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Isabel Rodríguez on Twitter: "The most important goal of any person working with children should be doing no harm. The most important goal of any teacher preparation program should be about unlearning violence, disrespect, prejudices and abuse of power a
"The most important goal of any person working with children should be doing no harm. The most important goal of any teacher preparation program should be about unlearning violence, disrespect, prejudices and abuse of power against children. Everything else is secondary.

With enough willingness and some help, we can learn almost anything we want at any age, but some emotional scars take a lifetime to heal and some never heal.

As I said once before, teachers' experiences and knowledge of students are limited, biased and fragmented. They didn't know them when they were just happy kids living life. They don't know what they are like when they are at home. They stop seeing them after they leave school.

And considering that our world's most threatening problems have not much to do with lack of knowledge, but much to do with power imbalances, violence, lack of empathy, alienation, property rights, and the commodification of human beings...

The emphasis of conventional schools on having well managed classrooms and making children learn is shortsighted and misguided.

If anything, schools should be about communities where children are allowed to co-exist as equals and where they are given access to the resources they need in order to learn for their own purposes and on their own terms, not those of the structures seeking to exploit them.

And if our main concern is social justice, schools could be meeting places, places of discussion, places of access to information, places of access to learning resources that most people would not be able to afford on their own.

However, the maintenance of strong hierarchies and attempts to control what children should learn and how they should behave are contradictory to the notion of wanting create a world of equals were people are not treated as tools or commodities for someone else's purposes.

In fact, if we were truly serious about social justice, schools would be open to their communities, people could keep attending school throughout their lives as fellow learners or fellow teachers, and schools would transcend their walls. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkiX7R1-kaY

It is only in an unequal world in which we are valued in terms of the economic value we produce, in which we are disposable, and in which many are deemed arbitrarily as undeserving or useless...

that we learn to think of ourselves as something with a useful life, an expiration date and in need of a certificate or letter of acceptance...

that countless human beings are forced to obtain a diagnosis in order to be able to exercise some of their most basic rights...
The right to learn differently should be a universal human right that’s not mediated by a diagnosis. http://boren.blog/2018/07/29/the-right-to-learn-differently-should-be-a-universal-human-right-thats-not-mediated-by-a-diagnosis/

It is only in a world in which competition, scarcity and exclusion are normalized that we learn to think of learning as something happening exclusively within schools' walls in which there is not enough space or enough money for everyone to attend.

It is only in a world in which competition, scarcity and exclusion are normalized that we learn to think that assigning grades and sorting children is okay."
isabelrodríguez  sfsh  schools  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  hierarchy  horizontality  community  lcproject  openstudioproject  agesegregation  2018  rynboren  mitchaltman  hackerspaces  makerspaces  dignity  parenting  children  power  control  exploitation  coercion  race  racism  prejudice  abuse  empathy  alienation  labor  work  capitalism  solidarity  propertyrights  commodification  humanrights  humans  learning  howwelearn  school  schooliness 
july 2018 by robertogreco
La Scuola Open Source: Education and Research for cultural, social and technological Innovation
"We’re a community of digital artisans, makers, artists, designers, programmers, pirates, dreamers and innovators. We act together, testing new research, teaching, mentoring, co-living practices and models. We are involved with: research for public and private interest; teaching for learners, freelancers and managers of all ages. We design social and technological innovation.

☛ Non-linear learning paths
☛ Learning by doing
☛ New professions & skills
☛ A sharing space to grow up"

[from: http://lascuolaopensource.xyz/en/manifesto

"La Scuola Open Source is a space dedicated to social and technological innovation, where to perform educational activities, cultural performances and research projects:

☛ A hackerspace, where people with shared interest in the fields of craftsmanship, technology, science, visual arts, poetry, editing, robotics, domotics, biology, electronics and more can gather, socialize and/or cooperate;

☛ A re-use promotion center where obsolete technology is collected with the aim of promoting their smart upcycling;

☛ A FabLab: a small workshop offering customized digital fabrication services, equipped with a kit of fast prototyping tools (3d printing, laser cut, etc.)

♥ This opens up to new opportunities.

↓ We believe in

☆ Non-linearity
Founding principle of Plato’s accademia: “a free individual should not be forced, as a slave, to learn any discipline”, diametrically opposed to the monastic principle (and that of today’s school system), well represented by Benedict’s rule: “Speaking and teaching is a teacher’s job, staying silent and listening is what a disciple should do”.

☆ Co-design
Design as a “catalyst to collectively redefine our relationship with reality”, envisioning things for how they could be, altogether.

☆ Open work
The School’s structure allows us to build - by co-designing it - its teachings offering in an open way, allowing us to evolve each of its aspects with time.

☆ Multiverse
In modern physics, multiverse is a hypothesis postulating many co-existing universe beyond our space-time dimensions.

☆ Antifragility
The world around us is mutating and ever-changing. Upon this constant transformation we are building a model capable to adapt to mutations and making good of any erraticity and change happening. (N.Taleb, Antifragile).

☆ Learning by doing
We believe that teaching should be always combined with a continuous activity of research and exploration. Doing things and learning while doing, situational learning, are absolutely central in our vision and in the project we intend to realize.☆ Do it yourselfWe promote an alternative and aware approach to designing and production processes, stimulating self-production as a form of self-employment.

☆ Opensource
Open source, in its incremental logic, represents the blueprint for a collaborative, adaptive and recursive cultural system. We believe that such approach needs to be used in all fields of knowledge, so to enable possibilities for everyone.

☆ Hacker ethics
Linux’s big innovation was not the Operating System, but the open social dynamic that was set up to make that project happen.

☆ Sharing
We welcome people, ideas and projects to share space, knowledge and values. Through a constant and mutual exchange, both a collective consciousness and a better informative quality can be quickly developed.

☆ Osmosis
La Scuola Open Source intends to facilitate and generate osmotic processes between experiences and skills, aiming to increase everyone’s intrinsic value for the community.

↓ Our value proposition

☛ Access to future, a better one
We therefore need to train ourselves, learn by doing, fail, consult with others, cooperate, work on projects with a tangible impact on the real world.

☛ Customized and non-linear learning paths
We believe that people need to be pushed to ask questions, curiosity being the engine of progress. We therefore want to apply the open source approach to humanities as well, promoting a transversal and peer-to-peer approach to the learning topic.

☛ Spaces for social aggregation to learn in a cooperative context
It is necessary to restore sharing spaces and practices, re-discovering the ability to build relationships and team up to achieve common objectives, leveraging on education and learning as vehicles for a social and economical renewing process. Spaces where to discover and cultivate curiosity, turning it into the engine to each one’s learning path, a self-built path within a virtuous system, providing input and stimula on several channels and levels.

☛ New professional figures
Tomorrow new jobs will rise, while others could disappear. Things change, therefore we need to change things. We have to reform this educational sector in a generative way, keeping in mind the context’s evolution into account and making it mutate within time, continuously adapting."
lcproject  openstudioproject  altgdp  learning  communities  community  design  pirates  nonlinear  learningbydoing  unschooling  deschooling  sharing  space  italy  glvo  italia  bari  non-linear  opensource  linux  osmosis  hacker  hackerethics  antifragility  multiverse  co-design  resuse  hackerspaces  art  technology  alinear  linearity 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Inside San Francisco's Anarchist Hackerspace - YouTube
"A quick visit to Noisebridge in San Francisco, one of the first and longest running hackerspaces in the US."

[See also:

"Inspired in part by the open source movement, public spaces are emerging where people congregate to share ideas, make cool projects, teach, and brainstorm with collaborators on everything from coding to cooking. With no leaders, they have one rule: "Be excellent to each other." Take a tour of the hackerspace Noisebridge, located in the heart of San Francisco's Mission District, with co-founder Mitch Altman."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wamwklXWK4M

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noisebridge
https://twitter.com/noisebridge
https://www.yelp.com/biz/noisebridge-san-francisco ]

[https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/Community_Standards

"The first principle of Noisebridge is to be excellent to each other. We get a lot more specific in our anti-harassment policy, but there are a whole load of other social norms which keep Noisebridge a safe and happy place to work and learn.

Noisebridge's Vision attempts to avoid hard-and-fast rules. Many of these are guidelines, and rightly so. In the past, we've noticed that certain actions and behaviors are good for the space and other actions cause problems. This page exists to help you determine whether something you're considering is a good idea, and to help you work things out when reasonable people disagree.

Although we work together and attempt to ensure that this page reflects what we collectively think, it's not our formal consensus."

and

https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/Noisebridge_Vision#Excellence

"Tripartite Pillars

Excellence
Be excellent to each other is the guiding principle of Noisebridge. Wikipedia uses a somewhat similar rule, which they call "the fundamental rule of all social spaces. Every other policy for getting along is a special case of it." Unlike Wikipedia, Noisebridge takes a positive approach, and avoids the practice of officially enumerating the myriad potential special cases; "be excellent" is enough.

Consensus
We make official Noisebridge decisions by consensus, which means the willing consent of all of our members. Decisions are typically made at our weekly meetings or via our online management venues, and items proposed for consensus are announced at least a week in advance to give everyone time to hear about them. Conceivably, members could block by proxy if they are unable to attend or if they wish to block anonymously. // More information on the Consensus Process. [https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/Consensus_Process ]

Do-ocracy
Doing excellent stuff at Noisebridge does not require permission or an official consensus decision. If you're uncertain about the excellence of something you want to do, you should ask someone else what they think."

also

"Noisebridge is a space for sharing, creation, collaboration, research, development, mentoring, and of course, learning. Noisebridge is also more than a physical space; it's a community with roots extending around the world.

For we're excellent to each other here
We rarely ever block
We value tools over pre-emptive rules
And spurn the key and the lock.
— Danny O'Brien, 2010-11-09 general meeting notes

We make stuff. So can you."]
noisebridge  sanfrancisco  electronics  hacking  hackerspaces  communitystandards  classideas  openstudioproject  lcproject 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Oscillator | On Democratization
"In the early 1970’s, several Dutch universities created “science shops” (wetenschapswinkels) with the aim of democratizing science. The science shops connected public interest groups who had scientific questions with university students and researchers who could provide answers. Opening access to university research would help activist groups achieve their goals, and would also have an impact on the universities themselves. In an essay for the journal Science, Technology & Human Values, Joseph Wachelder writes about the more radical goals of the science shops early on:
The democratization of science in fact implied a general and even radical transformation of society. The aim was to reorient science toward the social needs of workers and disadvantaged groups and to fight the vested interest of the establishment and the so-called military-industrial complex. In those early days, the political Left pushed science shops as one means of transforming both science and society in radical ways. Unions, targeting issues such as occupational health, social security, and working conditions; environmentalists; patients’ groups; third-world activists; and, slightly later, women’s liberation groups considered themselves as partners in pursuit of a new and better society.
I read about the science shops for the first time over the holidays in Making Genes, Making Waves, Jon Beckwith’s autobiography about his research in molecular biology and his political activism. Given the current fad for “democratizing science” I was surprised that I’d never heard them mentioned before.


Indeed, today’s democratization looks a lot different from the democratization pushed by science shops and radical science movements of the 70s. Science for the People, an activist group of scientists and engineers founded in the early 1970s, organized against the misuse of science by military and corporate interests and advocated that science work for marginalized people rather than maintaining the status quo. A powerful symbol for the group was a fist raised in solidarity next to a hand holding a flask. Alice Bell notes in a recent article on activist science that, “The fist of solidarity stood in front of the chemist’s flask here, not simply used to hold science up high.”

[image]

Compare that with Science for the People, a Canadian radio program about science, which rebranded in 2013 from “Skeptically Speaking.” Their logo echoes the Science for the People cover image from 1970, but here the fist holds up a test tube—literally holding science up high. In a blog post about their rebrand, the producers discuss what “science for the people” means to them:
We’re about getting the word of something we love to people who might not hear about it anywhere else, in the hopes that maybe, just maybe, they’ll love it a little too. We’re about taking tough scientific concepts and teasing out what matters. We’re about taking the latest in scientific progress and relate it to people like our friends and our families, and our communities, and our society.


[image]

Telling people about your love for science is great, but as Bell notes (referring to the flask-toting fist on the cover of the Geek Manifesto), “Looking back at these earlier radicals, [it] seems to pale to a Che Guevara T-shirt in comparison.”

Other efforts seem similarly pale when you begin to examine their claims about democratization in light of what democratization meant to more political generations of scientists. Like the Science for the People radio program, many of these efforts are focused on the one-way transmission of science from the academy to the public, rather than a radical transformation of science itself to address public interests.

Open access publishing has made it easier to publish and read scientific articles, and is gradually (hopefully) chipping away at the tyranny of the impact factor in academic career advancement. These are worthy goals which I support whole-heartedly—I’ve published most of my papers in open access journals—but making papers open to download doesn’t necessarily make science democratic and open to everyone.

Likewise, recent efforts to get more people involved in scientific research have been branded “citizen science,” but unlike the science shops where the citizens dictated research directions, citizen science projects simply allow non-scientists to volunteer their time collecting or analyzing data for professional researchers. These projects can be great learning experiences, allowing non-scientists to get a better picture of the scientific process, as well as great research experiences, allowing scientists to explore topics that they couldn’t have done without the expanded team. But letting people do free work for you isn’t the same as doing work for people.

In synthetic biology, “democratization” has recently been used as a marketing ploy for companies that are selling DNA or DNA editing software. Cambrian Genomics and Genome Compiler both claim to “democratize creation,” an empty statement that helps drive press coverage and TED invitations in the crowded genetic engineering market. Both companies are selling slightly different, cheaper, or easier to use versions of things that have been sold to molecular biologists for decades, but claiming that their versions will suddenly make it possible for “anyone” to do genetic engineering. Making cheaper and more accessible laboratory tools is great, but it’s worth asking what else is necessary to truly make “creation” accessible (I’m not going to get into the differences between synthesizing DNA and “creating life” here, but suffice it to say that I don’t agree with that part of their phrasing either). There are many other tools, training, and above all a reason to do it that are all necessary in order to make a “creature.” It’s no surprise then that, according to SF Gate, Cambrian currently sells DNA primarily to biotech giants like Roche, GlaxoSmithKline, and Thermo Fisher. If you don’t work to really democratize science, you’re just making cheaper tools for the people who already had access to them. (Also hype, lots of hype.)

[image]

The contemporary projects that seems most like the 70s Dutch science shops are today’s hackerspaces and community labs, where non-expert scientists can explore techno-scientific questions on their own time (and usually on their own dime). While there are a huge variety of projects and educational goals in these spaces, a particular kind of “hacker” has gone mainstream (and even received DARPA funding). Tinkering in a garage is now seen as the first step towards starting the next multibillion dollar Silicon Valley company. Hackerspaces can be the site of anti-establishment thinking, but they are also becoming part of the military-industrial complex.

None of these projects are necessarily bad. By and large, they all point towards a broader positive shift happening in the scientific community towards more transparency, accountability, diversity, and public involvement. But we shouldn’t let something as important as democratization become an empty label. We need to be critical of self-proclaimed democratizers—who is benefitting and who remains left out? Who is calling the shots and who is working for whom? Where does the money come from? How can we do science better?"
christinaagapakis  democratization  science  history  politics  1920s  netherlands  wetenschapswinkels  scienceshops  canada  scientificallyspeaking  transmission  citizenscience  scientificprocess  learning  education  accessibility  hackerspaces  communitylabs  labs  laboratories  darpa  tinkering  makerspaces 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Library as Infrastructure
"For millennia libraries have acquired resources, organized them, preserved them and made them accessible (or not) to patrons. But the forms of those resources have changed — from scrolls and codices; to LPs and LaserDiscs; to e-books, electronic databases and open data sets. Libraries have had at least to comprehend, if not become a key node within, evolving systems of media production and distribution. Consider the medieval scriptoria where manuscripts were produced; the evolution of the publishing industry and book trade after Gutenberg; the rise of information technology and its webs of wires, protocols and regulations. 1 At every stage, the contexts — spatial, political, economic, cultural — in which libraries function have shifted; so they are continuously reinventing themselves and the means by which they provide those vital information services.

Libraries have also assumed a host of ever-changing social and symbolic functions. They have been expected to symbolize the eminence of a ruler or state, to integrally link “knowledge” and “power” — and, more recently, to serve as “community centers,” “public squares” or “think tanks.” Even those seemingly modern metaphors have deep histories. The ancient Library of Alexandria was a prototypical think tank, 2 and the early Carnegie buildings of the 1880s were community centers with swimming pools and public baths, bowling alleys, billiard rooms, even rifle ranges, as well as book stacks. 3 As the Carnegie funding program expanded internationally — to more than 2,500 libraries worldwide — secretary James Bertram standardized the design in his 1911 pamphlet “Notes on the Erection of Library Buildings,” which offered grantees a choice of six models, believed to be the work of architect Edward Tilton. Notably, they all included a lecture room.

In short, the library has always been a place where informational and social infrastructures intersect within a physical infrastructure that (ideally) supports that program.

Now we are seeing the rise of a new metaphor: the library as “platform” — a buzzy word that refers to a base upon which developers create new applications, technologies and processes. In an influential 2012 article in Library Journal, David Weinberger proposed that we think of libraries as “open platforms” — not only for the creation of software, but also for the development of knowledge and community. 4 Weinberger argued that libraries should open up their entire collections, all their metadata, and any technologies they’ve created, and allow anyone to build new products and services on top of that foundation. The platform model, he wrote, “focuses our attention away from the provisioning of resources to the foment” — the “messy, rich networks of people and ideas” — that “those resources engender.” Thus the ancient Library of Alexandria, part of a larger museum with botanical gardens, laboratories, living quarters and dining halls, was a platform not only for the translation and copying of myriad texts and the compilation of a magnificent collection, but also for the launch of works by Euclid, Archimedes, Eratosthenes and their peers."



"Partly because of their skill in reaching populations that others miss, libraries have recently reported record circulation and visitation, despite severe budget cuts, decreased hours and the threatened closure or sale of “underperforming” branches. 9 Meanwhile the Pew Research Center has released a series of studies about the materials and services Americans want their libraries to provide. Among the findings: 90 percent of respondents say the closure of their local public library would have an impact on their community, and 63 percent describe that impact as “major.”"



"Again, we need to look to the infrastructural ecology — the larger network of public services and knowledge institutions of which each library is a part. How might towns, cities and regions assess what their various public (and private) institutions are uniquely qualified and sufficiently resourced to do, and then deploy those resources most effectively? Should we regard the library as the territory of the civic mind and ask other social services to attend to the civic body? The assignment of social responsibility isn’t so black and white — nor are the boundaries between mind and body, cognition and affect — but libraries do need to collaborate with other institutions to determine how they leverage the resources of the infrastructural ecology to serve their publics, with each institution and organization contributing what it’s best equipped to contribute — and each operating with a clear sense of its mission and obligation."



"Libraries need to stay focused on their long-term cultural goals — which should hold true regardless of what Google decides to do tomorrow — and on their place within the larger infrastructural ecology. They also need to consider how their various infrastructural identities map onto each other, or don’t. Can an institution whose technical and physical infrastructure is governed by the pursuit of innovation also fulfill its obligations as a social infrastructure serving the disenfranchised? What ethics are embodied in the single-minded pursuit of “the latest” technologies, or the equation of learning with entrepreneurialism?

As Zadie Smith argued beautifully in the New York Review of Books, we risk losing the library’s role as a “different kind of social reality (of the three dimensional kind), which by its very existence teaches a system of values beyond the fiscal.” Barbara Fister, a librarian at Gustavus Adolphus College, offered an equally eloquent plea for the library as a space of exception:
Libraries are not, or at least should not be, engines of productivity. If anything, they should slow people down and seduce them with the unexpected, the irrelevant, the odd and the unexplainable. Productivity is a destructive way to justify the individual’s value in a system that is naturally communal, not an individualistic or entrepreneurial zero-sum game to be won by the most industrious.


Libraries, she argued, “will always be at a disadvantage” to Google and Amazon because they value privacy; they refuse to exploit users’ private data to improve the search experience. Yet libraries’ failure to compete in efficiency is what affords them the opportunity to offer a “different kind of social reality.” I’d venture that there is room for entrepreneurial learning in the library, but there also has to be room for that alternate reality where knowledge needn’t have monetary value, where learning isn’t driven by a profit motive. We can accommodate both spaces for entrepreneurship and spaces of exception, provided the institution has a strong epistemic framing that encompasses both. This means that the library needs to know how to read itself as a social-technical-intellectual infrastructure."



"In libraries like BiblioTech — and the Digital Public Library of America — the collection itself is off-site. Do patrons wonder where, exactly, all those books and periodicals and cloud-based materials live? What’s under, or floating above, the “platform”? Do they think about the algorithms that lead them to particular library materials, and the conduits and protocols through which they access them? Do they consider what it means to supplant bookstacks with server stacks — whose metal racks we can’t kick, lights we can’t adjust, knobs we can’t fiddle with? Do they think about the librarians negotiating access licenses and adding metadata to “digital assets,” or the engineers maintaining the servers? With the increasing recession of these technical infrastructures — and the human labor that supports them — further off-site, behind the interface, deeper inside the black box, how can we understand the ways in which those structures structure our intellect and sociality?

We need to develop — both among library patrons and librarians themselves — new critical capacities to understand the distributed physical, technical and social architectures that scaffold our institutions of knowledge and program our values. And we must consider where those infrastructures intersect — where they should be, and perhaps aren’t, mutually reinforcing one another. When do our social obligations compromise our intellectual aspirations, or vice versa? And when do those social or intellectual aspirations for the library exceed — or fail to fully exploit — the capacities of our architectural and technological infrastructures? Ultimately, we need to ensure that we have a strong epistemological framework — a narrative that explains how the library promotes learning and stewards knowledge — so that everything hangs together, so there’s some institutional coherence. We need to sync the library’s intersecting infrastructures so that they work together to support our shared intellectual and ethical goals."
shannonmattern  2014  libraries  infrastructure  access  accessibility  services  government  civics  librarians  information  ethics  community  makerspaces  privacy  safety  learning  openstudioproject  education  lcproject  zadiesmith  barbarafister  seattle  nyc  pittsburgh  culture  google  neoliberalism  knowledge  diversity  inequality  coworking  brooklyn  nypl  washingtondc  architecture  design  hackerlabs  hackerspaces  annebalsamo  technology  chicago  ncsu  books  mexicocity  mexicodf  davidadjaye  social  socialinfrastructure  ala  intellectualfreedom  freedom  democracy  publicgood  public  lifelonglearning  saltlakecity  marellusturner  partnerships  toyoito  refuge  cities  ericklinenberg  economics  amazon  disparity  mediaproduction  readwrite  melvildewey  df 
december 2014 by robertogreco
unMonastery: Matera
"“When it comes to work it is increasingly difficult to reconcile making money with making sense. People do work to make a living. Others do work to make meaning. But the two works are not the same work.”

The unMonastery is an ambitious and radical response to the challenge of bridging this gap. It draws inspiration from the 10th century monastic life to encourage radical forms of social innovation and collaboration. A sort of lay, off-grid mendicant order striving for a society that can better withstand present and future systemic crises.

This place-based social innovation, is aimed at addressing the interlinked needs of empty space, unemployment and depleting social services by embedding committed, skilled individuals within communities that could benefit from their presence.

The unMonastery aims to develop a new kind of social space, akin to co-living and co-working spaces, drawing influence from both Monasteries and HackerSpaces, with a focus on the process of co-creation and co-learning between the community and unMonasterians.

At the core of the unMonastery concept is a desire to recreate the best social functions of the traditional monastery: by giving the participants a collective purpose, a chance to develop deep relationships with one another and a reduced need to generate personal income so time can be dedicated entirely to serving the local community and contributing to global efforts in creating new digital tools.

At-A-Glance
• The unMonastery is a non-profit project that aims to challenge existing dependency chains and economic fictions.
• The unMonastery was developed in collaboration with EdgeRyders LBG, over the course of 18 months. • Edgeryders started out as a project by the Council of Europe and the European Commission, which after termination developed into an international community run social enterprise.
• The unMonastery as a whole is defined by the place in which unMonasterians gather - and is not tied to a physical geographical location.
• The unMonastery aims to establish a network of spaces throughout the world, which will work together but autonomously to prototype new solutions to common problems.
• The unMonastery is heavily indebted to the concept of HackerSpaces and borrows parts of the model to build an outward facing space that engages closely with its local community."

[See also: http://unmonastery.org ]
unmonastery  money  society  hackerspaces  monasteries  socialinnovation  community  communities  collectivism 
august 2014 by robertogreco
3-D print your way to freedom and prosperity | Al Jazeera America
"The appeal of this movement is readily apparent. What’s not to like with a revolution that — according to tech gurus, media and politicians alike — is seemingly so democratizing, empowering and profitable?

But there’s a downside, too. The maker movement is born out of, and contributes to, the individualistic, market-based society that has become dominant in our time. More specifically, the movement fits well into what, nearly 20 years ago, the media theorists Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron called “the Californian Ideology.” According to this view, new technologies promise to create a class of high-tech entrepreneurs thanks to their ability to “empower the individual, enhance personal freedom and radically reduce the power of the nation-state.” All while allowing them to ignore or simply design their own way around the established political, economic and legal system. And thus clearing the way for the “unfettered interactions between autonomous individuals and their software” that perpetuate, rather than disrupt, that very system.

Makers and takers

The maker movement doesn’t, on the surface, appear to be particularly ideological. For those who lean to the right, the movement is representative of good old-fashioned economic values and entrepreneurial individualism. “Love the ‘makers,’ deride the ‘takers,’” goes their refrain. For progressives, the maker movement and its “hackerspaces” and “makerspaces” — workshops with tools and space for engaging in making — give an aura of grassroots community building and self-empowerment, from bowling alone (as political scientist Robert D. Putnam characterized our turn-of-the-century decline of social involvement) to making together. For libertarians, the maker movement fits into the common narrative of the “self-made man” who wields market power; only now self-making takes on a more literal meaning.

We’re not saying these elements don’t have kernels of truth to them. But this has led the maker movement to embrace a kind of naively apolitical, techno-economic, capitalist utopia that thrives on individualistic values and discounts the very public contributions to science, infrastructure and society that enable them to do what they do.

It’s not hard to see why so many different ideologies can incorporate the maker movement into their politics: It has one hell of a branding and marketing team. Maker Media — a spinoff company of O’Reilly Media, the technology publishing and conference empire — launched a widely circulated magazine, Make, produces the conference Maker Faire, and “also develops ‘getting started’ kits and books that are sold in its Maker Shed store as well as in retail channels.” All of this is in addition to glowing profiles in major outlets like BBC News."



"Maker technologies obscure the real labor and costs that are globally embedded in them. Today a small contingent experiences new opportunities to express itself creatively. But what emerges if this becomes the basis for a new economic development program? A society of makers would be one in which each worker internalizes the failings of the economic system by believing he or she is not sufficiently creative and ingenious. Others who fail can be assigned to this new class of noncreatives — again, “takers” instead of “makers.” And this is just for those with the privilege to try and claim a seat at the manufacturing table. What of the service workers today? Can maker ideology help, say, the hotel workers who struggle to keep their jobs? More likely, it becomes further cause for brushing aside labor issues, both domestic and abroad."



"There’s real collective democratic freedom to be gained from the maker movement. But it needs to shake off simplistic economic individualism and hypercapitalistic politics if makers want to represent a disruption of the existing economy. The interest by the White House illustrates how the maker community is less disruptive and more likely a new vein of social life to be incorporated in existing economic expansion. What the maker movement needs is to embrace more social views of the technologies’ potential — views oriented toward helping people do more than just play with tools and make personalized schlock."
3dprinting  culture  technology  ideology  californianideology  individualism  economics  society  2014  jathansadowski  paulmanson  policy  politics  markets  idealism  robertputman  sharonzukin  chrisanderson  corydoctorow  makers  makermovement  hackerspaces  makerspaces 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Mark Allen Artist Lecture on Vimeo
"The LA Times writes that Mark Allen is “Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of ‘The Anarchist Cookbook.’” Come hear a talk by Machine Project founder Mark Allen at the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry: Step right up!

Mark Allen is an artist, educator and curator based in Los Angeles. He is the founder and executive director of Machine Project, a non-profit performance and installation space investigating art, technology, natural history, science, music, literature, and food in an informal storefront in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Machine Project also operates as a loose confederacy of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under his direction Machine has produced shows with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, the Contemporary Art Museum St Louis, and the Walker Museum in Minneapolis. He has produced over 500 events in Los Angeles at the Machine Project storefront space, and recently concluded a year long artist residency addressing topics of public engagement at the Hammer Museum.

Machine Project events emphasize intersections between fields and practices, particularly where the arts and sciences meet. In a 2006 LA Weekly article, writer Gendy Alimurung described Machine Project as, “Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of ‘The Anarchist Cookbook.’ “[2] Machine Project facilitates conversations between poets, technicians, artists, scientists, and obscure hobbyists and supports work that arises out of unusual combinations of interests. Past activities have included urban plant foraging and needlepoint therapy based on classic oil paintings. Machine Project prioritizes accessibility, explicitly courting amateur practitioners and curious locals. Workshops are regularly offered in sewing electronics, soldering, Arduino and Processing for artists.

In addition to weekly events held in the storefront gallery space in Echo Park, Machine Project operates as a gathering place for local and visiting artists to produce shows at various cultural institutions and events in Los Angeles. Frequent collaborators include Brody Condon, Liz Glynn, Kamau Patton, Corey Fogel, Jason Torchinsky, Chris Kallmyer, and Adam Overton. Machine Project has curated performances at the Glow Festival at Santa Monica Pier and at several art museums. Through their Artist in Residence program, Machine Project invites previous collaborators to develop larger projects that generally include a pedagogical element in addition to performances and exhibitions.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the CMU School of Art."
markallen  collaboration  participatoryart  2013  poetry  art  lcproject  openstudioproject  capitalism  machineproject  events  learning  education  museums  howwelearn  arts  audience  process  howwework  experimentation  gender  curiosity  identity  titles  ambiguity  adaptability  makerspaces  hackerspaces  community  communitycenters  collectives  horizontality  organizations  flexibility  accessibility  humor  riskaversion  risk  institutions  failure  risktaking  curation 
july 2014 by robertogreco
“Education in Disguise”: Culture of a Hacker and Maker Space [eScholarship]
"Hacker and maker spaces (HMSs) are open-access workshops devoted to creative and technical work. Their growing numbers (over 500 worldwide) make them a significant grassroots movement supporting informal learning. Scholars have found pedagogical benefits of tinkering and hacking, but the cultural contexts from which these practices arise remain under-studied. How do members of hacker and maker spaces bring about personalized and collaborative learning? In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2011 and March 2012 with members of GeekSpace, a North American HMS. Findings suggest that the pragmatic attitude present in other hacker cultures served a similar uniting function in this space. Specifically, members encouraged learning and collaboration predominantly through a belief in materialities, particularly as GeekSpace's collective identity shifted from hacker to maker. Members altered the space to serve individual and collective goals rather than employing deliberation or strong organizational methods. Initially the group approached learning through lectures and solo problem-solving, which gave way to learning through hands-on work and peripheral participation on projects. Future avenues of research on HMSs include patterning across different sites, organizational practices and factors that inhibit participation. This article draws on interviews with HMS members to discuss how the spread of hacking and making has led to members forming loose organizations focused on informal learning and peer production."
hackerspaces  makerspaces  lcproject  openstudioproject  research  2014  andrewschrock  learning  education  howwelearn  tinkering  grassroots  constructivism  informallearning  collaboration  criticalmaking  mattratto  seymourpapert 
march 2014 by robertogreco
The Library of the Future Is Here - Brian Resnick - The Atlantic Cities
"The library as a warehouse of information is an outdated concept. The library of the 21st century is a community workshop, a hub filled with the tools of the knowledge economy.

"If we can't shine in this environment, in this economy, shame on us," says Corinne Hill, the director of library system in Chattanooga, Tennessee—a system that has thoroughly migrated into the current era.

The library of the 21st century still has books, but it also has 3-D printers, laser cutters, sewing machines, and spaces for conducting business meetings. It offers computer coding classes. It has advanced video- and audio-production software. All things that might and individual may find too expensive but can still benefit from using."

"Backus says libraries should find instruction in the evolution of the Internet—which started as a place to post static pages and now is a thoroughly collaborative environment. "There needs to be production capabilities for true access to happen," she says. "That means the ability to create a video, the ability to learn how to make a website, to have access to the software that can create these 3-D files."

And the library's initiatives aren't just for adults; the children and teen section now has videogames, button-makers, and a sewing machine."



"As information has become easier to access, libraries are smart to bolster their physical spaces to stay relevant. And Chattanooga isn't the only city that has adopted this philosophy. The Martin Luther King Library in Washington, D.C., for instance, has a "Digital Commons," equipped with 3-D printers and a bookbinding machine. But libraries also adapt to the needs and interests of their communities. A library in Overland Park, Kan., last year offered a popular seminar in hog-butchering.

Libraries are especially apt to increase their relevance in the coming years, considering the rise of the "sharing economy," a concept arguably invented by the first libraries. The sharing economy means that instead of owning things outright, people pay to use them only when needed. Think Zipcar and Citi Bike as prime examples.

Recently, the Pew Research Center found that 90 percent of Americans would be upset if their local library closed. But the survey also found "52% of Americans say that people do not need public libraries as much as they used to because they can find most information on their own."

That's why libraries need to adapt. People want them—but want them to be better. Instead of a warehouse of information, libraries need tools for use by the commons—a Netflix of things.  

"We've been in the information business for 3,000 years," Hill says, waxing philosophical on the role of the librarian in society. "If there's anything we do well, it's deliver information, and information is knowledge. I think if anybody is positioned to help build workers for this new information age, it is the library.""
corinnehill  makerspaces  making  libraries  brianresnick  chattanooga  megbackus  hackerspaces  openstudioproject  learning  howwelearn  internet  sharing  sharingeconomy  commons  lcproject  2014 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Minimum Viable Artwork | Feral Research Coalition
"That established cultural institutions are having a hard time relating to art and culture made with contemporary technology is painfully apparent. That they want to remedy this by turning towards the incubator model only shows how desperately regressive they are."



"It is unlikely that any of the artists featured in the exhibitions I mentioned above will be found writing Python code over a cafe midnight at Ritual (unless it’s their day job) because, for the most part, in the ecosystem of the artists I admire who are chasing the meat of art and tech, there couldn’t be three institutions less relevant than New York’s major museums, startup culture and (since I’m barbecuing sacred cows): hacker spaces.

This is not to say that these institutions are inherently evil or bad at what they do, it’s just to say that they are at best not particularly relevant to art production and at worst unintentionally destructive. In all cases this has mostly to do with their formal positions with regards to the dreaded market.

Major museums may wish to have a broad cultural mission and many even succeed on occasion, but they exist largely to condense, wash, clean, process and present the dirty fucked-up art world for preservation and trade. They are in the packaging business. If an artwork appears in MoMA it has been dipped in preservative and the edges have been filed off. This doesn’t mean it isn’t delicious, but Hostess isn’t your neighborhood bakery (which, in any case, is still a business and nothing at all like your grandmother’s home cooking). Museums, while occasionally flying the flag of the freaky creative class, have more in common with financial institutions than artist studios. (Quick: name one heist film that featured burgling a working artist)."



"In the end I don’t want to specifically criticize the New Museum’s venture because I believe it’s a symptom rather than the disease. We have come to believe that art and technology are somehow the same thing, just as we have internalized the idea that creative success and financial success are equivalent.

Art as I know it is messy, complicated, dirty, scary and sharp. It causes problems and fails to measure up and resists categorization. It generates failure. It wastes time and money. It burns through cash and it doesn’t say why.

Museums are archives and represent the endpoint of work, not the wellspring of creativity. If an artwork has solidified out of this primordial state it is not because it represents the “cutting edge” it is because it is finished. As Dave Hickey says: “Whatever happy contingencies fluttered around it disperse, as it departs society and enters “the culture,” where it must necessarily mean less, but to a lot more people. It’s spectator-food, now, scholar-fodder, so you may safely stick a fork in it, tell yourself you’ve won, and go to your room.”

I am not surprised that a major museum as a cultural actor is going to make a safe bet, in particular with regards to technology-based works which are notoriously risky and problematic as art objects. (“It worked five minutes ago” doesn’t fly well among preservationists or collectors). That most of the highly visible contemporary art and technology works currently being displayed are repeatable (if shallow) spectacles is not a major revelation, but it bears a hard look.

It bothers me that the last time I visited the New Museum I ducked into their auxiliary space to be confronted by Nathalie Djurbeg and Hans Berg’s delightfully weird Bird Parade. This was an artist and musician I had never heard of before, and I stayed until the guards kicked me out. Next time, a visit to the same space will require an NDA and likely revealing nothing more interesting than a bunch of white dudes pounding keyboards and energy drinks.

"It bothers me that the notion of artistic risk has been so de-fanged that it can be expressed only in terms of market risk (Serrano’s 1989 Piss Christ was both far more daring and far more beautiful than wasting series A funding, no matter how hot your photo sharing ap might be).

It bothers me that we even consider business strategy as a replacement for encouraging art production. I don’t anticipate the return of public arts funding for individual artists in the United States, but in a world of crowd funding filled with the likes of Kickstarter and Indiegogo and Bandcamp what the art world, (and in particular the art and tech field) needs are a lot fewer “startup incubators” and a lot more Awesome Foundations."

[via: https://twitter.com/matthewward/status/411041722739597313 ]

[See also: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303670804579236523526323820 ]
andrewsempere  inefficiency  newmuseum  davehickey  startupculture  kickstarter  indiegogo  bandcamp  awesomefoundation  2013  art  process  messiness  artproduction  diy  hackerspaces  incubators  culture  culturecreation  waste  time  money  markets  artmarket  finance  juliakaganskiy  artincubators  culturemaking  culturalproduction  andresserrano 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Medical Museion | Biohacking forside
"Medical Museion is currently hosting an open biohacking laboratory, pieced together from recycled furniture, IKEA cabinets, and cheap “hacked” instruments made by do-it-yourself biologists from BiologiGaragen and Hackteria. At a series of hands-on events and discussions, visitors are invited to step inside the world of practical biotechnology, and encounter the dreams and realities of open science.

This is an online version of the exhibition where you can also find photos, video and press coverage. Click on the titles below to explore:"
medicalmuseion  biohacking  ncmideas  hacking  events  openstudioproject  lcproject  hackerspaces  makerspaces  citizenscience  biologigarden  hackteria  biology  science  biotech  biotechnology 
august 2013 by robertogreco
A Hackerspace for Biology in San Diego » Bio, Tech and Beyond
"Bio, Tech and Beyond is an open innovation space dedicated to biology. We are a hybrid: part science educator, part biotech start up accelerator. Since we believe that people learn best by doing, our seminars and courses are complimented by wet labs where you can get your hands dirty and really understand how science works."

[See also: http://voiceofsandiego.org/2013/07/10/carlsbads-modern-day-land-grant/ ]
hackerspaces  makerspaces  biology  biotech  biotechnology  biotechandbeyond  carlsbad  openstudioproject  science  making  citizenscience 
july 2013 by robertogreco
RADical Design for LEARNING -- Survey Seminar and Practical Action Laboratory
"Wtf is going on? Why are people limping out of 20 years of schooling without directed motivation, a solid internal compass, or a commitment to passionately pursuing their interests? Let's examine why in a cozy, edgy, authentic seminar where we balance theory with real-world action (praxis). We'll study the radical learning greats such as Illich, Papert, and Llewelyn, with focused readings and videos followed by discussion. Whenever possible we'll try to have the authors or their direct students available for Q&A&Q. And through hands-on labs and projects we'll design and enact experience-based transformations, like improvised music, consciousness altering strategies, electronics workshops etc. We can't wait to see you realize your wonderful ideas!"
unschooling  deschooling  education  syllabus  jaysilver  ericrosenbaum  mit  learning  mitmedialab  medialab  lifelongkindergarten  amosblanton  lego  seymourpapert  ivanillich  gracellewelyn  bilalghalib  jefflieberman  making  hackerspaces  lcproject  makerspaces  openstudioproject  grading  rubrics  assessment  diy  notbacktoschoolcamp  johnholt  piaget  mitchresnick  leahbuechley  eleanorduckworth  nuvu  nuvustudio  holeinthewall  sugatamitra  sprout  elsistema  theblueschool  computerclubhouse  drishya  bakhtiarmikhak  sudburyschools  sudburyvalleyschool  samcassat  seanstevens  frostburn  quaker  criticalmass  burningman  paulofreire  quakers  sprout&co  jeanpiaget  syllabi 
june 2013 by robertogreco
SparkTruck
"SparkTruck is an educational build-mobile! We’re traveling across the USA with cool 21st-century shop tools, spreading the fun of hands-on learning and encouraging kids to find their inner maker."

[See also: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/jasonchua/sparklab-an-educational-build-mobile ]
openstudioproject  making  doing  makerspaces  mobile  arduino  hackerspaces  sparktruck 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Philadelphia's "gym for innovators." | NextFab Studio
"NextFab Studio is a membership-based, high-tech workshop and prototyping center — it’s Philadelphia’s “gym for innovators.”

We are located in a 21000 square foot facility at 2025 Washington Avenue, one of Philadelphia’s busiest retail corridors. This former custom iron workshop has been reconfigured into an engine of tomorrow’s creative economy featuring a collaborative workspace with cutting edge tools, expert staffing, 3D printers, computer controlled machine tools, software, electronic workbenches, classes, workshops, and friendly and affordable consulting services. We offer workspaces in a comfortable, clean and safe environment. NextFab Studio has everything necessary for you to invent, repair, create, and innovate!"
hackerspaces  makerspaces  business  diy  prototyping  3d  philadelphia  openstudioproject  lcproject  nextfabstudio  dmd 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Design for the New Normal (Revisited) | superflux
"I was invited to talk at the NEXT Conference in Berlin by Peter Bihr, as he felt that a talk I gave last year would fit well with the conference's theme Here Be Dragons: "We fret about data, who is collecting it and why. We fret about privacy and security. We worry and fear disruption, which changes business models and renders old business to ashes. Some would have us walk away, steer clear of these risks. They’re dangerous, we don’t know what the consequences will be. Maintain the status quo, don’t change too much.Here and now is safe. Over there, in the future? Well, there be dragons."

This sounded like a good platform to expand upon the 'Design for the New Normal' presentation I gave earlier, especially as its an area Jon and I are thinking about in the context of various ongoing projects. So here it is, once again an accelerated slideshow (70 slides!) where I followed up on some of the stories to see what happened to them in the last six months, and developed some of the ideas further. This continues to be a work-in-progress that Superflux is developing as part of our current projects. "

[Video: http://nextberlin.eu/2013/07/design-for-the-new-normal-3/ ]
anabjain  2013  drones  weapons  manufacturing  3dprinting  bioengineering  droneproject  biotechnology  biotech  biobricks  songhojun  ossi  zemaraielali  empowerment  technology  technologicalempowerment  raspberrypi  hackerspaces  makerspaces  diy  biology  diybio  shapeways  replicators  tobiasrevell  globalvillageconstructionset  marcinjakubowski  crowdsourcing  cryptocurrencies  openideo  ideo  wickedproblems  darpa  innovation  india  afghanistan  jugaad  jugaadwarfare  warfare  war  syria  bitcoins  blackmarket  freicoin  litecoin  dna  dnadreams  bregtjevanderhaak  bgi  genomics  23andme  annewojcicki  genetics  scottsmith  superdensity  googleglass  chaos  complexity  uncertainty  thenewnormal  superflux  opensource  patents  subversion  design  jonardern  ux  marketing  venkateshrao  normalityfield  strangenow  syntheticbiology  healthcare  healthinsurance  insurance  law  economics  ip  arnoldmann  dynamicgenetics  insects  liamyoung  eleanorsaitta  shingtatchung  algorithms  superstition  bahavior  numerology  dunne&raby  augerloizeau  bionicrequiem  ericschmidt  privacy  adamharvey  makeu 
april 2013 by robertogreco
SFPC
"school for poetic computation is an artist run school launching this fall in New York. A small group of students and faculty will work closely to explore the intersections of code, design, hardware and theory -- focusing especially on artistic intervention. It's a 10 week program, a hybrid of residency and research group, that will happen multiple times per year to be a powerboost for creativity. Our motto is: more poems less demos."

[From the Mission]

"The school for poetic computation is a school organized around exploring together the creative and expressive nature of computational approaches to art and design. The school’s focus is on writing code like creative writing — focusing on the mechanics of programming as well as demystifying as much as possible the tools, techniques and strategies for making art via code.

We are interested in how to program things that leave the screen and move into physical space, interacting with people through material-tactile expression. In this way, the school will focus on hardware, experimental interaction design, and computational ways of sensing movement, touch and gesture.

We are interested in craft, and the idea that every writer needs space and time to hone their trade. Our school aims to provide a safe haven – so you could get acquainted with the craft at your own pace, make it your own, find that part between your true creative process and the craft. This takes time, encouragement, the right push at the right time, conversations with colleagues, and more time.

This is a school for teaching. Every student who comes here will be asked to also teach, both to their classmates, but also in the form of workshops and outreach. We want to spread the things we care about as far and as wide as we can.

The goal of the school is to promote completely strange, impractical and magical work. We value aesthetics and poetics over efficiency and usefulness. It may not be the sort of things that are about building a portfolio for finding a job, but the sort of things that will surprise and delight people and enable you to be creative without the structure of school or job. However, we like to think employers will appreciate this kind of work as well.

This is not a program to get a degree, there are large programs for that. This is not a program to go for vocational skills, there are programs for that. This is a program for self initiated learners who want to explore new possibilities. This is a program for thinkers in search of a community to realize greater dreams."

[from the FAQ]

"Does the School issue certificate for graduation?
The school does not accredit any formal degrees but the group of alumni will grow into a lively community that will collaborate in the future. We hope students experience at the school and skill will be a validation for them to pursue a creative career."

"What are the core principles the school stands for?
Hacking, exploration, open source, publish everything and often, tools for building, deep understanding through hands on experience and so on…

What kind of students are you looking for?
We want to work with students who are creative at heart and dedicated to learning and teaching code and technology in general. We like students who are kind to help one another.
Where did this idea come from?

We have been teaching and organizing workshops at schools and festivals around the world. We want to create a safe haven for others to develop ideas into reality. We want to bring all of our experience and knowledge to make a sustainable system for learning and teaching code, electronics, installation, performance, user experience, data visualization and etc.



What is the teaching philosophy?
We celebrate failure and collaboration. Our classes are going to be a mix of lecture, demo and lab hours. We respect our students and support them as artist and educator. We hope our students will have the experience to create projects on their own and to teach after the program.



Why do you teach?
Teaching inspires to continue to learn. We love meeting new people and we often make our best work in collaboration with others."
hackerspaces  education  art  computing  programming  coding  altgdp  openstudioproject  lcproject  residencies  jenlowe  amitpitaru  zachliberman  taeyoonchoi  schoolforpoeticcomputation  time  slow  process  certification  accreditation  conversation  sharing  collaboration  teaching  learning  sfpc 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Makerspace Playbook | Makerspace
"Take a peek our current draft of the Makerspace Playbook, intended to offer some guidance to those who are hoping to start a Makerspace at their school or in their community. We welcome your feedback on the kinds of things we should add to this Playbook, what you think we got right and wrong, and any changes you’d make in general. We already know we’d like to add things like sample letters to garner support from administration and potential funders, more spotlights of teachers doing this kind of making with their students, and more detail about what the new roles for teachers, mentors, and shop hosts might entail. What do you need to know to get your Makerspace up and running?"

[Makerspace Playbook: http://makerspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/makerspaceplaybook-201204.pdf
High School Makerspace Tools & Materials: http://makerspace.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/hsmakerspacetoolsmaterials-201204.pdf ]
highschool  lcproject  openstudioproject  playbooks  howto  hackerspaces  makespaces 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Design Patterns - HackerspaceWiki
"A talk was given at the 24th Chaos Communication Congress (2007) on the topic of creating and running a hackerspace and it was built on the framework of Design Patterns.

Since then the catalog of Hackerspace Design Patterns has grown."
openstudioproject  lcproject  space  facilitation  patterns  design  designpatterns  makerspaces  hackerspaces 
november 2012 by robertogreco
MakerPlace [San Diego]
"At MakerPlace a complete metal, wood and electronic shop, classroom and work areas await 
your projects.

Think of it as your dream shop… 
the one you’d build if you had a really big garage and a huge budget … 
a large number of expensive tools, many computer controlled, available for your unlimited use.
Multi-needle embroidery and industrial sewing machines are available for your construction of personalized gifts, shirts, caps, backpacks and comforters.  

A 3-D printer can create real durable plastic objects from just a drawing … almost like Star Trek.  

Large format, high powered lasers are available to cut shapes from wood, plastic or many metals or delicately engrave messages on wine glasses.  

A computer controlled vinyl cutter can make precise signs, decals or sand blasting masks.  

Welders, benders, brakes, shears, mills, an English wheel and a complete (legal) paint spray booth are ready to make or modify your motorcycle, bike, or ATV…"
tools  workshops  hackerspaces  makerspaces  sandiego 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Los Angeles Young Makers (Los Angeles, CA) - Meetup
"We are a group of educators, hackers, artists, and others interested in building the Young Makers movement in LA. Whether you call them Fab Labs, SmartLabs, or Makerspaces... whatever permutation they take, let's join forces and get more going here in SoCal."
openstudioproject  lcproject  smartlabs  hackerspaces  makerspaces  fablabs  hackers  makers  losangeles 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Mt Elliott Makerspace
"MISSION

The Mt Elliott Makerspace is a community workshop where people make, tinker and learn together. We do this to strengthen ourselves and our communities.

GOALS

*To grow and strengthen a local community of “makers” – people with the creativity, skills and confidence to address any challenge and feel empowered to make better lives for themselves and their community

*To facilitate learning entrepreneurial experiences through the process of researching, designing, fabricating, and bringing to market useful products and services

*To assist local communities in their mission to improve safety, enhance infrastructure, and provide positive environments for local families and youth

*To participate in the local, regional and global networks of makers by actively exchanging knowledge, resources, and experiences

*To develop the Mt Elliott Makerspace into a financially self-sustaining and community-supported organization…"
hackerspaces  electronics  openstudioproject  lcproject  makerspaces  detroit 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Los Angeles Makerspace
"The Los Angeles Makerspace is a non-profit community space for makers of all ages to work on projects and take classes in software, hardware, electronics, robotics, art, filmmaking, bio-tech, eco-tech, wearable-tech and more!"

"Mission: To provide an all ages 24×7 community space in Los Angeles where makers of all ages learn to use tools and materials, explore their own interests, and develop creative projects.

The non-profit space is for members to develop and prototype ideas, work on projects, program events and classes and be the home for tech groups and school meetups. Our focus is on youth and families as well as those that support kids in learning through DIY. For the past several months we’ve been hosting events at locations around Los Angeles and we are very excited to announce that we have a new space located at LA Mart in Downtown Los Angeles.

Over the next couple of months we will be building the space out with help from community members."
hackerspaces  makers  openstudioproject  lcproject  tarayoung  losangeles  makerspaces 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Hacker Dojo
"…a community of members who share a common love of creating wonderful things and understanding how the world works. You don't need to be a programmer to use/enjoy the space… a do-ocracy run by members, including several self organizing teams like events, government, and operations.

…a community center in Mountain View which is about 1/3rd coworking space, 1/3rd events venue, and 1/3rd a big social living room. In the spirit of SuperHappyDevHouse, we're creating a physical community space for hackers and thinkers on the Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area. This is a location for events, lectures, parties, BarCamps, DevHouses, LAN parties, hackathons, knitting circles, tinkering, brainstorming, coworking, and more. We welcome visitors to many of our lectures and classes, and invite people to use the space on a drop-in basis. The Dojo is a community space first and foremost - this means that the focus of the layout and activities is to lend itself to be a useful place to throw…"
lcproject  hackerdojo  bayarea  mountainview  hackerspaces  hackers  coworking 
november 2012 by robertogreco
sprout & co.
"sprout is a community education and research organization devoted to creating and supporting the community-driven learning, teaching, and investigation of science. We're united by a passion to reclaim science as a richly personal and creative craft. Through our PROGRAMS & STUDIOS, we're working to make our vision real in Somerville.

You might say we're working to create a community college that lives up to its name—not a college in a community or a school in a building, but a community of people who work together as colleagues to explore questions they care about."

[From the Studios page]

"Our studios are a bit unusual. Here you can find out WHERE they are, how you can use them as a COWORKING space, a community VENUE, a WORKSHOP AND LABSPACE for independent investigation, or WHATEVER ELSE you have in mind. And if you're interested, you can read about WHY we run our studios the way we do."
deschooling  unschooling  schooldesign  venues  workshops  labspace  coworking  glvo  shaunalynnduffy  alecresnick  michaelnagle  lcproject  openstudioproject  mit  massachusetts  somerville  learning  community  diy  sprout  makerspaces  hackerspaces  education  science  design  boston  sprout&co 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Makeshift Society
"Make, learn, teach, think. A clubhouse for creatives in San Francisco."

"Makeshift Society is an organization for those who crave camaraderie to fuel their creativity. Our members are curious and creative. They make with their heads and think with their hands.

We support collaborative projects and community-building activities through a coworking space/clubhouse, innovative programming, and support for freelancers and small business owners.

While we fully embrace technology and its ability to transform and enhance our businesses, we feel like there are many coworking and networking options for technology startups in San Francisco, but far fewer for those in other creative fields. We want to enable everyone to make, learn, teach, and think."
srg  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  bayarea  hackerspaces  makerspaces  making  coworking  sanfrancisco  2012  makeshift  makeshiftsociety  renatom 
september 2012 by robertogreco
OmniCorpDetroit
"OmniCorpDetroit is an intense group of designers, artists, engineers, musicians, thinkers, do-ers and makers that get together to build new things as well as share and collaborate within the Detroit community.

In general, we’re making, breaking, reshaping and hacking all sorts of things!

Email info [at} omnicorpdetroit.com for more information. To be added to our mailing list, fill out the Spam Me! form located over there on the righthand column. Those on the mailing list will receive info on workshops, open hack nights and other glorious OCD events.

Want to see what happens at our events? check out our Flickr image pool!"

[via: https://vimeo.com/47203759 ]
omnicorpdetroit  design  artists  art  technology  hackerspaces  activism  detroit  diy 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Makerlab.com
"A Bay Area based incubator space for artists, makers, & developers."

From the manifesto:

"Ownership: Avoid silos; federate data - don't try to own data. Be transparent. …

…License free or open…

…Brainstorming, sketching and iterative concept development are encouraged…

Wiki-Like: Everything should be a wiki. Everything should allow reverting. Deputize participants to help. Disambiguate related content; duplicate persons & the like w/ disambiguation pages.

Conversational: Encourage real time discourse, encourage collaboration & open-ended conversation. Be humane. Be multi-modal & multi-gateway, multi-ligual & multi-faceted.

…Iterate quickly and often, take feedback and criticism and turn good projects into great ones.

Community: Focus on caring for our own communities first, then & only then do you grow outwards from our own community. Remember to appreciate those around you, encourage and validate the work of those around you."

[via: http://paige.saez.usesthis.com/ See also: http://paigesaez.org/ AND http://hook.org/ ]
discourse  manifestos  ownership  open  designpractices  wiki-like  wikis  community  agile  velocity  conversation  anselmhook  paigesaez  hackerspaces  software  newmedia  media  design  technology  lcproject  makerlab  sanfrancisco 
july 2012 by robertogreco
XOXO Festival by Andy Baio — Kickstarter
"Hey Kickstarter! We're organizing XOXO, an arts and technology festival in Portland, Oregon this September 13-16th.

XOXO is a celebration of disruptive creativity. We want to take all the independent artists using the Internet to make a living doing what they love — the makers, craftspeople, musicians, filmmakers, comic book artists, game designers, hardware hackers — and bring them together with the technologists building the platforms that make it possible. If you have an audience and a good idea, nothing’s standing in your way.

XOXO is in three parts:

Conference (Saturday – Sunday). Talks from artists and creative technologists around the country that are breaking new ground.
Market (Saturday – Sunday). A large marketplace with a tightly-curated list of the best of Portland's arts and tech scenes, sharing and selling their work, with food supplied by the best of our thriving food cart scene…"
via:caseygollan  togo  oregon  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  technology  arts  collaboration  hackerspaces  hackers  hardware  design  2012  events  andybaio  kickstarter  disruption  disruptive  conferences  portland  xoxo 
may 2012 by robertogreco
NIMBY
"A place to create the impossible, the new, the ridiculous, the exiting and most importantly, the never seen before. It is the largest do-it-yourself industrial art space in the Bay Area with over 40 different art groups and craftsmen in the shop.

NIMBY not only offers space to create, but supports its artists with resources, assistance in sourcing re-purposed material, as well as logistical and technical guidance. This supportive culture shared by all members of the NIMBY community is at the root of the amazing art that emerges from its doors. NIMBY is the hub for creativity that boggles the mind and fosters community values that encourage collaboration and
innovation.

Over the years, the concept of our community has brought together talented and diverse local artists who have created an impressive body of work. NIMBY has been the largest workspace/gallery of its kind in the City of Oakland and continues to provide a workspace, storage and display area - a one-stop shop for big…"
makerspaces  nimby  burningman  diy  art  sanfrancisco  oakland  hackerspaces  bayarea  openstudioproject 
may 2012 by robertogreco
BBC News - 'Biology hackers' create laboratory in New York City
"A group of researchers has created the first community-run biology laboratory in New York City.

The lab is an effort to provide a home for amateur scientists, as well as professionals looking for a space away from academia and business.

The co-founder of Genspace says it is "crucial that this lab exists" in order to foster creativity in the sciences.

The BBC's Matt Danzico visited the Brooklyn facility, which originally opened in late 2010, at a building home to a range of professionals ranging from designers to pastry chefs."

[See also: http://www.genspace.org/ and http://twitter.com/genspacenyc ]
brooklyn  science  research  biopolitics  biometrics  biotechnology  biotech  mattdanzico  nyc  2012  hackerspaces  diy  hackers  biology  genspace 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Treehouses: Online community for internet // Speaker Deck
Notes here by litherland:

“The ephemerality of speech [sic] in these tools better affords intimacy.” Revisit. /

“That speech is temporal also means someone can be absent, which makes presence meaningful.” Makes a lot of assumptions; needs to rethink (or think harder about) what speech is. Or what he means by it. /

Concept of “intransient group memory.” /

Interesting thoughts about playgrounds. /

“Conversation is an iterated game, so your pseudo can be a strong identity even if it isn’t your *public commercial web face*.” [my emph] /

“Hosts use soft power to influence. The group still governs itself.” /

“Recording is corrosive to candid sharing, so a private internet space must be transient.” /
2012  markpaschal  dannyo'brien  via:litherland  heatherchamp  self-organization  openspace  hackerspaces  autonomy  richardbartle  johanhui  johanhuizinga  play  groupmemory  availabot  ephemerality  muds  space  place  alancooper  sovereignposture  secondlife  personalization  tomarmitage  animalcrossing  ambient  presence  minimumviabletreehouses  minecraft  gaming  games  clubhouses  socialmedia  darkmatter  privacy  sharing  conversation  groups  onlinetreehouses  treehouses  organizing  activism  community  ephemeral 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Make, DARPA, and teens: A match made in hackerspace · demilit · Storify
"Well, well, well... What have we here? How painfully ironic this is. How shocking, in fact. And yet, this bit of news has flown under the radar for the past week. To put it bluntly, Tim O'Reilly's Make magazine and his cohort are working with the Pentagon. More specifically, DIY-zine Make and its folks are taking money from DARPA to create "makerspaces" for teens (aka the "Manufacturing Experimentation and Outreach," or "MENTOR" program)."
pentagon  teens  hackerspaces  makerspaces  militaryindustrialcomplex  military  education  2012  saulgriffith  oreilly  makemagazine  make  ethics  darpa  demilit  javierarbona 
january 2012 by robertogreco
MAKE | Is It Time to Rebuild & Retool Public Libraries and Make “TechShops”?
"Let’s explore what could be ahead for public libraries and how we could collectively transform them into “factories” — not factories that make things, but factories that help make people who want to learn and make things. Will libraries go away? Will they become hackerspaces, TechShops, tool-lending libraries, and Fab Labs, or have these new, almost-public spaces displaced a new role for libraries? For many of us, books themselves are tools. In the sense that books are tools of knowledge, the library is a repository for tools, so will we add “real tools” for the 21st century?

Before we dive into the future, let’s take a look at the current public library scene now. Feel free to skip this part. I think it’s pretty interesting though."
libraries  future  technology  books  hacking  make  education  lcproject  makers  hackerspaces  2011  philliptorrone 
november 2011 by robertogreco
The Public Library, Completely Reimagined | MindShift
"Earlier this year, MAKE Magazine’s Phillip Torrone wrote a provocative article asking “Is it time to rebuild and retool libraries and make ‘techshops’?” In other words, should libraries join some of the other new community centers that are being created (such as General Assembly which we covered yesterday) and become “hackerspaces” or “makerspaces”?

“Yes!”, says librarian Lauren Smedley, who is in the process of creating what might just be the first maker-space within a U.S. public library. The Fayetteville Free Library where Smedley works is building a Fab Lab — short for fabrication laboratory — that will provide free public access to machines and software for manufacturing and making things."
libraries  lcproject  makerbot  2011  audreywatters  philliptorrone  laurensmedley  lafayettefreelibrary  library2.0  makers  hackerspaces 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Venessa: Superhero School An Epicenter for Disruptive Innovation
"I put a short post up a few days ago in an online group I’m in, with the above image and this brief description:

superhero school. center for disruptive innovation. continuous learning zone. collective intelligence. live/work startup incubator. community center. hackerspace. makerlab. autonomous zone. permaculture and sustainable food production. cooperatively owned communications infrastructure. resilience. r&d; lab. a place for creative troublemakers. hudson valley. i want this to exist.

It blew up to over 100 comments in less than 48 hours, with many people sharing their own thoughts and plans and existing initiatives to create similar things in their areas. I was inspired! Is this an idea whose time has come?"

[Also here (with comments): http://emergentbydesign.com/2011/11/09/superhero-school-an-epicenter-for-disruptive-innovation/ ]
lcproject  cv  hackerspaces  unschooling  deschooling  glvo  kaospilots  incubator  communitycenter  communitycenters  creativity  sharedspace  collectiveintelligence  continuouslearningzone  learning  superheroschool  sharing  collaborativeconsumption  cocreation  makers  knowmads  twinoaks  tamera  kibbutzim  findhornfoundation  lionkimbro  centerforalternativetechnology  friendsofgaviotas  gaiauniversity  edenproject  schumachercollege  teamacademy  generalassembly  unreasonableinstitute  maisonnotman  blackbox  barcamp  unconferences  fablabs  workshops  chaordinatedevents  prototyping  rapidprototyping 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Student Research and Development [StudentRND]
"…student-run non-profit organization that aims to inspire students to learn more about science & technology by offering hands-on opportunities for students to explore beyond & experiment w/ concepts that were so laboriously covered in school textbooks.

Why? When learning how to ride a bike, the majority of people learned by trying over and over again until the skill has been mastered, not by reading a textbook, listening to a lecture, or watching an educational video. Thus, when learning about science & technology, students should be actually applying the knowledge they learn and asking more questions. Science is about inquiry.

…Much like there are libraries for people interested in reading, & sports fields for those interested in sports, we run a workspace in Bellevue where students can learn from our volunteers and classes as well as working on many cool projects…workspace is absolutely free…"
seattle  bellevue  washingtonstate  cascadia  lcproject  science  technology  learning  hackerspaces  education  inquiry  experimentation  laboratories  studentrnd  tcsnmy 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Fab Lab San Diego — A place where you can make almost anything
"In 2007, a collaboration between the MIT & the San Diego-based non-profit Heads On Fire allowed for the creation of an advanced digital design & fabrication laboratory where community members can utilize high-tech tools to actualize ideas through design & fabrication.

Today, in addition to localized learning, Fab Lab programs are available in a distributed format, bringing the opportunity to turn concepts into creations to as many community members as possible. Fab Lab programs offer experiences in design, science, engineering, electronics, computation, mathematics & the scientific method, through project-based learning, resulting in personal development & real-world skill attainment.

By promoting learning that addresses empirical education, innovation, production & creativity, we aim to provide accessible & applicable educational experiences for individual learners in order to support the development of more ingenious & resourceful communities."
diy  sandiego  fablab  education  fabbing  hackerspaces  headsonfire  macsd  ucsd  sdsu  steam  engineering  classideas  edg  srg  fieldtrips 
august 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: A physical place for virtual education
"…physical place is importan…beautiful…flexible…interactive. Kids should be free to come & go, but I'd like them to want to stay. Kids should have the tools they need there, & access to food & drink & other "comforts." & the faculty needs to be there too - not for supervision - but for interaction as students need & want.

…start w/ effective wireless capabilities in your "Physical Space for Virtual Learning," …4G comes in well…a Tool Crib of devices…lots of different kinds of seating. Tables and floor space for collaboration, and spaces - like music practice rooms - for solitude or quiet…furniture should all be movable, and probably whimsical in some ways…place for play…variety to the space, variety to the time, and variety in staff interaction…lighting varies…noise levels…vary…Don't pick "50 year" furniture.

Think of MeetUps linked to any possible subject of mutual interests. Hold Hack Days geared to music or games or teaching or anything. And invite the community in…"
schooldesign  tcsnmy  lcproject  learning  irasocol  2011  space  place  unschooling  deschooling  education  community  furniture  schools  teaching  meetups  meetingplace  play  hackdays  hackerspaces  variety  diversity 
july 2011 by robertogreco
not an alternative
"Not An Alternative is a hybrid arts collective and non-profit organization with a mission to affect popular understandings of events, symbols, and history. We curate and produce work that questions and leverages the tools of advertising, architecture, exhibit design, branding, and public relations. Programs are hosted at a variety of venues, including our Brooklyn-based gallery No-Space (formerly known as The Change You Want to See Gallery).

No-Space is host to free lectures, screenings, panel discussions, workshops and artist presentations. The space also consists of a production workshop, filming studio and video editing suite. During the day it is a collaborative office space (aka coworking) for freelancers and cultural producers."
activism  nyc  research  urbanism  art  architecture  brooklyn  galleries  no-space  notanalternative  coworking  studios  hackerspaces 
april 2011 by robertogreco
t h i n k | h a u s
"Think|Haus is a shared work space / social space and collective all about hacking, crafting, DIY and doing awesome stuff.

Think about how the history of Hamilton is intertwined in the “make it happen” ethos of the DIY mechanic, the basement engineer, the warranty violator, the patent ignorer.

Hamilton was once known as “The Ambitious City”.

Come and be ambitious with us."
hacking  diy  education  hackers  hackerspaces  deschooling  sharing  learning  lcproject  thinkhaus  hamilton  canada  ontario  making  make  unschooling 
april 2011 by robertogreco
San Diego Space Society
"The San Diego Space Society (“SD Space”) was founded in 2008 with the purpose of raising awareness and educating the general public to the benefits of human exploration of space and San Diego’s role in space development, as well as to the idea of creating a spacefaring civilization within our lifetimes.

General meetings are held regularly at the Serra Mesa library, and SD Space members participate in many other local space events. Details of each meeting will be posted to the calendar. The general public is welcome to attend any meeting or event listed on this site.

SD Space is headquartered at the Space Travelers Emporium [http://emporium.sdspace.org/ ], a storefront and workshop in the South Park neighborhood."
sandiego  space  southpark  spacetravel  travel  hackerspaces  education  organizations  gifts  shopping  lcproject  workshops  glvo  edg  srg  local  exploration  spaceexploration 
october 2010 by robertogreco
EscueLab - OLPC
"Through a partnership of ATA and the Prince Claus Fund (Netherlands), the EscueLab space/project is beeing supported for the next three years.

The mission of EscueLab is to provide a space/infrastructure that has been missing for young researchers/artists of the Andean Region to develop projects bridging the gap between technology & society.

Our interests span over a wide range of subjects related to technology appropiation, artistic & technological practices, technology in education, technology recycling, among others...

The planned activities of EscueLab include conference hosting, open workshops, project incubation, & a creators-in-residence program.

The infrastructure provided by EscueLab for those activities includes:

*three rooms for conference hosting,
*a hardware hack lab & warehouse,
*one PC lab, for programming workshops
*communications lab for video documentation of activities.
*dorms, kitchen & ateliers for up to eight creators in residence."
escuelab  perú  olpc  medialab  creativity  electronics  art  technology  edtech  e-learning  education  elearning  society  lima  lcproject  schools  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  projectbasedlearning  multidisciplinary  transdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  invention  innovation  hackerspaces  hackerculture  pbl  mitmedialab 
august 2010 by robertogreco
www.escuelab.org | creatividad, tecnología y sociedad
"No hay cultura sin cambio y no hay cambio sin experimento e innovación. Escuelab es un espacio en el centro de una capital latinoamericana que busca incentivar a creadores, teóricos y activistas jóvenes a proyectar sus ideas, nacidas del presente, para diseñar y construir futuros posibles en los que con imaginación se abordará la brecha entre tecnología y sociedad.

Escuelab ofrece un concepto de estudios dinámico y modular, enfocado al emprendimiento de proyectos, donde se integran disciplinas que suelen desarrollarse aisladamente. Esta línea de acción facilita el conocimiento transdisciplinario en los campos del arte, ciencia, tecnología y nuevos medios fuera de las clasificaciones habituales y las divisiones convencionales."
escuelab  perú  olpc  medialab  creativity  electronics  art  technology  edtech  e-learning  education  elearning  society  lima  lcproject  schools  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  projectbasedlearning  multidisciplinary  transdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  invention  innovation  hackerspaces  hackerculture  pbl  mitmedialab 
august 2010 by robertogreco
BioCurious
"Curious about Biology? Come find answers at the new biology collaborative lab space where citizen science moves of the classroom and into the community. Following the successful example of hackerspaces such as Noisebridge, Langdon Labs, Hacker Dojo, and co-working spaces such as the Hub, we're pleased to offer the first Bay Area space dedicated to Non Institutional Biology. Got an idea for a startup? Join the DIY, "garage biology" movement and found a new breed of biotech."

[See also: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1040581998/biocurious-a-hackerspace-for-biotech-the-community ]
biohacking  biology  diy  dna  science  hackerspaces  hacking  lcproject 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Ping - At TechShops, Do-It-Yourselfers Get to Use Expensive Tools - NYTimes.com
"Then they will direct their disposable income and free time toward making things — stuff like chairs, toys and, say, synthetic diamonds. They will do this because the tools needed to make really cool things have become cheaper and because humans feel good when they make really cool things.
techshop  hackerspaces  markhatch  lcproject  tinkering  make  do  making  invention  us 
april 2010 by robertogreco
GAFFTA
"Gray Area Foundation for the Arts (GAFFTA) is a San Francisco-based nonprofit dedicated to building social consciousness through digital culture. Guided by the principles of openness, collaboration, and resource sharing, our programs promote creativity at the intersection of art, design, sound, and technology. A conduit for multidisciplinary creative exchange, GAFFTA supports the creation and diffusion of works that engage and inspire audiences, and offer meaningful contributions to the global movement that is shaping our collective experience."
sanfrancisco  gaffta  collective  community  gallery  foundations  collaboration  arts  art  artists  activism  culture  design  nonprofit  media  technology  diy  hackerspaces  nonprofits 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Crash Space
"Crash Space is a hackerspace in Los Angeles, and is part of the growing global hackerspace movement. We are a collection of hackers, programmers, builders, makers, artists and people who generally like to break things and see what new things we can build with the pieces. We meet regularly at our physical location in Culver City.

Crash Space is generally open to members only, with the exception of regularly scheduled classes and occasional events. Our Mailing List is open to anyone and we invite you to join and say Hi. You can also check out our flickr group to see what we are up to."
losangeles  hackerspaces  hackercollective  lcproject  hackers  make  diy  arduino  seanbonner  electronics  hacking  space  socal  sandiego  culvercity 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Tinkering Makes Comeback Amid Crisis - WSJ.com
"American tradition of tinkering...is making comeback, boosted by renewed interest in hands-on work amid economic crisis & falling prices of high-tech tools & materials...Engineering schools across country report students are showing an enthusiasm for hands-on work that hasn't been seen in years. Workshops for people to share tools & ideas -"hackerspaces"- are popping up all over country...124 in US...up from a handful at the start of last year. SparkFun...expects sales of about $10 million this year, up from $6 million in 2008. "Make" mag...has grown from 22,000 subscribers in 2005 to > 100,000 now...annual "Maker Faire"...attracted 75,000 people this year. "We've had this merging of DIY with technology," says Bre Pettis..."I'm calling it Industrial Revolution 2."...Hands-on is catching on at other schools...27% more undergrads earned mechanical-engineering degrees in 2008 than 2003...[while] # of computer-engineering graduates slipped by 31%."
hacking  tinkering  diy  make  making  doing  tcsnmy  lcproject  hackerspaces  trends  handson  2009  engineering  arduino  makemagazine  sparkfun  education  universities  colleges  learning  manufacturing  fabbing  electronics 
november 2009 by robertogreco
portlandtechshop.com
"TechShop is a 33,000 square foot membership based workshop that provides members with any skill level to have access to tools and equipment, instruction, and a creative and supportive community of like minded people so you can build the things you have always wanted to make.

TechShop is perfect for inventors, "makers", hackers, tinkerers, artists, roboteers, families, entrepreneurs, youth groups, FIRST robotic teams, crackpots, arts and crafts enthusiasts, and anyone else who wants to be able to make things that they dream up but don't have the tools, space or skills."

[via: http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2009/04/techshop-portland/ ]
techshop  portland  oregon  hackercollective  hackerspaces  socialnetworking  technology  tools  diy  make  lcproject  equipment  classes  learning  machineproject 
may 2009 by robertogreco
DIY Freaks Flock to 'Hacker Spaces' Worldwide | Gadget Lab from Wired.com
"There are now 96 known active hacker spaces worldwide, with 29 in the United States, according to Hackerspaces.org. Another 27 U.S. spaces are in the planning or building stage. Located in rented studios, lofts or semi-commercial spaces, hacker spaces tend to be loosely organized, governed by consensus, and infused with an almost utopian spirit of cooperation and sharing. "It's almost a Fight Club for nerds," says Nick Bilton of his hacker space, NYC Resistor in Brooklyn, New York. Bilton is an editor in The New York Times R&D lab and a board member of NYC Resistor. Bilton says NYC Resistor has attracted "a pretty wide variety of people, but definitely all geeks. Not Dungeons & Dragons–type geeks, but more professional, working-type geeks.""
diy  lcproject  hackers  hackercollective  hackerspaces  community  machineproject  make  makemagazine 
march 2009 by robertogreco

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