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Uses This / Georgina Voss
"What I do - gestures expansively - is research-intensive projects (writing [essays, journalism], performance, installation, sculpture) about the politics of large-scale complex technological and industrial systems; and teaching about the same.

I'm co-founder and lead/director of two studios: Supra Systems Studio, based at the London College of Communication's Design School, University of the Arts London, where I'm a senior lecturer; and Strange Telemetry, in residence at Somerset House Studios. My PhD is in the anthropology of deviance, and industrial economics."



"Clue is the single best software tool I can think of, tying together my messy sense of time with the realities of my physical form; and was also the thing that made me realise that what I'd worried was an ongoing glandular fever relapse was actually pre-menstrual exhaustion. Thanks, Clue!"



"What would be your dream setup?

Universal healthcare and education, open borders, an alternative internet, better battery life. A gigantic warehouse big enough to do enormous work in; a huge city; also, a forest."
georginavoss  usesthis  thesetup  2018  education  healthcare  tools  software  hardware  anthropology  technology  deviance  bodies  time  body 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Blloc | Back to the root
Blloc is a plain and minimalistic smartphone combining a power saving operating system with efficient hardware and an easy to use messaging platform, it’s built to be the perfect communication and productivity tool that you can rely on every day."



"Regain control of your smartphone. Blloc allows you to focus on your contacts and meaningful interactions. With more effortless and fluid exchange of information, there is more space for your productivity.

The lost, forgotten and scattered information is now gathered in one place, a simple timeline which facilitates speedy and effective conversations, while Blloc anticipates your needs through learning."
android  mobile  phones  hardware  blloc  smartphones 
april 2018 by robertogreco
PINEBOOK – PINE64
"Light and Thin 64-bit ARM based Open Source Notebook
PINEBOOK is an 11.6″ or 14″ notebook powered by the same Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-Bit Processor used in our popular PINE A64 Single Board Computer. It is lightweight and comes with a full size keyboard and large multi-touch touchpad for students and makers.

As a new open source platform, Pinebook development is an ongoing process and represents a great opportunity to get involved with computing on a different level, to customise and personalise the portable computer experience, to understand what is going on beneath the surface. Your input can help shape and define what a Pinebook can be."
hardware  openspource  linux  laptops 
april 2018 by robertogreco
FIELD KIT - Electroacoustic Workstation by KOMA Elektronik GmbH — Kickstarter
"The new KOMA Elektronik Field Kit is the perfect tool for everyone who would like to experiment with electroacoustic sound. Use everyday objects, amplify them and use them to make sound, like our heroes John Cage and David Tudor used to do! 

The Field Kit is optimized to process signals from microphones, contact microphones, electromagnetic pickups and able to run DC motors and solenoids. On top of that it can receive radio signals and convert signals from switches and sensors into control voltage!"



"The Field Kit boasts 7 separate functional blocks all focussed on receiving or generating all types of signals. They are designed to operate together as a coherent electroacoustic workstation or alternatively together with other pieces of music electronics with the ability to use control voltage signals.

The Field Kit is capable of doing a lot of different things! Let us run your through its functions, first there is the Four Channel Mixer:

The Four Channel Mixer is the beating heart of the Field Kit, providing a fully functional mixer with individual Gain, Mix Level and Tone control over each channel and individual Master- and Aux sub-mixes.

The level of the Master and Aux Channels can be set with the Master Volume and Aux Volume controls and the channels being sent to the Aux sub-mix can be set with dedicated Aux Select-buttons. The Aux sub-mix is pre-fader.

For the noise heads amongst you: the mixer can be used very well for feedback mixing and no-input mixing as well; there is plenty of Gain to play with and the Tone control is a passive Low/Hi Pass filter drastically changing the sound.

AM/FM/SW Radio with CV Search function

The CV Radio is a CV-controllable radio receiver capable of receiving radio frequencies on AM/FM and SW bands. Additionally it provides the ability to catch electromagnetic waves for further processing inside the Field Kit. The frequency of the radio can be set with a dedicated multifunctional Search-control which acts both as a manual CV-source and as an input attenuator for a CV-signal.

The Field Kit comes with three connectors to attach needed antenna's for both FM and SW bands and a loop antenna connector for AM signals.

Envelope Follower with CV and Gate Out

The Envelope Follower in the Field Kit applies two functions to the waveform you send to the input: full-wave rectification (mirroring of negative portions of the waveform) and low-pass filtering (averaging). It can also be used for frequency doubling of a signal, which is a great tool to have in the electroacoustic domain.

In addition to the Envelope Out, the Envelope Follower inside the Field Kit also gives out a gate signal whenever the level of the input signal is high enough. The input signal level can be set with a dedicated Attenuation-control.

Low Frequency Oscillator (LFO)

The Low Frequency Oscillator generates periodically varying voltages to be used as control signals. The output waveform can be set with a three-position Waveform-control and gives out either a Square-, Triangle- or a mix of Square and Triangle waveforms.

The frequency of the LFO can be set together with a dedicated Frequency-control and a three-position Range-control. With the higher range-settings, the frequency of the LFO reaches into the audio-range so the LFO can also be used as a simple drone sound source, send this is into a delay effect and you can make trippy sounds for hours!

DC Interface

A very cool function of the Field Kit is the DC Interface. You can use its output voltages to run little motors, fans, solenoids, buzzers and control them with control voltage signals. You can pick up the vibrations and electromagnetic waves with the contact microphones and electromagnetic pickup.

The DC Interface can be used together with PWM (Pulse Width Modulation)- or Pulse-controlled devices. An example of a PWM-controlled device is a DC-motor of which the rotation speed can be set by varying the pulse width. A Pulse-controlled device can be a solenoid-motor whose impulse strength/distance can be set with the length of the control pulse. Other devices that can be used together with the DC Interface could be computer fans, LEDs, relay switches, etc.

Here are a few things you can use with the DC Interface:

The operation mode of the DC Interface can be set with a two-position Mode-switch and there is a multifunctional Intensity-control and a CV/Trigger-input whose functions are dependent on the mode of use and whether a jack is present at the CV/Trigger-input.

The Field Kit Expansion Pack comes with both a prepared DC-motor and a prepared solenoid-motor ready to be used together with the DC Interface or alternatively the user can prepare devices on his/her own.

Signal Interface

The Signal Interface is a nifty toolset to transform the raw signals of a wide variety of sensors and switches into signals that can be used with the Field Kit or other gear. This means you can trigger or control sound by light, heat, humidity, distance, speed, acceleration, proximity, pressure, force, level, all depending on what type of switch or sensor you are using! Ideal for sound installations!

The Signal Interface consists of two parts, the Switch and the Sensor Interface.

The Switch Interface transforms signals from different switches like buttons, ball- or tilt-switches etc. into four different types of gate signals. It can output gates, inverted gates, ramp or sawtooth triggers of adjustable length (1ms to 1s). It has two outputs that can be used at the same time, so you could drive a motor and scan the CV Radio with the same switch! The output-voltage spans a range from 0V to about 8V.

The Sensor Interface is made to manipulate the output voltage of analog sensors, like light-, heat- or distance-sensors and convert their signals into control voltage. It can amplify or attenuate the incoming signal and add a DC-offset, so you can for instance set the motor to a constant speed and make it run faster by outputting a higher voltage from the sensor.

The maximum output-voltage is about 8V. It provides enough current to power an Arduino!"
audio  sound  hardware  electroacousticsound  electronics 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Bat, Bean, Beam: Inside the Personal Computer
"The inside of a computer looks a bit like a city, its memory banks and I/O devices rising like buildings over the avenues of soldered circuits. But then so do modern cities resembles motherboards, especially at night, when the cars sparkle like point-to-point signal carriers travelling along the grid. It is a well-worn visual metaphor in films and advertising, suggesting that the nerve centres of business and finance have come to resemble the information infrastructure that sustains them. Besides, isn’t the city at the sharp edge of the late capitalist era above all a generator of symbols?

And yet this technology with which we are so intimate, and that more than any other since the invention of writing has extended us, remains mostly opaque to us. Why would anyone bother to learn what digital machines look like on the inside? What difference would it make, when the uses we make of them are so incommensurate with this trivial knowledge?

I like pop-up books, and early pop-up books about the inner workings of computers have become obsolete in an interesting way. They are the last thing we would think to use to demonstrate such knowledge nowadays. They are so prone to jamming or coming apart. They have none of the grace and smoothness that our devices aspire to.

The centre piece of Sharon Gallagher’s Inside the Personal Computer – An illustrated Introduction in 3 Dimensions (1984) is the machine itself, complete with keyboard and floppy disk drive.

If you push the disk inside its unit and lower the flap, a Roman blind-like mechanism changes the message on the screen from INSERT DISK AND CLOSE DOWN to HELLO: THIS BOOK EXPLAINS WHAT I AM AND HOW I WORK. BY THE END YOU’LL KNOW ME INSIDE OUT.

It’s a neat trick. But the book is at its best when it gets into the basics of how transistors work, or uses wheels to explain how to translate a number into binary code, or a typed character first into ASCII, then into its binary equivalent.

Or simply what happens when you type “M”.

There is the mechanical action that alienates us from the digital word. Writing technologized language but still allowed us to write in our own hand, whereas there is simply no way of typing gracefully. Any M is like any other M, and even if we choose a fancy font the translation from the essential M (ASCII code 77) to the fancy M happens inside the computer and in code. This is not a ‘bad thing’. It’s just the state of the tools of our culture, which require a different kind of practice.

The other thing that this book makes clear is that the personal computer hasn’t changed very much at all since 1984. Its component parts are largely unchanged: a motherboard, a central processing unit, RAM and ROM, I/O ports. Floppy disks have become USB sticks, while hard drives – which boasted at the time ‘between 5 and 50 megabytes of information – the equivalent of between 3,000 and 30,000 typewritten pages' – have fewer moving parts. But their function is the same as in the early models. Ditto the monitors, which have become flatter, and in colour. Even the mouse already existed, although back then its name still commanded inverted commas. Today’s computers, then, are a great deal more powerful, but otherwise fairly similar to what they were like three and a half decades ago. What makes them unrecognisable is that they’re all connected. And for that – for the internet – it makes even less sense to ‘take a look inside’. Inside what? Does the internet reside in the telephone exchange, or at the headquarters of ICANN, or where else?

The inside of a computer looks a bit like a city, but it’s an alien city. None of its buildings have doors or windows. The roads are made not of stone or asphalt but of plastic and metal.

The pictures above, by the way, show the guts of mine, which I recently upgraded. It’s what I used to write this blog and everything else from 2010 to June of this year, but I feel no attachment to it – it would be silly to.

There are guides on the web to help you mine your old computer for gold using household chemicals. They come with bold type warnings about how toxic the process is. But in fact computers are both hazardous to manufacture and to dismantle. Waste materials from all the PCs and assorted electronic devices discarded since 1984 have created massively polluted districts and cities in the global south. Places like the Agbogbloshie district of Accra, Ghana, and countless others. Vast dumping sites that are mined for scraps of precious metals as much as for the personal information left onto the hard drives, while leeching chemicals into the local water supply.

This would be a more meaningful inside in which to peer if we want to understand how computers work, and their effect on the world’s societies. One effect of globalisation has been to displace human labour. Not eliminate it, far from it, but rather create the illusion in the most advanced nations that manufacturing jobs have disappeared, and meaningful work consists in either farming the land or providing services. Automation has claimed many of those jobs, of course, but other have simply shifted away from the centres where most of the consumption takes place. This is another way in which the computer has become a mysterious machine: because no-one you know makes them.

Inside the Personal Computer was written 33 years ago in an effort to demystify an object that would soon become a feature in every household, and change everyone’s life. On the last page, it is no longer the book that ‘speaks’ to the reader, like in the first pop up, but the computer itself. Its message is perfectly friendly but in hindsight more than a little eerie."
giovnnitiso  computers  computing  2017  globalization  labor  hardware  geopolitics  economics  pop-upbooks  1984  sharongallagher  writing  technology  digital  physical  icann  ascii  accra  ghana  objects  environment  sustainability  ecology 
november 2017 by robertogreco
The genius strategy behind Google's new Pixel 2 smartphones
"But a decade into the smartphone era, specifications aren't enough. When considering which phone to buy, consumers are no longer looking at a simple list of features; they're considering how all the parts work together to make a device — and the broader ecosystem — more compelling. Giving consumers the most effective experience requires vertically integrating hardware, software, and services so that the experience can be seamless. For example, technologies like Google Lens, which lets users identify objects using the camera, rely on a variety of things working perfectly — from the computing to the imaging tech to the machine learning. The Pixel 2's likely excellent camera also comes with free cloud storage from Google, making the device even more compelling. In mimicking this integrated Apple approach, Google can also leverage a key advantage over Apple: a head start in AI, as Apple has come to the field later and more clumsily than its competitors, while Google continues to be a pioneer.

The upsides of this holistic approach are clear: When a tech company controls each point in an ecosystem, it is better able to produce the very best experiences for users, and evade the pitfalls and lag of tech partnerships. It's something the entire industry is slowly recognizing. Google also announced the Google Pixelbook, a high-end Chromebook with a touchscreen and pen. It instantly evoked both the Microsoft Surface and the iPad Pro. The eerie similarity was symbolic: All three major computing companies are trying to achieve the same basic thing, locking consumers into an ecosystem.

There is a problem looming here for Google, though. In theory, the Pixel line is supposed to function like Microsoft's Surface in that it highlights the company's ecosystem at its very best, spurring on development from its broad range of partners. But inevitably, there are competing interests at work. Samsung is also recognizing that power lies in the stack; it developed its own voice assistant called Bixby rather than relying on Google's Assistant. You can, however, access both services on a new Samsung phone. It's redundant, and a little ridiculous, but perhaps demonstrative of the tension at work. Where once there was overlap and cross-pollination, things are tightening into vertical silos, and partnerships are a thing of the past. What remains to be seen is whether Google can keep on this path without alienating its partners — or, if push comes to shove, have Android continue to succeed on its own without them."
apple  google  samsung  android  ios  technology  navneetalang  iphone  pixel  hardware  2017 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Sonnet: World's Most Advanced Off-Grid Communication Device by Sonnet — Kickstarter
"Send text messages, voice recordings, images, and GPS locations on your phone without cellular coverage, satellite, or Internet access."
meshnetworks  outdoors  communication  hardware  via:clivethompson  mobile  decentralization 
july 2017 by robertogreco
How I Made My Own iPhone - in China - YouTube
"I built a like-new(but really refurbished) iPhone 6S 16GB entirely from parts I bought in the public cell phone parts markets in Huaqiangbei. And it works!

I've been fascinated by the cell phone parts markets in Shenzhen, China for a while. I'd walked through them a bunch of times, but I still didn't understand basic things, like how they were organized or who was buying all these parts and what they were doing with them.

So when someone mentioned they wondered if you could build a working smartphone from parts in the markets, I jumped at the chance to really dive in and understand how everything works. Well, I sat on it for nine months, and then I dove in."
iphone  manufacturing  shenzhen  china  diy  2017  smarthphones  electronics  classideas  hardware 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Are You Being Served? → Summit_afterlife.md
"A few months after “Are You Being Served?“ some of us met up in the Feminist Server Summit at Art Meets Radical Openness (AMRO <http://radical-openness.org>), ESC in Graz. The theme of this edition, Autonomy (im)possible sparked discussions on relationality, dependency and what that would mean for an (imaginary) Feminist Server. The following embryonic manifesto was written in response to these discussions.
A feminist server…

* Is a situated technology. She has a sense of context and considers herself to be part of an ecology of practices
* Is run for and by a community that cares enough for her in order to make her exist
* Builds on the materiality of software, hardware and the bodies gathered around it
* Opens herself to expose processes, tools, sources, habits, patterns
* Does not strive for seamlessness. Talk of transparency too often signals that something is being made invisible
* Avoids efficiency, ease-of-use, scalability and immediacy because they can be traps
* Knows that networking is actually an awkward, promiscuous and parasitic practice
* Is autonomous in the sense that she decides for her own dependencies
* Radically questions the conditions for serving and service; experiments with changing client-server relations where she can
* Treats network technology as part of a social reality
* Wants networks to be mutable and read-write accessible
* Does not confuse safety with security
* Takes the risk of exposing her insecurity
* Tries hard not to apologize when she is sometimes not available


Another version will be developed and presented at The Ministry of Hacking (ESC, Graz) <http://esc.mur.at/de/projekt/ministry-hacking>. You are welcome to contribute to this text through comments, rewriting, additions or erasure: <http://note.pad.constantvzw.org/public_pad/feministserver>."
via:caseygollan  feminism  servers  technology  ecology  community  software  hardware  materiality  efficiency  scalability  slow  small  immediacy  networking  autonomy  security  safety  readwrite  service  manifestos  context  sfsh  care  caring  transparency  open  openness 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Andromium's $99 Superbook turns your Android phone into a laptop (crowdfunding) - Liliputing
[See also:

"Superbook"
https://getsuperbook.com/

"The Superbook: Turn your smartphone into a laptop"
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/andromium/the-superbook-turn-your-smartphone-into-a-laptop-f

"Superbook is a $99 laptop shell for Android smartphones"
http://liliputing.com/2016/04/superbook-is-a-99-laptop-shell-for-android-smartphones.html

"This $99 gadget can turn your Android phone into a laptop — here's how it works"
http://www.techinsider.io/andromium-superbook-photos-android-phone-laptop-2016-8

"The Superbook is a $99 laptop shell for your Android phone: The dream of the Motorola Atrix lives"
http://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2016/7/11/12152850/superbook-laptop-shell-android-phone

"HP's Elite x3 is designed to be your Windows phone, laptop, and desktop: A powerful phone meant to be your one and only device"
http://www.theverge.com/2016/2/21/11068496/hp-elite-x3-announced-specs-windows-10-mwc-2016

"In Less Than Two Years, a Smartphone Could Be Your Only Computer"
https://www.wired.com/2015/02/smartphone-only-computer/ ]
superbook  chromebooks  android  laptops  hardware  2016  windows  windowsphone 
september 2016 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] occupational safety and health administration for machine learning
"Trying to find your bearings, trying to make sense out of all these crosscurrents is dizzying and I don't have a pat answer for any of it. I would like to finish, though, by arguing that these ambiguities are what constitute the present for the internet of things.

The lack of clarity around, and in some cases the hijacking of, the reasonable expectations of action and reaction in an internet of things is what is and what will shape and redefine the relationship between the past and near-futures of the internet of things you have imagined for so long.

This is the work."
aaronstraupcope  internetofthings  nfc  hardware  cooper-hewitt  museums  2016  bespokiness  iot 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices | Crowd Supply
[via: https://boingboing.net/2016/08/04/a-freeopen-computer-on-a-card.html ]

"Have you ever had to replace an expensive laptop because it was “unfixable” or the cost of getting it repaired was ridiculously high? That really stings, doesn’t it?

Now imagine if you owned a computing device that you could easily fix yourself and inexpensively upgrade as needed. So, instead of having to shell out for a completely new computer, you could simply spend around US$50 to upgrade — which, by the way, you could easily do in SECONDS, by pushing a button on the side of your device and just popping in a new computer card. Doesn’t that sound like the way it should be?

We think so, too! That’s why we spent several years developing the easy-to-maintain, easy-on-your-pocket, easy-on-Mother Earth, EOMA68 line of computing devices.

Read on, because it gets even better. Now, let’s say you accidentally dropped your laptop and a corner gets cracked. Instead of swearing or weeping over the loss, you simply PRINT OUT REPLACEMENT PARTS with a 3D printer. With the EOMA68 line of computers, you have the freedom to make your own laptop housing parts and can download the CAD files to have replacement PCBs made. Heck, you don’t necessarily have to break anything to have a bit of fun with your laptop: maybe you would like the freedom of being able to CHANGE THE COLOR from silver to aqua to bright orange.

A great deal of thought and ingenuity has been put into the design of the EOMA68 line of computing devices to make them money-saving and convenient. For example, you can connect the computer card to your TV set to continue working if your monitor fails… and in the future, we’d like to give you the option to plug the computer card into your TV set if your monitor fails.

Security is also a major concern. We have taken measures to ensure the integrity of your computer data that exceed anything being sold in North America, Europe (or most parts of the world). And, because we have the complete set of sources, there is an opportunity to weed out the back doors that have been slowly making their way into our computing devices. There is no security without a strong foundation and understanding of what is running on your computing devices. For the first time, the EOMA68 is a standard to work off for building freedom-friendly, privacy-respecting, and secure computing devices.

Lastly, being kind to Mother Earth has to be a priority. It goes without saying that we don’t like seeing electronic goods continue to stack up in landfills around the world, and we know you don’t like it either. We envisage a thriving community developing around the re-use of older computer cards: people using them to set up ultra-low power servers, routers, entertainment centers or just passing them on to a friend.

The EOMA68 Standard
The goal of this project is to introduce the idea of being ethically responsible about both the ecological and the financial resources required to design, manufacture, acquire and maintain our personal computing devices. This campaign therefore introduces the world’s first devices built around the EOMA68 standard, a freely-accessible royalty-free, unencumbered hardware standard formulated and tested over the last five years around the ultra-simple philosophy of “just plug it in: it will work.”

Key Aspects
• Truly Free: Everything is freely licensed
• Modular: Use the same Computer Card across many devices
• Money-saving: Upgrade by replacing Computer Cards, not the whole device
• Long-lived: Designed to be relevant and useful for at least a decade, if not longer
• Ecologically Responsible: Keeps parts out of landfill by repurposing them

Some of you might recognise the form-factor of EOMA68 Computer Cards: it’s the legacy PCMCIA from the 1990s. The EOMA68 standard therefore re-uses legacy PCMCIA cases and housings, because that’s an environmentally responsible thing to do (and saves hugely on development costs).

Read more on the ecological implications of electronics waste in the white paper.

First Offerings
The first of the available devices will be a Micro-Desktop Housing, a 15.6” Laptop Housing, and two types of Computer Cards based on a highly efficient Allwinner A20 Dual-core ARM Cortex A7 processor."
plannedobsolescence  computers  hardware  computing 
august 2016 by robertogreco
LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."
libraris  hardware  opensource  occupy.here  librarybox  piratebox  classideas  projectideas  via:unthinkingly 
june 2016 by robertogreco
BRCK | Rugged, Portable WiFi Hotspot & Battery Extender
"We’re a team of software developers, engineers and technologists who are from Africa and live here. We have a long history of building things, such as Ushahidi, Crowdmap and the iHub. Our expertise runs from cloud software to fingerprint scanners for mobile devices to high-level medical device prototyping and manufacturing.

The BRCK was designed and prototyped in Nairobi, Kenya. We wanted a connectivity device that fit our needs, where electricity and internet connections are problematic both in urban and rural areas.

As we laid out what such a device would look like – physically robust, able to connect to multiple networks, a hub for all local devices, enough backup power to survive a blackout – we realized that the way the entire world is connecting to the web is changing. We no longer only get online via desktops in our office with an ethernet connection, we have multiple devices, and mobile connectivity is crucial."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/brcknet/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BExylz5FIRU/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BFl2RW3lIVf/ ]
wifi  internet  hardware  brck  nairobi  kenya  ushahidi  ihub  crowdmap  connectivity 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Maharam | Story | Anni Albers: Hardware
"In 1940, renowned Bauhaus weaver Anni Albers and student Alex Reed created a collection of jewelry from basic household items. They sourced materials from hardware stores and five-and-dime shops such as paper clips, bobby pins, erasers, wine corks, metal sieves, washers, and nuts. By utilizing these objects decoratively and formally, Albers and Reed created a collection of anti-luxury jewelry that proposed a new definition of value.

Albers and Reed first met at Black Mountain College, the legendary experimental art school located in the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina. The school offered a progressive liberal arts education that fueled the American avant-garde from 1933-1956. Collaborations between teachers, students, and visiting artists were encouraged and, accordingly, Albers and Reed worked and traveled together.

It was during their trip to Oaxaca, Mexico, that they encountered the pre-Columbian jewelry of Monte Albán. The thousand-year-old jewelry was composed of unusual material combinations of precious and non-precious elements—pearls and seashells, rock crystals and gold. To Albers and Reed, this jewelry offered an insight into the wisdom of material value.

Albers and Reed’s collection was born from this logic. They were able to approach material as elemental form, dissociated from its prior purpose. Later associations of industrial hardware as ornament can be found in the punk fashions of the 1970s and ’80s. But rather than seeking to subvert the status quo, the jewelry designs of Albers and Reed had their humble beginnings in the relics of Monte Albán—creating a collection that affirmed ancient aesthetics through forward-focused practicality."
annialbers  bmc  blackmountaincollege  hardware  jewelry  alexreed  materials  diy  classideas 
april 2016 by robertogreco
#vaporfolk #hollyvoodoo. Sponsored by Amazon Readymades.
"With technology invented to fly us to the moon we write LMAO.

The internet tribe abandoned the global village when it started to resemble a shopping mall. After the digital natives were promised that their new ideas would lead to fame and success on global markets, they are now confronted with totalitarian networks and corporate structures. Consequently they turned their heads away from the screen. Facebook owns the copyrights to their ideas, shared infinitely to only disappear in the clouds.

Among all the possible realities imaginable, artists start to look for common ground in products, hardware and brands – commodities made from global materials. A form of recursive materialism emerges. The common ground between seven billion people is that we can all share a micro USB connector. An empty coke bottle will be found in the desert sands and nomads navigate the dunes with a Samsung tablet. Global materials seem to override all phantasies of unique visions and subjective expressions.

But the internet tribe moves to the outskirts of physical production, reusing artifacts from the world of corporate mythologies. They work with concepts of the “Archaic” instead of “New”, choosing to be ‘poorsumers’, transforming ideological waste into something magical. For them, art is a poetic freight and the trade system a collective parable of desire. By imitating commodities in almost shamanic rituals, a higher form of cargo is summoned: be it future wealth, success or even art.

Zsófia Keresztes, Angus McCullough, Alexandra Hackett (A.L.C.H.), Andreas Ervik, Stephanie Syjuco, Michele Gabriele, Pau Sampera, Peter Moosgaard, Bernhard Garnicnig

Opening: 3.6. 18:00
Exhibition: 5.6.–27.6.
Lust Gallery, Hollandstrasse 7 1020 Wien

“An approach to the now which looks widely, sharply, and especially at global materials ripe for use by our village of disenfranchised consumers.” (Quote and image of “Prototype: Axe” by Angus McCullough)

In cooperation with Making.Artistic.Technology (http://artistictechnology.at/) and the Palais des Beaux Arts Wien (http://www.palaisdesbeauxarts.at/). Supported by the Austrian Federal Chancellery.

#walmartsurrealism #hyperethnicity #vaporfolk #brandart #matrixbotanica #productshamanism #favelachic #holycargo #ritualfakes #ancientonline #poplatch #postdigital #ersatzculture #saintpepsi #refundutopia #parableofdesire #neomaterialism #summonwarhola #hollyvoodoo #digitalnaïve #artsypovera"
petermoosgaard  bernhardgarnicnig  pausampera  angusmccullough  alexandrahackett  andreaservik  stephaniesyjuco  michelegabriele  zsófiakeresztes  globalization  technology  art  vaporfolk  hollyvoodoo  capitalism  screens  digitalnatives  cloud  hardware  poorsumers  magic  cargocult  wealth  success  latecapitalism 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Strategies against architecture: interactive media and transformative technology at Cooper Hewitt | MW2015: Museums and the Web 2015
"Cooper Hewitt reopened at the end of 2014 with a transformed museum in a renovated heritage building, Andrew Carnegie's home on the Upper East Side of New York City. New galleries, a collection that was being rapidly digitized, a new brand, and a desire for new audiences drove the museum to rethink and reposition its role as a design museum. At the core of the new museum is a digital platform, built in-house, that connects collection and patron management systems to in-gallery and online experiences. These have allowed the museum to redesign everything from object labels and showcases to the fundamentals of a 'visit experience'. This paper explores in detail the process, the decisions made – and resulting tradeoffs - during each stage of the process. In so doing it reveals the challenges of collaborating with internal and external capacities; operating internationally with online collaboration tools; rapid prototyping; and the distinct differences between software and hardware design and production."



"In early 2012 at the National Art Education Association conference at the Metropolitan Museum of Art a group of junior school children working with Queens Museum of Art got up on stage and presented their view of ‘what technology in a museum should be like’. The kids imagined and designed the sorts of technologies that they felt would make their visit to a museum better. None of their proposed technologies were unfeasible and they imagined a very familiar sounding museum. The best invention proposed was a tracking device that each child would wear, allowing them to roam freely in a geo-fenced museum like home-detention prisoners with ankle-shackles, whilst their teachers sat comfortably in the museum cafe watching them move as dots on a tablet. The children argued that such a device would allow them to roam the museum and see the parts of it they actually wanted to see, and the teachers would get to fulfil their desires of just “hanging out in the cafe chatting”.

Often it feels like museums make decisions about the appropriate use of technology based upon short term internal needs – the need to have something ‘newsworthy’, the need to have something to keep their funders happy, and occasionally to meet the assumed needs of a specific audience coming to a specific exhibition. Rarely is there an opportunity like the one at Cooper Hewitt, to consider the entire museum and purposely reconfigure its relationships with audiences, all in one go. Even rarer is the funding to make such a step change possible.

The D&EM team established a series of unwritten technology principles for the new galleries and experience that were reinforced throughout the concept design stages and then encoded into practice during development. At the heart of these was an commitment to ensure that whatever was designed for the galleries would give visitors a reason to physically visit – and that nothing would be artificially held back, content-wise, from the web. Technology, too, had to help and encourage the visitor against the architectural impositions of the building itself.

Complementing a strategic plan that envisioned the transformation of the museum into a ‘design resource’, and an increasing willingness to provide more open access to the collection, concepts for media and technology in the galleries was to –

1. Give visitors explicit permission to play
Play was seen as an important way of addressing threshold issues and architecture. Entering the Carnegie Mansion, the experience of crossing the threshold provided an opportunity to upend expectations – much like the lobby space of a hotel. Very early on in the design process, then-Director, Bill Moggridge enthused about the idea of concierges greeting visitors at the door, warmly welcoming them into the building and setting them at ease. Technological interventions – even symbolic ones – were expected to support this need to change every visitor’s perception of how they were ‘allowed to behave’ in the mansion.

2. Make interactive experiences social and multi-player and allow people to learn by watching

The Cooper Hewitt, even in its expanded form, is a physically small museum. It has 16,000 sq ft of gallery space which is configured as a series of domestic spaces except for the open plan third floor, which was converted from offices into gallery space as part of the renovation. If interactive experiences were to support a transformed audience profile with more families and social groups visiting together, the museum would need experiences that worked well with multiple users, and provided points of social interaction. Immediately this suggested an ‘app-free’ approach even though Cooper Hewitt had been an early adopter of an iPod Touch media guide (2010) and iPad App (2011) in previous special exhibitions.

3. Ensure a ‘look up’ experience

Again, because of the domestic spaces with narrow doorways, encouraging visitors to be constantly referring to their mobile devices was not desirable. There was a strong consensus amongst the staff and designers that the museum should provide a compelling enough experience for visitors to only need to use their mobile devices to take photos with.

4. Be ubiquitous, a ‘default’ operating mode for the institution

The biggest lesson from MONA was that for a technology experience to have the best chance of transforming how visitors interacted with the museum, and how staff considered it into the future, that technology had to be ubiquitous. An ‘optional guide’, an ‘optional app’, even a ‘suggested mobile website’ might meet the needs of some visitors but it was unlikely to achieve the large scale change we hoped for. Indeed, the experience of prior technologies at Cooper Hewitt had been considered disappointing by the museum with a 9% take up rate (Longo, 2011) for the iPad guide made for the (pre-closure) blockbuster exhibition Set In Style. Similarly, only having interactive experiences in ‘some galleries’ threatened to relegate certain experiences to ‘younger audiences’ – something that is common in science museums.

5. Work in conjunction with the web and offer a “persistence of visit”

We were also insistent from the start that whatever was designed, that it had to acknowledge the web, and that ‘post-visit’ diaries were to be considered. The museum was enamoured with MONA’s post-visit reports from The O, and similar initiatives that followed including MOMA’s Audio+ (2013) and others. This idea grew and the D&EM team began to build out a sizeable infrastructure over 2013, the desire to ensure that everything on exhibition in the museum would also be available online – without exception – became technically feasible. As the museum’s curatorial staff began to finalise object lists for the opening exhibitions, it became clear that beyond the technology layer, a new layer of policy changes would be required to realise this idea. New loan forms and new donor agreements were negotiated and by the time objects began to arrive for installation at the museum in 2014, all but a handful of lenders had agreed to have a metadata and image record of their object’s presence in the museum not only be online during the run of an exhibition, but permanently on the exhibition’s online catalogue."



"As a sector we have spent a couple of decades making excuses for why “digital” can’t be made core to staffing requirements and the results have ranged from unsatisfying to dismal.

The shift to a ‘post-digital’ museum where “digital [is] being naturalized within museums’ visions and articulations of themselves” (Parry, 2013) will require a significant realignment of priorities and an investment in people. The museum sector is not alone in this – private media organisations and tech companies face exactly the same challenge. Despite ‘digital people’ and ‘engineers’ being in high demand, they should not be considered an ‘overpriced indulgence’ but rather than as an integral part of the already multidisciplinary teams required to run a museum, or any other cultural institution.

The flow of digital talent from private companies to new types of public service organizations such as the Government Digital Service (UK), 18F (inside GSA) and US Digital Service, proves that there are ways, beyond salaries, to attract and retain the specialist staff required to build the types of products and services required to transform museums. In fact, we argue that museums (and other cultural institutions) offer significant intrinsic benefits and social capital that are natural talent attractors that other types of non-profits and public sector agencies lack. The barriers to changing the museum workforce in this way are not primarily financial but internal, structural and kept in place by a strong institutional inertia."
cooper-hewitt  aaronstraupcope  sebastianchan  2015  design  museums  experience  web  internet  ux  api  userexperience  hardware  change  organizationalchange  billmoggridge  mona  theo  davidwalsh  digital  gov.uk  privacy  identity  absence  tomcoates  collections  soa  servicesorientedarchitecture  steveyegge  persistence  longevity  display  nfc  rfid  architecture  applications  online  engagement  play  technology  post-digital  18f 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Sneakernet - Wikipedia
"Sneakernet is an informal term describing the transfer of electronic information, especially computer files, by physically moving removable media such as magnetic tape, floppy disks, compact discs, USB flash drives (thumb drives, USB stick) or external hard drives from one computer to another, usually in lieu of transmitting the information over a computer network. The term, a tongue-in-cheek play on Ethernet,[citation needed] refers to the use of someone wearing sneakers as the transport mechanism for the data."
p2p  peer2peer  filesharing  sneakernets  networks  hardware  usbdrives  sneakernet 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Why I’m Saying Goodbye to Apple, Google and Microsoft — Backchannel — Medium
"I’d periodically played with Linux and other alternatives on my PC over the years, but always found the exercise tedious and, in the end, unworkable. But I never stopped paying attention to what brilliant people like Richard Stallman and Cory Doctorow and others were saying, namely that we were leading, and being led, down a dangerous path. In a conversation with Cory one day, I asked him about his use of Linux as his main PC operating system. He said it was important to do what he believed in—and, by the way, it worked fine.

Could I do less, especially given that I’d been public in my worries about the trends?

So about three years ago, I installed the Ubuntu variant — among the most popular and well-supported — on a Lenovo ThinkPad laptop, and began using it as my main system. For a month or so, I was at sea, making keystroke errors and missing a few Mac applications on which I’d come to rely. But I found Linux software that worked at least well enough, and sometimes better than its Mac and Windows counterparts.

And one day I realized that my fingers and brain had fully adjusted to the new system. Now, when I used a Mac, I was a bit confused."



"As mobile computing has become more dominant, I’ve had to rethink everything on that platform, too. I still consider the iPhone the best combination of software and hardware any company has offered, but Apple’s control-freakery made it a nonstarter. I settled on Android, which was much more open and readily modified.

But Google’s power and influence worry me, too, even though I still trust it more than many other tech companies. Google’s own Android is excellent, but the company has made surveillance utterly integral to the use of its software. And app developers take disgusting liberties, collecting data by the petabyte and doing god-knows-what with it. (Security experts I trust say the iPhone is more secure by design than most Android devices.) How could I walk my talk in the mobile age?"



"So I keep looking for ways to further reduce my dependence on the central powers. One of my devices, an older tablet running Cyanogenmod, is a test bed for an even more Google-free existence.

It’s good enough for use at home, and getting better as I find more free software — most of it via the “F-Droid” download library — that handles what I need. I’ve even installed a version of Ubuntu’s new tablet OS, but it’s not ready, as the cliche goes, for prime time. Maybe the Firefox OS will be a player.

But I’ve given up the idea that free software and open hardware will become the norm for consumers anytime soon, if ever—even though free and open-source software is at the heart of the Internet’s back end.

If too few people are willing to try, though, the default will win. And the defaults are Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Our economic system is adapting to community-based solutions, slowly but surely. But let’s face it: we collectively seem to prefer convenience to control, at least for the moment. I’m convinced more and more people are learning about the drawbacks of the bargain we’ve made, wittingly or not, and someday we may collectively call it Faustian.

I keep hoping more hardware vendors will see the benefit of helping their customers free themselves of proprietary control. This is why I was so glad to see Dell, a company once joined at the hip with Microsoft, offer a Linux laptop. If the smaller players in the industry don’t themselves enjoy being pawns of software companies and mobile carriers, they have options, too. They can help us make better choices.

Meanwhile, I’ll keep encouraging as many people as possible to find ways to take control for themselves. Liberty takes some work, but it’s worth the effort. I hope you’ll consider embarking on this journey with me."
apple  google  microsoft  dangilmour  linux  opensource  2015  community  hardware  dell  cyanogenmod  ios  android  windows  mac  osx  f-droid  ubuntu  firefoxos  firefox  os  mozilla  lenovo  richardstallman  corydoctorow  libreoffice 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Russell Davies: The day the rabbits died
"Somewhere around the end of February my Nabaztag rabbit stopped doing the only thing it did any more - announcing the time in odd, amusing ways, in a strange English accent.

It was an act any of you could have built with a couple of line of javascript and a voice over artist but it felt different because it was embedded in a plastic rabbit.

And, although I didn't notice straight away the sound of the Nabaztag not doing anything because one a routine failure faded into the sound of the Nabaztag not doing anything because they'd switched the servers off and I noticed it had died and I was sad.

I've owned three iterations of the Nabaztag/Karotz thing - each bought and connected in the fond hope that it would finally make the network talk to me rather than just appear on a screen. And each didn't quite work, and each attempt at hacking around it didn't quite work either and then they just became Minimum Viable Talking Things muttering to themselves in the corner of the room.

But there was still something to love about them.

Not least because they suggested there were alternatives to the Silicon Valley object design axis where everything sits somewhere on a line between Useful and Delightful. They found another interesting place to be, a line between Useless and French, and they explored what it meant to make the network into something funny, social and decorative. They didn't fail because no one wants that. They failed because the technology wasn't good enough and because hardware is hard.

This still feels to me, like fresh and unexplored territory - the network talking to you, not you talking to it. It doesn't need speech recognition, it just needs to connect to your feeds and friends and occasionally tell you what's happening. The Nabaztag took that further by embedding that capability in something charming and odd, something that didn't look and feel like 'technology'.

Now, though, the servers are off and it looks like my only option is to learn how to run it off a Raspberry Pi.

The rabbits have fallen apart."
2015  russelldavies  nabaztag  magic  uselessness  useful  delight  delightfulness  technology  ambient  karotz  hardware 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Raspberry Pi XBMC Media Center – A Complete Solution - Jason Carr
"I have to admit it’s taken a good amount of research and experimentation, but I finally have an XBMC media center solution on the Raspberry Pi that rivals what I used to have on my old power-sucking full-size PC.

I’m writing this guide to help others get up and running with a stable solution as quickly as possible. I’ll be covering everything from the hardware pieces to the software and configuration. I’m also hoping this guide will be accessible to those who aren’t overly tech-inclined, and I’ll provide some support in the comments.

Continue on after the break for the complete guide."
raspberrypi  mediacenters  2012  via:maxfenton  hardware 
february 2015 by robertogreco
PirateBox by David Darts
"PirateBox is a self-contained mobile communication and file sharing system. Simply turn it on to transform any space into a free and open communications and file sharing network."

[See also: http://piratebox.cc/
http://piratebox.cc/openwrt:diy

http://occupyhere.org/
http://librarybox.us/index.php ]

[via: http://www.furtherfield.org/programmes/event/piratebox-cutlery-auto-net ]
projectieas  occupy.here  hardware  darknets  networks  opensource  communication  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  tecnology  davidarts  librarybox  wifi  filesharing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Joi Ito's 9 Principles of the Media Lab on Vimeo
"In a brief address delivered at the MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference, Media Lab director Joi Ito proposed the "9 Principles" that will guide the Media Lab's work under his leadership… some in pointed contrast to those of the Lab's founder, Nicholas Negroponte.

Ito's principles are:

1. Disobedience over compliance
2. Pull over push
3. Compasses over maps
4. Emergence over authority
5. Learning over education
6. Resilience over strength
7. Systems over objects
8. Risk over safety
9. Practice over theory"
joiito  mitmedialab  disobedience  compliance  authority  emergence  learning  education  resilience  systemsthinking  systems  2014  practice  process  risk  risktaking  safety  leadership  administration  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  knightfoundation  money  academia  internet  culture  business  mbas  innovation  permission  startups  power  funding  journalism  hardware  highered  highereducation  agile  citizenjournalism  nicholasnegroponte  citizenscience  medialab 
december 2014 by robertogreco
goTenna | No service, no problem.
"goTenna pairs wirelessly with your smartphone, enabling you to text and share your location with anyone who has the device even if you don't have service. No towers, routers or satellites required!"
location  gotenna  hardware  communication  radio  via:tcarmody 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Cyborg Unplug
"Cyborg Unplug is a wireless anti-surveillance system for the home and workplace. 'Plug to Unplug', it detects and kicks devices known to pose a risk to personal privacy from your local wireless network, breaking uploads and streams. Detected devices currently include: Google Glass, Dropcam, small drones/copters, wireless 'spy' microphones and various other network-dependent surveillance devices.

Cyborg Unplug comes hot on the heels of glasshole.sh, a script written by Julian Oliver to detect and disconnect Google's Glass device from a locally owned and administered network. Following broad coverage in the press, the script struck a chord with countless people all over the world that felt either frustrated or threatened by the growing use and abuse of covert, camera-enabled computer technology.

Whether business office, restaurant, school or nightclub: it's your territory and your rules, so make it harder for those that seek to abuse it.

Cyborg Unplug is developed in shared spirit with the Stop The Cyborgs campaign, whose Google Glass ban signs have become popular among restauranteurs, cafe and club owners in the United States.

Cyborg Unplug will be available for pre-order September 30, 2014. Subscribe to ensure you are kept up-to-date with the launch and to receive other low-volume information about the project."
culture  art  cyborg  privacy  wireless  cyberunplug  surveillance  julianoliver  detection  hardware  jamming 
september 2014 by robertogreco
The USB Condom - Home
"The USB Condom protects personal and private data stored on your mobile device by blocking data connections in the USB cable, only allowing power to your device."

"The USB Condom protects personal and private data stored on your mobile device, so now you can charge your battery anywhere without fear your data will be stolen, accidentally shared, or infected with a virus! USB Condoms only transfer power, not your data!"
hardware  security  usb 
august 2014 by robertogreco
AirType keyless bluetooth keyboard fits in the palm of your hand
"AirType keyless bluetooth keyboard fits in the palm of your hand

a hardware and machine learning startup based out of austin, texas has developed AirType, a keyboard-less keyboard that allows users to type on virtually any surface, or none at all. fitting in the palm of one’s hand, the ‘AirType’ self-learns finger movements and is accompanied by an app that brings dynamic text prediction and correction to each typing experience. the compact piece of technology also adapts to the way users type, meaning typing habits never need to change. for easy transportation, just clip it onto your tablet, and take it with you everywhere. to learn more, see here."

[website: http://airtype.io/ ]
[video: https://vimeo.com/90766615 ]
typing  hardware  keyboards  accessories  input  airtype 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Petcube – Interactive wireless pet camera. Smart monitor for your cat or dog.
"Check on your furry loved ones when out of home
Play with your pet using a safe built-in laser toy
Save your pet from obesity with daily exercise
Share access to your petcube and play with other shared pets
Make friends. Discover cuteness."
pets  hardware  technology  surveillance  play  dogs  cats  cameras  animals 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Kano
"It's a computer — and you make it yourself"
raspberrypi  kids  children  computers  hardware  kano  kits  classideas 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Instead of futurists, let’s be now-ists: Joi Ito at TED2014 | TED Blog
[Update 8 July 2013: video now at http://www.ted.com/talks/joi_ito_want_to_innovate_become_a_now_ist ]

"Remember before the internet? Ito calls this period ”B.I.” In this stage of the world, life was simple and somewhat predictable. “But with the internet, the world became extremely complex. The Newtonian laws that we so cherished turned out to be just local ordinances … Most of the people who were surviving are dealing with a different set of principles.”

In the B.I. world, starting a business had a clear timeline: says Ito, you hired MBAs to write a business plan, you raised money, and then you built the thing you wanted to build. But in the AI world, the cost of innovation has come down so much that you start with the building—and then figure the money and business plan. “It’s pushed innovation to the edges, to the dorms rooms and startups, and away from stodgy organizations that had the money, the power and the influence.”

During Nicholas Negroponte’s era at the MIT Media Lab, the motto he proposed was: “Demo or die.” He said that the demo only had to work once.But Ito, who points out that he’s a “three-time college dropout,” wants to change the motto to: “Deploy or die.” He explains, “You have to get it into the real world to have it actually count.”

Ito takes us to Shenzhen, China, where young inventors are taking this idea to the next level. In the same way that “kids in Palo Alto make websites,” these kids make cell phones. They bring their designs to the markets, look at what’s selling and what others are doing, iterate and do it over again. “What we thought you could only do in software, kids in Shenzhen are doing in hardware,” he says.

He sees this as a possibility for the rest of us, too. He introduces us to the Samsung Techwin SMT SM482 Pick & Place Machine, which can put Samsung machine can put 23,000 components on an electronics board, something that used to take an entire factory. “The cost of prototyping and distributing is becoming so low that students and software can do it too,” says Ito. He points to the Gen9 gene assembler. While it used to take millions and millions of dollars to sequence genes, this assembler can do it on a chip, with one error per 10,000 base pairs. In the space of bioengineering. “This is kind of like when we went from transistors racked by hand to Pentium, pushing bioengineering into dorm rooms and startup companies,” he says.

Of course, this new model is scary. “Bottom-up innovation is chaotic and hard to control,” he says. But it’s a better way. It’s a way that lets you pull resources—both human and technical—when you need them rather than hoarding what you think you’ll need before you start. And we need to educate children to think along on these lines. “Education is what people do to you and learning is what you do for yourself,” says Ito. “You’re not going to be on top of mountain all by yourself with a #2 pencil … What we need to learn is how to learn.”

Ito urges us to follow a compass rather than a map. Instead of planning out every exact points before you start, allow yourself to make the decisions you need as you go in the general direction of where you need to be.

“I don’t like the word ‘futurist,’” he says. “I think we should be now-ists. Focus on being connected, always learning, fully aware and super present.”"
connectedlearning  fabrication  making  joiito  2014  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  justintime  openstudioproject  lcproject  hardware  software  demos  demoing  now-ists  futurists  future  speculativedesign  glvo  teams  bottomup  chaos  control  resources 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Ariel Waldman » Democratized Science Instrumentation
"I wrote/curated a guidebook on democratized science instrumentation, documenting both hardware and software that significantly increase people’s opportunity to participate in scientific discovery. The paper was commissioned by the Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI) to be presented to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)."

[PDF: https://www.ida.org/stpi/occasionalpapers/papers/OP-7-2012-DemocratizedScienceInstrumentation-v1.pdf ]
openhardware  hardware  science  citizenscience  arielwaldman  2014  ostp  stpi  technology  instrumentation  software  projectideas  openstudioproject  srg  edg  glcvo 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Public Lab: a DIY environmental science community
"The Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (Public Lab) is a community -- supported by a 501(c)3 non-profit -- which develops and applies open-source tools to environmental exploration and investigation. By democratizing inexpensive and accessible Do-It-Yourself techniques, Public Lab creates a collaborative network of practitioners who actively re-imagine the human relationship with the environment.

The core Public Lab program is focused on "civic science" in which we research open source hardware and software tools and methods to generate knowledge and share data about community environmental health. Our goal is to increase the ability of underserved communities to identify, redress, remediate, and create awareness and accountability around environmental concerns. Public Lab achieves this by providing online and offline training, education and support, and by focusing on locally-relevant outcomes that emphasize human capacity and understanding."
diy  environment  research  science  sustainability  citizenscience  classideas  open  technology  opentechnology  community  opensource  publiclab  civicscience  hardware  software  boston  cambridge  lcproject  openstudioproject 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Fairphone | A seriously cool smartphone. Putting social values first.
"Our Story. It’s big, small and about you.

You can change the way products are made, starting with a single Phone. Together, we’re opening up the Supply Chain, and redefining the Economy – one step at a time."
fairphone  mobile  phones  environment  hardware  sustainability  economics  labor 
june 2013 by robertogreco
OPENROV
"OpenROV is a DIY community centered around underwater robots for exploration & adventure. We're a group of amateur and professional ROV builders and operators from over 50 countries who have a passion for exploring the deep."
robot  robots  openrov  underwater  rov  hardware  opensource  diy  robotics  drones  oceanography  droneproject 
august 2012 by robertogreco
ShareBrained Technology | Electronics for Curious Brains
"Hi, I’m Jared. I have a little company called ShareBrained Technology. It’s just me right now, designing timekeeping, radio, and music hardware and software I think is cool. I subscribe to the open-source hardware philosophy — if you buy a product, you should be able to modify it in whatever way you imagine. Encouraging hacking of hardware and software is the best way I can think of to promote the advancement of useful technology.

Have a look around the Web site — at my blog, or at my products, and let me know what you think via e-mail, Facebook, or Google+. If you live in Portland, Oregon, catch me at a Dorkbot PDX meeting."
music  radios  sharebrained  hacking  portland  oregon  jaredboone  make  microcontroller  kits  steampunk  timepieces  clocks  diy  hardware  electronics 
august 2012 by robertogreco
MaKey MaKey: An Invention Kit for Everyone (Official Site)
"MaKey MaKey is an invention kit for the 21st century. Turn everyday objects into touchpads and combine them with the internet. It's a simple Invention Kit for Beginners and Experts doing art, engineering, and everything inbetween:

The kit will include everything you see above: MaKey MaKey, Alligator Clips, USB Cable."
interface  mit  invention  programming  children  interaction  hardware  diy  arduino  makeymakey  coding 
july 2012 by robertogreco
A Cloud of My Own (Pinboard Blog)
"I have no idea what I'm doing. I do it, I write it up, and then wisdom pours down from the Internet."
tinkering  servers  hardware  twitter  crowdsourcing  web  internet  2012  learningbydoing  experimentation  learning  doing  maciejceglowski  pinboard  maciejcegłowski 
june 2012 by robertogreco
FreedomBox Foundation
"What is FreedomBox?

Email and telecommunications that protects privacy and resists eavesdropping

A publishing platform that resists oppression and censorship.

An organizing tool for democratic activists in hostile regimes.

An emergency communication network in times of crisis.

FreedomBox will put in people's own hands and under their own control encrypted voice and text communication, anonymous publishing, social networking, media sharing, and (micro)blogging.

Much of the software already exists: onion routing, encryption, virtual private networks, etc. There are tiny, low-watt computers known as "plug servers" to run this software. The hard parts is integrating that technology, distributing it, and making it easy to use without expertise. The harder part is to decentralize it so users have no need to rely on and trust centralized infrastructure."
decentralized  decentralizedcomputing  decentralization  infrastructure  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  mediasharing  encryption  eavesdropping  telecommunications  email  oppression  censorship  microblogging  publishing  ebenmoglen  activism  hardware  technology  linux  security  freedom  privacy  opensource  software  freedombox 
may 2012 by robertogreco
XOXO Festival by Andy Baio — Kickstarter
"Hey Kickstarter! We're organizing XOXO, an arts and technology festival in Portland, Oregon this September 13-16th.

XOXO is a celebration of disruptive creativity. We want to take all the independent artists using the Internet to make a living doing what they love — the makers, craftspeople, musicians, filmmakers, comic book artists, game designers, hardware hackers — and bring them together with the technologists building the platforms that make it possible. If you have an audience and a good idea, nothing’s standing in your way.

XOXO is in three parts:

Conference (Saturday – Sunday). Talks from artists and creative technologists around the country that are breaking new ground.
Market (Saturday – Sunday). A large marketplace with a tightly-curated list of the best of Portland's arts and tech scenes, sharing and selling their work, with food supplied by the best of our thriving food cart scene…"
via:caseygollan  togo  oregon  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  technology  arts  collaboration  hackerspaces  hackers  hardware  design  2012  events  andybaio  kickstarter  disruption  disruptive  conferences  portland  xoxo 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Teagueduino: Learn to Make by Teague — Kickstarter
"Teagueduino is an open source electronic board and interface that allows you to realize creative ideas without soldering or knowing how to code, while teaching you the ropes of programming and embedded development (like arduino). Teagueduino is designed to help you discover your inner techno-geek and embrace the awesomeness of making things in realtime — even if you’ve only ever programmed your VCR."
arduino  microprocessors  2011  electronics  kickstarter  hardware  diy  hacking  learning 
november 2011 by robertogreco
There Is One Apple, But Many Microsofts: The Company You Don’t Know | Epicenter | Wired.com
"But now, even as I (like most everyone else) use more of Apple’s stuff, I think I’m more fascinated by Microsoft — particularly the Microsoft that most of us don’t usually think about."
apple  microsoft  organizations  timcarmody  2011  business  software  revenue  hardware 
july 2011 by robertogreco
» The New Ecology of Things: Slabs, Sofducts, and Bespoke Objects Johnny Holland – It's all about interaction » Blog Archive
"Several major trends are emerging that affect interaction design. With the advent of post-PC devices like the iPad, cheap sensors and microcontrollers like the Arduino, and services like Kindle Wispersync, we’re in the middle of a shift towards ubiquitous computing, tangible interaction, and cloud services. Because of these trends, our field must consider the integration of the traditionally separate areas of screen and tangible interaction design.

Of particular significance is the shift away from the generic computation typified by the “personal computer,” which never really achieved the individuality or specificity implied by the term “personal.” In short, we’re experiencing the emergence of The New Ecology of Things, where a network of heterogeneous, smart objects and spaces are replacing our current design context."
consumerism  twitter  ipad  ecology  internetofthings  ecologyofthings  matthewcrawford  shopclassassoulcraft  making  meaning  meaningmaking  personalization  sofducts  bespoke  bespokeobjects  craft  slabs  interactiondesign  interaction  glvo  diy  iphone  applications  computing  fabbing  3dprinter  3d  culture  software  hardware  prosthetics  tailoring  animism  sound  light  haptics  kinetic  kineticbehavior  behavior  android  arduino  nikeid  manufacturing  apple  philipvanallen  spimes  ios  iot 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Setup: Frank Chimero
"I’d like a more flexible, faster all-in-one inbox for my digital detritus. For some reason, DevonThink, Yojimbo, & Evernote aren’t cutting it for me. Tumblr is close, but not quite it. I’d like something that successfully handles images in tandem w/ text, because that’s how my brain works. I have this dream of having a management interface very similar to a hybrid of LittleSnapper & Yojimbo, & then a “serendipity engine” application for iPad. It’d be a bit like Flipboard where things are served up at random from your collection for browsing. That’s the flaw of all of these things, in my mind: they encourage you to get things in, but aren’t optimized for revisiting it in a way that lacks linearity or classification. If you’re looking to make constellations of content, I think the way your collection is presented back to you matters. I guess what I’m asking for is a digital rendition of the commonplace book, & serious rethinking of what advantages digital could provide…"
frankchimero  hardware  software  thesetup  tools  howwework  commonplacebooks  dropbox  devonthink  yojimbo  evernote  macbookair  photoshop  illustrator  muji  notebooks  tumblr  serendipity  discovery  iphone  kindle  lumixgf1  appletv  netflix  texteditor  gmail  instapaper  simplenote  rdio  itunes  reeder  2011  usesthis 
april 2011 by robertogreco
An interview with Keita Takahashi : The Setup
"MacBook Pro…w/…anti-glare display…

My music player is an iPod. It is an old model w/ blue-white LED backlit display. The capacity is only 20GB, but I love the design so I keep using it…

This year, I bought a digital camera after waiting 7 years…DSC-HX5V. It has a stereo microphone & GPS, & can take so-so movies & photos. I am moderately satisfied…

My vacuum cleaner is a Numatic Henry (Green). It is the vacuum cleaner I always yearned for. I was dreaming of it when I graduated from university, & bought it with my first salary…

My refrigerator is a SHARP SJ-XW44S. The door can be opened from either the right or left. Cool…

Basically, I don't use especially impressive software…

Until several years ago, my main web browser was OmniWeb. So, I bought OmniFocus to try it. I learned I was not well suited for such kinds of GTD software…

What would be your dream setup?

A big house with a vast garden. A miraculous notebook that enhances my ideas. That's perfect."
keitatakahashi  software  media  design  games  gaming  hardware  interview  computing  simplicity  mattescreens  vaccuum  ipod  refrigerators  gtd  omnifocus  thesetup  2010  usesthis 
october 2010 by robertogreco
MSP430 LaunchPad (MSP-EXP430G2) - Texas Instruments Embedded Processors Wiki
"The LaunchPad is an easy-to-use, affordable, and scalable introduction to the world of microcontrollers and the MSP430 family.

Easy-to-use – LaunchPad includes all of the hardware and software needed to get started. Open source projects and code examples help users get up and running quickly.

Affordable – For $4.30, the LaunchPad includes a development board, 2 programmable MSP430 microcontrollers, mini-USB cable, PCB connectors for expandability, external crystal for increased clock accuracy, and free & downloadable software integrated development environments (IDEs) – everything you need to get started today.

Scalable – The LaunchPad is a simple introduction to the MSP430 microcontroller family. As application requirements change, programs developed on the LaunchPad can be migrated to higher end MSP430 devices."

[via: http://hackaday.com/2010/06/22/ti-makes-a-big-bid-for-the-hobby-market/ ]

[see also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSP430 ]
microcontrollers  texasinstruments  ti  msp430  arduino  usb  opensource  electronics  hacking  diy  hardware 
august 2010 by robertogreco
MSP430 LaunchPad (MSP-EXP430G2) - Texas Instruments Embedded Processors Wiki
"The LaunchPad is an easy-to-use, affordable, and scalable introduction to the world of microcontrollers and the MSP430 family.

Easy-to-use – LaunchPad includes all of the hardware and software needed to get started. Open source projects and code examples help users get up and running quickly.

Affordable – For $4.30, the LaunchPad includes a development board, 2 programmable MSP430 microcontrollers, mini-USB cable, PCB connectors for expandability, external crystal for increased clock accuracy, and free & downloadable software integrated development environments (IDEs) – everything you need to get started today.

Scalable – The LaunchPad is a simple introduction to the MSP430 microcontroller family. As application requirements change, programs developed on the LaunchPad can be migrated to higher end MSP430 devices."

[via: http://hackaday.com/2010/06/22/ti-makes-a-big-bid-for-the-hobby-market/ ]

[see also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSP430 ]
microcontrollers  texasinstruments  ti  msp430  arduino  usb  opensource  electronics  hacking  diy  hardware 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Jugaad: Questions for Santosh Ostwal | The Economist
"SANTOSH OSTWAL, husband and father of two, lost his apartment in 2001 after quitting his job in Pune to solve an engineering problem he’d been thinking about for twenty years. Today his solution – a mobile-phone adaptation that triggers irrigation pumps remotely – is saving water in India and helping more than 10,000 farmers avoid several taxing, dangerous long walks a day. I talked to Mr Santosh for a podcast earlier this year, but it’s worth digging back into the transcript now to help explain the Indian concept of jugaad, an inspired kind of duct-taped ingenuity that employs only the tools at hand."
via:blackbeltjones  jugaad  santoshostwal  india  hacking  hardware  constraints  makedo  localsolutions  theadjacentpossible  engineering  chimericthinking 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Modkit [I would love to have an invite for this.]
"Modkit is an in-browser graphical programming environment for little devices called embedded systems. Modkit can currently program Arduino and Arduino compatible hardware using simple graphical blocks similar to and heavily inspired by the Scratch programming environment developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab."
edg  arg  arduino  scratch  programming  coding  processing  physicalcomputing  automation  embedded  hardware  electronics  education  diy  toshare 
july 2010 by robertogreco
iPhone 4: The Last Mobile Phone | Mssv
"The iPhone 4 may be the last major advance in mobile phones we’ll ever see. There’ll still be plenty of incremental and useful improvements, but it’s hard to see what kind of attention-grabbing features are left...
apple  future  iphone  phones  2010  hardware  mobile  technology 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Nokia’s designs on Apple | Tech Blog | FT.com
"“I still think the whole industry is missing a trick,” said Mr Ahtisaari during a meet-the-press session in London yesterday. “All the touchscreen interfaces are very immersive. You have to put your head down. What Nokia is very good at is designing for mobile use: one-handed, in the pocket. Giving people the ability to have their head up again is critical to how we evolve user interfaces.”
markoahtisaari  nokia  iphone  ipad  mobile  mobility  smartphones  immersive  hardware  future  design  apple  phones  screens  2010  socialmedia  ux  interface  interfacedesign  glowingrectangles 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow, You Are a Consumer, Too - Freedom - Gizmodo
"I'm glad Apple ][+ came w/ schematics for circuit boards. I'm glad it encouraged generation of kids to tinker & explore. I'm also glad that I don't live in 70s & have to type in programs from a magazine anymore.
corydoctorow  ipad  hardware  ebooks  drm 
april 2010 by robertogreco
$11,000 for the First Apple Portable Computer! The Real Cost of Apple Products - What's the Big Deal?
"On the eve of Apple's iPad launch, we thought it would be interesting to see whether the cost of the iPad really is an 'unbelievable price' compared to previous Apple product launches.

Looking back through the archives, to the launch of the first Apple computer in 1976, we've worked out how much it would cost to buy each of Apple's new major product releases today - accounting for inflation.

So, is the iPad as good value as Steve Jobs would like us to believe? We'll let you make your own mind up."
visualization  infographics  inflation  infographic  statistics  apple  computers  mac  money  prices  gadgets  comparison  hardware  ipod  iphone  ipad 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Why I won't buy an iPad (and think you shouldn't, either) - Boing Boing
"If you want to live in the creative universe where anyone with a cool idea can make it and give it to you to run on your hardware, the iPad isn't for you.
corydoctorow  freedom  hardware  opinion  publishing  journalism  ipad  consumption  comics  closed  business  boingboing  apple  drm  culture  ebooks  internet  technology  open  media 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: An Ode to DiskWarrior, SuperDuper, and Dropbox
"However, I find terrific value in SuperDuper’s model. SuperDuper creates a bootable clone of your startup drive. With Time Machine, if your startup drive goes kaput, you’ve got to go through a lengthy restore process (and, in the case of hardware failure on the kaput drive, you need an extra bootable volume to restore to). With SuperDuper, you just plug in the clone, reboot, and you’re back up."
superduper  diskwarrior  dropbox  backup  macosx  mac  timemachine  harddrive  utilities  daringfireball  hardware  recovery  osx 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Organovo [see also: http://www.economist.com/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15543683]
"Regenerative medicine is a rapidly advancing field that has the potential to transform human heath care. The potential now exists to develop tissue constructs for tissue repair and organ replacement. The US Dept. of Health and Human Services predicts that "within 20 years regenerative medicine will be the standard of care for replacing all tissue/organ systems in the body in addition to extensive industrial use for pharmaceutical testing." Organovo, Inc. is dedicated to applying its breakthrough NovoGen tissue printing technology to make those goals a reality. Founded by scientists from the National Bioprinting Center, Organovo is developing proprietary technologies to deliver on this promise."
biotechnology  biology  hardware  medicine  biotech  sandiego  local  science  tcsnmy 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Tinkerer’s Sunset [dive into mark]
"Once upon a time, Apple made the machines that made me who I am. I became who I am by tinkering. Now it seems they’re doing everything in their power to stop my kids from finding that sense of wonder. Apple has declared war on the tinkerers of the world. With every software update, the previous generation of “jailbreaks” stop working, and people have to find new ways to break into their own computers. There won’t ever be a MacsBug for the iPad. There won’t be a ResEdit, or a Copy ][+ sector editor, or an iPad Peeks & Pokes Chart. And that’s a real loss. Maybe not to you, but to somebody who doesn’t even know it yet."
ipad  apple  iphone  closed  tinkering  programming  coding  learning  children  computers  development  computer  drm  hacking  hacks  hardware  handheld  freedom  future  software  hackers  appleii  hack  computing  trends  2010  teaching 
january 2010 by robertogreco
rc3.org - Is the iPad the harbinger of doom for personal computing?
"What bothers me is that in terms of openness, the iPad is the same as the iPhone, but in terms of form factor, the iPad is essentially a general purpose computer. So it strikes me as a sort of Trojan horse that acculturates users to closed platforms as a viable alternative to open platforms, and not just when it comes to phones … The question we must ask ourselves as computer users is whether the tradeoff in freedom we make to enjoy Apple’s superior user experience is worth it. … If Apple is really successful, it’s likely that other companies will be more emboldened to forsake openness as well. … The other question that arises for me is whether, in the the long term, the computer you hold in your hand really matters. … A future where applications and data in the cloud are more our own than the computers on our desks seems bizarre, but I can see things playing out that way."
via:preoccupations  ipad  apple  open  cloudcomputing  cloud  decentralization  mac  freedom  computers  applications  iphone  creativity  computing  hardware  technology  future  closed  ios 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The Tragedy of One Laptop Per Child - SlashGear
"Like the mythical predecessors that came before it, the new device is said to have an 8.5 x 11 inch touch screen made by Pixel Qi with an indoor/outdoor display, use inductive charging (like the Palm Pre), will be waterproof and cost no more than $100. Of course, you can’t buy or order one as they’re targeting 2012 for the ship date. I’ve been asked by a few folks how the OLPC project could manage this with their current specifications and the answer is simple: they won’t be able to."
olpc  development  poverty  hardware  technology  education  thirdworld  xo 
december 2009 by robertogreco
gregdek: Enough of the boo-hoo-hooing about OLPC.
"The OLPC organization is built to do hardware innovation. Of the many things they've attempted, it's the one thing at which they have clearly been wildly successful. They put the fear of God into Intel and forced the worldwide introduction of the Netbook, thus driving down the median price of personal computing all over the world -- whether you choose to give them credit for that achievement or not. Their decision to focus on hardware innovation as a core competency is a good thing, not a bad thing...
olpc  2009  hardware  openeducation  opensource  sugarlabs 
december 2009 by robertogreco
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