recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : hospitals   12

The Making of a Democratic Economy | Ted Howard | RSA Replay - YouTube
"While not often reported on in the press, there is a growing movement – a Community Wealth Building movement – that is taking hold, from the ground up, in towns and cities in the United States and in the United Kingdom, in particular.

Ted Howard, co-founder and president of the Democracy Collaborative, voted one of ‘25 visionaries who are changing your world’, visits the RSA to share the story of the growth of this movement, and the principles underlying it. Join us to explore innovative models of a new economy being built in cities from Cleveland, Ohio to Preston, Lancashire, and to discuss how we might dramatically expand the vision and reality of a democratic economy."
economics  tedhoward  inequality  democracy  extraction  extractiveeconomy  us  uk  2018  capitalism  privatization  finance  wealth  power  elitism  trickledowneconomics  labor  work  universalbasicincome  ubi  austerity  democraticeconomy  precarity  poverty  change  sustainability  empowerment  socialism  socialchange  regulations  socialsafetynet  collectivism  banking  employment  commongood  unemployment  grassroots  organization  greatdepression  greatrecession  alaska  california  socialsecurity  government  governance  nhs  communities  communitywealthbuilding  community  mutualaid  laborovercapital  local  absenteeownership  localownership  consumerism  activism  participation  participatory  investment  cleveland  systemicchange  policy  credit  communityfinance  development  cooperatives  creditunions  employeeownership  richmond  virginia  nyc  rochester  broadband  publicutilities  nebraska  energy  utilities  hospitals  universities  theprestonmodel  preston  lancashire 
november 2018 by robertogreco
ER bills: A baby was treated with a nap. His parents got an $18,000 bill. - Vox
"An ER patient can be charged thousands of dollars in “trauma fees” — even if they weren’t treated for trauma."



"Patients face steep bills — and questionable charges — when trauma teams “activate”"



"An ibuprofen, two medical staples — and a $26,998 bill"
us  healthcare  medicine  money  2018  policy  hospitals  california 
june 2018 by robertogreco
DAVID GRAEBER / The Revolt of the Caring Classes / 2018 - YouTube
"The financialisation of major economies since the '80s has radically changed the terms for social movements everywhere. How does one organise workplaces, for example, in societies where up to 40% of the workforce believe their jobs should not exist? David Graeber makes the case that, slowly but surely, a new form of class politics is emerging, based around recognising the centrality of meaningful 'caring labour' in creating social value. He identifies a slowly emerging rebellion of the caring classes which potentially represents just as much of a threat to financial capitalism as earlier forms of proletarian struggle did to industrial capitalism.

David Graeber is Professor of Anthropology, London School of Economics and previously Assistant Professor and Associate Professor of Anthropology at Yale and Reader in Social Anthropology at Goldsmiths, University of London. His books include The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy (2015) Debt: The First 5000 Years (2011) and Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology (2004). His activism includes protests against the 3rd Summit of the Americas in Quebec City in 2001, and the 2002 World Economic Forum in New York City. Graeber was a leading figure in the Occupy Wall Street movement, and is sometimes credited with having coined the slogan, 'We are the 99 percent'.

This lecture was given at the Collège de France on the 22nd March 2018."
davidgraeber  care  caring  teaching  nursing  economics  capitalism  labor  work  employment  compensation  resentment  bullshitjobs  finance  politics  policy  us  uk  workingclass  intellectuals  intellectualism  society  manufacturing  management  jobs  liberalism  values  benefits  nobility  truth  beauty  charity  nonprofit  highered  highereducation  activism  humanrights  os  occupywallstreet  opportunity  revolution  revolt  hollywood  military  misery  productivity  creation  creativity  maintenance  gender  production  reproduction  socialsciences  proletariat  wagelabor  wage  salaries  religion  belief  discipline  maintstreamleft  hospitals  freedom  play  teachers  parenting  mothers  education  learning  unions  consumption  anarchism  spontaneity  universalbasicincome  nonprofits  ubi 
may 2018 by robertogreco
SHORT: Catherine Opie: Cleveland Clinic | Art21
"Photographer Catherine Opie describes her intentions behind the permanent installation "Somewhere in the Middle" (2011) at Hillcrest Hospital, a branch of Cleveland Clinic, in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. Created specifically for the hospital setting, the installation consists of 22 photographs taken from the shores of Lake Erie near Opie's hometown of Sandusky, Ohio. It is Opie's hope that the photographs provide a space for patients, doctors, vistors and hospital employees to experience an ethereal moment during what may be a difficult time in their lives."

[via: http://ucresearch.tumblr.com/post/45794504571/photographs-from-ucla-professor-catherine ]
catherineopie  art  photography  2011  lakeerie  ohio  health  medicine  hospitals 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Freakonomics » Lottery Loopholes and Deadly Doctors: A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast
"Also in this episode, we take a broader look at financial literacy – or, really, financial illiteracy. In general, Americans aren’t very good at the basics of saving, investing, and retirement planning. So we want to know: How do we improve our grade?  We’ll hear from one scholar who wants to put financial literacy in schools and another who thinks that would be a waste of time. Guests also include two members of President Obama’s economic team and National Book Award-winner Sherwin Nuland.

And if education isn’t the route to financial literacy, maybe we can learn something from how one Los Angeles hospital solved the problem of its doctors failing to wash their hands."
whatworks  visualization  teaching  math  economics  hospitals  freakonomics  2012  healthcare  medicine  health  education  learning  financialliteracy  finances 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Months to Live - With Faith and Friends, Convent Offers Model for End of Life - Series - NYTimes.com
[Notes and emphasis by @litherland, I agree.]
A convent is a world apart, unduplicable. But the Sisters of St. Joseph, a congregation in this Rochester suburb, animate many factors that studies say contribute to successful aging and a gentle death — none of which require this special setting. These include a large social network, intellectual stimulation, continued engagement in life and spiritual beliefs, as well as health care guided by the less-is-more principles of palliative and hospice care — trends that are moving from the fringes to the mainstream.
“We approach our living and our dying in the same way, with discernment,” said Sister Mary Lou Mitchell.
Few sisters opt for major surgery, high-tech diagnostic tests or life-sustaining machinery. And *nobody can remember the last time anyone died in a hospital*, which was one of the goals in selling the old Mother House, with its tumbledown infirmary — a “Bells of St. Mary” kind of place — and using the money to finance a new facility appropriate for end-of-life care.
*** “Hospitals should not be meccas for dying. Dying belongs at home, in the community.” ***

Wow:
Dr. McCann said that the sisters’ religious faith insulated them from existential suffering — the “Why me?” refrain commonly heard among those without a belief in an afterlife. Absent that anxiety and fear, Dr. McCann said, there is less pain, less depression, and thus the sisters require only one-third the amount of narcotics he uses to manage end-of-life symptoms among hospitalized patients.
eldercare  via:litherland  life  living  hospitals  death  faith  religion  nuns  endoflife  aging  community 
april 2012 by robertogreco
New Essay on “Therapeutic Cities” | Anthony Townsend
"The seed for this forecast perspective was planted the day my daughter was born in Feb 2008. After the delivery, I put my wife & baby to bed for a much-needed rest & wandered down to the cafeteria at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Over a revolting cheeseburger and some stale coffee, I sat fascinated listening to the conversation at the table I shared – a deeply experienced master cardiac surgeon in a post-op debriefing with a team of doctors visiting from, judging by their accents, Eastern Europe. Having spent so much of my adult life thinking about how innovation and learning happens in technology clusters, I was intrigued by the intense face-to-face exchange of medical and scientific knowledge I was witnessing. Knowing that like our own obstetrician, these people were all practitioners as well as researchers and educators, I became fascinated by the dynamics of life in a major urban research hospital. The “therapeutic cities” idea was born the same day as my daughter."
hospitals  cities  anthonytownsend  therapeuticcities  sharing  knowledge  urban  urbanism  health  healthcare  research  education  medicine  practice  conversation 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Space Hackers are coming! - Dougald's posterous
"a new kind of spatial agent is emerging: improvisational, bottom-up, working w/ materials to hand; perhaps unqualified, or using training in unexpected ways; responding pragmatically to constrictions & precarities of post-crisis living. Btwn jugaad culture of Indian village, temporary structures built by jobless architects, pop-up shops, infrastructure-savvy squatters & open source shelter-makers, Treehouse Galleries & urban barns & Temporary Schools of Thought, just maybe something new is being born.

…the culture of the Space Hacker…new players have more in common w/ geeks, hippies & drop-out-preneurs who gave us open source & internet revolution, than w/ architects, developers or property industries…

Unlike Silicon Valley, though, these hackers have given up on goal of getting rich.…driven instead by desire to make spaces in which they want to spend time—sociable spaces of living, working & playing - as they, & the rest of us, adjust to the likelihood of getting poorer."
dougaldhine  postmaterialism  postconsumerism  spatial  spacehackers  hackers  diy  make  making  favelachic  post-crisisliving  cv  opensource  architecture  squatters  dropouts  counterculture  spacemaking  unschooling  deschooling  alternative  vinaygupta  rayoldenburg  ivanillich  schools  learning  future  sociability  thirdplaces  postindustrialism  postindustrial  capitalism  marxism  hospitals  healthcare  health  society  improvisation  popup  pop-ups 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Good Enough Revolution: When Cheap and Simple Is Just Fine
"instead of building a hospital in a new area, Kaiser leased space in a strip mall, set up a high tech office, & hired 2 doctors to staff it. Thanks to the digitization of records, patients could go to this "microclinic" for most of their needs & seamlessly transition to a hospital farther away when necessary...series of trials to see what such an office could do. They cut everything they could out of the clinics: no pharmacy, no radiology...explored cutting the receptionist in favor of an ATM-like kiosk where patients would check in with their Kaiser card...found that the system performed very well. 2 doctors working out of a microclinic could meet 80% of a typical patient's needs. With a hi-def video conferencing add-on, members could even link to a nearby hospital for a quick consult with a specialist. Patients would still need to travel to a full-size facility for major trauma, surgery, or access to expensive diagnostic equipment, but those are situations that arise infrequently."
design  technology  culture  future  economics  business  goodenough  cheap  simple  flip  simplicity  mp3  digital  marketing  strategy  cameras  innovation  trends  quality  music  kaiser  healthcare  medicine  clinics  hospitals 
december 2009 by robertogreco
REFERENCE LIBRARY: Renate Müller, Animals
"Renate Müller's leather and jute animals were designed in the early 1970s for H. Josef Leven, a manufacturer of therapeutic and developmental toys for the disabled. Success was short lived, the parent company was nationalized and rights to the toys were lost. In 1991 Renate Müller regained control of the rights to her own designs. Since then, she's been running a bed and breakfast and filling orders for animals and toys for therapeutic zoos — mainly for kindergartens and hospitals in (surprise) Japan."

[via: http://www.dwell.com/daily/blog/29624014.html ]
plush  glvo  animals  health  therapy  toys  schools  hospitals  kindergarten  renatemüller 
september 2008 by robertogreco
3quarksdaily - Below the Fold: A World without the Rich
"If Americans examined the deeper damage that the rich do to society, perhaps they might be willing to try cutting the rich down to size. Let’s look at how the rich damage American society."
us  wealth  economics  society  politics  money  government  corruption  policy  power  control  health  medicine  hospitals  universities  colleges  equality  freedom  meritocracy  elitism  philanthropy  influence  rich  consumerism  consumption  development 
october 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read