recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : impostorsyndrome   9

That's What Xu Said : Stop Blowhard Syndrome
"When I express any shred of doubt about whether I deserve or am qualified for something, people often try to reassure me that I am just experiencing impostor syndrome. About 10% of the time, it’s true. Amelia Greenhall’s excellent piece, however, has inspired me to clear up a big misconception about what is happening the other 90% of the time.

While there are a few situations that make me feel insecure, I am, for the most part, an excellent judge of what I’m capable of. Expressing a reasonable amount of doubt and concern about a situation that is slightly outside my comfort zone is normal, responsible behavior. Understanding my limits and being willing to acknowledge them is, in fact, one of my strengths. I don’t think it should be pathologized alongside the very real problem of “impostor syndrome”.

In fact, it is the opposite behavior—the belief that you can do anything, including things you are blatantly not qualified for or straight up lying about—should be pathologized. It has many names (Dunning-Krueger, illusory superiority), but I suggest we call it blowhard syndrome as a neat parallel. Blowhard syndrome is all around us, but I have a special fondness in my heart for the example my friend Nicole has taxidermied on her Twitter profile.

Just to be clear, I’m not mad at anyone who has tried to reassure me by telling me I have impostor syndrome, and I recognize it as a real problem that lots of talented people struggle with. But I am furious at a world in which women and POC are being told to be as self-confident as a group of mostly white dudes who are basically delusional megalomaniacs. We’re great the way we are, level-headed self-assessments and all. Stop rewarding them for being jackasses.

My totally reasonable amount of self-confidence is not a syndrome; dudes’ bloated senses of self-worth and the expectations we’ve built around them are. Correct accordingly."
christinaxu  impostorsyndrome  ameliagreenhall  doubt  2015  blowhards  blowhardsyndrome  gender  race  inequality  confidence  self-confidence  dunning-krugereffect 
february 2015 by robertogreco
what the Dunning-Kruger effect is and isn’t | [citation needed]
"This is one of the key figures from Kruger and Dunning’s 1999 paper (and the basic effect has been replicated many times since). The critical point to note is that there’s a clear positive correlation between actual performance (gray line) and perceived performance (black line): the people in the top quartile for actual performance think they perform better than the people in the second quartile, who in turn think they perform better than the people in the third quartile, and so on. So the bias is definitively not that incompetent people think they’re better than competent people. Rather, it’s that incompetent people think they’re much better than they actually are. But they typically still don’t think they’re quite as good as people who, you know, actually are good. (It’s important to note that Dunning and Kruger never claimed to show that the unskilled think they’re better than the skilled; that’s just the way the finding is often interpreted by others.)"
impostorsyndrome  dunning-krugereffect  competence  psychology  bias  behavior 
january 2014 by robertogreco
jeweled platypus · text · Leveling up conferences
"I’m in Portland for Community Leadership Summit this weekend, I’ll be at Defcon soon, and I’m going to XOXO in September, so I’ve been thinking about things AdaCamp did that I’d like to see more conference organizers consider. Of course I like the idea of making tech events better for women, but this stuff is especially interesting to me because worthwhile efforts to make a tech event more welcoming to women also make the event more welcoming to other non-majority types of people (for example, including women means not just including able-bodied women). It’s the magic of intersectionality! Some of these ideas are conveniently compiled on the page of resources for conference organizers on the Geek Feminism Wiki, but here’s my list too:

• If you have an application process, like AdaCamp and XOXO do, it’s great for the application to be as encouraging and inclusive as possible, with detail about how the conference is aiming for a crowd that is diverse in x and y and z ways. …

• Before the conference, providing a list of nearby low-cost hostels and hotels. …

• Giving people a choice of badge lanyards: green meaning “photographs always ok”, yellow meaning “ask before photographing”, and red meaning “photographs never ok”. …

• Laying blue tape on the floor to mark access paths where people shouldn’t stand or put chairs/bags; you can label them “walk and roll” (ha ha). …

• Being explicitly inclusive of people of all gender identities, including considering labeling all-gender bathrooms along with men-only bathrooms and women-only bathrooms. …

• Setting up a dedicated “quiet room” with a rule against talking in that room; people can use the space to nap or work/relax quietly. …

• Having a series of 90 second (1 slide) lightning talks - I thought 90 seconds sounded impossibly short compared to normal 5 minute lightning talks, but it turned out to be great.

• For evening meals: creating a spreadsheet on Google Docs with a list of nearby restaurants, and inviting people to type in their names to create small groups for dining out."
conferences  brittagustafson  howto  eventplanning  conferenceplanning  photography  2013  adacamp  xoxo  defcon  inclusiveness  impostorsyndrome  accessibility  crowds  quiet  diversity  gender  universaldesign  planning  events  inclusion  inclusivity  inlcusivity 
july 2013 by robertogreco
The Imperfectionist | Sara Wachter-Boettcher | Content Strategy Consulting
"Eventually I forced myself to write a blog post. Then another. And somehow people responded to the things I had been so petrified to write about: How to make content work for mobile, deal with the messy people problems behind most companies’ publishing workflows, and break down decades of document-centric thinking.

I still didn’t have the answers, though. I’d simply become an imperfectionist."
sarawachter-boettcher  impostorsyndrome  impostors  2013  writing  contentstrategy  expertise  workinginpublic  blogging  imperfectionists  imperfection  vulnerability  flaws  honesty  work  howwework 
june 2013 by robertogreco
No One Knows What the F*** They're Doing (or "The 3 Types of Knowledge")
"real reason you feel like a fraud is because you have been successful in taking a lot of information out of [shit you know don't know you don't know] & put it into [shit you know you don't know]; you know of a lot of stuff you don’t know...good news is that this makes you very not dangerous...bad news is that it also makes you feel dumb & helpless a lot of the time.

I hope that this helps if you find yourself sometimes feeling conflicted, recognizing the contradiction between your abilities & what other people say about your abilities. When you find yourself in a situation where you don’t know what you’re doing, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Don’t ever feel ashamed for not understanding something, even it seems like it should be obvious; if you don’t understand it, then it’s not obvious, plain & simple.

In fact, if you never feel clueless, & you always know better than everyone else, please let me know, so that I can be aware of how dangerous you are."
knowledge  learning  education  psychology  information  wisdom  schools  teaching  understanding  cv  fraud  confidence  danger  dangerous  blackswans  random  krugereffect  tcsnmy  leadership  indecurity  lcproject  fakingit  nobodyknowshatthey'redoing  impostorphenomenon  impostorsyndrome 
february 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » This Blog Is Counterproductive
Dan Meyer reacts to these four quotes on his previous post: "#1 I read stuff like this, and the first thought that goes through my mind is, “Man, I suck at teaching math.” #2 I’m with Steve. I realize how far I am from where I should be. #3 I’m with Steve and Craig- I can’t teach this way yet because my brain isn’t aware/smart/intuitive/mathematical enough to first notice these things, then develop a lesson, and actually deliver and make sense of it. #4 I’ll echo Steve’s comment, I read this site and I feel like a fraud. I don’t know anything about teaching math." [Feeling like a fraud — it's not unfamiliar, but I suppose that's the product of always taking a hard look at yourself and your practices and striving to do better. Anyone who wants to improve him/herself probably has the thought on a regular basis.]
teaching  danmeyer  learning  self  cv  frauds  self-criticism  professionaldevelopment  tcsnmy  impostors  impostorphenomenon  impostorsyndrome 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Introduction of the Imposter Syndrome
"Imposter syndrome can be defined as a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist even in face of information that indicates that the opposite is true. It is experienced internally as chronic self-doubt, and feelings of intellectual fraudulence."
psychology  confidence  work  competition  success  phoniness  self-esteem  academia  business  women  sociology  education  fraud  impostor  impostors  impostorphenomenon  impostorsyndrome  gender 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Psychology - Imposter Syndrome - Feeling Like a Fraud - New York Times
"Researchers have shown...that people tend to be poor judges of their own performance and often to overrate their abilities. Their opinions about how well they’ve done on a test, or at a job, or in a class are often way off others’ evaluations."
psychology  impostors  impostorphenomenon  confidence  work  competition  success  phoniness  self-esteem  academia  business  women  sociology  education  fraud  impostor  impostorsyndrome  gender 
february 2008 by robertogreco
You're Not Fooling Anyone - Chronicle.com
"Holden Caulfield hunted phonies few blocks from here, but times have changed. Now the phonies — or people who think they are — hunt themselves....Columbia University held a well-attended workshop for young academics who feel like frauds."
academia  class  scholarship  stress  consciousness  success  education  failure  fraud  mfa  people  psychology  phd  society  impostorsyndrome  impostorphenomenon 
november 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read