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Universe
"Make an awesome website from your phone.

Download

The internet is your canvas.

Visit Gallery ➔

Universe is the easiest way to make a website. Choose a custom domain, build your site, and share it in less than a minute—all on your iPhone, for free.

What kind of sites? Well, anything you can imagine. Start with a personal, business, or creator site and evolve from there. This site was made on Universe, of course. "

[See also:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/universe-website-builder/id1211437633
http://onuniverse.com/posts/
https://universe.dropmark.com/494459

https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2017/3/22/15026976/universe-website-building-app-custom-sites-iphone
https://techcrunch.com/2017/03/22/universe-a-mobile-only-website-builder-lets-you-create-pages-in-under-a-minute/ ]
applications  webdeb  ios  webdesign  hosting 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Static Site CMS - Forestry.io
"A full-featured CMS for your static site with support for Jekyll, Hugo and Git"
cms  webdev  jekyll  hosting  web  static  via:jarrettfuller  webdesign 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Siteleaf - A friendly CMS for your static site
"Built for developers, Loved by everyone
Siteleaf is a content management system designed for a better web.

Develop with existing tools
Code offline with Jekyll, sync with GitHub

Edit in the cloud
Easy for non-technical clients, writers, and producers

Free your content
Access by API or generate static sites to S3, GitHub, FTP"
cms  webdev  jekyll  hosting  web  static  via:jarrettfuller  webdesign 
june 2017 by robertogreco
John Berger remembered – by Geoff Dyer, Olivia Laing, Ali Smith and Simon McBurney | Books | The Guardian
"Ali Smith

I heard John Berger speaking at the end of 2015 in London at the British Library. Someone in the audience talked about A Seventh Man, his 1975 book about mass migrancy in which he says: “To try to understand the experience of another it is necessary to dismantle the world as seen from one’s own place within it and to reassemble it as seen from his.”

The questioner asked what Berger thought about the huge movement of people across the world. He put his head in his hands and sat and thought; he didn’t say anything at all for what felt like a long time, a thinking space that cancelled any notion of soundbite. When he answered, what he spoke about ostensibly seemed off on a tangent. He said: “I have been thinking about the storyteller’s responsibility to be hospitable.”

As he went on, it became clear how revolutionary, hopeful and astute his thinking was. The act of hospitality, he suggested, is ancient and contemporary and at the core of every story we’ve ever told or listened to about ourselves – deny it, and you deny all human worth. He talked about the art act’s deep relationship with this, and with inclusion. Then he gave us a definition of fascism: one set of human beings believing it has the right to cordon off and decide about another set of human beings.

A few minutes with Berger and a better world, a better outcome, wasn’t fantasy or imaginary, it was impetus – possible, feasible, urgent and clear. It wasn’t that another world was possible; it was that this world, if we looked differently, and responded differently, was differently possible.

His readers are the inheritors, across all the decades of his work, of a legacy that will always reapprehend the possibilities. We inherit his routing of the “power-shit” of everyday corporate hierarchy and consumerism, his determined communality, his ethos of unselfishness in a solipsistic world, his procreative questioning of the given shape of things, his articulate compassion, the relief of that articulacy. We inherit writing that won’t ever stop giving. A reader coming anywhere near his work encounters life-force, thought-force – and the force, too, of the love all through it.

It’s not just hard, it’s impossible, to think about what he’s given us over the years in any past tense. Everything about this great thinker, one of the great art writers, the greatest responders, is vital – and response and responsibility in Berger’s work always make for a fusion of thought and art as a force for the understanding, the seeing more clearly and the making better of the world we’re all citizens of. But John Berger gone? In the dark times, what’ll we do without him? Try to live up to him, to pay what Simone Weil called (as he notes in his essay about her) “creative attention”. The full Weil quote goes: “Love for our neighbour, being made of creative attention, is analogous to genius.”

Berger’s genius is its own fertile continuum – radical, brilliant, gentle, uncompromising – in the paying of an attention that shines with the fierce intelligence, the loving clarity of the visionary he was, is, and always will be.

***

Geoff Dyer

There is a long and distinguished tradition of aspiring writers meeting the writer they most revere only to discover that he or she has feet of clay. Sometimes it doesn’t stop at the feet – it can be legs, chest and head too – so that the disillusionment taints one’s feelings about the work, even about the trade itself. I count it one of my life’s blessings that the first great writer I ever met – the writer I admired above all others – turned out to be an exemplary human being. Nothing that has happened in the 30-odd years since then has diminished my love of the books or of the man who wrote them.

It was 1984. John Berger, who had radically altered and enlarged my ideas of what a book could be, was in London for the publication of And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief as Photos. I interviewed him for Marxism Today. He was 58, the age I am now. The interview went well but he seemed relieved when it was over – because, he said, now we could go to a pub and talk properly.

It was the highpoint of my life. My contemporaries had jobs, careers – some even owned houses – but I was in a pub with John Berger. He urged me to send him things I’d written – not the interview, he didn’t care about that, he wanted to read my own stuff. He wrote back enthusiastically. He was always encouraging. A relationship cannot be sustained on the basis of reverence and we soon settled into being friends.

The success and acclaim he enjoyed as a writer allowed him to be free of petty vanities, to concentrate on what he was always so impatient to achieve: relationships of equality. That’s why he was such a willing collaborator – and such a good friend to so many people, from all walks of life, from all over the world. There was no limit to his generosity, to his capacity to give. This did more than keep him young; it combined with a kind of negative pessimism to enable him to withstand the setbacks dished out by history. In an essay on Leopardi he proposed “that we are not living in a world in which it is possible to construct something approaching heaven-on-earth, but, on the contrary, are living in a world whose nature is far closer to that of hell; what difference would this make to any single one of our political or moral choices? We would be obliged to accept the same obligations and participate in the same struggle as we are already engaged in; perhaps even our sense of solidarity with the exploited and suffering would be more single-minded. All that would have changed would be the enormity of our hopes and finally the bitterness of our disappointments.”

While his work was influential and admired, its range – in both subject matter and form – makes it difficult to assess adequately. Ways of Seeing is his equivalent of Keith Jarrett’s Köln Concert: a bravura performance that sometimes ends up as a substitute for or distraction from the larger body of work to which it serves as an introduction. In 1969 he put forward Art and Revolution “as the best example I have achieved of what I consider to be the critical method”, but it is in the numerous shorter pieces that he was at his best as a writer on art. (These diverse pieces have been assembled by Tom Overton in Portraits to form a chronological history of art.)

No one has ever matched Berger’s ability to help us look at paintings or photographs “more seeingly”, as Rilke put it in a letter about Cézanne. Think of the essay “Turner and the Barber’s Shop” in which he invites us to consider some of the late paintings in light of things the young boy saw in his dad’s barber shop: “water, froth, steam, gleaming metal, clouded mirrors, white bowls or basins in which soapy liquid is agitated by the barber’s brush and detritus deposited”.

Berger brought immense erudition to his writing but, as with DH Lawrence, everything had to be verified by appeal to his senses. He did not need a university education – he once spoke scathingly of a thinker who, when he wanted to find something out, took down a book from a shelf – but he was reliant, to the end, on his art school discipline of drawing. If he looked long and hard enough at anything it would either yield its secrets or, failing that, enable him to articulate why the withheld mystery constituted its essence. This holds true not just for the writings on art but also the documentary studies (of a country doctor in A Fortunate Man and of migrant labour in A Seventh Man), the novels, the peasant trilogy Into Their Labours, and the numerous books that refuse categorisation. Whatever their form or subject the books are jam-packed with observations so precise and delicate that they double as ideas – and vice versa. “The moment at which a piece of music begins provides a clue to the nature of all art,” he writes in “The Moment of Cubism”. In Here Is Where We Meet he imagines “travelling alone between Kalisz and Kielce a hundred and fifty years ago. Between the two names there would always have been a third – the name of your horse.”

The last time we met was a few days before Christmas 2015, in London. There were five of us: my wife and I, John (then 89), the writer Nella Bielski (in her late 70s) and the painter Yvonne Barlow (91), who had been his girlfriend when they were still teenagers. Jokingly, I asked, “So, what was John like when he was 17?” “He was exactly like he is now,” she replied, as though it were yesterday. “He was always so kind.” All that interested him about his own life, he once wrote, were the things he had in common with other people. He was a brilliant writer and thinker; but it was his lifelong kindness that she emphasised.

The film Walk Me Home which he co- wrote and acted in was, in his opinion, “a balls-up” but in it Berger utters a line that I think of constantly – and quote from memory – now: “When I die I want to be buried in land that no one owns.” In land, that is, that belongs to us all.

***

Olivia Laing

The only time I saw John Berger speak was at the 2015 British Library event. He clambered on to the stage, short, stocky, shy, his extraordinary hewn face topped with snowy curls. After each question he paused for a long time, tugging on his hair and writhing in his seat, physically wrestling with the demands of speech. It struck me then how rare it is to see a writer on stage actually thinking, and how glib and polished most speakers are. For Berger, thought was work, as taxing and rewarding as physical labour, a bringing of something real into the world. You have to strive and sweat; the act is urgent but might also fail.

He talked that evening about the need for hospitality. It was such a Bergerish notion. Hospitality: the friendly and generous reception and entertainment of guests, visitors or strangers, a word that … [more]
johnberger  2017  geoffdyer  olivialaing  alismith  simonmcburney  marxism  capitalism  migration  soundbites  hospitality  storytelling  hope  hopefulness  utopia  hierarchy  consumerism  compassion  unselfishness  questioning  skepticism  simoneweil  creativeattention  attention  goldenrule  humanism  encouragement  relationships  friendship  equality  giving  generosity  solidarity  suffering  seeing  noticing  looking  observation  senses  kindness  commonality  belonging  ownership  thinking  howwethink  care  caring  blackpanthers  blackpantherparty  clarity  money  communalism  narrowness  alls  difference  openness  crosspollination  hosting  hosts  guests  strangers  enemies  listening  canon  payingattention  audience  audiencesofone  laughter  resistance  existence  howtolive  living  life  howwelive  refuge  writing  certainty  tenderness 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Neocities: Create your own free website!
"Create your own free website.
Unlimited creativity, zero ads.

Neocities is a community of 64,800 sites that are bringing back the lost individual creativity of the web. We provide free web hosting and tools that allow anyone to make a website. Only your imagination is required. Join us!

Share your web creation with the world
Follow your favorite Neocities sites to keep up with all their latest updates. Discover new websites related to your interests using tags, comment on them, and share them.

Powerful new features to help you build
We’ve made it easier to build your website and explore other sites. Neocities features an in-browser HTML editor, custom domain support, faster site loading, easy file uploading, RSS feeds, folder support, and much more.

Our mission: To make the web fun again by giving you back control of how you express yourself online.

HTML editor, right in your browser

No tools needed. With our easy-to-use HTML editor, you're ready to start building your awesome website right now.

If you'd rather use your favorite desktop editor, no problem. Uploading files is as easy as drag-n-drop.

It's time to bring back web surfing.

All Neocities sites are viewable in our website gallery. And it's easy to browse sites with our optional surf bar.

Using tags (our version of Web Rings) you can easily discover new sites related to your interests.

Follow your favorite Neocities sites

Keep track of all your favorite sites by following them. Any changes to the sites automatically show up in your news feed. You'll also see what sites they follow.

Web creativity plus community

Interact with your favorite web builders by posting comments, and sharing their sites on your social network of choice.

Zero advertising

Neocities will never sell your personal data or embed advertising on your site. Instead, we are funded directly by our community through supporter plans and donations. This allows us to base all our decisions on making the best possible web building experience for you, rather than on appeasing ad companies.

More space, speed, and security

Neocities now uses distributed, globally-cached web servers in datacenters all over the world to serve your site. Whether it’s your personal home page or a busy professional site, your site loads fast. And if you need more space, we've got you covered. We also provide Snowden-grade SSL cryptography on all sites, preventing snoops from seeing what you browse.

Developer tools

Our fast static hosting comes with a great in-browser HTML editor, easy file uploading, RSS feeds for every site, powerful APIs for building developer applications, and much more! Upgrade to a supporter plan to get WebDAV publishing and support for custom domains.

Open Company

Neocities is a member of the Open Company Initative, working to help improve trustability in tech companies. We publish the code that powers the site for inspection, and strive for openness in our company's operations. We want to win your trust—not lock you in."
free  hosting  html  web  webdev  neocities  geocities  webrococo  community  websurfing  opencompanyinitiative  kyledrake  victoriawang  scotto'hara  onlinetoolkit  classideas  webdesign 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Blot is the easiest way to blog
"Blot creates a folder in your Dropbox
and publishes files you put inside.

[Blot demo video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k2NQNj9-LE ]

Blot turns images, text, markdown and HTML files into posts. Use your favourite app to write your blog posts.

There are no ads and no third-party tracking. You pay a small annual fee and that's it.

Blot is fast, reliable and hosts blogs with thousands of posts without issue.

✓ Hosting included
✓ Five beautiful themes
✓ Use a custom domain
✓ Create a theme
✓ Markdown support
✓ RSS feed & sitemap
✓ Code highlighting
✓ Math typesetting
✓ Disqus comments
✓ Analytics integrations
✓ Search engine
✓ Draft previews

Sign up for $20 a year and start your blog now.

FAQs
Why does Blot cost money?
I have to cover the cost of running Blot somehow.

Can Blot access all the files in my Dropbox?
No, Blot can only access the folder containing your blog posts.

Will my blog use up my Dropbox bandwidth?
No, Blot fetches a copy of each blog post and hosts it on Blot's servers.

See more on the help page [https://blot.im/help ]. Don't hesitate to contact me [https://blot.im/contact ] with any questions.

Themes
Blot comes with five themes. You can also create your own from scratch.

[screenshots]

Dashboard
Your blog comes with a dashboard for customizing your blog. This is how it looks:

[screenshots]"

[via: https://twitter.com/johnpavlus/status/668227772368580608 ]
blot  webdev  web  blogging  dropbox  markdown  onlinetoolkit  hosting  webdesign  davidmerfield 
november 2015 by robertogreco
The Next Internet Is TV - The Awl
"Websites are unnecessary vestiges of a time before there were better ways to find things to look at on your computer or your phone."



"In this future, what publications will have done individually is adapt to survive; what they will have helped do together is take the grand weird promises of writing and reporting and film and art on the internet and consolidated them into a set of business interests that most closely resemble the TV industry. Which sounds extremely lucrative! TV makes a lot of money, and there’s a lot of excellent TV. But TV is also a byzantine nightmare of conflict and compromise and trash and waste and legacy. The prospect of Facebook, for example, as a primary host for news organizations, not just an outsized source of traffic, is depressing even if you like Facebook. A new generation of artists and creative people ceding the still-fresh dream of direct compensation and independence to mediated advertising arrangements with accidentally enormous middlemen apps that have no special interest in publishing beyond value extraction through advertising is the early internet utopian’s worst-case scenario."
future  internet  media  television  tv  2015  johnherrman  hosting  journalism  content  snapchat  facebook  channels  buzzfeed  vox  youtube  video  delivery  syndication  advertising  ads  fusion  espn  cnn 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Small Victories
"Small Victories is a simple way to make a website out of the contents of a Dropbox folder.

What the hell would I use that for?

You could make a blog, share images, make yourself a portfolio — it's kind of like a scrapbook."
webdev  dropbox  hosting  css  html  webdesign  via:ableparris 
february 2015 by robertogreco
HOWTO: use GitHub Pages to host a bootstrap-themed website | Open Educational Thinkering
"Last week I mentioned in a blog post and my weekly newsletter the pre-launch website of my new (part-time) consultancy Dynamic Skillset. I had an enquiry as to how the site put together, so I put together this screencast:

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YCPWpVjwh8 ]

The great thing about being shown how to do something via video is that, if you get stuck, you can pause, rewind and watch parts again. In this one, I go through the process of downloading a responsive website theme and hosting it for free using GitHub Pages.

Remember, the way to increase your digital and web literacies is to tinker about and try new things. You can’t break anything here and all you have to lose is your GitHub virginity."
github  webdev  hosting  webdesign  howto  tutorials  2015 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Upload - PDFy - Instant PDF Host
"Why does PDFy exist? I got sick of documents getting locked up behind login walls of services like Scribd. PDFy exists to offer a place where anybody can instantly upload and share a PDF, much like Imgur does for images. PDFy is free, ad-free, and non-commercial.

Servers aren't free, though. Your donations are much appreciated. You can donate by clicking here, using PayPal, Bitcoin, or Flattr.

Click to upload ... or drag and drop a PDF file here, to upload it (max. 100 MB).
What you get:

• Your PDF hosted permanently, ad-free.
• Share-able page with PDF viewer (using pdf.js).
• Embeddable version of the viewer.
• Original PDF can be downloaded by anybody, without registration.
• All public PDFs mirrored to the Internet Archive for preservation.

Please don't upload warez! Terms of Service here."

[See also: https://github.com/joepie91/pdfy ]
pdf  pdfs  pdfy  hosting  ebooks  documents  onlinetoolkit  via:caseygollan  scribd  imgur 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Jekyll • Simple, blog-aware, static sites
"Transform your plain text into static websites and blogs."

"Free hosting with GitHub Pages

Sick of dealing with hosting companies? GitHub Pages are powered by Jekyll, so you can easily deploy your site using GitHub for free—custom domain name and all."

[Migration from Wordpress, Tumblr, Drupal, Posterous, Blogger, etc.: http://jekyllrb.com/docs/migrations/ ]
cms  ruby  web  webdev  jekyll  migration  github  hosting  static  blogging  webdesign 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Siteleaf
"Own Your Data
Manage your website in the cloud and publish to your own FTP, Amazon S3, or Rackspace Cloud account. Your data is archived forever, independent of our service.

Collaborate
Send invitations to clients, colleagues, and others to edit and review sites. Managing content in Siteleaf is easy enough anyone can do it, with nothing to install.

Develop Locally
Develop templates locally using HTML and Liquid syntax. Test your sites locally using the same data on your live site. Built-in support for Anvil and Pow.

Mobile-friendly
Need to update your website from the beach? Lucky you. With Siteleaf, you can manage and publish sites on the go with your favorite mobile devices, including iPad, iPhone, and Android."
cms  siteleaf  via:caseygollan  webdev  hosting  ftp  blogging  webdesign 
july 2013 by robertogreco
The Present Group
"The Present Group is an arts based think tank and creative studio whose projects focus on leveraging new technologies in support of the arts and finding new ways to fund and distribute artists projects."
art  technology  glvo  thinktank  funding  distribution  webhosting  hosting  thepresentgroup  ebooks  tumblr  printing  print  papernet 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Build a Website - Squarespace 6
"Squarespace starts you with beautiful templates right out of the box — each handcrafted by our award-winning design team to make your content stand out."

"Whether you need simple pages, sophisticated galleries, or a professional blog — or any combination of each of those — it all comes standard with your Squarespace website."

"Our revolutionary LayoutEngine technology gives you the freedom to create visually rich pages with any configuration of text, images, or blocks by dragging items exactly where you want them. We lay things out in a perfect grid, so everything is always aligned."

"Our photo galleries come with next-generation features you'll love. Enjoy easy uploading by dragging files from your desktop into the browser. Edit images any time you want with Aviary. Select the focal point of each image, ensuring the best crop possible."

"Effortlessly create content with our Page Builder and gallery system. Share easily, map posts with native geolocation, and use our bookmarklet…"
squarespace  responsivewebdesign  tools  web  design  blogging  hosting  webdesign  responsivedesign  webdev 
november 2012 by robertogreco
HowTo: EC2 for Poets
"EC2 for Poets is a tutorial that shows you how to set up a server in Amazon's "cloud." All you need is a net connection, credit card, and a basic understanding of how to use computers.

Initially, the goal for EC2 for Poets was to make cloud computing less mysterious by helping people get through the process of setting up a server on Amazon EC2. The newest version is more than an experiment, it's a platform for applications. We're starting with the RIver2 news aggregator, an app that reads RSS feeds you're subscribed to every ten minutes and posts the new items at the top of the list. It's also a podcatcher and a photo aggregator, supports realtime updating and OPML reading lists.

And there are more apps you can install after getting your river up and running… Each app is an instrument, together they form a symphony. …"
glvo  webdev  s3  amazonwebservices  2012  2011  2009  davewimer  howto  amazon  hosting  ec2forpoets  ec2  webdesign 
september 2012 by robertogreco
UNHOSTED - Freedom from web 2.0's monopoly platforms
"By "unhosted web apps" we mean browser-based apps with no server-side backend. Unlike server-side or client-server apps, unhosted web apps leave users in control of their valuable user data and privacy, by default.

Unhosted web apps are also more resilient and more scalable. Most importantly, unlike Apple/iOS, Flash, and Facebook apps, the web platform is open and free: controlled by you and not by stockholders."
privacy  webapps  unhostedwebapps  tools  hosting  web  webdev  unhosted  cloud  opensource  webdesign 
august 2012 by robertogreco
HowTo: EC2 for Poets
"Most people think they can't run a server, but servers aren't any more complicated than a laptop. The main difference is that a server is always on and always connected to the Internet.

EC2 for Poets is a tutorial that shows you how to set up a server in Amazon's "cloud." All you need is a net connection, credit card, and a basic understanding of how to use computers."
servers  s3  cloud  server  hosting  setup  howto  amazon  ec2 
july 2012 by robertogreco
DropMocks
"DropMocks is the easiest way to create and share beautiful image galleries online"
html5  hosting  free  images  galleries  photography  dropmocks  via:robinsloan 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Preoccupations's Wikileaks Bookmarks on Pinboard
Through his bookmarks on Delicious, David Smith is building a valuable reference on the topic of Wikileaks surrounding Cablegate. See also his bookmarks for Julian Assange: http://pinboard.in/u:preoccupations/t:Julian_Assange
wikileaks  2010  davidsmith  julianassange  privacy  us  security  amazon  espionage  paypal  search  hosting  internet  web  information  dns  freespeech  sweden  france  cloud  cloudcomputing  censorship  democracy  policy  politics  whistleblowing  secrecy  government  activism  journalism 
december 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Bandcamp
"Your fifth (very nerdy) Beatle. We provide fast, dependable streaming and downloads of your entire catalog, adorn your tracks with all the metadata they need to sail into iTunes with artwork, titles, and so on intact, and mutter the various incantations necessary to get your site top-ranked in Google. All things we know you could do, but we suspect you’d rather focus on your music. Well, think of us as your invisible bandmate who loves that other stuff. And we won't even ask to play tambourine."
music  mp3  hosting  bandcamp  onlinetoolkit  bands  audio 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Pixelpipe - Free your media, upload and share anywhere
"Liberate your media with Pixelpipe and get your content out to your favorite social network, photo/video and blog service. We support popular destinations and provide a number of applications to free your media from your desktop and mobile."
onlinetoolkit  aggregator  microblogging  pixelpipe  hosting  storage  sharing  software  media  tools  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  photography  video  online 
october 2008 by robertogreco

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