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robertogreco : graduateschool   8

Data on Community College Grads Who Earn Graduate Degrees
"The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center this week released new data on the numbers of graduate and professional degree earners who first began their postsecondary studies at a community college."

Roughly one-in-five master's degree earns, 11 percent who earned doctoral degrees and 13 percent of professional degree earners originally began at a two-year college, found the center, which tracks the progress of almost all U.S. college students.

“Community college is typically viewed as a portal to the baccalaureate degree, but this study shows that it also helps many individuals access the lifelong employment benefits associated with a master’s or doctorate,” Suzanne Ortega, president of the Council of Graduate Schools, said in a written statement. “I hope this study will inspire new strategies for helping community college students chart a path to graduate school.”

[via: http://2017trends.hackeducation.com/2017/12/16/more-for-profits ]
communitycolleges  data  2017  colleges  universities  highered  highereducation  gradschool  graduateschool  education 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: STEM It Up, Kids!
"John Skylar [http://www.johnskylar.com/post/107416685924/a-career-in-science-will-cost-you-your-firstborn ]:
"I hate science." In six years of graduate school, this has to be the phrase I’ve heard most frequently from my colleagues.

People who have dedicated their lives to science.

People who made a decision when they were about 16 years old to focus on science, who went through four years of undergrad and an average 6 years of graduate school, and 4-10 more years of training.

People who’ve spent every moment since 2000 entirely dedicated to making new facts using the scientific process.

"I hate science." Why this instead of, "I love science?"

Frankly, everything about the career, the business of science, is constructed to impoverish and disenfranchise young scientists, delaying the maturation of their careers beyond practicality.

You'd think it would be a bit easier to find science teachers among all the people bailing out of academic science careers."
science  stem  2015  johnskylar  education  research  tomhoffman  academia  careers  graduateschool  purpose  disenfranchisement  practicality  abuse 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Something About How Steve Roggenbuck's Poetry Will Save the Internet
[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Roggenbuck ]

"Twenty-six-year-old Roggenbuck, a self-declared “internet poet,” is the antidote. Since 2010 Roggenbuck has been an obsessive user of Twitter, Facebook and multiple Tumblrs, but his best work is his YouTube videos. In these videos, he spews hysterical riffs and one-liners of wildly varying comprehensibility to a camera he points at himself, usually to the backing of an exhilarating electronic soundtrack, usually somewhere beautiful outside.

His most popular video is "make something beautiful before you are dead." I first saw it two years ago on a friend’s Tumblr and I was struck by Roggenbuck's raw vlogger solipsism, which would be grating if it weren’t backed up by equally raw virtuosity. The video starts quietly. Roggenbuck's in a room, affecting a piercing nasal midwestern twang as he muses to the camera about how he's "going to find the best deal."

It's a parody of every boring YouTube video blog you've seen, which Roggenbuck sets up only to explode seconds later in a dizzying epiphany. Suddenly he's outside in the woods, still holding his camera, popping out from bushes, shouting "two words, Jackass: Dog the Bounty Hunter," swinging an enormous tree branch and berating a dead tree stump for not being alive. Roggenbuck appears to have just broken out from a dark basement where he'd been imprisoned from a young age, raised entirely on AOL chatrooms, reality TV and Monster Energy Drinks. He's exhilaratingly callous about his own body, holding his camera inches from face despite a pretty intense outbreak of acne, at times so excited by his own words that the camera jerks crazily up and down with every cheesy self-help exhortation. When Roggenbuck yells "Get me in control of ABC Family and I will fuck this country up" while sprinting through a drizzly field to a dubstep soundtrack you feel like you're watching neurons firing and forging strange connections in real time. It's a selfie of the soul.

As impressive as the video is the outpouring of adoration in comments under "make something beautiful before you are dead." Most YouTube comments are petri dishes of cutting-edge hate speech, but a community of ebullient Roggenbuck worshipers has turned his comments sections into a virtual self-help seminar."



"Steve Roggenbuck would horrify the Jonathan Franzens of the world. Poetry is supposed to be serious and introspective—the opposite of the superficial, buzzing, electronic hellscape that critics imagine the internet to be. According Roggenbuck’s own creation myth, he's a product of that polarity: As an MFA student, he began to focus on the internet after one of his instructors commented on his misspelled, dashed-off-seeming poems, "save this for your blog." (He dropped out of the MFA program.)

But "save this for your blog" isn't quite the insult an MFA professor might image. New York Times economics columnist Paul Krugman (!) recently wrote about how poetry was once passed among networks of elites, "allow[ing] people both to discuss sensitive topics elliptically and to demonstrate their cleverness." Elliptical demonstrations of cleverness: Imagine what they would have thought of Tumblr! And the internet is more than just a staging ground—it's a huge source of inspiration and material for young artists, poets, technologists and writers.



Anyone who wants to understand the internet generation would do well to pay attention to Roggenbuck's oeuvre. It can be hard to get past Roggenbuck's aggressive naivety and goofy schtick, which can come across like the twee mirror to the strident net freedom diatribes of Wikileaks fanatics and hacktvists. You could say he's way too uncritical about the incentives embedded in the technologies he uses—created by huge corporations whose exact goal is to encourage the sharing he craves—and how that might negatively affect his work. But this is just to point out that are as many flaws in the the structures of the internet as there are in the people embedded in them. The best of Roggenbuck's work shows there's equally as much promise."

[See also: http://htmlgiant.com/author-spotlight/ultimately-beautiful-an-interview-with-steve-roggenbuck/

NC: Why did you drop out of your MFA program?

SR: i think if my life conditions were different, i never would have gone. i never had any illusons that it was going to magicaly transform my writeing, or that teaching was the perfect career fit for me. after undergrad i was in a long-term relationship, and we were planning to have a family in the next ~5 years. i felt like i needed to pursue a “career” that would bring in an income big enough to support a family. but i am also very stubborn about doing what i want with my tiem. i hate having a job, last year i maxed out my credit cards instead of getting a summer job. the mfa was kind of a compromise between what i really wanted (to be an artist all the time) and what was expected of me (standard middle-class career path)

i gained some things from my mfa experience.. i now have an acute awareness of what i don’t like about academic/lit culture, for exampel. i started fully embraceing my identity as an “internet poet” only after my workshop teacher left me a condescending comment on my poem, “save this stuff for your blog.” with my misspellings too, i was fueled by my teacher’s disapproval

i never really liked the progam too much, but when my long-term relationship ended, i felt like i finaly had other options. i could live with my dad for free (or with various friends, as i eventualy decided), or i could at least split rent with more roommates in a cheaper neighborhood, without bothering/disappointing my partner

also my school started grating on me in more fundamental ways this past fall. my core audience is not poets in academia.. so why should i be seeking feedback from (only) poets in academia? i would get comments from my teachers, for example discouraging my misspellings, and i would kind of just dismiss them because i know they arent realy my main audience. but if i they’re not my audience, why am i asking for their feedback in the frist place? the feedback ive gotten from friends online has been much more valuable" ]

[More: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/11/is-this-loud-youtube-loving-poet-the-bard-of-the-internet/281189/ ]
via:timmaly  steveroggenbuck  poetry  internet  twitter  socalmedia  mfa  youtube  writing  reading  spelling  teaching  learning  graduateschool  highered  highereducation  literature  jonathanfranzen  daveeggers  kennethgoldsmith  piotrczerki  youth  life  living  thoreau  waltwhitman  yolo  commenting  video  literacy  schooliness  creativity  education 
november 2013 by robertogreco
THNK Amsterdam School for Creative Leadership
"mission: develop a new breed of creative leaders who transcend disciplines & co-create to solve real world challenges & generate unexpected innovations.

…students will learn how to effectively lead organizations through uncertainty & constant change using divergent thinking…faculty will go 1 step further by encouraging them to actively seek ‘no comfort’ zones to trigger creativity, discover new possibilities beyond status quo & learn a whole lot about themselves in process.

We’ll challenge them to tackle big, difficult issues related to business, creativity, technology & governance while developing key creative leadership skills:

multi-disciplinary approaches to exploring issues from different & even contradictory perspectives;empathy in order to understand what people think, do & feel;prototyping & hands-on experimentation;mastery of cutting edge technologies; &ability to push through business & societal change.

…first 4-month, full-time program in Sept 2011."
amsterdam  education  creativity  design  entrepreneurship  experimentation  prototyping  designthinking  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  leadership  alternative  altgdp  graduateschool  governance  innovation  business  lcproject  basverhart  learning  picnic 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Doctoral degrees: The disposable academic: Why doing a PhD is often a waste of time | The Economist
"Many of those who embark on a PhD are the smartest in their class and will have been the best at everything they have done. They will have amassed awards and prizes. As this year’s new crop of graduate students bounce into their research, few will be willing to accept that the system they are entering could be designed for the benefit of others, that even hard work and brilliance may well not be enough to succeed, and that they would be better off doing something else. They might use their research skills to look harder at the lot of the disposable academic. Someone should write a thesis about that." [via: http://ayjay.tumblr.com/post/2375320461/many-of-those-who-embark-on-a-phd-are-the-smartest ]
graduateschool  education  academia  labor  economics  phd  competition 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Graduate School in the Humanities: Just Don't Go - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"most prospective graduate students have given little thought to what will happen to them after they complete their doctorates...assume that everyone finds a decent position somewhere, even if it's "only" at a community college (expressed with a shudder). Besides, the completion of graduate school seems impossibly far away, so their concerns are mostly focused on the present...It's hard to tell young people that universities recognize that their idealism & energy — & lack of information — are an exploitable resource. For universities, the impact of graduate programs on the lives of those students is an acceptable externality, like dumping toxins into a river. If you cannot find a tenure-track position, your university will no longer court you; it will pretend you do not exist and will act as if your unemployability is entirely your fault. It will make you feel ashamed, & you will probably just disappear, convinced it's right rather than that the game was rigged from the beginning."
education  gradschool  humanities  academia  capitalism  advice  tips  phd  teaching  future  academics  jobs  reality  graduateschool  learning  unschooling  deschooling  society  hierarchy  exploitation  universities  colleges  thomasbenton 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Contributor - End the University as We Know It - NYTimes.com
"Abolish permanent departments, even for undergraduate education & create problem-focused programs. These constantly evolving programs would have sunset clauses & every 7 years each one should be evaluated & either abolished, continued or significantly changed. It is possible to imagine a broad range of topics around which such zones of inquiry could be organized: Mind, Body, Law, Information, Networks, Language, Space, Time, Media, Money, Life and Water. ... a Water program ... more pressing problem than oil ... pose significant scientific, technological and ecological difficulties as well as serious political & economic challenges. ... would bring together people in the humanities, arts, social & natural sciences w/ representatives from professional schools like medicine, law, business, engineering, social work, theology & architecture. Through the intersection of multiple perspectives & approaches, new theoretical insights will develop & unexpected practical solutions will emerge."
education  interdisciplinary  gradschool  colleges  universities  problemsolving  gamechanging  reform  change  tcsnmy  learning  deschooling  humanities  academia  tenure  collaboration  curriculum  disciplines  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  interdepartmental  graduateschool 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Marginal Revolution: Does graduate school performance predict job placement?
"In my time, twenty years ago, foreign-trained students are more likely to have already seen the core material. It may also be that many elite, non-U.S. educational systems are better geared toward producing good grades than producing independent research
economics  education  science  graduateschool  altgdp  colleges  universities  success  performance  research 
january 2007 by robertogreco

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