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Data for Social Good: Crisis Text Line CEO Nancy Lublin | Commonwealth Club
[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRlCX597JhA ]

"Suicide and mental health are hard subjects—so Crisis Text Line leveraged the power of the data it collects to help their counselors determine the best way to talk about the topics with those in need. The nonprofit, founded in 2013 by CEO Nancy Lublin, has provided a free text-based and human-driven service to support those experiencing mental health stress, gathering data points from more than 75 million text messages sent and maximizing the impact of their information to better train counselors and support their community. Its innovative and data-driven methodology for tackling hard conversations can also be applied to more than the mental health space, including to Lublin’s latest venture: Loris.ai. 

Lublin’s entire career has focused on initiatives addressing social issues, and she founded Dress for Success and Do Something prior to Crisis Text Line. With her technology lens on big challenges, she continues to iterate on innovative mechanisms and creative solutions to sticky problems. At INFORUM, she’ll be joined in conversation by DJ Patil, head of technology at Devoted Health and former U.S. chief data scientist in the Obama administration, to dig into the power of data to effect change. Come curious!"
data  mentalhealth  socialgood  crisistext  nancylubin  djpatil  2019  nonprofit  nonprofits  911  socialmedia  suicide  society  government  crisiscounseling  emoji  language  communication  responsiveness  texting  sms  stress  funding  fundraising  storytelling  technology  siliconvalley  philanthropicindustrialcomplex  philanthropy  charity  startups  capitalism  importance  charitableindustrialcomplex  canon  noblesseoblige  humanism  relationship  courage  racism  connection  humanconnection  loneliness  pain 
may 2019 by robertogreco
more than 95 theses - This Google Doodle of a Brazilian favela was...
"Few things are more tiresome to me than the educated Left’s ceaseless policing of the symbolic/discursive realm (e.g., politically incorrect Google Doodles), in what might charitably be described as the naive belief that consciousness-raising promotes justice, which by now we ought to know it doesn’t. Those of us who have been trained to manipulate symbols and language tend to overrate their importance, but at this point in history there’s no excuse for such overrating.

On a less charitable reading, people like policing symbols and discourses because you can do it from your computer without ever lifting a finger, or paying a cent, to alter the structural injustice that perpetuates the favelas. Signaling your outrage on Twitter does absolutely nothing to help anybody. Getting Google to take down their Doodle is a pathetic parody of a moral victory.

Meanwhile the rich keep getting richer and the poor poorer. Families and communities around the world are under assault by malicious forces. The favelas in Brazil receive no relief, and children keep getting shot in Chicago, and Wall Street (i.e., international capitalism) proceeds from strength to strength in sublime indifference to it all. If we’re going to choke on our own outrage, there are plenty of reasons. Google Doodles are not among them."
susbstance  2014  alanjacobs  whatmatters  distraction  whininess  justice  socialjustice  avoidance  heavylifting  outrage  importance  signaling 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Orion - May/June 2013 - Page 18-19
"Mysteries of Thoreau Unsolved: On the dirtiness of laundry and the strength of sisters" by Rebecca Solnit

"None of us is pure, and purity is a dreary pursuit best left to Puritans."
rebeccasolnit  sisters  siblings  thoreau  activism  importance  2013  purpose  labor  work  writing  laundry  martinlutherkingjr  walden  abolitionists  history  picasso  michaelbranch  michaelsims  chores  purity  liberation  freedom  prison  mlk 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Global city - Wikipedia
"A global city (also called world city or sometimes alpha city or world center) is a city generally considered to be an important node in the global economic system. The concept comes from geography and urban studies and rests on the idea that globalization can be understood as largely created, facilitated, and enacted in strategic geographic locales according to a hierarchy of importance to the operation of the global system of finance and trade.

The most complex of these entities is the global city, whereby the linkages binding a city have a direct and tangible effect on global affairs through socio-economic means.[1] The use of global city, as opposed to megacity, was popularized by sociologist Saskia Sassen in her 1991 work, The Global City: New York, London, Tokyo[2] though the term world city to describe cities that control a disproportionate amount of global business dates to at least the May 1886 description of Liverpool by the Illustrated London News.[3] Patrick Geddes also used the term "world city" later in 1915.[4] Cities can fall from such categorization, as in the case of cities that have become less cosmopolitan and less internationally renowned in the current era, e.g., Alexandria, Egypt; Coimbra, Portugal; and Thessaloniki, Greece."

[See the chart on the page.]

[via: https://twitter.com/blaine/status/308696111818895360 ]
cities  economics  geography  global  saskiasassen  patrickgeddes  lists  cosmopolitanism  globalization  urban  urbanism  importance  finance  trade  workdcities  globalcities 
march 2013 by robertogreco
What do startup founders want? (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
No, I think the thing startup founders want is importance.
Importance is a bit like power, but heavily diluted. Power is about being able to make people do something they wouldn’t otherwise do. The Instagram founders weren’t in it for power: they have very little interest in making people take photos they wouldn’t otherwise take. But nonetheless, their decisions had a great deal of importance for their users. If they decided to put ads in their app or remove a favorite filter, millions of people’s lives suddenly get a little bit more annoying.
Importance is different from impact. Tim Berners-Lee (inventor of the Web) had a huge impact in the world, but he’s not particularly important. He decided long ago that the Semantic Web was the next big thing, but few people cared, because practically there was very little he could actually do about it.
technology  power  society  importance  startups  instagram  timberners-lee  aaronschwartz  via:tealtan 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Amanda Krauss -- Pulling the Plug - Worst Professor Ever
"Only when the humanities can earn their own keep will they be respected in modern America…will only happen when you convince majority of people to be interested, of their own volition, rather than begging/guilting them into giving you money to translate your obscure French poem on vague grounds of “caring about culture.”…either figure something out, or shut up & accept that the humanities are an inherently elite activity that will rely on feudal patronage. Just like they always have. (If you think of Maslow’s hierarchy, it’s obvious why leisure class, which generally has money, sex, food, & security taken care of, has been in charge of learning.)

You have no idea how much it pains me to say this, but speaking from experience I now believe that private industry is doing a better job of communicating, persuading, innovating, of everything university has stopped doing. I do not take this as indicator of how well capitalism works…[but] of how badly universities have failed…"
education  change  academia  criticism  higheredbubble  highereducation  capitalism  2011  amandakrauss  humanities  relevance  money  gradschool  autodidacts  unschooling  deschooling  importance  via:ayjay  irrelevance 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Leadership Tips from Tony Hayward (or Not) - Rosabeth Moss Kanter - Harvard Business Review
"• Deny and minimize problems. Drop any mention of the high-minded principles you announced at the beginning of your term, such as…a culture that puts people first. Sweep them under the rug…Or better yet, find someone else to blame…

• Emphasize your own power and importance. Keep yourself front and center all the time. Rarely bring forward the rest of the team, nor even indicate that it's a team effort.

• Make the story all about you. Talk about your heavy burdens and the costs to your life. When forced to acknowledge the true victims, pay lip service.

• Never apologize, and don't even pretend to learn from your mistakes. Brush off public disapproval, and persist in the same mindless behavior…

• Hang onto your job even when it's clear you should go, in order to negotiate the highest severance package, whether you deserve it or not. Don't even consider a deferred resignation to allow for smooth suggestion. Cling to power, and keep everyone guessing to the very end."

[via: http://blogs.hbr.org/haque/2011/07/how_our_economy_was_overrun_by.html ]
business  management  leadership  2010  tcsnmy  administration  narcissism  hownottodoit  hownotto  inmyexperience  denial  power  importance  seenthis 
july 2011 by robertogreco
What Twitter users asked the president - Boston.com
"At a town hall Tuesday, President Obama will answer a few of the thousands of questions posed by Twitter users in the past week. Below, the percent of recent questions asked by Twitter users, and White House journalists, that mention selected topics."
media  twitter  audience  2011  politics  disconnect  importance  government  sensationalism  discord  journalism 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » Nervous Writing / Well-Trained Teachers
"Last week when I told this story, a tech director raised her hand and said “You know, I think it’s interesting that your son is nervous about sharing his writing. Does he ever get nervous about his writing for school?” I thought for a second and said “Um, no…you know you’re right. He hardly thinks twice about that stuff.” She said “I’m guessing he’d be more motivated to work on his Percy Jackson story to make it good than he is his homework.” And ever since I’ve been wondering why we can’t instill a healthy nervousness every now and then into our writing process, now that we have these ready made audiences (or at least easily found audiences). All it would take is a willingness on our parts to let kids write about the things they truly love from time to time and connect that to an audience larger than the classroom. Shouldn’t be too hard these days…"
fanfiction  education  willrichardson  writing  apprehension  children  audience  importance  authenticity  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  learning  anonymity  sharing  criticism  constructivecriticism  discussion  schools  teaching 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Why the Novel Matters
"Nothing is important but life. & for myself, I can absolutely see life nowhere but in the living. Life with a capital L is only man alive. Even a cabbage in the rain is cabbage alive. All things that are alive are amazing. & all things that are dead are subsidiary to the living. Better a live dog than a dead lion. But better a live lion than a live dog. C'est la vie!"

[Updated 20 May 2012 after a Charlie Loyd reference to the article: http://twitter.com/vruba/status/203976280343973889 ]

"For this reason I am a novelist. And being a novelist, I consider myself superior to the saint, the scientist, the philosopher, and the poet, who are all great masters of different bits of man alive, but never get the whole hog.

The novel is the one bright book of life. Books are not life. They are only tremulations on the ether. But the novel as a tremulation can make the whole man alive tremble. Which is more than poetry, philosophy, science, or any other book-tremulation can do."

"Let us learn from the novel. In the novel, the characters can do nothing but live. If they keep on being good, according to pattern, or bad, according to pattern, or even volatile, according to pattern, they cease to live, and the novel falls dead. A character in a novel has got to live, or it is nothing."

"Let us learn from the novel. In the novel, the characters can do nothing but live. If they keep on being good, according to pattern, or bad, according to pattern, or even volatile, according to pattern, they cease to live, and the novel falls dead. A character in a novel has got to live, or it is nothing.

We, likewise, in life have got to live, or we are nothing.

What we mean by living is, of course, just as indescribable as what we mean by being. Men get ideas into their heads, of what they mean by Life, and they proceed to cut life out to pattern."

"To be alive, to be man alive, to be whole man alive: that is the point. And at its best, the novel, and the novel supremely, can help you. It can help you not to be dead man in life. So much of a man walks about dead and a carcass in the street and house, today: so much of women is merely dead. Like a pianoforte with half the notes mute."
dhlawrence  via:cburell  writing  novels  life  philosophy  importance  literature 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Adventures of the Mind « John’s Blog
"...you never know when a decision you make is going to have a profound effect in your life. At least, I’ve never been able to tell. So my coping strategy — what I do to make everything work for me — is try to put myself into situations where there are tons of great choices, tons of great people, tons of great outcomes possible — so that it makes the odds that I make some really important & good choices that much better." [via: http://metacool.typepad.com/metacool/2010/05/metacool-john-lilly.html]
choice  serendipity  importance  planning  cv  vision  purpose  learning  opportunity  life  decisions  decisionmaking  people  connections  conversation  chance 
may 2010 by robertogreco
The World Question Center: The Edge Annual Question — 2010: How is the internet changing the way you think?: Paul Saffo: A Third Knowledge
"The Internet has changed our thinking, but if it is to be a change for the better, we must add a third kind of knowledge to Johnson's list — the knowledge of what matters. Two centuries ago the explosion of print demanded a new discipline of knowing where to find knowledge. When looking up was hard, one's searches inevitably tended towards seeking only what really mattered. Now that finding is easy, the temptation to chase down info-fluff is as seductive as a 17th century Londoner happily wallowing in books with no purpose. Without a discipline of knowing what matters, we will merely amuse ourselves to death."
paulsaffo  2010  edge  internet  importance  information  attention  infooverload 
january 2010 by robertogreco
What Do You Do? Who Cares? - Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect
"There are of course strong cultural, contextual and personal differences in the importance of defining and presenting oneself through a job title. ... Of course the role of the business card is also changing - in an interconnected world it becomes more of a tangible reminder, a conduit to the online you - where ever that may be, and with it - the age of the anonymous researcher is rapidly drawing to a close.

My rule of thumb? The more an individual relies on their particularly senior business title to project what they are capable of the less self confident they are at actually fulfilling that role.

So, what is it that I do? Does it matter? Kinda. Sorta. But when it comes to you, I care, I really do."
janchipchase  titles  importance  relationships  observations  businesscards  names  business  organizations  naming 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Artichoke: Teaching: working for the government and stealing chickens.
"irrelevance of ideas around changing education in Time’s “changing the world” list...worries me that children & learning seem so easily excluded from these imaginings over remaking the global economy. Are teachers so professionally predictable that...we have nothing new/relevant to contribute? Has our secure government salary meant that “paradigm shifting” edu_(un)conferences...“future focussed Web2.0” edu_blogs/twitter streams –“best evidence synthesis based” edu_professional learning communities – & “knowledge waved” edu_policies/edicts allowed us a false sense of relevance? Has being pre-disposed to risk adverse behaviours...like choosing to: train for, apply...and work in a job with a predictable salary – excluded us from 10 ideas changing the world right now...How might we alter our pedagogical approach if we thought we were working in uncertain careers in perilous times?...if what we could offer was not needed every day?...if what we could offer was only occasionally useful?"
education  gamechanging  deschooling  unschooling  relevance  irrelevance  teaching  learning  children  global  economics  certainty  uncertainty  worldchanging  tcsnmy  importance  utility  artichokeblog  pamhook 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Work on Stuff that Matters: First Principles - O'Reilly Radar
"I spent a lot of last year urging people to work on stuff that matters. This led to many questions about what that "stuff" might be. I've been a bit reluctant to answer those questions, because the list is different for everyone. I thought I'd do better to start the new year with some ideas about how to think about this for yourself. ... 1. Work on something that matters to you more than money.2. Create more value than you capture. 3. Take the long view."

[See also video interview: http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/01/work-on-stuff-that-matters-interview-tim-oreilly.html ]
timoreilly  business  economics  recessions  importance  community  work  life  productivity  startups  entrepreneurship  valueadded  sustainability  brianeno  longhere  longnow  bighere  bignow  bubbles  innovation  philosophy  principles  advice 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Random Etc. : Blog Archive : The Importance of Perspective
“Trout wondered what a child who was just learning to read would make of a message like that. The child would suppose that the message was terrifically important, since somebody had gone to the trouble of writing it in letters so big.”
vonnegut  twitter  writing  blogging  del.icio.us  importance  filtering  information  overload  minutiae  kurtvonnegut 
january 2008 by robertogreco

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