the Chicago Review? I wish I knew which tools were used to compose it, because that matters. Google docs? An email list with a single editor? Facebook chat? How could you find out? Who could you ask? The things that are stable (“No to rape”) are very stable; other things are completely unstable. This poem raises a million questions about what it means to read things and how the Internet is changing writing. There are many poetic manifestos in the world and I’m sure some of them were anonymously written but the thing I keep thinking about is how there are now a set of technologies — in the broadest sense, not just the Internet but technologies of self-organizing and collaboratively working — that enable the rapid creation of new things in reaction to events."



"I’ve half-followed the Alt-Lit scene for a while and have probably spent 20 years reading about “digital poetics,” and this is the very first time I went, well, there you go.

It seems that a lot of worlds are starting to collide. It also feels that anonymous international collectives of varying sizes and shapes, with radically different ideologies, will claim their voice in culture moving forward, ranging from 4Chan and Gamergate, which are very masculine entities, to this no collective, which is avowedly, fundamentally feminist. I expect people sharing other kinds of belief systems will start operating and creating as collectives, too."
feminism  language  paulford  poetry  rape  2015  authorship  googledocs  cocreation  collaboration  writing  howwerite  activism  collectivism  poems 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Watch Me Write This Article | FiveThirtyEight
"In November, Somers, a developer for Genius, released an app called Draftback.1 It’s a fascinating experiment that treats writing like data. After years of trying to build a program, Somers realized that Google Docs was already saving every keystroke we enter. So he hacked Google Docs to play documents back to their authors, materializing on the screen with every stutter-step inherent to the writing process. In its latest form, Draftback is a Google Chrome extension that can reach deep into the archives of any Google Doc you have editing rights to, make sense of all that writing and rewriting you innocuously poured into it, and beam it right back to you, backspaces and all. It doesn’t matter if your document was created before or after you installed Draftback — the keystrokes have been buried the whole time. Draftback can unearth any fossil.

In practice, it looks something like this:

[example]

It’s a program that acknowledges how we write — in a word processor, staring into the maw of a blank screen — and then turns the computer into a camera. What can we learn if we rewind and press play?"
writing  howwewrite  draftback  rapgenius  jamessomers  chadwickmatlin  process  workinginpublic  googledocs  genius.com 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Risk, Reward, and Digital Writing - Hybrid Pedagogy
"Digital writing is political because in every pixel, every DNA-like strand of code, we are placing ourselves into the public. Even if we are not writing for a wide audience, even if we make no plans to disseminate our work, the craft of writing now takes place within other people’s software, in other people’s houses. This page the borrowed sheets. Me the writer a couch surfer.

Owning our own homes in the digital requires an expertise that this writer does not have. I don’t own my own server, I haven’t learned to code, I haven’t designed my own interfaces, my own web site, nor even my own font. I must content myself to rent, to squat, or to ride the rails. But in this I find a certain freedom, a resistance in the willy-nilly. I cannot build my own home in the digital, but I can mark my territory.

In November, Hybrid Pedagogy — along with the UW-Madison Division of Continuing Studies — will once again host Digital Writing Month, a 30-day writing challenge that asks participants to create works of text, image/video, and sound. The form these works take, and what they say, do, expose, problematize, or solve, is entirely up to the author(s) and artist(s) who join the fray. The work should be challenging, inventive, and should give the digital writer a chance to do something they’ve always wanted to do.

Here, in this piece, I am offering an additional challenge: to make the act of digital writing truly political. To rouse and incite, to question and provoke, to mark our territories on the spaces delimited by their designers. By creating, hack; by writing, rebel. We must make the sites of our work little bitty Bastilles, our tweets and Vines and sound clips tiny marches on Versailles. Imagine a blog that flies the Jolly Roger, a podcast that bows to no one, a Vimeo channel that riots and runs amok. These are the ways the insurgence begins.

In this, I recognize I speak of rebellion playfully, when in truth most revolutions are terrible, bloody affairs. That playfulness, though, is the invitation. We are creating a revolution of digital handicraft, of makers and shakers. We shall not throw our bodies upon the machines, but we shall throw our words there — and our images — and our voices. The approach may look joyous and celebratory, and the fervor may delight and inspire, and the result will have meaning.

Hybrid Pedagogy has been accused of being Pollyanna, our work too blithe and easy, our seriousness not nearly serious enough. Our editors on the tenure track have been reminded to publish with traditional journals, lest their academic work wither under the glare of rigor and double-blind peer review. But there is nothing casual about Hybrid Pedagogy, just as there is nothing casual about any other digital work. What digital work does is change the landscape of all work. When we write in the digital, our words behave differently; when we broadcast our ideas, the reception re-broadcasts and re-purposes those ideas. Digital publishing, digital writing, digital humanities, digital literacy, digital citizenship — these are not terms à la mode, but rather they are new components of very real human communities, very real human craft. We may approach them with equal part suspicion and exaltation, but approach them we must.

Insisting on such requires a certain risk, especially in academia. We must be prepared to look back in the faces of those who think our digital work lacks merit and tell them otherwise. And we must do so to the ends of our wits.

To change the perception that the digital is not as consequential as work in traditional media we must participate in it. We must put our best work there, and eschew the paper-bound, readerless journals that grow mold in library basements. We must reinhabit libraries, as sites for conference and debate, crafting and creation, community and not simply curation. We must likewise redefine what matters, what has impact factor, and grow the traditional so it’s not so obsolete. We must show up in digital places in throngs and masses. No algorithms will change unless we move against them. The LMS will not die its death until we put it in the ground. Our work in the digital will not begin if we never recognize that it is work that must begin.

Digital Writing Month, and digital writing at any time, is never frivolous. In doing things differently, we sow difference. “Essays quake and tremble at the digital,” I said. “They weep in awe and fascination. And they throw themselves into the abyss … Digital writing is a rebellion. An uprising against our sense and sensibility. Différance.” By refusing to do what’s expected, we frame a space of new expectations, new possibilities. When we recognize the oppression of autocorrect, the hegemony of the algorithm, the charade of rigor, we light the fires of revolution. And though they may glow softly at first, enough of them gathered together will burn down towers."
seanmichaelmorris  2014  writing  digitalwriting  communication  pirates  squatting  hobos  nomads  digitalnomads  adomainofone'sown  blogs  blogging  googledocs  renting  creation  conversation  vine  twitter  photography  podcasts  lms  revolution  academia  participatory  participation  howwewrite  digiwrimo  culturecreation 
november 2014 by robertogreco
A list of writing tools is a displacement activity - rodcorp
"Writing, focussing, assembling, editing, collaborating, feeding back, researching, structuring, outputting and publishing.

Focus through constraint:

• iaWriter - "Keep your hands on the keyboard and your mind in the text". Has good reviews.
• Byword - "Simple and efficient text editing". Also has good reviews.
• Writeroom - appears a generation older than iaWriter and Byword.
• Textmate - does text , html and a zillion other developer's things.

Research speed and convenience:

• nvALT - Speeds up that did-I-already-write-about-this? moment, auto-saves, does text files, Markdown. Nice. I'm writing this post in it.
• Pinboard - elegantly executed webpage bookmarking.

Collaborating and community feedback:

• Draft - its drafts are neat version control, has premium "ask a pro".
• Poetica - "Get feedback about your writing from people you trust, wherever they are" - not released yet.
• Google Docs - good at collaboration and export, auto-saves. Has automated versioning but without actual version *control*.

Assembling, structuring, editing and eBook workflow:

• Ulysses 3 - "All your texts. In one place. Always." Not tried, but this review says "the app reimagines the text editor in a way that visually resembles Mail and conceptually sits somewhere between iA Writer and the project-based Scrivener". Which sounds like quite a thing.
• Scrivener - looks a bit of a mess to be honest. They also have Scapple, a mind map/words-on-sticks app.
• LeanPub - "Publish Early, Publish Often - Authors and publishers use Leanpub to publish amazing in-progress and completed books". Costs $0.50 plus 10%.
• Lacuna books - "the best way to write and publish a book". Big on structuring, rendering chapters and ebooks easily.

Formats and outputs:

• Marked, Mou - because between text and html, Markdown is the popular "intermediary" format, and these (and nvALT) are good at simultaneous preview.
• And a simple Google Apps script to convert a Google Drive Document to markdown

Online publishing and attention:

• Medium - "A better place to read and write things that matter" - becoming a centre of gravity for serious writing, per-para commenting interesting
• Wattpad - an ebook platform/store/agora that isn't Kindleland.

Back to it now."
writing  tools  onlinetoolkit  rodmclaren  2013  jawriter  byword  writeroom  textmate  nvalt  pinboard  draft  poetica  googledocs  ulysses3  scrivener  leanpub  lacunabooks  marked  mou  markdown  googleapps  googledrive  medium  wattpad  howwework  howwewrite  webapps  publishing  formatting  ebooks  epub  collaboration  editing  focusing  focus  feedback  researching  epublishing  collaborativewriting  digitalpublishing  epubs 
august 2013 by robertogreco
DrupalCon Portland 2013: DESIGN OPS: A UX WORKFLOW FOR 2013 - YouTube
"Hey, the dev team gets all these cool visual analytics, code metrics, version control, revision tagging, configuration management, continuous integration ... and the UX design team just passes around Photoshop files?

Taking clues from DevOps and Lean UX, "DesignOps" advocates more detailed and durable terminology about the cycle of user research, design and production. DesignOps seeks to first reduce the number of design artifacts, to eliminate the pain of prolonged design decisions. DesignOps assumes that the remaining design artifacts aren't actionable until they are reasonably archived and linked in a coherent way that serves the entire development team.

This talk will introduce the idea of DesignOps with the assumption that the audience has experience with a basic user research cycle — iterative development with any kind of user feedback.

DesignOps is a general approach, intended to help with a broad array of questions from usability testing issues, documentation archiving, production-time stress, and general confusion on your team:

What are the general strategies for managing the UX design process?
How do you incorporate feedback without huge cost?
What happened to that usability test result from last year?
How much space goes between form elements?
Why does the design cycle make me want to drink bleach?
WTF why does our website look like THIS?
* Features turnkey full-stack (Vagrant ) installation of ubuntu with drupal 7 install profile utilizing both php and ruby development tools, with all examples configured for live css compilation"
chrisblow  contradictions  just  simply  must  2013  drupal  drupalcon  designops  fear  ux  terminology  design  audience  experience  shame  usability  usabilitytesting  work  stress  archiving  confusion  relationships  cv  canon  collaboration  howwework  workflow  versioncontrol  versioning  failure  iteration  flickr  tracker  creativecommons  googledrive  tags  tagging  labels  labeling  navigation  urls  spreadsheets  links  permissions  googledocs  timelines  basecamp  cameras  sketching  universal  universality  teamwork  principles  bullshitdetection  users  clients  onlinetoolkit  offtheshelf  tools  readymadetools  readymade  crapdetection  maps  mapping  userexperience  research  designresearch  ethnography  meetup  consulting  consultants  templates  stencils  bootstrap  patterns  patternlibraries  buzzwords  css  sass  databases  compass  webdev  documentation  sharing  backups  maintenance  immediacy  process  decisionmaking  basics  words  filingsystems  systems  writing  facilitation  expression  operations  exoskeletons  clarification  creativity  bots  shellscripts  notes  notetaking  notebo 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Collections
"As a native Mac client, Collections lets you access your Google Docs with unparalled speed. Simply launch the app and you're off to the races – browse and edit your documents and even read a cached version offline.

Our speedy preview mode also lets you rapidly scan the contents of your documents and find exactly what you need. Double-click on a document or on anywhere in its preview to edit.

Sick of logging in and out of Google to access your documents from different accounts? Annoyed that you end up dedicating an entire browser to a given account? It's high time for hassle-free multiple account support.

With Collections, all of your Google Docs can live in one place, no matter which account they're associated with. Now you can view and edit everything through the same efficient interface. Simply login to Google once for each account and Collections handles the rest."
osx  mac  software  applications  googledocs 
july 2012 by robertogreco
russell davies: On mending, mice and seams
"I've been writing a lot in googledocs recently… I wrote a longish piece about something, shared it with a bunch of colleagues and they swarmed all over it with really smart suggestions and improvements. It was brilliant…

…They weren't meddling, they were mending. I think it's something to do with the openness of it and the way that people can agree with each other. If one person says a sentence doesn't work - it's just their opinion, if a few do then it goes beyond personal and becomes fact.

Which talk of mending led me to notice this video when it raced past my social windscreen:

This is also about mending. Mending that celebrates the seams…

In essence - "Broken pieces are bonded and the line of the repair is decorated with gold".

Wouldn't this be a great way to represent editing and collaboration? - to show the seams, to illustrate how much writing is a communal process. And maybe it could be an inspiration for networked writing - how would you decorate these seams on the web?"
cowriting  editing  discussion  conversation  online  web  netwrokedwriting  collaborative  collaboration  annegalloway  mattjones  openness  googledocs  writing  collaborativewriting  mending  seamlessness  seams  2012 
june 2012 by robertogreco
How To Run A News Site And Newspaper Using WordPress And Google Docs - 10,000 Words
"A former colleague of mine, William Davis, understands what a “web first” workflow is, and has made it happen through software at his newspaper in Maine. The Bangor Daily News announced this week that it completed its full transition to open source blogging software, WordPress. And get this: The workflow integrates seamlessly with InDesign, meaning the paper now has one content management system for both its web and print operations. And if you’re auspicious enough, you can do it too — he’s open-sourced all the code!"

[See also: http://publisherblog.automattic.com/2011/06/20/bangor-daily-news-a-complete-publishing-system-on-wordpress/ ]
wordpress  googledocs  workflow  cloud  journalism  editing  classideas  publishing  news  newspapers  howto  opensource  open  maine  blogging  indesign  print  digital  2011  tutorials  williamdavis 
june 2011 by robertogreco
New Work Flow with Tech - Practical Theory
"I've always just carried my laptop to and from school every day, but with the launch of the iPad, I thought it might be time for a change. The laptop is good enough, but there were starting to be too many times when I wanted more screen real estate, and I found myself really envying my wife's big honking desktop, but the big issue was really that I didn't want files in two places. My laptop was organized to the point where it was pretty much hardwired to my brain. (My knapsack is like that too, but even it is wearing out... some might argue, so's my brain.) With the summer hitting, and with a realization that carrying my laptop and my iPad to and from school every day was really counter-productive, I made the leap."
chrislehmann  ipad  computing  workflow  newutilitybelt  onlinetoolkit  dropbox  mobileme  evernote  googleapps  googledocs  cloud  productibity  portability  iwork  productivity 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The new utility belt « Snarkmarket
"While we’re out scour­ing San Diego that after­noon, our allies leap into action. Fin­ished images are appear­ing in real-time. Every few min­utes I’ll check the Drop­box app on my iPhone, see some­thing new, announce it to the group, and every­one will gather around the tiny screen and ooh and ahh...This is the new utility belt: Twitter...Google Docs...Dropbox...So if these are the tools, what are the skills? Jane McGo­ni­gal has already fig­ured this out. She calls them the ten col­lab­o­ra­tion super­pow­ers. And in par­tic­u­lar, I think the first three are key:

* Mob­ba­bil­ity: the abil­ity to do real-time work in very large groups; a tal­ent for coor­di­nat­ing with many peo­ple simultaneously.
* Coop­er­a­tion radar: the abil­ity to sense, almost intu­itively, who would make the best col­lab­o­ra­tors on a par­tic­u­lar task.
* Ping quo­tient: mea­sures your respon­sive­ness to other people’s requests for engagement."
snarkmarket  dropbox  googledocs  twitter  socialnetworking  crowdsourcing  collaboration  robinsloan  storytelling  socialnetworks  technology  tools  onlinetoolkit  writing  thenewutilitybelt  tcsnmy  cv  shelldrake  tcsnmy7  sandiego  journalism  normalheights  alexismadrigal 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Google Docs Gets More Realtime; Adds Google Drawings To The Mix
"Google Drawings is not really a drawing app, it’s more of an online whiteboard. The app is designed to help people visualize ideas through flow charts, diagrams, and stencils. There is a chat window where participants can chime in. Images can be imported and moved around. But sadly there is no freehand drawing option. Google Drawings is best experienced in an HTML5 browser (Chrome, Safari, Firefox, IE9 if it supports SVG). Google Docs will also be discontinuing offline access via Google Gears on May3, and will bring it back later via HTML5.
virtualwhiteboard  googledocs  realtime  tcsnmy  cloud 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Last Beautiful feedback and the new process > Robin Sloan
"But my emerg­ing process hinges on this notion: a piece of fic­tion is like a lump of clay, & my pref­er­ence is to put it out in pub­lic before it fin­ishes dry­ing. It does dry even­tu­ally: it would feel really strange to go back & make edits to, say, The Writer & the Witch at this point. Even Last Beau­ti­ful feels mostly baked. But did I open it up & smooth out a sen­tence just now? I sure did.

My friend A Fitzger­ald accused me recently of being “addicted to real-​​time feed­back.” I had to admit that I was; I find this process just totally, irre­sistibly fun & use­ful. And rather than wring my hands over whether it’s the best path to pro­duc­ing great work—longer sto­ries, bet­ter sto­ries, deeper stories—I’m going to just keep devel­op­ing it, improv­ing it, until it gets me there. As I said up top, & as I’m sure you’ve sensed: this isn’t slav­ish crowd-​​fiction. There is a pur­pose to all this, & the pur­pose is to make some­thing great.

Wel­come to the new process."
robinsloan  writing  process  real-timefeedback  editing  selectivecrowdsourcing  twitter  googledocs  howwework  ficition  iteration  gamechanging  comments  fiction 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Backupify :: Secure Online Backup and Archiving for Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, and Wordpress
"Your company has important data locked up in cloud based applications. Backupify provides daily automatic backups, archiving, and export for all your social media and SaaS data. Take back control of your online data with Backupify."
backup  cloud  data  facebook  flickr  gmail  google  googledocs  del.icio.us  wordpress  picasa  webservice  twitter  lifestream  media  online  services 
april 2010 by robertogreco
What Do We Want? Our Data. When Do We Want It? Now! | Epicenter | Wired.com
"Data portability is a rapidly growing movement among cloud-computing supporters. The idea that the online services we’ve herded ourselves into should let us at least pass from one pen to the next is key, although the nuts and bolts of how open standards will work are still being hammered out.
dataportability  cloud-computing  cloud  privacy  socialmedia  google  data  portability  gmail  googledocs  picasa  youtube  amazon  kindle  itunes  apple  kodak 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Docs for students - Google Docs Help
"Welcome to the Docs for students page! On this page, we'll be demonstrating how Google Docs can be used by many students for various classes and interests. We'll show you real examples of how useful docs can be in your personal and academic life."
via:preoccupations  education  googleapps  googledocs  teaching  google  learning  tcsnmy  projectideas  students 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Official Google Docs Blog: Day in the Life of a Docs Student
"The Google Docs team is getting ready for back to school. We've been doing our homework this summer to make your school year go a little smoother. Today we're launching a handful of features that will benefit both students and teachers. Speaking from experience, as students ourselves, we know that these features will come in handy on any given day. Check out the schedule below to see how."
spanish  googledocs  tcsnmy  cloudcomputing  education  learning  technology  teaching  google  edtech  writing  footnotes  googleapps  examples  students  scheduling  googlesites 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Official Google Blog: Back to school with Google Docs
"As interns on the Google Docs team this past summer, we were excited to be able to work on making Google Docs that much more useful for students like us. We've now added a bunch of back to school features which should help our fellow students make the transition from summer to school that much easier — and we hope they'll be useful to you non-students as well!"
googledocs  schools  education  learning  technology  math  chemistry  equations  edtech  cloudcomputing  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Using Google Docs in the classroom: Simple as ABC
"#Promote group collaboration, creativity # Keep track of grades, attendance... #Facilitate writing as process #Encourage collaborative presentation skills # Collaborate on document with teachers #Maintain, update, share lesson plans #Track and organize c
googledocs  google  education  collaboration  howto  teaching  classideas  elearning  edtech  technology  via:preoccupations  classroom  students  writing  classrooms 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Styles in Google Docs - Google Docs | Google Groups
"we've enabled "Edit CSS" on Docs such that you can explore styling documents. Think of Docs as the platform and the world wide web your place to explore the different styles! The possibilities are endless!"
googledocs  via:preoccupations  css 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Clickable Culture - Google Spreadsheet As Virtual World
"Controlled multi-user environment; Presence indicators; Real-time text chat; Unique, mobile avatars; Spatial relationships between users; User-generated content; Dynamic content; Inhabitable zones; Persistent world; Communication with outside world"
collaboration  community  googledocs  virtualworlds  webapps  socialsoftware  lifeasgame 
april 2008 by robertogreco
ongoing · Blows Against the Empire
"Then I saw “Open as as a Google Document” and I tried and, you know, it’s Good Enough. And snappy. And free. And internationalized. And I’m not the only person having this experience."
googledocs  google  webapps  microsoft  office  via:preoccupations  online  productivity 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Official Google Docs Blog: Stop sharing spreadsheets, start collecting information
"We're really excited to bring you forms! Create a form in a Google Docs spreadsheet and send it out to anyone with an email address. They won't need to sign in, and they can respond directly from the email message or from an automatically generated web p
google  googleapps  googledocs  forms  access  filesharing  productivity  webapps  excel  surveys  statistics  spreadsheets  documents  database  data  survey 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Screw Microsoft Word - Featured on BuzzFeed
"Like Howard Beale in Network, many longtime Microsoft Word users are mad as hell, and they're not going to take it anymore. So they're abandoning Word in droves, turning instead to Google Docs and other more elegant, intuitive, user-friendly apps such as
wordprocessing  microsoft  office  text  googledocs  writeroom  scrivener  trends 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Official Google Data APIs Blog: Easily upload your documents to Google Docs!
"To demonstrate the functionality of the Documents List Data API, I have released a new sample application that makes uploading your documents even easier. The application works on Windows PCs running the .NET Framework 2.0 or higher."
google  googledocs  productivity  uploading  documents  api  windows 
january 2008 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read