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robertogreco : haptics   16

Hapticality in the Undercommons, or From Operations Management to Black Ops | Stefano Harney - Academia.edu
"Fanon begins his conclusion by calling for the rejection of what he calls the ‘European model’ in the coming post-colonial world:

When I search for Man in the technique and the style of Europe, I see only a succession of negations of man, and an avalanche of murders.

But what is this European model, what is at the heart of this model, why the negations, the unending blood-soaked dawns? Here is Fanon’s answer:
But let us be clear: what matters is to stop talking about output, and intensification, and the rhythm of work.

The coming post-colonial nations must break not only with the negations of history, culture, and personality wrought by colonialism but with the ‘rhythm of work’ imposed by the European model. And he clarifies:
No, there is no question of a return to Nature. It is simply a very concrete question of not dragging men towards mutilation, of not imposing upon the brain rhythms that very quickly obliterate it and wreck it. The pretext of catching up must not be used to push man around, to tear him away from himself or from his privacy, to break and kill him.

Here is that word ‘rhythm’ again. ‘Rhythms imposed on the brain’ this time, imposed by a drive to ‘catch up.’ Catching up was a phrase much circulated in the takeoff theories of capitalist development pushed by the United States in the Cold War. But, Fanon points out, this catching up institutes a rhythm that ‘breaks’ and ‘kills’ man. This is a rhythm that ‘tears man away from himself’, that ‘obliterates’ and ‘wrecks’ his brain. Fanon uses the metaphor of the ‘caravan’ for a system that tears man away from himself."



"Fanon feared post-colonial nations would keep the regime and merely erect the outside, with flags, anthems, and new ruling classes. Who can say he was wrong? But Fanon’s warning was more than a post-colonial critique of the idea of the outside. It was an analysis of the European model and its tendency towards producing this rhythm without an outside. Indeed Fanon saw the colony as the first social factory, where worker replaces subject in society as a whole. In the colony, in the first social factory any move to other social being was, as it is today, criminal, conspiratorial. The only sound in the social factory is the rhythm of work because that is what takes place in a factory."



"This is our work today. We take inventories of ourselves for components not the whole. We produce lean efforts to transconduct. We look to overcome constraints. We define values through metrics. These are all terms from operations management but they describe work far better than recourse to the discourse of subject formation. Creativity itself, supposedly at the heart of the battle for the subject today, is nothing but what operations management calls variance in the line, a variance that may lead to what is in turn called a kaizen event, an improvement, and is then assimilated back into an even more sophisticated line. Today ours is primarily the labour of adapting and translating, being commensurate and flexible, being a conduit and receptacle, a port for information but also a conductor of information, a wire, a travel plug. We channel affect toward new connections. We do not just keep the flow of meaning, information, attention, taste, desire, and fear moving, we improve this flow continuously. We must remain open and attuned to the rhythm of the line, to its merciless variances in rhythm. This is primarily a neurological labour, a synaptic labour of making contact to keep the line flowing, and creating innovations that help it flow in new directions and at new speeds. The worker operates like a synapse, sparking new lines of assembly in life. And she does so anywhere and everywhere because the rhythm of the line is anywhere and everywhere. The worker extends synaptic rhythms in every direction, every circumstance. With synaptic work, it is access not subjects that the line wants, an access, as Denise Ferreira da Silva reminds us, that was long at the heart of the abuse of the affected ones, the ones who granted access out of love, out of necessity, out of the consent not to be one, even before that granting was abused."
stefanoharney  frantzfanon  labor  work  leisure  blackops  fredmoten  rhythm  deniseferreiradasilva  information  haptics  hapticality  art  academia  flow  athi-patraruga  zarinabhimji  creativity  flexibility  latecapitalism  capitalism  neoliberalism  society  colonialism  colonization  decolonization  nature  undercommons 
december 2017 by robertogreco
The Listen Tree Project | MIT – Docubase
"ListenTree is an audio-haptic display meant to be embedded in the natural environment. A visitor to the installation notices a faint sound appearing to emerge from a tree, and might feel a slight vibration under their feet as they approach. By resting their head against the tree, they are able to hear sounds through bone conduction. To create this effect, an audio exciter-transducer is weatherproofed and attached to the tree trunk underground, transforming the tree into a living speaker that channels audio through its branches. The apparatus, set up underground at the base of a tree, transforms the tree into a loudspeaker. The exhibit also uses Raspberry Pi to connect to WiFi, which enables one tree to communicate with other trees, other sound sources, or other transducers.

While the initial intent of the producers was to create an audio installation, they have also found other uses cases for ListenTree as a platform for other stories, given that any source of sound can be played through the tree, including pre-recorded or live tracks. For example, during an installation in Mexico City, ListenTree was used to play pre-recorded audio of poems by Mexican poets at a Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) event. Glorianna Davenport, who oversees a project called The Living Observatory, which tracks the recovery of the wetlands at Tidmarsh Farms, has also used ListenTree as a platform to play audio recorded at Tidmarsh. This particular installation of the ListenTree can be found at the MIT Museum. “A very important benefit of [the interaction] is the juxtaposition of physically being here and connecting to a remote site,” remarks Davenport. The ListenTree can also be expanded to include multiple trees in a single installation, for which Davenport sees much potential: “It is important that the basic idea is later expanded.  If you look at the installation in Mexico,  it is clear that having many trees, and having the installation outdoors at events that had large audiences changes the dynamic.”

Storytellers and documentarians might conceive of other ways to sonify stories through ListenTree, which is able to play sounds collected remotely through a local, natural interface; combine the interaction between a story and its medium to aid in meaning construction; and reconcile the immateriality of digital media with a materiality of a physical exhibit."
listentree  haptics  trees  lilybui  edwinaportocarro  sound  audio  classideas  storytelling 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Calm Technology
"The world around is made up of information that competes for our attention. What is necessary? What is not?

When we design products, we aim to choose the best position for user interface components, placing the most important ones in the most evident and accessible places within the screen. Equally important is the design of communication. How many are notifications are necessary? How and when should they be displayed? To solve this, we can be inspired by the principles of calm technology.1

Principles of Calm Technology

I. Technology should require the smallest amount of our attention.
Technology can communicate, but doesn’t need to speak.
Create ambient awareness through different senses.
Communicate information without taking the wearer out of their environment or task.

II. Technology should inform and encalm.
A person's primary task should not be computing, but being human.
Give people what they need to solve their problem, and nothing more.

III. Technology should make use of the periphery.
A calm technology will move easily from the periphery of our attention, to the center, and back.
The periphery is informing without overburdening.

IV. Amplify the best of technology and the best of humanity.
Design for people first.
Machines shouldn't act like humans.
Humans shouldn't act like machines.
Amplify the best part of each.

Examples

Tea Kettle
If a technology works well, we can ignore it most of the time. A teapot tells us when it is ready, and is off or quiet the rest of the time. A tea kettle can be set and forgotten, until it sings. It does not draw constant attention to itself until necessary. A tea kettle's whistle brings information from another room to one's attention.

Inner Office Window
An inner office window provides an understanding of whether someone is busy or not without the need to interrupt them.

Jawbone Up
The Jawbone Up has a single button and a colored status light. The device can be set to buzz after a short nap or at the optimium sleep cycle for a good night of sleep. It counts movement in the background without requiring additional action from the wearer. The device syncs to the user's phone through the audio jack and gives a summary of the wearer's individual day in sleep and physical activity.

Lavatory Sign
This simple sign tells you whether the lavatory is occupied or not. No need to translate it into multiple languges. The simple icon is either occupied or not.

Roomba Vacuum Cleaner
The humble Roomba Vacuum cleaner chirps happily when it is done and emits a sad tone when it is stuck. There is no uncanny valley present in this technology. Roomba doesn't have a spoken language, just simple tones. This makes it easy to understand what Roomba is saying, and elimates the need to translate the tone into many different languages.

Sleep Cycle
Sleep Cycle is a mobile application that monitors your sleep and allows you to track times of deep sleep and REM. You can set an alarm in the app and Sleep Cycle will wake you up before the time at the best place in your sleep cycle with a soft noise or buzz. Because the haptic alert occurs under your pillow, you can configure it so that you can wake up without anyone else being affected by the alarm.

Smart Badge
A smart badge is simple. Smart badges are small, wearable technologies that don't require a charger, user interface or operating system. Simply touch a provisioned smart badge to a door or elavator panel and you'll easily gain access.

Calm Communication

Haptic Alert
Use haptics or touch to inform someone of important information. Many people set their phones to buzz, but other products such as the LUMOBack Smart Posture Sensor buzzes you when you exhibit poor posture. Touch is a high resolution of human sensation. A lot of information can be conveyed with no visual or auditory requirement.

Trend Graph
A good trend graph is all about making the formerly invisible visible. The Sleep Cycle app graphs sleep over time, compressing that long term data into an easily accessible format. Be patient: good data may a long time to collect, but it is well worth the wait! Displaying data in a elegant way is one of the most important aspects of trend graphs. Elegance is about information and comprehension, not just visual appearance.

Status Light
Status lights are farily common on video cameras. A device is active when the red 'record' light is on. Status lights can be used for more than just recording. Our daily travels are mediated by the simple colors of traffic lights. A light that shows the weather is far more calm than a weather ssystem that constantly calls attention to itself. Think about how to use different colors of light to inform and encalm in your products.

Status Tone
A status tone is a quick way for a device to let a person know whether it needs attention or not. Products that have a positive tones upon completion, or negative tones when stuck are more likely to be helped by their human owners.

Status Shout
A Status Shout is similar to a Status Tone but can be much louder and more urgent. Smoke alarms, tea kettles and microwaves all use shouts to alert people to their status. Ambulances use Status Shouts to alert people to make way for an emergency. Tornado warnings utilize Status Shouts to help neighborhoods get to a safe place and out of the tornado's path. Status Shouts should be reserved for very important information.

Popup
Popup alerts are perhaps the most common form of alert, but they can quickly overwhelm people when not used correctly. Alerts should be used when deleting a piece of content, for an emergency, or when someone has specifically opted into a piece of content or stream. Otherwise, try to think of ways to alert a person using the other senses.

Timed Trigger
A simple status light on a timer can make for a calm and informative notifier. An orange light that turns on at sundown or reminds you to brush your teeth.

Delay
Use a delay or interrupt during a change of state. For example, when the headphones of an iPhone become disconnected, the music player automatically pauses the music."
technology  design  ux  ui  teakettles  calm  calmtechnology  via:alexismadrigal  slow  communication  calmcommunication  haptics  ambientintimacy  ambient  roomba  jawbone  windows  glanceable  attention  humanism  periphery  information  chrisdancy  ambercase 
november 2014 by robertogreco
RINGLY | Smart Jewelry and Accessories
"Introducing our first line of connected rings that let you put your phone away and your mind at ease. Ringly notifies you about the MESSAGES/EMAILS/PEOPLE/APPS/PEOPLE/PHONE CALLS that matter most. Ringly creates jewelry and accessories that connect to your phone and notify you about the things that matter most. Put your phone away and enjoy the moment."
jewelry  via:rachelbinx  wearables  haptics  notifications  ios  applications  2014  iphone  ringly 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Disney's Aireal lets you feel the imaginary | The Verge
"The researchers think that this kind of new haptic technology could be used not only to provide feedback for computer interfaces and video games (like the soccer goalie game pictured above), but also allow for new kinds of experiences like the butterfly on your houseplant — what they call "transient haptic displays." They envision a movie watcher getting hit with vortices when there's an explosion onscreen, possibly knocking papers off the living room table. And when combined with new, immsersive display technologies like Microsoft's Illumiroom, the possibilities get even more exciting. "We have only begun to scratch the surface of what is possible," says the team."
disney  aireal  haptic  technology  haptics  interaction  matthewglisson  2013 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Why People Really Love Technology: An Interview With Genevieve Bell - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic
"There's something in it that you recognize as being a kind of truth. The early ideology of the Internet was about radical transparency, free information, and the sense that the consequences of that would be this sort of massive social upheaval. I sometimes think the more-interesting things are the really mundane, banal things that the Internet and digital technologies are now part of: everything from how we balance our checkbooks to how we arrange our romantic lives to how we insure that there's still a paper that gets delivered to our houses every two weeks. I'm fascinated by that piece. And the ways in which the Internet has become not just part of our romantic lives but also our spiritual and religious ones, and clearly it's part of our political landscape."

"We've been in a decade of dematerialization, all the markers of identity. You and I, when we were younger, knew how to talk about ourselves, to ourselves and others, through physical stuff--music, the books on our shelves…"
society  fear  culture  web  internet  dematerialization  haptics  tactility  japan  robots  3dprinting  geography  intel  genevievebell  alexismadrigal  2012  technology 
december 2012 by robertogreco
» The New Ecology of Things: Slabs, Sofducts, and Bespoke Objects Johnny Holland – It's all about interaction » Blog Archive
"Several major trends are emerging that affect interaction design. With the advent of post-PC devices like the iPad, cheap sensors and microcontrollers like the Arduino, and services like Kindle Wispersync, we’re in the middle of a shift towards ubiquitous computing, tangible interaction, and cloud services. Because of these trends, our field must consider the integration of the traditionally separate areas of screen and tangible interaction design.

Of particular significance is the shift away from the generic computation typified by the “personal computer,” which never really achieved the individuality or specificity implied by the term “personal.” In short, we’re experiencing the emergence of The New Ecology of Things, where a network of heterogeneous, smart objects and spaces are replacing our current design context."
consumerism  twitter  ipad  ecology  internetofthings  ecologyofthings  matthewcrawford  shopclassassoulcraft  making  meaning  meaningmaking  personalization  sofducts  bespoke  bespokeobjects  craft  slabs  interactiondesign  interaction  glvo  diy  iphone  applications  computing  fabbing  3dprinter  3d  culture  software  hardware  prosthetics  tailoring  animism  sound  light  haptics  kinetic  kineticbehavior  behavior  android  arduino  nikeid  manufacturing  apple  philipvanallen  spimes  ios  iot 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The web in the world
"In same way as the web is quickly extending onto mobile platform, we are starting to see web moving further into physical world. Many emerging technologies are beginning to offer physical-world inputs & outputs; multi-touch iPhones, gestural Wii controllers, RFID-driven museum interfaces, QR-coded magazines, GPS-enabled mobile phones. These technologies have been used to create very useful services that interact with web such as Plazes, Nokia Sports Tracker, Wattson, Tikitag, Nike+. But the technologies themselves often overshadow the user-experience and so far designers haven’t had language or patterns to express new ideas for these interfaces. This talk will focus on a number of design directions for new physical interfaces...various ideas around presence, location, context awareness, peripheral interaction...haptics & tangible interfaces. How do these interactions work with the web? What are the potentials and problems, and what kinds of design approaches are needed?"
timoarnall  design  RFID  interactiondesign  touch  nearfield  nfc  personalinformatics  interface  haptics  context  spimes  web  interaction  wattson  wiimote  iphone 
october 2008 by robertogreco
lorbus » Blog Archive » 10 Ways To Make An iPhone Killer
"device is screen. Preload with basic software. Allow complete software personalization. Free idea, mods & software exchange. Phones fall, design accordingly. Involve more senses. Camera companies are dead. Charge through induction. More status levels."
iphone  mobile  phones  design  android  google  computing  haptics  induction  senses  customization  open  freedom  personalization 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Mixed Reality Lab, Singapore
"The Mixed Reality Lab, at the National University of Singapore, is aiming to push the boundaries of research into interactive new media technologies through the combination of technology, art, and creativity"
research  lab  reality  interactive  mixedreality  immersive  pervasive  arg  games  gamedesign  gaming  haptics  interaction  interactivity  interface  technology  singapore  science  future  design  ubicomp  virtual 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Adobe - Design Center : The fake-space race: Design and the future of travel
"Current attempts at verisimilitude seem to underestimate our imaginative capacity, while tripping our deceit sensors. It's a matter of timing. The world needs artful telepresence more urgently than ever before. Can we please get on with it?"
johnthackara  sustainability  travel  telecommunication  communication  telepresence  presence  virtual  haptics  sensing  remote  video  videoconferencing  videophones  telecoms  perception  cyberspace  distance 
april 2008 by robertogreco
iphone-haptics - Google Code
"Our aim with this web site is to publicly experiment with user interface design prototypes, implemented on the Apple iPhone utilising its built-in variable intensity actuator and multi-touch screen."
iphone  interface  haptics  haptic  feedback  touch  ui  mobile  phones  tactile 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Nokia perfects the clicky tactile touchscreen - iPhone gnashes teeth, swears revenge - The Red Ferret Journal
"taken them 10 years but Nokia boffins have finally perfected a ‘touch feedback’ touchscreen...you press a key on the screen, and it clicks under your finger with exactly the same sort of fingertip feedback as if you’d pressed a conventional keyboar
touchscreen  haptic  haptics  hardware  interface  iphone  nokia  tactile  gadgets  technology  usability  ui  mobile  phones  multitouch  keyboard  touch 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Subtraction: The Little Keyboard That Could—n’t
"Still, that won’t stop me from airing my theory: there is an inherent learning plateau in Apple’s software keyboard, and that plateau falls short of full accuracy."
apple  design  haptics  hardware  iphone  mobile  usability  ux  keyboard  input 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Wired 15.04: Mixed Feelings
"See with your tongue. Navigate with your skin. Fly by the seat of your pants (literally). How researchers can tap the plasticity of the brain to hack our 5 senses — and build a few new ones."
body  brain  cognitive  senses  synesthesia  tactile  tangible  technology  human  hacks  data  perception  psychology  neuroscience  science  research  input  future  evolution  engineering  sensory  haptics  bodies 
may 2007 by robertogreco

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