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Feuilleton - Wikipedia
"Feuilleton (French pronunciation: ​[fœjtɔ̃]; a diminutive of French: feuillet, the leaf of a book) was originally a kind of supplement attached to the political portion of French newspapers, consisting chiefly of non-political news and gossip, literature and art criticism, a chronicle of the latest fashions, and epigrams, charades and other literary trifles. The feuilleton may be described as a "talk of the town",[1] and a contemporary English-language example of the form is the "Talk of the Town" section of The New Yorker.[2]

In English newspapers, the term "feuilleton" instead came to refer to an installment of a serial story printed in one part of a newspaper. The genre of the feuilleton in its French sense was eventually included in English newspapers, but was not referred to as a feuilleton.

In contemporary French, feuilleton takes on the definition of "soap opera," specifically ones aired for television.

German and Polish newspapers still use the term for their literary and arts sections.
The term feuilleton was invented by Julien Louis Geoffroy and Bertin the Elder, editors of the French Journal des Débats in 1800."
via:robinsonmeyer  feuilleton  words  french  soapopera  talkofthetown  newspapers  gossip  news 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Mediactive » Toward a Slow-News Movement
"Like many other people who've been burned by believing too quickly, I've learned to put almost all of what journalists call "breaking news" into the categories of gossip or, in the words of a scientist friend, "interesting if true." That is, even though I gobble up "the latest" from a variety of sources, the closer the information is in time to the actual event, the more I assume it's unreliable if not false.

It's my own version of "slow news" -- an expression I first heard on Friday, coined by my friend Ethan Zuckerman in a wonderful riff off the slow-food movement. We were at a Berkman Center for Internet & Society retreat in suburban Boston, in a group discussion of ways to improve the quality of what we know when we have so many sources from which to choose at every minute of the day... "

[via: http://www.boingboing.net/2009/11/08/slow-news-designing.html ]
slow  news  literacy  journalism  slownews  dangillmor  speed  quality  media  criticalthinking  online  realtime  gossip  ethanzuckerman 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Facts Prove No Match for Gossip, It Seems - New York Times
"Gossip also told people whom to trust, and the prospect of a bad reputation discouraged them from acting selfishly, so large groups could peacefully cooperate. At least, that was the theory: gossip promoted the “indirect reciprocity” that made human
gossip  human  behavior  society  reputation  trust  relationships  evolution  communication  facts 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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