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Old memories, accidentally trapped in amber by our digital devices
"Part of what humans use technology for is to better remember the past. We scroll back through photos on our phones and on Instagram & Flickr — “that was Fourth of July 5 years ago, so fun!” — and apps like Swarm, Timehop, and Facebook surface old locations, photos, and tweets for us on the regular. But sometimes, we run into the good old days in unexpected places on our digital devices.

Designer and typographer Marcin Wichary started a thread on Twitter yesterday about “UIs that accidentally amass memories” with the initial example of the “Preferred Networks” listing of all the wifi networks his computer had ever joined, “unexpected reminders of business trips, vacations, accidental detours, once frequented and now closed cafés”.

[image: screeshot of macOS wi-fi panel]

Several other people chimed in with their own examples…the Bluetooth pairings list, the Reminders app, the list of alarms, saved places in mapping apps, AIM/iChat status message log, chat apps not used for years, the Gmail drafts folder, etc.

John Bull noted that his list of former addresses on Amazon is “a massive walk down memory line of my old jobs and places of residence”. I just looked at mine and I’ve got addresses in there from almost 20 years ago.

Steven Richie suggested the Weather app on iOS:
I usually like to add the city I will be travelling to ahead of time to get a sense of what it will be like when we get there.

I do this too but am pretty good about culling my cities list. Still, there are a couple places I keep around even though I haven’t been to them in awhile…a self-nudge for future travel desires perhaps.

Kotori switched back to an old OS via a years-old backup and found “a post-breakup message that came on the day i switched phones”:
thought i moved on but so many whatifs flashed in my head when i read it. what if i never got a new phone. what if they messaged me a few minutes earlier. what if we used a chat that did backups differently

Similarly, Richard fired up Google Maps on an old phone and was briefly transported through time and space:
On a similar note to both of these, a while ago I switched back to my old Nokia N95 after my iPhone died. Fired up Google Maps, and for a brief moment, it marked my location as at a remote crossroads in NZ where I’d last had it open, lost on a road trip at least a decade before.

Matt Sephton runs into old friends when he plays Nintendo:
Every time my friends and I play Nintendo WiiU/Wii/3DS games we see a lot of our old Mii avatars. Some are 10 years old and of a time. Amongst them is a friend who passed away a few years back. It’s always so good to see him. It’s as if he’s still playing the games with us.

For better or worse, machines never forget those who aren’t with us anymore. Dan Noyes’ Gmail holds a reminder of his late wife:
Whenever I open Gmail I see the last message that my late wife sent me via Google chat in 2014. It’s her standard “pssst” greeting for me: “aye aye”. I leave it unread lest it disappears.

It’s a wonderful thread…read the whole thing. [https://twitter.com/mwichary/status/996056615928266752 ]

I encounter these nostalgia bombs every once in awhile too. I closed dozens of tabs the other day on Chrome for iOS; I don’t use it very often, so some of them dated back to more than a year ago. I have bookmarks on browsers I no longer use on my iMac that are more than 10 years old. A MacOS folder I dump temporary images & files into has stuff going back years. Everyone I know stopped using apps like Path and Peach, so when I open them, I see messages from years ago right at the top like they were just posted, trapped in amber.

My personal go-to cache of unexpected memories is Messages on iOS. Scrolling all the way down to the bottom of the list, I can find messages from numbers I haven’t communicated with since a month or two after I got my first iPhone in 2007.

[image: screenshot of Messages in iOS]

There and elsewhere in the listing are friends I’m no longer in touch with, business lunches that went nowhere, old flames, messages from people I don’t even remember, arriving Lyfts in unknown cities, old landlords, completely contextless messages from old numbers (“I am so drunk!!!!” from a friend’s wife I didn’t know that well?!), old babysitters, a bunch of messages from friends texting to be let into our building for a holiday party, playdate arrangements w/ the parents of my kids’ long-forgotten friends (which Ella was that?!), and old group texts with current friends left to languish for years. From one of these group texts, I was just reminded that my 3-year-old daughter liked to make cocktails:

[screenshot]

Just like Sally Draper! Speaking of Mad Men, Don’s correct: nostalgia is a potent thing, so I’ve got to stop poking around my phone and get back to work.

Update: I had forgotten this great example about a ghost driver in an old Xbox racing game.
Well, when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together — until he died, when i was just 6.

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years.

but once i did, i noticed something.

we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came.

and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST.

See also this story about Animal Crossing. (via @ironicsans/status/996445080943808512)"
digital  memory  memories  2018  jasonkottke  kottke  traces  animalcrossing  videogames  games  gaming  flickr  wifi  marcinwichary  death  relationships  obsolescence  gmail  googlhangouts  googlechat  iphone  ios  nostalgia  xbox  nintendo  messages  communication  googlemaps  place  time  chrome  mac  osx 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Breaking and Entering - YouTube
"By Kelley Dong

http://kinet.media/films/program-08/breaking-and-entering-late-embryo-rained-last-night "

"Breaking and Entering + Late Embryo + Rained Last Night
Kelley Dong, US, Digital Video, 3 min, Sound, 2017

1. Breaking and Entering:
The impossible childhood home, it cannot be reached and it is not the same.

2. Late Embryo: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxeIURhgvc0 ]
300 frames of 56 photographs taken over 20 days compressed into the span of the time it takes for you to answer my call as I pull up into the driveway and wait by the phone.

3. Rained Last Night: [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9gFUToL9Es ]
More waiting. Thinking about how much I hate rain."
film  video  kelleydong  2017  googlestreetview  internet  storytelling  streetview  googlemaps  via:fantasylla 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Google Lat Long: Discover the action around you with the updated Google Maps
"The real world is changing every second and Google Maps is changing with it. Most often these changes happen behind the scenes in the form of road closures and new businesses. But today we’re making a few visual changes and additions to Google Maps on desktop, Android and iOS to help you better explore the world around you.

A cleaner look

The world is full of information, which means highlighting necessary info on the map without overcrowding it is a balancing act. So as part of this update, we’ve removed elements that aren’t absolutely required (like road outlines). The result is a cleaner look that makes it easier to see helpful and actionable information like traffic and transit. And we’ve improved the typography of street names, points of interest, transit stations, and more to make them more distinguishable from other things on the map, helping you navigate the world with fewer distractions.

Areas of interest

The cleaner canvas also lets us show local information in entirely new ways. As you explore the new map, you’ll notice areas shaded in orange representing “areas of interest”—places where there’s a lot of activities and things to do. To find an “area of interest” just open Google Maps and look around you. When you’ve found an orange-shaded area, zoom in to see more details about each venue and tap one for more info. Whether you’re looking for a hotel in a hot spot or just trying to determine which way to go after exiting the subway in a new place, “areas of interest” will help you find what you’re looking for with just a couple swipes and a zoom.

We determine “areas of interest” with an algorithmic process that allows us to highlight the areas with the highest concentration of restaurants, bars and shops. In high-density areas like NYC, we use a human touch to make sure we’re showing the most active areas.

A more subtle and balanced color scheme

The new Maps has a subtle color scheme to help you easily differentiate between man-made or natural features, and quickly identify places like hospitals, schools or highways. In case you’re curious, here’s a key showing what each color on the map represents.

Google Maps already provides you everything you need to get around the world in one place —including business information, ratings and reviews, and more than 100+ million distinct places. And with these updates, it's now even easier to navigate to where you want to go."
maps  googlemaps  mapping  2016  design  color 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Transit Maps: Apple vs. Google vs. Us — Medium
"Transit maps are beautiful. You see them plastered on bus shelters and subway stops. Your parents kept one in their pockets. You might have one burned into your brain.

A transit map is much more than a list of stations. It’s the underlying anatomy of your city. It shows how people move, how neighbourhoods are connected, and how your craziest city adventures begin.

Of course, transit maps are also incredibly functional: they’re abstract diagrams that show you how your transit system works. They have rigid lines and fixed-angles. While they’re not geographically accurate, they do a pretty good job of helping you figure out how to get from A-to-B. Every transit line has a different colour, and intersecting lines show you where to transfer.

You can ask any transit agency designer: creating a transit map is a painstaking process. Transit agencies put lots of thought into making diagrams that are equally beautiful and functional…

…although no two cities approach transit maps exactly the same way.
Which is great!

Unless you’re trying to design a transit map for every city in the world.

Imagine that: every transit line in every city, condensed into one, single, beautiful, curvy, map. Millions of stops, thousands of lines, hundreds of agencies.

Google Maps and Apple Maps have tried to do it, but we thought we could do better.

They have lots of resources. We don’t. But then again… we have Anton.

In this post, we’ll show you how Anton, our algorithm alchemist, took on both Apple and Google. He’ll be posting a technical follow up soon, so if you’re into that, we’ll let you know on Twitter. (If you want to take our word for it though, maybe just download our app? See our transit maps in all their titillating, unadulterated glory.)"
maps  mapping  application  ios  mobile  android  iphone  googlemaps  applemaps  apple  google  transit  transitapp  publictransit  2016  design 
july 2016 by robertogreco
What Happened to Google Maps? — Justin O'Beirne
"Given these trends, it's likely that Google Maps was optimized for mobile — and this explains some of the changes we observed earlier.

Unfortunately, these "optimizations" only served to exacerbate the longstanding imbalances already in the maps. As is often the case with cartography: less isn't more. Less is just less. And that's certainly the case here.

Google should add some of the cities back to its maps, and the maps would be better and more balanced."
maps  mapping  googlemaps  cartography  design  2016  justino'beirne 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Google Maps Streetview Player
"The google maps streetview player will take in either a starting point and end point, or a provided file of a route and provide a playthrough of the google streetview images that are available."
googlemaps  streetview  maps  animation  playthrough  googlestreetview 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Final Port-ject | Electronic Literature
[More on the course here: http://courses.digitaldavidson.net/dig220/about/
and http://courses.digitaldavidson.net/dig220/ ]

"Overview
The final project is a “port”—a kind of translation—of a work of electronic literature from one platform to another, not necessarily digital, platform. The process of porting forces one to define the “essence” of a work, and also reveals a great deal about the affordances of technology. The final project is due at the Digital Project Showcase, December 9, 3:30-5pm in the Lilly Gallery.

Rationale
Adapting a program from one hardware system to another is “porting,” a term derived from the Classical Latin portare—to carry or bear, not unlike the carrying across (trans + latus) of translation. A port is borne from one platform to another, and the bearer is the programmer or designer, who attempts to preserve the program’s essential properties from one platform to the next.

A translator faces the same challenges. Think about the questions that arise when translating a poem. Where does the poetry of the poem lie? Where is its poemness? In its rhythm? Its rhyme? Its diction? Its layout? Its constraints? Its meanings? Which of these must be carried over from one language to another in order to produce the most faithful translation?

In Nineteen Ways of Looking at Wang Wei (1987), a study of the act and art of translation, Eliot Weinberger reads nineteen different translations of a four-line, 1,200-year-old poem by the Chinese master Wang Wei, attentive to the way translators have reinterpreted the poem over the centuries, even as they attempted to be faithful to the original. With a single word, a translator may create a perspective unseen in Wei’s original, radically shift the mood of the poem, or transform it into complete tripe. Many times these changes come about as the translator tries to improve the original in some way. Yet translation, Weinberger writes, ought to be “dependent on the dissolution of the translator’s ego: an absolute humility toward the text” (17).

We who port face similar challenges. What must be preserved when a work of electronic literature is carried across to a new platform: the work’s interface? Its narrative or themes? Its interactivity? Its aesthetic design? The underlying algorithms? The constraints of the original? And should the port try to improve upon the original? Or perhaps “break” the original, by exposing its insides? Where does our humility come into play? The ethos of adaptation will vary from port to port and writer to writer; what you choose to prioritize will help to determine the qualities of the final port and its relationship to the original program.

Getting Started
As you work on your port, think about your source material in terms of the elements of digital literature we’ve studied: data, process, surface, interaction, context. Any of these elements might be “portable”—the aspect of the work you focus on transforming into another platform. Also think about how the rules of notice and signification come into play with the source work, and how those rules might be transformed in the new medium.

Another way to approach the port is to focus on the seemingly most essential digital affordances of the work and turn them into something else, even their opposites. For example, if the source offers a relatively straightforward narrative, turn it into a wiki. Or if the work focuses heavily on images, render that textually. Or vice-versa.

I encourage you to review your private sketchbook for ideas. Also reread the public sketchbooks. There may be something buried there, some seed of an idea that could blossom into a compelling project.

Finally: be bold. Unlike Weinberger, I believe you can have “absolute humility toward the text” while at the same time producing something radically different from the text.

Tools and Platforms
• Twine
• Mediawiki (installable on your domain through the cPanel)
• Google Maps
• Timelines
• Storymaps
• Scratch
This list will continue to grow as I add add more possibilities!

Timeline
• Thursday, November 19: Proposal due (includes name of source work, medium of the port, and a project work plan)
• Thursday, December 3: Minimally Viable Port (MVP) due
• Wednesday, December 9: Final version due at the the Digital Project showcase, with the statement and reflection due by midnight on the same day

Project Statement and Reflection
In an addition to the port itself, you must write a project statement and reflection of 1,500-2,000 words. In this document you’ll reflect on the choices you made, what your port reveals about the original, and what you learned about the process of porting. Use the statement and reflection to address the criteria below that aren’t self-evident in the port itself. The best demonstrations of your project’s engagement with the themes of this course will be explicit analyses of and connections to various readings, theories, and material from the class (e.g. affordances, five elements of digital literature, properties of digital media environments, etc.)

Evaluation
The port will be assessed according to the following criteria:

• Essence (the degree to which your port captures the source’s essence, however you define that)
• Insight (the extent to which you uncover and articulate surprises and insights about the source material through the porting process)
• Craft (the degree of mastery of the mode of composition or representation of the port)
• Intention (the sense of intentionality and deliberateness of the work)
• Theme (the level of engagement with ideas from this class and its online counterpart)
• Synthesis (the way you mobilize both your port and the original material to make some broader hypothesis or claim that matters)

Suggested Sources
• The works of Dreaming Methods
• The works of Jason Nelson
• The works of Christine Wilks
• The works of Alan Bigelow
• The works of Kate Pullinger
• Pieces from the first and second volumes of the Electronic Literature Collection
• Works in the ELMCIP Knowledge Base
• Works in the Pathfinders project
• Works in the Interactive Fiction Database"
classideas  marksample  eliterature  electronicliterature  if  interactivefiction  writing  literature  classes  digitalhumanities  twine  scratch  mediawiki  googlemaps 
december 2015 by robertogreco
How Nairobi Got Its Ad-Hoc Bus System on Google Maps | WIRED
"The idea to map the matatus began in 2012 when Sarah Williams and Jacqueline Klopp, two researchers working on land use projects in Nairobi, connected with Groupshot co-founder Adam White. “Adam and I started talking about the problem of working on sustainable transportation,” says Klopp, an associate research scholar at the Columbia Center for Sustainable Urban Development. “There were all these transportation projects going on, but there was no basic data about the existing transit system in Nairobi.”

The annals of the city government held some matatu data, but not much. Digital Matatus found records for about 75 percent of the routes, but they only included the start and end points, making it impossible to know how the buses navigated through the city. So armed with smartphones, ten university students spent four months riding the matatus, noting the name and location of each stop in a purpose-built app, which also used GPS to track the route. In dangerous neighborhoods, they followed behind the brightly painted buses in private cars.

By the end, the students recorded almost 3,000 stops on more than 130 routes. Next, all that data needed to be put in a usable format—specifically, a global standard called the General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS), which is compatible with open-source software used to make routing apps like Google Maps. But GTFS, developed in 2005, is geared towards formal transit systems, ones with fixed times and schedules.

That’s when Digital Matatus connected with Google Maps. Along with the rest of the robust GTFS community, Google agreed to update the global standard to make room for flexible transit networks with constantly changing schedules, routes, and stops. Nairobi was a perfect test bed. “In our efforts to expand public transportation on Google Maps, it was a good place to go next because there were people eager and willing to work on it,” said Mara Harris, a Google rep."



"Launching the matatu routes in Google emphasizes the need to study the informal transit networks that shuttle masses of people around in sub-Saharan Africa, southeast Asia, and south Asia. “You’re saying this is part of the system,” said Klopp. And since the GTFS data structure and the Nairobi data are open source, Digital Matatus gives other groups in Mexico City, Manila, Dhaka, China, and elsewhere a plan to collect and disseminate data on their transit. The collaboration has already received requests from around the world to map their cities.

Digital Matatus has also started talks with four more cities in Africa—Kampala, Accra, Lusaka, and Maputo—to use the same methods to map their informal mass transit systems. “So many of our problems in developing cities where you have extreme poverty and awful environmental conditions—they’re always tied in some way to the transport sector,” said Cervero. “It’s very chaotic and unmanaged, so this is a huge first step towards enhancing those services.”

People in Nairobi still use the paper maps because the matatu routes have not changed since their release, and the ultimate goal is a formal transit system with set maps, times, and prices. But hopefully “formal” will still mean you enjoy your commute with twinkling disco balls and a good beat."
nairobi  googlemaps  buses  transportation  maps  mapping  publictransportation  africa  kenya  matutus 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Google Street View Comes to California's State Parks | State Park | SoCal Wanderer | KCET
"Last week, California State Parks and Google Maps unveiled a project that allows folks to experience the images and sights of various hikes throughout California State Parks. Rather than fitting a 360-degree camera on top of a car, Google used Trekker, its camera that fits onto a wearable backpack and snaps photos as one walks."
california  stateparks  2015  googlemaps  google  streetview  googlestreetview  parks 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Smartphones and the Uncertain Future of 'Spatial Thinking' - CityLab
"Your brain is indeed relaxing. In a handful of studies conducted over the last decade in the United States, England, Germany and Japan, researchers have shown that GPS navigation has a generally pernicious effect on the user's ability to remember an environment and reconstruct a route. Toru Ishikawa, a spatial geographer at the University of Tokyo, quantified the difference in a study published earlier this year. Asked to recall various aspects of their surroundings, participants using GPS navigation performed 20 percent worse than their paper-map peers.

As Ishikawa pointed out to me, these findings raise questions beyond urban anthropology. Spatial thinking helps us structure, integrate, and recall ideas. It's less an independent field of study than a foundational skill; a 2006 report from the National Research Council called spatial literacy the "missing link" in the K-12 curriculum at large.

Navigating is among the greatest incubators of that ability. A sophisticated internal map, as a famous study of London cab drivers showed, is tied to greater development in the hippocampus, the brain region responsible for spatial memory. In another study, participants with stronger hippocampus development tended to navigate with complex cognitive maps, while those with less developed spatial memory memorized turn-by-turn directions.

Isn't it ironic: the easier it is for me to get where I'm going, the less I remember how I got there. As a conscious consumer of geographic information, should I be rationing my access to navigation tools—the mental equivalent of taking the stairs instead of taking the elevator?"



"It's too early to toll the bell for human navigation. GPS remains a clumsy accessory for a pedestrian, frustrating on a bicycle, and impossible on a motorcycle. There are indications that regular car commuters, too, may be impervious to the commands of the dashboard gods. "In general, the reason there's traffic is that people take the same way even if there's a different route," says Julie Mossler, head of global communications and creative strategy at Waze. Old highways die hard.

It seems that digital maps haven't rid wayfinding of its personal touch; rather, they are just beginning to properly incorporate it. New products in consumer mapping respond to the hegemonic efficiency of tools from Garmin, TomTom, and others. A handful of services cater solely to joggers. Yahoo Labs is attempting to quantify a nice walk based on crowd-sourced impressions of the city. A Dutch cartographer aims to chart the streets you have or haven't traveled. Every few months, it seems, some entrepreneur is embroiled in controversy over a map service showing neighborhoods that the user should avoid. The worldwide map, like the sprawling territory of the Internet itself, is balkanizing into a set of increasingly specialized "maplications."

The casualty of this gradual fine-tuning, I think, is chance. Routes were once conceived in a febrile mix of logic, accident, and instinct. Today's data-driven apps have mastered logic. They have registered road traffic, train delays, and the other accidents of travel. They have also, by explicitly catering to each of our effable desires, rendered human navigational impulse an eccentricity.

It's still possible, of course, to take a walk or go for a drive; to open your mind and let the city deliver, in Walter Benjamin's phrase, its "hints and instructions." The reverie of wandering, on foot or on wheels, can't be calculated by an algorithm or prescribed by an app.

But technology doesn't go away when you don't use it. From now on, an aimless jaunt is marked not only by openness to the stimuli of the physical world, but by the strain of blocking out their virtual counterparts. Contingent on technophobic self-control, wandering has lost its essential ease."
spatialthinking  cartography  mapping  maps  navigation  2014  via:shannon_mattern  gps  smartphones  orientation  wayfinding  walking  googlemaps  driving  cars  publictransit  memory  henrygrabar 
july 2015 by robertogreco
radio aporee ::: maps - sounds of the world
"The project radio aporee ::: maps has started 2006. it is a global soundmap dedicated to phonography, field recording (and related practices) and the art of listening. it connects sound recordings and places, in order to create a sonic cartography, open to the public as a collaborative project. It contains recordings from numerous urban, rural and natural environments, showing their audible complexity, as well as the different perceptions, practices and artistic perspectives of its many contributors, related to sound, public and private spaces, listening and sense of place."

[via: http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-05-29/heres-what-map-world-sounds ]
maps  mapping  sound  googlemaps  audio  fieldrecordings 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Diane Goes For You
"Here you can see the places that I visited as requested by people who had found an interesting location on Google Maps. Upon visiting these locations, I answered questions that people had asked about them and presented the answers here on this website."



"1. About:

"In the new empire of Google, it may seem to us that the whole world can be known without getting up from our chair, whithout turning our eyes away from the computer. Of course this is not true. Hopefully it will never become true. Even on the most detailed satellite view, the world remains strange and unknown. In order to have a closer look on this unknown world, Diane Rabreau is ready to get up from her chair and to be your explorer."
Till Roeskens, artist explorer.

2. What is Diane Goes For You:

It's a "service to individuals" and a game I purpose you to play.
If there is any place on earth you would like to know more about, if there is any spot on Google's satellite view that seems strange to you or that inspires you any question for which the answer can't be found online but only by going there for real, send me the geographic coordinates and I will try to go there one day and tell you what I saw and experienced.

3. How it started:

I started my explorations in January 2013. A first trip took me around France and Belgium, and a second one – thanks to the partnership of Rotterdam Film Festival– all around Europe.

4. Why I am doing this:

The little game of walking on Google Maps as if it was real is something I often do when I'm bored and I waste my time. There are thousands of us who play this game, because it's a great one, it's like a world conquest. There is too many things to know on Earth, and if we had to visit all of these things, we would need more than one lifetime. What is the point in visiting a place if, upon going there we feel like we know it already because the internet refers to it a thousand times? Can't an ordinary field lost in the Belgian countryside have the same emotional value as an Egyptian pyramid? Oddly, there's no information about what here looks like a section of a road in a Parisian building site. We don't know where it goes or where it comes from. It raises questions but there's no one to answer them because nobody cares. You care and I care too. This "section of road" could be of a huge interest or it could be nothing, whatever, we just want to know.
I have the time and the enthusiasm, therefore I am offering this service to individuals. Let's build together an infinite encyclopaedia made up of unknown destinations."
cartography  art  exploration  googlemaps  mapping  dianerabreau  via:jenlowe 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Fieldwork.
"An artwork by John Rogers & Amy Tavern, created in GoogleMaps, Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter & IRL."

[Sample posts (process posts) from the Tumblr:
http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/post/88959021965/the-found-object-photography-is-pretty-much
http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/post/88073405985/grouping-processing-remembering-arranging
http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/post/89365968975/this-crashed-dc-3-us-plane-lies-crumbling-4km-out
http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/post/89084694735/starting-on-the-installation-for-tomorrows
http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/post/88107086145/finding-the-right-light
http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/post/88211918200/a-surprise-whilst-photographing-found-objects-for ]
[See also:
https://twitter.com/fieldworkk
http://instagram.com/fieldworkk_

http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/
http://fieldworkk.tumblr.com/about

"Welcome to Fieldwork, a collaboration between artists John Rogers and Amy Tavern.

The project is a multidisciplinary “fieldwork”, presented online & IRL, that incorporates ideas of space, movement, memory and technology; place, image, experience and object.

The “findings” of Fieldwork are presented in an array of formats, with internet and social media explored and reconfigured as art spaces, creating a flow of content and an expression of information generated by moving through the world.

This includes a map that uses GPS coordinates to accurately place photographs, found objects, videos and other media into an ongoing online presentation. As well as the “facts” of these travels, the map will collate the artists’ experience of the journey and the project’s development, via accompanying texts and process documentation.

Fieldwork will also be shown IRL, drawing together these strands with projections, arrangements of objects, exhibition of images and videos, and the artists present and working in a constructed art-lab-gallery-studio environment.

Presentation #1 takes place in Reykjavík, Iceland, on June 18, 2014 at the SÍM basement, Seljavegur 32, Reykjavík 101. The presentation will also be open June 19 and 20 from 2-6pm each day.

Begin exploring Fieldwork via the map, which can be found here.

You can add Fieldwork on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and Tumblr to watch the project evolve."
iceland  johnrogers  amytavern  googlemaps  instagram  facebook  twitter  tumblr 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Ascii Street View
"Real-time Ascii Art conversion of Google Street View panorama's done in WebGL.

You'll need Chrome, Firefox 8+, or another browser that supports CORS WebGL textures.

Coded by @peter_nitsch. Inspired by Sol's TextFX library. Built with @thespite's Google Street View Panorama library, and three.js.

Read about this at Teehan+Lax Labs."

[Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntRiIkh6_DQ ]
streetview  ascii  googlemaps  google  maps  mapping 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Journey to the Centre of Google Earth - Simon Sellars
"Google Earth is more than the God’s-eye view – more than just us mortals seeing through the eyes of God. In Google Earth, we are God. We see over, under, inside and out. We see into the beyond, with a second sight unavailable to our mortal selves. We see ghosts of dead friends and dead strangers. We see ourselves. If the colonial God’s-eye view in Mercator maps is an uneasy settling of the planet (hoping the savages will stay in their place and not upset the prescribed order), then Google Earth, with its forking paths Google Maps and Google Street View, is a parallel world bleeding into this one."



"Paul Virilio, urbanist and theorist of cyberculture, once told an interviewer about a science fiction story in which artificial snow was seeded with tiny cameras and dropped from planes. He explained, “when the snow falls, there are eyes everywhere. There is no blind spot left.” The interviewer asks: “But what shall we dream of when everything becomes visible?” Virilio replies: “We’ll dream of being blind.” Desperate, I will dream that same dream, but even gouging out my eyes – all eighteen of them – will not be enough, for the imprint will remain, the augmented overlay, glowing like tracer bullets in the radioactive darkness of the mind’s eye. Remember, I can never unsee.

Then I will dream of death, but even death won’t save me, for I will have left enough data, enough tweets, enough cookies and enough honey traps from my online browsing patterns to allow unscrupulous marketers to harvest the information and construct a digital version of me. It will be a magnificent feat of malware, social engineering composed of my online leavings. This digital construct will traverse the Google Earth just as I do now. It will spam my friends and family, and it will tweet the same observations about Street View as I do. Actually, not “the same observations about Street View as I do”, but “the same observations because it is me”. No one will tell the difference. In the future, we are all sentient spambots.

My digital doppelganger will see me in Google Earth, reflected in the hubcap of the Street View car. It will see me reflected in the illusory facade of the PricewaterhouseCoopers building, watching myself watching the Barcode Project. It will see me in the machine, which has taught me how to remember a past I never had and a future I will never see.

The machine will teach my doppelganger how to live, at the same time as it teaches me how to die. No one will tell the difference."
maps  mapping  simonsellers  2014  googlemaps  googlestreetview  streetview  googleearth  cartography  time  paulvirilio 
june 2014 by robertogreco
MapTiler - Map Tile Cutter. Overlay Generator for Google Maps, Google Earth (KML SuperOverlay).
"MapTiler is graphical application for online map publishing. Your map can create overlay of standard maps like Google Maps, Yahoo Maps, Microsoft VirtualEarth or OpenStreetMap and can be also visualized in 3D form by Google Earth. Only thing you have to do for publishing the map is to upload the automatically generated directory with tiles into your webserver.

Supported files for conversion: TIFF/GeoTIFF, MrSID, ECW, JPEG2000, Erdas HFA, NOAA BSB, JPEG and more...

MapTiler is graphical interface for GDAL2Tiles utility, which is part of GDAL."
maps  mapping  tiles  generator  gis  googlemaps  edg  software  applications  mac  osx 
may 2014 by robertogreco
We're sharing more photos but getting less in return
"Theoretically, we could have an up-to-the-minute photo database of any popular location. We'd just need Instagram to include more metadata by default and allow users to sort by location (or let a third-party app do the same).

If we were properly organizing the photos we're already putting online, I could see how a festival was going, and Google Maps could show me all the photos taken from the Eiffel Tower in the last five minutes. I could even see if a popular bar is crowded without any official system. We'd be able to see the world right now, as clearly as we see its past on Google Street View, as quickly as news spreads on Twitter.

We have the data and the technological infrastructure, but we're stuck because no developer can access all the data.

If anyone was going to deliver these capabilities, it would be Flickr. In 2006, it was the canonical destination for photos. If you wanted to see photos of a certain place or subject, that’s where you went. But Facebook replaced Flickr as a social network, killing it on the desktop, and Instagram released a simpler mobile app, killing it there too. That would have been fine if Facebook and Instagram kept their photos data-rich and fully exportable. But both services give fewer tagging, grouping, and other sorting options, and they built their photos into incompatible databases. Facebook won't organize photos any way but by human subject or uploader. Instagram has just a few view options and focuses solely on the friend-feed.

We're photographing everything now, building this amazing body of work, but we're getting less and less out of it.

We do get some benefits from not having one monopoly in charge of photo sharing: Instagram did mobile better than Flickr, Facebook can link a photo of someone to their whole social profile, and Foursquare efficiently arranges photos by location. These advantages, however, have replaced Creative Commons licensing, advanced search, and any other tool that relies on treating the world's photo pool as a mass data set rather than a series of individualized feeds.

Twitter, Tumblr, and Imgur siphon off bits of the photo market without giving them back into the mass set. Meanwhile, any photo service that dies off (RIP Picasa, Zooomr, Photobucket) becomes a graveyard for photos that will probably never get moved to a new service.

Why are we giving up this magical ability to basically explore our world in real-time? The bandwidth is lower than streaming video; the new-data-point frequency is lower than Twitter; the location sorting is less complicated than Google Maps or Foursquare. But no one service has an incentive to build this tool, or to open up its database for a third party. Instead they only innovate ways to steal market share from each other. Flickr recently downgraded its mobile app, removing discovery options and cropping photos into squares. The new app is an obvious Instagram imitation, but it won't help Flickr recapture the market. If any photo service beats Instagram, it won't be by making data more open.

Our collective photo pool suffers from a tragedy of the commons, where each service snaps up our photos with as few features as it can, or by removing features. (Snapchat, for example, actively prevents photos from joining the pool by replacing the subscription model with a one-to-one model, efficiently delivering photos straight from my camera to your feed.) We are giving our photos to these inferior services, they are making billions of dollars from them, and what we're getting back is pathetic.

The best agnostic tool we have is the archaic Google Image Search, which doesn't effectively sort results, doesn't distinguish between image sources, and doesn't even touch location search. The lack of agnostic metadata is keeping us in the past. As Anil Dash pointed out in 2012, the photo pool (like blogs and status updates) is becoming fragmented and de-standardized. Everything we're putting online is chopped up by services that don't play well together, and that's bad for the user.

Dash wrote, "We'll fix these things; I don't worry about that." I do. I don't think technology has to work out right. We can build expressways where we should have built bullet trains. We can let an ISP monopoly keep us at laughable broadband speeds. We can all dump our memories into the wrong sites and watch them disappear in 10 years. We can share postage-stamp-sized photos on machines capable of streaming 1080p video.

Even if we do fix this, it will not be retroactive. There are stories about whole TV series lost to time because the network stupidly trashed the original reels. Now that we take more photos than we know what to deal with, we won't lose our originals—we'll just lose the organization. When Facebook and Instagram are inevitably replaced, we'll be left without the context, without the comments, without anything but a privately stored pile of raw images named DCIM_2518.JPG.

Just a heap of bullshit, really."
nickdouglas  flickr  metadata  photography  2014  instagram  tags  tagging  search  storage  facebook  tumblr  imgur  twitter  picasa  zooomr  photobucket  archives  archiving  creativecommons  realtime  foursquare  googlemaps  snapchat  anildash  googleimagesearch  technology  regression  socialmedia  fragmentation  interoperability 
may 2014 by robertogreco
On the Road : Gregor Weichbrodt
"Based on the novel “On the Road” by Jack Kerouac and Google Maps Direction Service.

The exact and approximate spots Kerouac traveled and described are taken from the book and parsed by Google Direction Service API. The result is a huge direction instruction of 45 pages. The chapters match the ones of the original book.

All in all, as Google shows, the journey takes 272,261667 hours (for 17527 miles)."
maps  ontheroad  jackkerouac  mapping  googlemaps  2014  poetry  gregorweichbrodt 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The Ends of the Road - In Focus - The Atlantic
"Inspired in part by the great geography game GeoGuessr, I spent some time recently in Google Maps, finding the edges of their Street View image coverage. I've always been drawn to the end of the road, to the edges of where one might be allowed to travel, whether blocked by geographic features, international borders, or simply the lack of any further road. Gathered below is a virtual visit to a few of these road ends around the world -- borders, shorelines, dead ends and overlooks from New Zealand to Svalbard, from Alaska to South Africa. [26 photos]"
geoguessr  googlemaps  googlestreetview  streetview  geography  2013  photography  infocus 
june 2013 by robertogreco
a brief history of participation
"These activities were not always congenial to the program of government reform towards democratization. Many of them used participatory methods instead to net poor peoples into networks of debt and reliance on hierarchical authorities.

The reasons for the failures of participatory technology are actually quite specific.

Participation was appropriated during the 1970s as a means of cheap development without commitment of resources from above. The theme of participatory ownership of the city, pioneered in discussions about urban planning in the West, remained strong in the context of the developing world, and even grew in a context of spiraling urbanization. In India, the Philippines, and much of Africa and Latin America, postwar economies pushed peasants off of the land into cities, where the poor availability of housing required the poor to squat on land and build their own homes out of cheap building materials. At first, the governments of these towns collaborated with the World Bank to take out loans to provide expensive, high-rise public housing units. But increasingly, the World Bank drew upon the advice of western advocates of squatter settlements, who saw in western squats the potential benefits of self-governance without interference from the state. In the hands of the World Bank, this theory of self-directed, self-built, self-governed housing projects became a justification for defunding public housing. From 1972 forward, World Bank reports commended squatters for their ingenuity and resourcefulness and recommended giving squatters titles to their properties, which would allow them to raise credit and participate in the economy as consumers and borrowers.

Participatory mechanisms installed by the Indian government to deal with water tanks after nationalization depend on principles of accountability at the local level that were invented under colonial rule. They install the duty of the locality to take care of people without necessarily providing the means with which to do so.

We need developers who can learn from the history of futility, and historians who have the courage to constructively encourage a more informed kind of development. "
peertopeer  web2.0  joguldi  2013  conviviality  participation  participatory  government  centralization  centralizedgovernment  self-rule  history  1960s  democracy  democratization  reform  networks  mutualaid  peterkropotkin  politics  activism  banks  banking  patrickgeddes  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  planning  self-governance  worldbank  dudleyseers  gandhi  robertchambers  neelamukherjee  india  thailand  philippines  gis  geography  latinamerica  1970s  squatters  economics  development  africa  cities  resources  mapmaking  cartography  maps  mapping  googlemaps  openstreetmap  osm  ushahidi  crowdsourcing  infrastructure 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Maps, Maps And MOAR Maps At The Society Of Cartographers And Expedia | Gary's Bloggage
"History has a habit of repeating itself and so does the map. From primitive scratchings, through ever more sumptuous pieces of art, through to authoritative geographical representations, the map changes throughout history. Maps speak of the hopes, dreams and prejudices of their creators and audience alike, and with the advent of neogeography and neocartography, maps are again as much art as they are geographical information.

... will that do?"
noaa  bigdata  data  exploration  aaronstraupcope  flickr  googlemaps  bingmaps  agi  osm  openstreetmap  yahoo  nokia  geography  stamen  mattbiddulph  garygale  2012  history  neocartography  mapping  maps 
september 2012 by robertogreco
How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic
"As we slip and slide into a world where our augmented reality is increasingly visible to us off and online, Google's geographic data may become its most valuable asset. Not solely because of this data alone, but because location data makes everything else Google does and knows more valuable.

Or as my friend and sci-fi novelist Robin Sloan put it to me, "I maintain that this is Google's core asset. In 50 years, Google will be the self-driving car company (powered by this deep map of the world) and, oh, P.S. they still have a search engine somewhere."

Of course, they will always need one more piece of geographic information to make all this effort worthwhile: You. Where you are, that is. Your location is the current that makes Google's giant geodata machine run. They've built this whole playground as an elaborate lure for you. As good and smart and useful as it is, good luck resisting taking the bait."
cartography  alexismadrigal  google  geodata  googlestreetview  googlemaps  process  mapping  maps  2012 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Rhizome | The Universal Texture
"By capturing screenshots of these images in Google Earth, I am pausing them and pulling them out of the update cycle. I capture these images to archive them - to make sure there is a record that this image was produced by the Universal Texture at a particular time and place. As I kept looking for more anomalies, and revisiting anomalies I had already discovered, I noticed the images I had discovered were disappearing. The aerial photographs were getting updated, becoming 'flatter' – from being taken at less of an angle or having the shadows below bridges muted. Because Google Earth is constantly updating its algorithms and three-dimensional data, each specific moment could only be captured as a still image. I know Google is trying to fix some of these anomalies too – I’ve been contacted by a Google engineer who has come up with a clever fix for the problem of drooping roads and bridges. Though the change has yet to appear in the software, it’s only a matter of time."
algorithms  art  google  googlemaps  maps  googleearth  via:stml  clementvalla 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Walk [Your City]™
"What? An online pedestrian empowerment tool for any citizen to become an engaged stakeholder in their community. The W[YC] platform will allow anyone to auto-magically create their own guerrilla wayfinding sign to export, print and install.

Why? Walk Raleigh, our initial guerrilla (unsanctioned & self initiated) wayfinding project, has resonated with so many people, both home and away (even the BBC came to town!), we had to make it accessible for more people to use. Walk Raleigh has even been adopted as a pilot educational program in Raleigh, N.C. Wait, whats guerrilla or tactical urbanism anyways?

How? By using existing digital resources and the newly released “google maps” walk tool, we will develop a simple point and click sign-making experience for even the most novice of computer-user. Anyone will be able to auto-magically download their own sign."
walkability  googlemaps  signs  guerillawayfinding  wayfinding  mapping  maps  signalization  transportation  urbanism  urban  walking  pedestrians  empowerment  cities 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Search and you shall find - Art - Domus
"The experiments conducted today by artists using Google Maps are impetuous and have the same high margin of error — and, perhaps, even the same lack of inhibition — typical of the avant-gardes of the past. An art report from Milan by Roberto Marone"
mapping  maps  geography  christopsniemann  albertobiagetti  sanjapupovac  richardsympson  damonzacconni  julienlevesque  jonrafman  clementvalla  helmutsmits  jennyodell  via:cityofsound  2012  images  satelliteview  satelliteimages  googlemaps  art  robertomarone 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Hypercities
"Built on the idea that every past is a place, HyperCities is a digital research and educational platform for exploring, learning about, & interacting with the layered histories of city and global spaces. Developed though collaboration between UCLA & USC, the fundamental idea behind HyperCities is that all stories take place somewhere and sometime; they become meaningful when they interact and intersect with other stories. Using Google Maps & Google Earth, HyperCities essentially allows users to go back in time to create and explore the historical layers of city spaces in an interactive, hypermedia environment.

A HyperCity is a real city overlaid with a rich array of geo-temporal information, ranging from urban cartographies and media representations to family genealogies and the stories of the people and diverse communities who live and lived there. We are currently developing content for: Los Angeles, NYC, Chicago, Rome, Lima, Ollantaytambo, Berlin, Tel Aviv, Tehran, Saigon, Toyko…"
seoul  shanghai  tokyo  saigon  telaviv  berlin  ollantaytambo  lima  rome  chicago  nyc  losangeles  storytelling  googleearth  googlemaps  usc  ucla  atemporality  timetravel  hypercities  visualization  research  history  geography  maps  mapping  cities  urban 
april 2012 by robertogreco
MoMA | New Photography 2011 | Doug Rickard
"Doug Rickard (American, born 1968) studied United States history and sociology at the University of California, San Diego, before moving to photography. He has drawn on this background in research for his series A New American Picture, which focuses on places in the United States where unemployment is high and educational opportunities are few. On a virtual road trip, Rickard located these sites remotely using the Street View feature of the website Google Maps, which has mapped and photographed every street in the country. Scrutinizing the Google Maps pictures, he composed images on his computer screen, which he then photographed using a digital camera. The resulting pictures—digitally manipulated to remove the Google watermark and cropped to a panoramic format—comment on poverty and racial equity in the United States, the bounty of images on the web, and issues of personal privacy."
steetscapes  landscape  poverty  race  us  2011  art  moma  dougrickard  photography  googlestreetview  googlemaps 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Mapvelopes
"Mapvelopes is a 'map envelope' generator, inspired by the 'Google Envelopes' concept by Rahul Mahtani & Yofred Moik, showcased on the Yanko Design blog. Mapvelopes lets you create your own real-life versions of these envelopes, for any from and to address you wish.

To use it, simply enter the source and destination addresses below, and select the type of envelope you want to use. A PDF will be generated and returned to you, suitable for printing directly onto the envelope!

If there's a land route between your source and destination addresses, the route will be printed on the returned map envelope. If there's no route, or we don't have enough routing quota left for the day, an envelope with the start and end markers but no route will be returned."
maps  envelopes  stationery  web  papernet  printing  googlemaps 
december 2011 by robertogreco
'Collecting' Swimming Pools And Stadiums: Art Made From Google Maps : The Picture Show : NPR
"How many baseball diamonds are there in Manhattan? According to Jenny Odell, 116. And how does she know? Because she's put in the time scouring satellite images of New York City's surface on Google Earth, collecting every sighting of a field, compiling and displaying them all at once like so: [10 images]

Odell, who was born in the Californian town of Mountain View, where Google would eventually set its roots, calls her project "Satellite Collections."

She is drawn to the parking lots, pools and silos she finds while scanning the satellite images because, she writes in an email, "they're things we often overlook or take for granted as part of our environment; but somehow, from a satellite point of view, they reveal themselves to be (somewhat) ubiquitous signs of human civilization, popping up in certain places while the surrounding area may simply be desert or mountains. From this perspective there's something very fragile and nostalgic about them.""
googleearth  satelliteimages  satellites  satelliteview  photography  art  collage  jennyodell  googlemaps  michaelwolf 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Animaps - Create and view beautifully informative animated maps, for free!
"Animaps extends the My Maps feature of Google Maps by letting you create maps with markers that move, images and text that pop up on cue, and lines and shapes that change over time.

When you send your Animap to friends it appears like a video - they can play, pause, slow and speed up the action!"
maps  mapping  animation  onlinetoolkit  googlemaps 
july 2011 by robertogreco
GRAND THEFT AUTO IV - Map: Liberty City
"Plunge into the boroughs of Liberty City from the safety of your own chair."
architecture  games  maps  mapping  gaming  libertycity  googlemaps  gta  grandtheftauto 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Random Markers: Fictional Worlds in Street View
"Recently, I discovered a map on a fan site for Grand Theft Auto IV. It's actually not the first one, the first one I've seen was on IGN. Both these sites use Custom Projections and map tiles to define a map that shows only Liberty City with no reference to Google Map tiles.

The new site though has a significant new feature, it uses Custom Street View Panoramas to display the Street View of Liberty City. Go ahead, try it, drop pegman onto the city and check out the panoramas. I'll wait…

I'm hoping we'll see more of these kind of fictional places in Street View Maps API implementations. The code for it is reasonably simple, creating the actual panoramas is more difficult. I hope this sort of thing inspires people to use the Maps API to show planning projects too, showing interiors of buildings yet to be built, etc."
gta  libertycity  maps  googlemaps  videogames  fiction  fictionalmaps  mapping  streetview  grandtheftauto 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Comparing 16th Century Maps to Current Satellite Imagery - Leah Goldman - Technology - The Atlantic
"Remember life before GPS? Instead of to-the-minute maps and turn-by-turn directions to the tune of an Australian woman's voice, we relied on compasses and hand drawn maps.

Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg compiled Civitates Orbis Terrarum, a book of bird's eye view maps from the 16th century.

Take a look at how the Google Maps of the 1500s compares to today's version, in some of the world's biggest cities."
history  maps  geography  cities  london  cairo  istanbul  mapping  1500s  dublin  moscow  prague  paris  milan  rome  lisbon  frankfurt  florence  2011  googlemaps  satelliteview  aerialphotography 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Google Map Maker
"Leave your mark on the map: Add and update the places you know for millions to see in Google Maps. Start adding your local knowledge to the map.<br />
<br />
Add businesses and building outlines. Move place markers to the right locations. Build a detailed map of your school campus. See live mapping by users around the world!"<br />
<br />
[Live mapping is here: http://www.google.com/mapmaker/pulse ]
google  maps  googlemaps  mapping  diy  crowdsourcing 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Actually, it’s eleven eyes > Robin Sloan
"Could 9eyes be any more sub­lime? It’s a per­fect project, and a per­fect piece of art, for the year 2010. Here’s why: It deals with the enor­mity of the inter­net not by lament­ing that we’re adrift in a sea of data, etc. etc. (that’s such a bor­ing response) but by using it—by tak­ing some­thing as mind-​​bogglingly mas­sive as the Google Street View data­base and rec­og­niz­ing it, rightly, as a tool, in the same way that oil paint is a tool—and then doing some­thing uniquely human with it. And that’s a big deal."
streetview  robinsloan  google  googlemaps  internet  media  art  scale  human  infooverload  9eyes 
november 2010 by robertogreco
View From Your Window Game
"Try to find the location seen in the picture in the upper right within the fixed number of guesses."
googlemaps  streetview  googlestreetview  geography  games  fun 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Mapped historical photos, film, and audio | SepiaTown
"SepiaTown lets you view and share thousands of mapped historical images from around the globe. Search the map to view images or...

We welcome historical images from collections of all sizes, from libraries and historical societies to individuals with a boxful of cool old photos."
via:javierarbona  archive  photography  geography  mapping  maps  history  images  cities  moscow  boston  london  sanfrancisco  paris  amsterdam  losangeles  buenosaires  valparaíso  sandiego  local  portland  oregon  googlemaps 
october 2010 by robertogreco
The Wilderness Downtown
"An interactive film by Chris Milk…Featuring "We Used To Wait"…Built in HTML5" [For Chrome only, it didn't work so well on my Macbook, but I found the concept intriguing.]
chrome  google  googlemaps  googleearth  memory  film  html5  maps  mapping  location  googlestreetview  video 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Nagasaki Archive (En)
"In a situation like this, we started to consider if there is something new that we can engage, here from Nagasaki, the very place where the A-bomb struck. With all the abundant valuable resources in Nagasaki, a new approach to take advantage of them lead to this project. This project enables to access all of those resources from all over the world, which was formerly unable to do so. Moreover, by mapping the information with topographic data, the user can enhance the experience of what it was like when the A-bomb struck Nagasaki, in detail. "Nagasaki Archive" is an attempt to reorganize all of those information on a digital virtual globe (google earth). In order to make Nagasaki the last place on earth where the A-bomb struck, we hope that many people to interact with and learn from "Nagasaki Archive"."

[via: http://twitter.com/javierest/status/21271433051 ]
japan  ww2  wwii  secondlife  history  googlemaps  googleearth  socialstudies  images  teaching  atomicbomb  classideas  maps  mapping  nagasaki  us 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Cars parked illegally in bike lanes - MyBikeLane.com
"MyBikelane is built on the notion that:
* Cyclists are sick of having to dodge cars and trucks using the bikelane illegally.
* These illegally parked cars force cyclists into traffic, making their commute more dangerous.
* Those cyclists have cameras or cell phones w/ cameras.
* Using the power of the community, we can hopefully make the problem more obvious and get the city to do something about it.
* This makes it safer to cycle for fun or to commute.

How MyBikelane works:
* You the cyclist see a car parked illegally.
* You snap a picture, taking care to capture the license plate of the vehicle and proof that the vehicle is parked illegally.
* You upload the photo, tell us when and where the incident occurred and the license plate info.
* We make the site available to media, city officials, and the web to show the problem."
activism  bikes  biking  cars  cities  bikelanes  transportation  community  collaboration  parking  traffic  conflict  googlemaps  nyc  dc  sandiego  losangeles  portland  sanfrancisco  washingtondc 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Patrick O'Brian Mapping Project
"To accurately map the progress of Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin over the course of the 21 novels by Patrick O'Brian."
classideas  via:migurski  maps  mapping  literature  infographics  history  googlemaps  gis  fiction  books  patrickobrian  jackaubrey  stephenmaturin  novels 
july 2010 by robertogreco
A Place in Time (gctgone)
"Explore with your students the power of images and their impact on history as they research, select and evaluate photographs in an interactive and collaborative lesson."
maps  mapping  googlemaps  history  images  photography  tcsnmy  classideas  lessons  via:morgansully 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Ushahidi :: Crowdsourcing Crisis Information (FOSS)
"Our goal is to create a platform that any person or organization can use to set up their own way to collect and visualize information. The core platform will allow for plug-in and extensions so that it can be customized for different locales and needs. The beta version platform is now available as an open source application that others can download for free, implement and use to bring awareness to crisis situations or other events in their own locales, it is also continually being improved tested with various partners primarily in Kenya. Organizations can also use the tool for internal monitoring or visualization purposes.
activism  humanrights  visualization  opensource  violence  socialsoftware  maps  mapping  googlemaps  disaster  crowdsourcing  kenya  crisis  ushahidi  sms  foss  via:preoccupations 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Google LatLong: Nearby places you might like...
"When you live in New York City, everyone has an opinion on where to eat. And usually, telling someone a place you love will lead to a long conversation of a string of other places you should try. For example, one of the more interesting restaurants I've eaten at in NYC was recommended to me by someone who knew I loved a different restaurant by the same owner. And, when I told a friend I was heading to the Lower East Side to get some yummy knishes for lunch, he told me to make sure I checked out the famous Guss' Pickles right around the corner and that I might consider picking up some smoked fish at Russ & Daughters down the street.
google  location  places  nearby  serendipity  maps  mapping  googlemaps  search  local 
february 2010 by robertogreco
OffMaps: Offline Maps for iPod Touch and iPhone
"OffMaps lets you take your maps offline. It is the ideal companion for any iPhone and iPod Touch user, who wants to access maps when travelling abroad (and avoid data roaming charges) and who wants to have fast access to maps at all times. This app (and the icon) just has to be on the right hand side of Apple's built-in maps app. OffMaps uses OpenStreetMap that include a lot more information than simple road maps: from ATMs and train stations to restaurants and pubs! You choose which areas to download instead of buying a new app for every city you want to visit. Our guides include all data from OpenStreetMap and lets you browse a wide array of points of interest offline. Check out the Guides section to see our ever-expanding Guide library." [Update: Kottke approved]
googlemaps  openstreetmap  mapping  ipod  ipodtouch  itunes  gps  maps  iphone  applications  navigation  offline  software  mobile  travel  handhelds  osm  offmaps  ios 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Google LatLong: Your world, your map
"cyclists will now find many more trails and paths to explore. Soon we even plan on providing you with biking directions to take advantage of this new data."
bikes  biking  googlemaps  maps  mapping 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Ride the City: safe bike routes made easy
"Welcome to Ride the City! We'll help you find a safe bike route.

Enter your starting and ending address (or drag the cyclist and stop sign icons to the map). We'll take it from there."
bikes  maps  mapping  local  safety  transportation  googlemaps  biking  sandiego  routes  directions 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Mix-A-Lot's posse route tracked in Google Maps | Crave - CNET
"For most people, Sir-Mix-A-Lot is synonymous with his hit "Baby Got Back." But for his real fans, or fans of early hip-hop in general, the greatest song Mix ever did was "My Posse's On Broadway," an homage to my home neighborhood in Seattle. It's a detailed step-by-step trek with Mix and his posse as they hit up local landmarks like Dick's Burgers and generally have a good time.

It's a great, fun song, and Google Maps user Adam Cohn has done fans a favor by making a map of Seattle that details every stop along the way. This is one of the most fun things I've seen in Google Maps in a long time.

An image of the map is above, but for a more interactive version you can check out Cohn's map for yourself. To make it more fun, below is the video for the single so you can follow along while you follow along. Try not to get the song stuck in your head."
seattle  washingtonstate  hiphop  music  musicvideo  video  geography  googlemaps  narrative  broadway  sir-mix-a-lot  via:javierarbona 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Street View Partner Program [Legoland California and SDSU are two of the examples]
"Do you manage a unique property (pedestrian mall, amusement park, university campus, etc.) that users would like to visit in Street View? Through our Partner Program, you can now request Google to collect imagery of your location. Once the images are added to Street View, people all over the world will be able to virtually explore your property. To learn more, check out our FAQs."
googlemaps  streetview  googleearth  mapping  maps  sdsu  legoland  california  sandiego 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Destination: Argleton! Visiting an imaginary place « Walking Home to 50
"The possibility of actually visiting an imaginary place seemed irresistible. In terms of my journey, not to go there would be a dereliction of duty, like saying ‘I could have made a detour to Rock Candy Mountain’ or ‘Tir-nan-Og’, ‘but I decided to press on directly to Maghull instead’. So today I decided to make the expedition – from the world we know to a fictitious and uncertain place."
imaginaryplaces  imaginary  googlemaps  territory  fiction  maps  mapping  data  travel  google 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Time Spent Alone
"Time spent alone is a series of projects conceptually linked through their being conceived in solitude and intended for display in the isolated social space of the internet. They are daydreams, worries and solitary trips.
art  books  maps  mapping  travel  world  google  data  googlemaps  experimental  emotion  coding  desire  via:foe 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Destinations - Time Spent Alone
"“Where do you want to go?” and “Why do you want to go there?” are the basic questions behind Destinations. Continuously changing, the main page shows people’s responses to those questions. It is an introspective exercise and a forum for the exploration of shared aspirations.

You are invited to share your responses to the above questions. If we like what you’ve shared, we’ll include it in the main page rotation.

When sharing, you might want to create a username and login. That way, you can keep track of all your contributions and update them later if you want to tweak your wording or position the map just so.
Now more social.

We started a twitter account for the whole timespentalone series, but Destinations is the main attraction. Now, whenever you submit a destination, we'll twitter it and post a link to your submitted page. Follow us over at twitter.com/timespentalone.'"
googleearth  geotagging  googlemaps  maps  mapping  interactive  twitter  gis  writing  netart  via:foe 
may 2009 by robertogreco
More Geo-Games: Ship Simulator on Google Earth - O'Reilly Radar
"Frank Taylor of the Google Earth Blog just posted about Ships, a new ship simulation plugin that uses the API ( Frank's movie review). It's one of the Plugins he's going to dissect in his Google Earth workshop at Where 2.0 tomorrow (use whr09rdr for 20% off that last-minute registration)." See also: http://ships.planetinaction.com/
games  googlemaps  simulation  geolocation  googleearth  ships  navigation  maps  mapping  simulations 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Cloudmade - Make Maps Differently
"CloudMade help you make the most of map data. We source our maps from OpenStreetMap, the community mapping project which is making a free map of the world. Our aims are to continue the democratization of geo data and to expand access to open geo data through a range of simple yet powerful tools and APIs.
opensource  maps  mapping  cloudmade  openstreetmap  geocoding  crowdsourcing  googlemaps  geography  cartography  gis  geodata  open  osm 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Hopstop Jumps Onto iPhone App Bandwagon That Is Driven By Google Maps
"Transit planner HopStop launched its free iPhone application last week to rival the mobile version of Google Map’s Transit option. The application, with support from iPhone’s GPS functionality, offers all the same services as the website. This includes trip customization, maps marked with nearby subways and bus stops, a taxi mode that estimates time and cost of travel and contact information for taxi companies, and the ability to re-route a transit plan that is provided."
iphone  applications  masstransit  googletransit  googlemaps  directions  transportation  ios 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Google Maps añade capa de tránsito para transporte público - FayerWayer
"Google Maps ha añadido una capa de tránsito para transporte público a los mapas de algunas ciudades. Ahora es posible ver vistas de las rutas de autobús, tren, y líneas de metro.

Este servicio solo está disponible en 59 ciudades del mundo, incluyendo ubicaciones importantes como Brasil, México, Chile y Venezuela."
maps  mapping  googlemaps  chile  santiago  metro  transit  publictransit 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Un mapa de la inseguridad, versión 2.0 - FayerWayer
"Desgraciadamente, en Argentina es tema de todos los días la inseguridad: es uno de los principales asuntos que más preocupan a los habitantes de este país. Cualquier persona, en cualquier lugar es una potencial víctima de la inseguridad. Es aquí, donde Mapa de la Inseguridad entra en juego. ¿Qué hace básicamente? Bajo el lema “Saber nos da Seguridad”, el sitio pretende ser una especie de registro visual, donde los usuarios puede notificar vía web o telefónicamente cuando y donde han sido víctimas de un delito."
argentina  buenosaires  maps  mapping  googlemaps  crime  security 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Japanese site tracks stinky areas using Google Maps | Japan Probe
"Odor-obsessed weirdos in Japan now have a place to hang out on the net: Nioibu.com. The site allows users to sign up and enter reports of odors they encounter, tracking the stinky locations using markers on Google Maps. A few examples: watermelon smell, ferret odor, old lady stench(”grandma smell”), gasoline fumes, and curry."
smell  japan  maps  mapping  location  ofors  googlemaps 
december 2008 by robertogreco
A map is not the map - Les Liens Invisibles (2008)
"Comissioned by LX 2.0 - a project by Lisboa 20 Arte Contemporânea and curated by Luis Silva - Google Is Not The Map (GISNTM) is a collection of 35+ GeoPoeMaps, a series of works in which ordinary maps become the unusual surfaces used to disarticulate perception of the world, to trace new routes accross the boundaries and to draw new imaginary geometries of the possible."
maps  mapping  google  googlemaps  psychogeography  conceptual  cartography  design  art 
november 2008 by robertogreco
STREET WITH A VIEW: a project by Robin Hewlett & Ben Kinsley
"Street With A View introduces fiction, both subtle and spectacular, into the doppelganger world of Google Street View. On May 3rd 2008, artists Robin Hewlett and Ben Kinsley invited the Google Inc. Street View team and residents of Pittsburgh’s Northside to collaborate on a series of tableaux along Sampsonia Way. Neighbors, and other participants from around the city, staged scenes ranging from a parade and a marathon, to a garage band practice, a seventeenth century sword fight, a heroic rescue and much more... Street View technicians captured 360-degree photographs of the street with the scenes in action and integrated the images into the Street View mapping platform. This first-ever artistic intervention in Google Street View made its debut on the web in November of 2008."
streetview  google  literature  performance  googlemaps  googlestreetview  newmedia  design  art  culture  cities  mapping  street  storytelling  maps  intervention  pittsburgh 
november 2008 by robertogreco
MeetWays - Find a point of interest between two given addresses - Lets Meet!
"Meetways.com was created to allow users to find a point of interest between two addresses. Let's say you need to meet a friend or client for lunch on the other side of town? Meetways.com ways will allow you to enter both addresses and the type of restaurant you are looking for and give you the exact halfway point and a list of restaurants in that area. Save hours trying to figure out the halfway point on a map and instead find it in one simple click!"
meetingplace  mapping  transportation  travel  maps  meetings  googlemaps  networking  social  halfway 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Nike Playmaker
"Take the hassle out of organising football." Smart move here by Nike, providing tools to make play easier.
football  nike  collaboration  groups  googlemaps  services  organization  management  messenging  sms  email  coordination  participatory  participation  play  sports 
october 2008 by robertogreco
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