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robertogreco : indigo   8

Manual Issue 4: Blue | e-flux
"Indigo blue, ultramarine blue, cobalt blue, cerulean blue, zaffre blue, indanthrone blue, phthalo blue, cyan blue, Han blue, French blue, Berlin blue, Prussian blue, Venetian blue, Dresden blue, Tiffany blue, Lanvin blue, Majorelle blue, International Klein Blue, Facebook blue. The names given to different shades of blue speak of plants, minerals, and modern chemistry; exoticism, global trade, and national pride; capitalist branding and pure invention. The fourth issue of Manual is a meditation on blue. From precious substance to controllable algorithm to the wide blue yonder, join us as we leap into the blue. 

From the Files: Curatorial assistant A. Will Brown discusses color theory of Joseph Albers’s Homage to the Square series, revealing notations on the back of the canvases. 

Double Takes: Curator Dominic Molon and cognitive scientist Karen Schloss illuminate the perceptual play of a Dan Flavin light sculpture; conservator Ingrid Neumann and curator Lawrence Berman unearth the matter and meaning of the ancient pigments in an Egyptian paintbox; art historian Margot Nishimura and paper preservation specialist Linda Catano look closely at the exquisite details and hues of a 15th-century manuscript illumination. 

Object Lessons: Curator Kate Irvin provides a tactile archaeology of the faded shades of indigo of a Japanese boro garment. Louis van Tilborgh and Oda van Maanen of the Van Gogh Museum examine the dominant blues and disappearing violets of van Gogh’s View of Auvers-sur-Oise. 

Portfolio: A survey of blue from azure to zaffre. 

How To: Curator Elizabeth A. Williams illuminates the history of blue and white porcelain. Photographer Anna Strickland discusses Anna Atkins’s early cyanotypes. 

Artists on Art: Artist Spencer Finch presents a tear-out color study. Author Maggie Nelson considers an Alice Neel’s portrait. Graphic designer Jessica Helfand mixes Facebook blue with the cyanotype process."
blue  color  colors  indigo  josefalbers  awillbrown  dominicmolon  karenscholes  danflavin  ingridneumann  lawrenceberman  margotnishimura  lindacatano  kateirvin  louisvantilborgh  odavanmaanen  vangogh  elizabethwilliams  annastrickland  annaatkins  maggienelson  aliceneel  jessicahelfand  cyanotypes  glvo  boro  yvesklein  ikb  toread  2015  internationalkleinblue 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Grow Your Own Indigo — Graham Keegan
"Indigo pigment grows naturally in the leaves of a large number of plant species from around the world. This plant, Persecaria Tinctoria, also know as Polygonum Tinctorum, has been a staple source of blue in East Asia for millenia. It is known for being relatively easy to grow. All it needs is lots of sunshine, plenty of water, and some food.

As an experiment, I've germinated a bunch of indigo seeds and want to get the seedlings into as many people's hands as possible! I hope to spread the wonder about the fact that color can be grown, to raise the consciousness of humanity's original sources of pigment, and to get people to exercise their thumbs, green or otherwise!

The pigment can be extracted from the mature leaves and used to dye all types of natural fibers. As the season goes on, I'll be posting harvest and processing instructions, as well as invitations to two separate harvest parties where we pool our collective leaves and do some dyeing!

These seedlings will be available for pickup from my workshop in Silver Lake (Los Angeles, CA) from June 6-8, 2014 (10 AM - 2 PM Daily). They will be ready to be (and should be) transplanted ASAP. I will also have a limited number of growing kits available for purchase for apartment dwellers that will include a suitable pot, soil, and plant food ($12) There is no charge to adopt an indigo seedling. However you must sign the pledge poster to properly care for your plant (pictured below) in order to receive your indigo seedling. You will also receive a copy of the poster to hang in a prominent place in your home, lest you forget about your little baby!

There are a limited number of seedlings available. Please reserve yours by filling out the form below.

For those of you not able to pick up a seedling here in Los Angeles, I am willing to experiment with shipping them directly to you in the mail for the cost of postage. I have zero real world experience with this but have been reading up on the process and believe that it is possible. There is no guarantee that the plants will arrive alive, but I'll do all that I can on my end to ensure safe travel!

Remember, this is an experiment! If we fail this year, we'll try again next year!

Please grow along with me!

Graham"
glvo  dyes  indigo  shibori  plants  grahamkeegan  gardening  losangeles 
january 2015 by robertogreco
The last trustee of indigo - The Hindu
"With the death of Yellappa, the last of a family of great indigo dyers in Andhra Pradesh, a way of life has faded away"
indigo  color  glvo  andhrapradesh  shivvisvanathan  2014  yellappa  dyeing  dyes 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Nigeria hopes Kano's ancient textile traditions can boost trade and tourism | World news | The Guardian
"For centuries, merchants flocked across Saharan trade routes to buy the deep blue cloth of Kano, a former emirate which in its heydays rivalled Timbuktu for wealth and scholarship. Traded for gold, ivory and salt, the city's indigo fabric became a symbol of wealth and nobility. Even today, indigo turbans are reserved for the emir's courtiers.

"The royal design is the most difficult, it takes two weeks to make," said Lawan, as she tied an intricate burst of spirals. "If there's even one mistake, the whole thing spoils," she said, sitting upon an antique wooden chest.

Some clients have changed little in centuries. Known as the "blue men of the desert", Tuaregs still travel thousands of miles over the Sahara's dunes to buy the fabric. Swathed in blue-black turbans that reveal only their eyes, the nomads earned their nickname from a penchant for cloths whose dye hasn't fixed, staining their faces. "Even the war in Mali hasn't stopped them coming," said Aleja Audu, the city's 73-year-old sarkin karofi or chief dyer.

Indigo textile art was once widespread across west Africa, as far east as the grassland kingdoms of Cameroon. The bug bit even colonialists who arrived in the 1800s. Heinrich Barth, one of the first European explorers to reach Kano, proudly wrote home of buying his first patterned shirt."
textiles  indigo  africa  nigeria  2013  glvo  kano 
july 2013 by robertogreco
PingMag MAKE - The House where Indigo Lives
"An indigo dye workshop built in the Edo period. It is here where Tadashi Higeta tends his vats of dye, full to the brim with foaming blue liquid. Indigo was once a pillar of Japanese domestic life, and has now been pushed to the wayside. This quiet, inte
craft  japan  indigo  fabric  glvo  pingmag 
march 2008 by robertogreco

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