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robertogreco : individualized   15

Half an Hour: The MOOC of One
"I want to begin by asking the question, "What does it mean to be one person?" What does it mean to be, say, Valencian? What does it mean to be a doctor? We have this intuitive idea that we think we understand when we begin to educate someone, we're going to make somebody a doctor, but what does that mean? I'm not sure we even know, and a major part of the reason we developed the MOOC is to challenge our thinking around some of these ideas.

In the traditional course, and that includes the traditional online course as well as the traditional offline course in traditional education (Pape talked about it as well) we have this idea that there is the authority at the center who will throw content at you - lots of content, piles of books, piles of video, and hope some of it sticks.

Even the MOOCs, the Massive Open Online Courses, that have followed the MOOCs that were developed by George Siemens and myself, the courses offered by Khan Academy, Coursera, Udacity, Udemy, and the rest are all based on the idea of some body of content.

Is being one being the same? That's kind of a hard question. It's not even clear what I mean when I ask that. Let's take doctors. Does being a doctor mean having exactly the same knowledge as every other doctor? No.



When we design these MOOCs, we realized every single person taking our course is going to be different. Some use Internet Explorer, some of them use Firefox, some use Opera, who knows why, some even use Safari (and nothing works in Safari! [laughter]). Different languages, different cultures. Some people want to get the knowledge, some people want to socialize, some people want to meet other people."



"In our MOOCs, there's no constructor of things. MOOCs (and people) are self‑organizing networks that process and organize perceptions in a natural automatic way given that they are provided proper nutrition, diversity, openness, autonomy, and the rest.

From the student's perspective, if they're taking the MOOCs - reflect on your own experience here for a second - they're right at the center. Goodness, they might even be taking more than one MOOC at a time. From different institutions at the same time, I know it's heresy but they might be doing that. They might be communicating on WordPress or on Flickr delicious, posting videos on YouTube, but they're always at the center of their Internet sphere.

That's basically how we, in developing the next phase - remember I promised a new technology after MOOCs - but here is what it looks like. It's really MOOCs Mark II, but now we're telling the story from the perspective, not of the education provider, but from the perspective of the individuals who are participating in the learning.

We understand that they are perceiving and reasoning self‑organizing networks. They will be coming into this with that capacity, but with those needs, and therefore what we're attempting to do, we're creating something called learning and performance support system (I'm really sorry about the name) to provide that measure of support."



"And finally to be one is to be you. Now, everybody talked about massive open online learning. I don't care about the massiveness of open online learning. It's important - that there are seven billion people in the planet, whatever we do has got to work for everyone of them - but it's only going to work for every one of them, one person at a time. There's no other way of doing it. 

 There's no other way of doing it because there's no other way that's going to be genuine. There's no other way that's going to be effective. What makes the MOOCs special is that each person taking the MOOCs makes it their own. They create and shape their own learning according to thier own needs and their own interests, their own values, their own objectives. And that to me is what learning and education is all about."
stephendownes  mooc  moocs  scale  2014  self-directed  self-directedlearning  learning  education  georgesiemens  self-organizedlearning  individuality  individualized  participatory  networks  networkededucation  audiencesofone 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Suburbs and Cubicles : peterme.com
"The cubicle farm strikes me as the real-world embodiment of the dehumanization represented in org charts. I’m reading Douglas Rushkoff’s Life, Inc., about the rise of corporatism. He mentions the flight to the suburbs (also mentioned in The McDonaldization of Society) and I wondered about the connection between the suburbs and the cubicle farm. Both contributed to the individualizing of America, our separation from one another.. Both strike me as products of Weberian rationalization, in that tract homes and cubicle farms are models of efficiency and quantifiability from the stand point of production… but ultimately isolating and damaging from the perspective of those who have to live in and use them."
suburbs  suburbia  cubicles  perermerholz  work  workplace  structures  industrialage  deschooling  unschooling  community  communities  separation  individualized  individualism  collaboration  corporatism  lcproject  tcsnmy  hierarchy  petermerholz 
april 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: A Middle School that Works [Project-based everything, individually crafted, team focused, individual education plans for all, "extra" curricular]
"The middle school is really just junior high school continued, & that was always a bad idea. Kids stumble through a bizarrely carved up yet age-dependent curriculum, & nothing could be less appropriate. There is no age range w/ a greater range of individual skills no matter the birth date, & there is no age range where getting kids interested in school is harder…kids 11-14 have a million things, really important things, to learn - about themselves, society, life, their bodies, & almost none of those things are taught in schools.

Meanwhile, the grades, subject areas, sports teams, honor rolls - even corridors - of middle school are essentially designed (a) to encourage bullying, & (b) to make kids see school as worthless & irrelevant.

…divide Middle School Grades into 9 large, & 3 "mini" project-based experiences…which kids choose. Completely interdisciplinary…

Kids would pick three 10-week experiences & 1 shorter experience each year, and that is what they would do all day."
irasocol  education  progressive  tcsnmy  lcproject  cv  teaching  projectbasedlearning  student-centered  projects  middleschool  juniorhigh  gamechanging  change  realreform  learning  adolescence  schools  schooldesign  individualized  teams  collaboration  collaborative  pbl 
january 2011 by robertogreco
At the Core of the Apple Store: Images of Next Generation Learning (full-length and abridged article) | Big Picture
"What are the essential features of the Apple Store’s learning culture?

* The learning experience is highly personalized and focused on the interests and needs of the individual customer.

* Customers can make mistakes with little risk of failure or embarrassment. Thinking and tinkering with the help of a staff member provide opportunities for deep learning.

* Challenges are real and embedded in the customer’s learning and work.

* Assessment is built right into the learning, focusing specifically on what needs to be accomplished.

A disruptive innovation? We think so. The Apple Store has created a new type of learning environment that allows individuals to learn anything, at any time, at any level, from experts, expert practitioners, and peers."
apple  applestore  learning  schooldesign  innovation  via:cervus  education  lcproject  technology  williamgibson  geniusbar  retail  studioclassroom  openstudio  thirdplaces  problemsolving  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  personalization  individualized  challenge  disruption  assessment  deeplearning  21stcenturylearning  learningspaces  thirdspaces 
december 2010 by robertogreco
NYU > Gallatin
"The Gallatin School of Individualized Study, a small innovative college within New York University, gives students the opportunity to design a program of study tailored to their own needs and interests. When students choose Gallatin, they take on the exciting challenge of creating their own curriculum and unique plan for learning. They pursue their individual interests from a personal perspective by taking courses in the various schools of New York University, engaging in self-directed education through independent studies, and participating in experiential learning through internships at New York City's countless institutions, businesses, and arts organizations. Undergraduates experience a thorough grounding in the history of ideas and great books, and graduate students pursue advanced study in interdisciplinary modes of thought."
nyc  nyu  schools  colleges  universities  gallatin  gallatinschoolofindividualizedstudy  individualization  individualized  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  porous  openclassroom  explodingschool  crossdisciplinary  generalists  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  srg  edg  glvo  seminars  seminarmethod  greatbooks  education  learning 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Gallatin School of Individualized Study - Wikipedia
"The Gallatin School of Individualized Study (generally known simply as Gallatin) is a small college within New York University.

Founded in 1972 as the University Without Walls, the school is named after Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under Thomas Jefferson, and the founder of NYU. Gallatin believed that the place for a university was not in "the seclusion of cloistered halls but in the throbbing heart of a great city." It was in this spirit that Gallatin was founded. Herbert London was the school's first dean through 1992.

Gallatin aims to provide a "small college" feel, while leveraging its location within one of the largest private universities in the United States. Students are expected to design their own interdisciplinary program that meets their specific interests and career goals. Coursework can be undertaken at any of the schools that comprise NYU. Gallatin currently enrolls 1200 undergraduates and 200 graduate students."
nyc  nyu  schools  colleges  universities  gallatin  gallatinschoolofindividualizedstudy  individualization  individualized  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  porous  openclassroom  explodingschool  crossdisciplinary  generalists  mosdef  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  srg  edg  glvo  seminars  seminarmethod  greatbooks  education  learning 
november 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: What I wish Bill Gates had learned about education from Microsoft
"What most frustrates me is that Gates doesn't even seem to have learned the lessons which his company could have taught him. It is a classic case of a smart person letting what he doesn't know overwhelm what he does, which is turning out sad for all of us....

What are the Microsoft Lessons for Education? 1. Finding trumps knowing ... 2. Learning doesn't take place via lessons ... 3. There are loads of ways to do things... 4. People fall behind and they race ahead, where you are at any moment really doesn't matter... 5. The blank sheet is better... 6. It takes educators to let learners use the tools in front of them."
billgates  education  technology  microsoft  tcsnmy  lcproject  policy  influence  understanding  learning  experience  rttt  nclb  gatesfoundation  money  power  ignorance  tracking  standardization  agesegregation  standards  accountability  2010  open  cheating  choice  individualized  business  elitism  irasocol 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Least Restrictive Environment - Practical Theory
"I was thinking about Special Ed concept of Least Restrictive Environment & idea that many of the concepts of special education, such as an IEP, are concepts we should want for every student...

Banning all these devices when there are many kids who can use them wisely & well is not putting kids into the least restrictive environment for their own learning.

Yes, there are some kids who struggle—despite many opportunities to figure how to manage it—to use technology in a classroom without it serving as a distraction. Let's admit that. [some examples & solutions]...Those instances are absolutely the exception, not the rule. (In talking w/ colleagues, I'd say that cell phone misuse is much lower at SLA than it is at schools that theoretically ban their existence.)...

But banning their use or locking up every laptop would hamstring so much of what we do, & it would not be, for the overwhelming majority of students, the least restrictive environment in which they could—& do—learn."
chrislehmann  specialed  leastrestrictiveenvironment  cellphones  mobile  phones  laptops  filtering  learning  empowerment  tcsnmy  individualized  teaching  schools  policy  blanketpolicies  restrictthemallforthedifficultiesoffew  millennials  technology  theyrealldifferentbutweshouldtreatthemthesame  ieps  digital 
july 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: Returning School to Humanity
"we expect students to be "on time" not because it is educationally important [NBIIEI]...but because we are training workers to be on time. We create "standards" for each grade level NBIIEI...but because we are teaching single-tasking & work conformity. We test individually, blocking collaboration (which we call "cheating") NBIIEI...but because we are manufacturing workers for assembly line.

While people worry about testing averages, about whether schools should be run as public goods or for corporate profit, about number of school days, about what topics to emphasize, the real question, as the 21st Century rolls on, needs to be the very designed structure of our schools. They were created by a certain kind of society for a certain kind of economic reality. Whether that was ever good or bad is a question for another time, but for today I believe we need to begin to return our schools back to the "natural humanity" of the time before the assembly line began to rule our lives."
irasocol  schools  prussia  us  history  industrialization  education  learning  tcsnmy  change  reform  unschooling  deschooling  policy  progressive  individualized  standards  standardizedtesting  cheating  collaboration  factoryschools  factories  apprenticeships  mentoring  mentorship  hiddencurriculum  curriculum  rules  grades  grading  gradelevels  purpose  taskoriented 
june 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: The School I'd Like
"No grades, No grades: The 2 "grading systems" would be gone...destructive & useless. I imagine a K-12 school...w/ 2 divisions: K-4 & 5-12. W/in these divisions children would progress at own rates & would work w/ groupings based on interests & capabilities...No subject divisions: Everything a student can study can, & should, bring every "subject" into play...Technological Freedom: students in "my school" would have tech freedom...encouraged to discover best ways to use media & ICT to support their learning, to build their "Toolbelts."...A part of the community: Students need some separation from "society." They need to be in a safe place where mistakes & failure are fine. But they cannot be "apart" from their society...A willingness to change...illustrates the trap so many educators fall into. They build, or enter, a structure, & then accept that structure as a "natural" & unchangeable experience. It should be neither.
irasocol  tcsnmy  lcproject  schools  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  grades  grading  assessment  departments  self-directedlearning  self-directed  individualized  education  learning  schooldesign 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Come On In, We're Open!
"The Open High School of Utah is putting the focus where it should be – on the student. Our mission is to facilitate lifelong success by meeting the needs of the 21st century learner through individualized, student-centered instruction, innovative technology, service learning, and personal responsibility."
schools  utah  openeducation  education  learning  online  elearning  technology  individualized  servicelearning  student-centered 
february 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: Why "Standards-Based" and "Accountability" are dirty words [see also comment thread]
"every time we speak of "age appropriate goals," "grade level expectations," & "academic standards" we force students into 2-tier system...create disability & rob people of their human right to develop in way that serves them best... "evidence based practice" which is code for treating education the way a steel mill treats iron ore...real inclusion means abandoning our notions of "standards," "accountability," "evidence."...many of our basic conceptions of what schools look like...embracing the individual learner and not the group." ... ""that's not the "hidden curriculum" of schools, it is "the curriculum."...probably why America's most creative businesses are usually run by those who - at one point or another - found school either intolerable or irrelevant."
assessment  standards  access  individualized  education  policy  us  progressive  tcsnmy  learning  schools  schooling  diversity  accountability  irasocol  curriculum  change 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Remember Those Color Coded SRA Cards? [see also comment by Stephen Downes]
"I grew up in a small town in Central Pennsyltucky with 20% unemployment in the 70's, and we had all sorts of individualized programmed instruction. We had boxes of SRA cards in elementary school, I remember some kind of Star Wars branded package that let you work up yourself up to Jedi Knight status (although we didn't stick with it that long... I guess it was the precursor to everyone's fantasies about WoW-themed learning environments), the advanced 11th grade chemistry class was built around self-paced units, and of course, we all had Little Professors and Datamen.

No doubt the new stuff is much smarter, but please, this is not something that nobody has looked at. Or did everyone else just get a much more retrograde education than me? Doesn't Joel Klein know Lauren Resnick?"
whatsoldisnew  whatsoldisnewagain  progressive  education  curriculum  learning  schools  technology  individualized  tcsnmy  joelklein  tomhoffman  stephendownes  itsnotexperimental  projectbasedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  recyclingideas  philosophy  teaching  pbl 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Child-Centered Learning: Are We Going Too Far? at The Core Knowledge Blog
"How can we ignore two of the deepest human needs of all: to understand the world around us and to communicate with others?...Without common knowledge and common vocabulary, we are stranded and can only send out help signals."
education  learning  brainresearch  childcenteredlearning  children  curriculum  schools  individualized  philosophy 
april 2008 by robertogreco

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