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robertogreco : googlefonts   10

‎Font Viewer - Your Design Helper on the App Store
"A font viewer app that helps designers choose a typeface for their project from a variety of different fonts. While at the desk, on the go or during lunch. Now fonts for iOS (system-installed), Google Edition(fonts at Google Fonts), and Font Awesome are available."
fonts  applications  ios  googlefonts  yoshitohasaka 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Averia Serif Libre - Google Fonts
"Avería ("breakdown" or "mechanical damage" in Spanish - related to the root of the English word "average") is a Unicode typeface superfamily created from the average of all fonts on the computer of the creator, Dan Sayers. The process is described at iotic.com/averia. All metrics are the result of an averaging process. The included glyphs are those that existed in a majority of the source fonts.

The Averia Libre families of fonts are based on the average of all 725 fonts in the Google Web Fonts project, released under the SIL Open Font License, as of 9 Nov 2011.

Averia Serif Libre exists in 6 styles, and there are also the Averia Libre, Averia Sans Libre and Averia Gruesa Libre families.

For more information please visit the Avería page on the iotic website or send an email to Dan Sayers."
fonts  googlefonts  typography  free 
may 2018 by robertogreco
The Ultimate Collection of Google Font Pairings (Displayed Beautifully with Classic Art) | Reliable
"How this post came to be

I have to be honest - I love the concept of Google fonts, but I find the execution to always be somewhat... lacking. I don't know. When compared to classics like Futura, Bodoni, Garamond - even Helvetica - they just fall short, and I rarely, if ever, end up using them.

Can you relate?

Again, I love the concept of Google font pairings: the fast download of cool fonts (and even cute fonts) from their high-speed library is great, and has brought far more unique, web friendly fonts and font pairs to the internet than ever before. They sort of broke us out of the standard web fonts and web safe fonts we were all chained down to a few years back of Arial and Verdana and even the Times New Roman font (remember those days? Can you believe they were just a few short years ago?).

But because of that feeling of something "lacking" - I've stayed away from Google fonts. Until now.

A while ago, my partner and co-founder of Reliable, David Tendrich, challenged me to do something about it.

"Make Google fonts work," he said.

And so that's how this post was born.

I wanted to create the best font pairings Google has to offer that even high-end agency designers would be tempted to use. I wanted to assemble Google font pairs that even I would have trouble turning down.

So I combed through Google's vast library and tested hundreds of font combinations, from their most famous and top fonts like the Roboto font, Railway font, Montserrat font, Lato font, Oswald font, Lobster font, and more, to more obscure, funky ones you may have never even seen before this post.

The wonderful Rijks collection

It was also about this time that I came across the Rijks Museum's online art collection. In short, it's a beautiful collection of both classical and modern art that is 100% royalty free and available for any use you'd like. (Can you say "aaaamazing?")

I took my favorite pieces from the Rijks collection and combined them with my Google font pairings to create a truly beautiful display of Google fonts that really work. We've also organized them by filters to help you find a font to fit that project you're working on right now. You'll find dozens of font pairings you can re-use time and time again for different clients and projects.

But that's not all!

I undertook one more challenge in this project: To express these font pairings through profound, time-tested quotes on design from world-renowned designers of all styles. So we have beauty in art, functionality in fonts, and wisdom in quotes.

If you too have had trouble finding great Google fonts and combinations, this might win you over to the Google Fonts Team like it won me over. Or maybe not! The beauty of design is that, at the end of the day, our own preferences and styles are what truly matter.

One last thing:

To help you find font pairings, we organized them in two ways: Style (Serif, Sans Serif, Both), and Mood (Any, Modern, Striking, Eccentric, Classic, Minimal, Neutral, Warm).

Here's a brief explanation of each of these moods:

Modern: Feels like it was made for the 21st century, and wouldn't make sense in any other period. Typically clean, more on the minimal side, and great for projects that require a more polished feel.

Striking: Impact. Boldness. Weight. These font pairs reach out and grab you and pull you into their message.

Eccentric: Quirky. Odd. Different. These fonts communicate uniqueness in various ways. Great for personal blogs, companies in a crowded marketplace that need to be set apart, and more.

Classic: These font combinations feel like they could have existed for generations. They're reminiscent of classic, time-tested and weathered fonts that last. Great for projects that need to project confidence, reliability, style.

Minimal: These minimal font pairings say so much, with a whisper. They almost try to blend into the background and get out of the way to help you more purely take in the message. Clean. Concise. Polished.

Neutral: Some brands are like the friendly local baker who greets everyone with a smile. Others are more professional, cerebral. These neutral fonts are more on the cerebral side - conveying professionalism and cleanliness above all else. Think Helvetica, but for Google fonts.

Warm: For brands who are the "friendly local baker," these fonts are for you. They convey heart, creativity, openness. They say, "Come talk to me, let's be friends." Great for brands that have that personal touch.

So there you have it!

Beautiful fonts and combinations from Google you can use to fuel your personal and client projects. They're completely web safe fonts, and due to their vast use worldwide, I think it's safe to say Google fonts are the new standard web fonts.

(By the way, we've made this entire collection of Google font pairings into a downloadable PDF that you can easily reference at any time. You should see a small yellow tab at the bottom of your screen - click that to download the post now!)

I hope displaying them on top of various colors, with various beautiful works of art behind them, helped you envision how they might work in your projects. That was one of my biggest goals in creating this post.

An important lesson

That's actually a lesson that was greatly reinforced in me throughout this Google font quest - that how fonts are used are just as important, if not more so, than the fonts themselves.

I think often Google fonts are strewn across designs that are lacking the fundamentals of good design. They're the cool, hip thing to use - and as a result, so many people us them. But design is a spectrum ranging from bad to great, and as bell curves go, few designs are truly great.

By simple math, most designs using Google fonts need improvement. Perhaps that's where my initial bias against Google fonts came from. Design is something I take so seriously, and am so passionate about, that when I see bad or lazy design, it hurts. From seeing so much sub-par design riddled with Google fonts, I associated Google fonts with sub-par design.

A new perspective

But undertaking this challenge to create this collection forced me to see Google fonts from a new perspective. Namely, it forced me to throw away my previous conceptions and see them anew. When I did, I simply viewed them like I would anything else in a design - as an asset to be used and manipulated to achieve an end-goal.

When I had no choice but to make them work, I viewed them as something that actually "could" work. And that's where the creativity and magic began.

That leads me to another important lesson I became re-acquainted with in this process - that when we think something won't work, it won't work. And when we truly think it can, we really can make it work.

Strategies for choosing font pairs

I also wanted to talk about some of the strategies behind these Google font combinations to help you create even more of your own. Because while I have 50 here, I'm certain there are dozens more waiting to be made.

If you'll notice, there's a pattern to nearly every pair: The headline is very bold and impactful, and then the body font is very light and airy. This contrast creates a nice tension and context for the fonts. It makes it very interesting as you scroll. Our eyes and brains desire constant change and flux and small contrasts like this deliver.

Another reason the body fonts are very light and airy is that they have to be palatable and legible to the eye over the course of a long piece of text. If I throw a bold, impactful font at you for more than 10 or so words - your eye will go crazy. It's like talking on the phone with someone who only screams.

When you go from a louder headline font to a body font, there's almost a feeling of relief. The headline was a nice, momentary burst of excitement - but then the eye is relieved to handle something easier and less demanding.

Serif & Sans

In addition, still in line with that concept of contrast, I often paired a serif headline with a sans serif body, or vise versa. Again, this just emphasizes contrast and keeps things interesting.

It also takes things a step further and shifts the feel. Serif fonts tend to feel more grounded, conservative and calm. Sans serif fonts tend to feel more modern, daring, progressive. By paring the two together, you get a great balance that's interesting to the mind and the eye.

Work with what you (don't) love

Finally, in line with the attitude shift I mentioned above, in going from "Google fonts don't work" to "Let's make them work" - I purposefully chose some fonts I simply thought I'd never like or want to use in any context. If I looked at a font and felt like it was a "heck no" - I felt compelled to give it a try.

This is so important for the creative process. Often, without even realizing it, we confine ourselves to our creative comfort zones, which slowly shrink over time. But when we step outside and try something we thought we'd never like - we often have our biggest breakthroughs."
font  typography  fonts  design  google  googlefonts  free  loulevit  2017  webdev  graphicdesign  via:lukeneff  webdesign 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Google Web Fonts Typographic Project
"There are over 650 Google Fonts available for free. But, pairing typefaces isn’t easy and many of those fonts don’t work for typical websites. Part of the 25x52 initiative, this collaborative, ongoing project offers inspiration for using Google’s font library.

All passages are from the Project Gutenberg transcript of Æsop’s Fables. All photographic images are from Unsplash.com."
design  fonts  typography  webdesign  googlefonts  google  webdev 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Google Is Designing the Font of the Future -- NYMag
"Among the thousands of features on your smartphone, one you’ve probably never thought about is which fonts it uses. Typography is involved in almost everything we do on our devices — the emails we send and receive, the texts we compose, the tweets we scroll through — yet to most of us, letters are just letters, numbers are just numbers. We might pick Garamond over Comic Sans for a cover letter, but on a phone, who cares?

Google, though, is paying attention. It’s spent years trying to create the perfect fonts for Android devices, a sprawling ecosystem that includes small phones, big tablets, and everything in between. And now, as Google is installing Android into cars, TVs, and watches on your wrist, the company is attempting an audacious task: making a typeface that looks good on all of them.

“Typography is kind of the skeleton. It’s the unsung hero,” Matias Duarte, Google’s vice president of design, said in an interview this week. "We’re trying to give people one logical, consistent system.”

Google’s efforts to perfect a universal typeface began in 2005, when it acquired a small operating-system-maker named Android. Two years later, it released Droid, a family of fonts designed by type-design firm Ascender specifically for use on Android devices. Until Droid, many fonts used in mobile applications were holdovers from the desktop age — Helvetica, Arial, Verdana, and other household names. Droid looked markedly better on smartphones than those typefaces, but it had problems of its own. Droid fonts worked best on small, low-resolution screens like the ones on early Android phones. But on the larger, high-definition screens that were introduced in later models, the fonts looked off. The bold letters were too blocky, and some of the non-bold letter forms, which had been designed for low-pixel-density screens, looked insubstantial and oddly spaced in high resolution. "Droid struggled to achieve both the openness and information density we wanted," Duarte later wrote in a Google+ post."



"Roboto wasn’t an immediate hit. Some type geeks dismissed it as a “Frankenfont,” a pastiche that borrowed heavily from other popular fonts, including Helvetica, the famous font that inspired a 2007 documentary. “Roboto is a Helvetica rip-off. It’s Google’s Arial,” tech blogger Jon Gruber wrote. Typographer Stephen Coles labeled it “an unwieldy mishmash,” and said, “This is not a typeface. It’s a tossed salad.” And though others were more complimentary – Glenn Fleishman wrote that "Roboto pricks at your sense of the familiar at first, but then, like a person you see passing in a crowd that you believe is a friend, and then on fully facing realize is a stranger, the font asserts its own identity" — Roboto was never truly embraced by the small community of designers who pay close attention to things like exit angles and ball terminals. (Google isn't alone in this; Apple's choice to use an existing typeface for iOS, rather than create its own custom typeface, has also come under heavy scrutiny from designers.)

Unlike pre-digital fonts, which were essentially set in stone after being finished, Google got to keep working on Roboto. And in subsequent editions, the typeface got a face-lift. The uppercase B got a little slimmer. The comma was made less angular. “The old model for releasing metal typefaces doesn’t make sense for an operating system that is constantly improving,” Duarte said. “As the system evolves over time, the type should evolve along with it.”

With its latest operating system, Android L, Google has made the most dramatic update to Roboto yet. The changes are part of Google's new, somewhat inscrutable "material design" initiative, and unless you study fonts, you might not notice the difference. But under the hood, there’s a lot going on."



"Unlike most innovations in computing, typeface design doesn't succeed by grabbing your eye. In fact, if you notice the changes in the new version of Roboto, Robertson and his team have probably done something wrong. The goal of a good font is to be silently useful, to improve a readers's experience without calling too much attention to itself. But if you notice, in the coming months, that your Moto X or your Samsung smartwatch suddenly starts to feel a little sleeker, and your emails and tweets get a tiny bit easier to read, it might be the new Roboto at work behind the scenes."
google  android  typography  design  kevinroose  2014  fonts  droid  roboto  googlefonts 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Google Fonts Crimson Text
"Crimson Text is a font family for book production in the tradition of beautiful oldstyle typefaces.

There are a lot of great free fonts around, but one kind is missing: those Garamond-inspired types with all the little niceties like oldstyle figures, small caps, fleurons, math characters and the like. In fact, a lot of time is spend developing free knock-offs of ugly "standards" like Times and Helvetica.

Crimson Text is inspired by the fantastic work of people like Jan Tschichold, Robert Slimbach and Jonathan Hoefler. We hope that the free type community will one day be able to enjoy Crimson Text as a beautiful workhorse."
via:zearl  fonts  googlefonts 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Beautiful web type — the best typefaces from the Google web fonts directory
"There are over 400 typefaces in the Google web fonts directory. Many of them are awful. But there are also high-quality typefaces that deserve a closer look. Below are examples of these typefaces in action. Click the examples to get the typeface from the Google web fonts directory."
via:derrickschultz  chadmazzola  webdev  webdesign  design  webfonts  fonts  google  typography  free  googlefonts 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Google Font Directory
"The Google Font Directory lets you browse all the fonts available via the Google Font API. All fonts in the directory are available for use on your website under an open source license and served by Google servers.
google  fonts  typography  javascript  html5  html  webdev  api  css  design  webdesign  free  type  googlefonts 
may 2010 by robertogreco

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