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robertogreco : idaho   5

The New High-School Outsiders - The New York Times
"When these students land in Idaho, they may know little or no English. The bucolic landscape looks nothing like the America they say they fantasized about from glimpses of pop culture abroad. In this alien setting, young refugees may not want to assert their adolescent independence from parents or other relatives, who most likely represent teenagers’ only earthly ties to the world they formerly knew or people they once held dear. “Some struggle a lot — that comes with these traumatic experiences,” says Christian Lim, a school counselor who runs a program at Hillside Junior High and Borah High School in Boise for recent immigrants. “But the initial couple of months, there’s so much positive energy, just the euphoria to be here.”

Soon, however, a heavier reality sets in. Although refugees receive initial cash assistance and help finding a place to live, these benefits last only eight months. Lim says the subsequent transition for students can be difficult. “They start dealing with financial issues, the family losing their house, and suddenly kids are having to work after school until midnight or two in the morning,” he says."



"For many students, the camaraderie among the refugee-filled classes at Borah begins to satisfy some of the normal adolescent pangs to belong. And many refugees cite the district’s E.L.L. programs for seeing them through. Zahraa Naser, who is Muslim and fled to Syria from her home in Iraq after her father was kidnapped and murdered, says: “I loved those teachers. They were always the nicest, and even after you went out of the E.L.L. program, they would always help you.”

Classmates, however, can be more of a mystery. Although some self-sorting occurs at all schools, refugee students express a desire to get to know their American peers better but acknowledge that closing the gap between newcomer and native can be tough. This may be especially so in the current political climate, where a debate over refugees — which ones and how many to admit — is roiling election-year politics. Language barriers can make exchanging teenage confidences hard, though technology helps. Many refugees are more comfortable texting, the lingua franca of adolescence, than talking anyway. Still, friendships are often forged not in school but through parties or extracurricular activities, which few refugees have time or money for. “Only rich white kids can do that,” one refugee says. “I have to work.”"



"Boise has been resettling displaced persons since 1975, when Idaho answered President Gerald R. Ford’s call to states to take in 130,000 Southeast Asians taking flight in the aftermath of the Vietnam War. Angie Smith, a photojournalist based in Los Angeles who has family in Idaho that dates back three generations, first took notice of the growing refugee presence on a trip to Boise five years ago. In a state whose population is more than 90 percent white, these new arrivals were sometimes hard to miss. Curious about this migration, she began photographing refugees in 2015. Many didn’t possess a single picture of their families, and Smith would give them one. In time, she asked Hanne Steen, a journalist and an oral historian, also based in Los Angeles, to help with the interviews, including those of seniors in Boise’s class of 2016, whom Smith photographed for The New York Times Magazine. Steen grew up in Africa, the daughter of American aid workers, and at one point, she and her parents were evacuated from Rwanda in the wake of genocide there. An exhibit of Smith’s work, accompanied by transcriptions of interviews with refugees, opened in public locations around the city this month, supported in part by a grant from Boise’s Department of Arts and History.

Zahraa Naser, the Iraqi refugee, says that she has American friends but that for now, her closest friends are those with experiences of dislocation like hers. Last year, she started wearing a hijab for the first time, as is customary for girls in her culture once they reach puberty, but she felt some friends stiffen and pull away. In her mind, the step was overdue; a younger sister had already begun to wear hers. “I think most people, when they see me, because I’m wearing the head scarf and I’m Muslim, think that I am, like, a terrorist, but I’m not,” she says. “I’m just the same as them. I’m not any different.”"
highschool  refugees  idaho  boise  2016  us  immigration  migration 
october 2016 by robertogreco
One Stone | US
"One Stone is a student-led and directed nonprofit that makes students better leaders and the world a better place. Our program empowers high school students to learn and practice 21st century skills through experiential service, innovative initiatives and social entrepreneurship.

Our work is rooted in design thinking, a creative problem solving and innovation discovery process developed at Stanford University’s d.school. Using design thinking, we can uncover new ideas that allow us to disrupt for good – improving the status quo for lasting change. Through this, students learn and practice critical 21st Century skills: empathy, collaboration, communication, leadership, innovation, critical thinking, adaptability and creativity.

One Stone does not charge membership dues or fees, ensuring that our programs are accessible to any high school student who wants to be a better leader and make the world a better place."



"Welcome to the Big Idea – the One Stone free, independent high school.

Only it really isn’t anything like a high school — it’s more of an “un-school.” No classes or grades; no teachers or classrooms. Instead, One Stone is a collaborative place where coaches help each student explore their passions. Students learn by doing. Building on years of experience with project-based learning and the successful delivery of 21st century skills, One Stone has curated a learning experience for students.

Building on the successful foundation of One Stone, all learners work on One Stone ventures that provide real-world experience while helping to fund the school and its programs. They understand the power of innovation and iteration and acquire a highly-personalized understanding of the world—including how they relate to it and how they can fully participate in it.

Learners develop multiple solutions to problems and discover the importance of combining, exploring, and creating new opportunities and innovations. They learn that solutions depend on perspective, and that only by empathizing with multiple stakeholders can they fully explore the terrain of possibilities. Our graduates are better equipped not just to go on to post-secondary education but to thrive, start a business, or follow other passions. They are innovative thinkers and doers. They are financially literate and will successfully employ life skills. They make informed decisions about thought, speech, and action that are grounded in their authentic story.

One Stone learners are able to navigate the ethical dilemmas facing our time with creativity, cultural competency, and compassion. They lead with empathy through difficult conversations and are aware of what they can bring to any context. One Stone will graduate an army of talent—leaders who will make change and make the world a better place."
boise  idaho  schools  education  unschooling  nonprofit  designthinking  alternative  learning  nonprofits 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Ambassador of Fruit | Orion Magazine
"An Iranian pomologist transforms an Idaho landscape and helps its growers stay in business"
fruit  agriculture  farming  idaho  grapes  apples  iran 
august 2009 by robertogreco

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