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The Evolution of the Web
"The web today is a growing universe of interlinked web pages and web apps, teeming with videos, photos, and interactive content. What the average user doesn't see is the interplay of web technologies and browsers that makes all this possible."

Over time web technologies have evolved to give web developers the ability to create new generations of useful and immersive web experiences. Today's web is a result of the ongoing efforts of an open web community that helps define these web technologies, like HTML5, CSS3 and WebGL and ensure that they're supported in all web browsers.

The color bands in this visualization represent the interaction between web technologies and browsers, which brings to life the many powerful web apps that we use daily.
internet  web  history  browsers  infographics  html  technology 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Atlas for the End of the World
[via: https://kottke.org/17/06/an-atlas-for-the-end-of-the-world ]

"Coming almost 450 years after the world's first Atlas, this Atlas for the End of the World audits the status of land use and urbanization in the most critically endangered bioregions on Earth. It does so, firstly, by measuring the quantity of protected area across the world's 36 biodiversity hotspots in comparison to United Nation's 2020 targets; and secondly, by identifying where future urban growth in these territories is on a collision course with endangered species.

By bringing urbanization and conservation together in the same study, the essays, maps, data, and artwork in this Atlas lay essential groundwork for the future planning and design of hotspot cities and regions as interdependent ecological and economic systems."



"The findings of this research are threefold: first, a majority of the ecoregions in the hotspots fall well short of United Nations' 2020 targets for protected lands; second, almost all the cities in the hotspots are projected to continue to sprawl in an unregulated manner into the world's most valuable habitats; and finally, only a small number of the 196 nations who are party to the CBD (and the 142 nations who have sovereign jurisdiction over the hotspots) have any semblance of appropriately scaled, land use planning which would help reconcile international conservation values with local economic imperatives.6

By focusing attention on the hotspots in the lead-up to the UN's 2020 deadline for achieving the Aichi targets, this atlas is intended as a geopolitical tool to help prioritize conservation land-use planning. It is also a call to landscape architects, urban designers, and planners to become more involved in helping reconcile ecology and economics in these territories.

Set diametrically at the opposite end of modernity to Ortelius' original, this atlas promotes cultivation, not conquest. As such, this atlas is not about the end of the world at all, for that cosmological inevitability awaits the sun's explosion some 2.5 or so billion years away: it is about the end of Ortelius' world, the end of the world as a God-given and unlimited resource for human exploitation. On this, even the Catholic Church is now adamant: "we have no such right" writes Pope Francis.7"



"This immense and ever-expanding trove of remotely sensed data and imagery is the basis of the world's shared Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The subject of this cyborgian, perpetual mapping-machine is not only where things are in space, but more importantly how things change over time. Because the environmental crisis is generally a question of understanding what is changing where, we can say that with remote sensing and its data-streams we have entered not only the apocalyptic age of star wars and the white-noise world of global telecommunications, but more optimistically, the age of ecological cartography.

The "judgment and bias" of this atlas lies firstly in our acceptance of the public data as a given; secondly in the utilization of GIS to rapidly read and translate metadata as a reasonable basis for map-making in the age of ecological cartography; thirdly, in our foregrounding of each map's particular theme to the exclusion of all others; and finally in the way that a collection of ostensibly neutral and factual maps is combined to form an atlas that, by implication, raises prescient questions of land-use on a global scale."



"Who are the Atlas authors?
The Atlas for the End of the World project was conceived and directed by Richard Weller who is the Martin and Margy Meyerson Chair of Urbanism and Professor and Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture at The University of Pennsylvania (UPenn). The Atlas was researched and created in collaboration with Claire Hoch and Chieh Huang, both recent graduates from the Department of Landscape Architecture at UPenn now practicing landscape architecture in Australia and the United States."
biodiversity  culture  future  maps  anthropocene  earth  multispecies  environment  ecology  ecosystems  mapping  data  visualization  infographics  dataviz  bioregions  atlases  geography  urbanization  cities  nature  naturalhistory  california  classideas  flora  fauna  plants  animals  wildlife  morethanhuman  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  economics  endangersspecies  statistics  richardweller  clairehoch  chiehhuang 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Against Infographics - Art Journal Open
"When design is excellent, graphics reveal data, writes the infographics guru Edward Tufte.1 Good information graphics allow the reader to see relationships not apparent in data without visual form. In principle, such graphics do not impose interpretations but, by showing relationships, make interpretations possible. In Tufte’s oft-quoted phrase: “Good design is clear thinking made visual.”2 Things become considerably more difficult, however, if, pace Tufte, your analytic goal is to complicate rather than to simplify, to open multiple avenues of inquiry, and, most important, to challenge the stability of underlying data, in fact or in principle.

All of these complexities are probed intensely in Depictions, an ongoing print series by the Dutch artist Gert Jan Kocken (b. 1971). Depictions consists of room-size maps of European cities during the Second World War—Rome, Vienna, Munich, and Berlin along the north-south axis of fascism; London, Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Łódź, Warsaw, and Stalingrad along the east-west corridor of conflict—each built up in layers from dozens of source maps unearthed in archives. Kocken’s three-by-four meter Depictions of Berlin, 1933–1945 (2010), for example, is constructed from 104 historical maps, which the artist scanned, georectified, layered into a single digital image, and rendered as a C-print. The resulting composite is a welter of information representing the breakneck change, contradictory claims, and massive data production of the Second World War.

Visually, Kocken’s Depictions are both familiar and strange. Anyone who knows Berlin, particularly the internal borders drawn in 1945 and ossified in the Berlin Wall that remain central to the city’s identity, will easily recognize the terrain of Depictions of Berlin. But other cartographic ghosts visible in the work are invisible on the ground. In Kocken’s map, along with the outlines of the wall, we see the process of ethnic cleansing as registered in contemporary reports, the footprint of Germania, the megacity with which Hitler intended to replace Berlin, and the view from Allied bombers. At once, the Depictions series draws on the data-rich tradition of monumental history painting, as seen, for example, in Albrecht Altdorfer’s The Battle of Alexander at Issus (1529), and on the defocalizing, allover paintings of Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, and other artists working in the 1940s and 1950s. Kocken’s Depictions are simultaneously narrative and aleatory."



"For infographic purposes, there are a number of more obvious ways to deal with historical maps than Kocken’s approach. In the first place, we have the computer interface. Clearly, this is a resource available to Kocken, as his maps all pass through digital mediation on their way to their final printed form. One can easily imagine, for example, a mapping application that allows users to pick and choose among the 104 maps that constitute Kocken’s Depictions of Berlin, selecting display options such as color, opacity, and so forth. And, indeed, many such engines exist. Moreover, with the right approach, even Kocken’s print artifact could be rendered more legible. Kocken chose a different angle, allowing competing stories to conflict visually as well as epistemologically. In places, this conflict produces illegibility not unlike what we find in the dark regions of the Ypres map; in other places, coherences and transparencies are themselves a surprise.

In an age of infographics, we tend to forget that infographics age and the foreignness of old graphics matters to our understanding of them. Kocken’s Depictions show us that information graphics are always historical and conveying their opacity is as much a part of the historical project as is translating them into a contemporary visual language."
via:shannon_mattern  ambiguity  cartography  epistemology  complexity  art  maps  mapping  gertjankocken  danielrosenberg  2016  edwardtufte  visualization  infographics  berlin  amsterdam  rotterdam 
march 2016 by robertogreco
How to Avoid Being Fooled by Bad Maps - CityLab
"Maps are big these days. Blogs and news sites (including this one) frequently post maps and those maps often go viral—40 maps that explain the world, the favorite TV shows of each U.S. state, and so on. They’re all over Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr, and news organizations are understandably capitalizing on the power that maps clearly have in digital space: they can visualize a lot of data quickly and effectively. But they can also visualize a lot of data inaccurately and misleadingly.

A map is not just a picture—it’s also the data behind the map, the methodology used to collect and parse that data, the people doing that work, the choices made in terms of visualization and the software used to make them. A map is also a representation of the world, which in some ways must always be a little inaccurate—most maps, after all, show the roughly spherical world on a flat surface. Certain things are always left off or highlighted while others are altered, as no map can show everything at once. All of those choices and biases, conscious or not, can have important effects on the map itself. We may be looking at something inaccurate, misleading, or incorrect without realizing it.

As Mark Monmonier writes in the fantastic book How to Lie With Maps, Americans are taught from an early age to analyze and understand the meaning and manipulation of words, such as advertising, political campaigns, news and the like (to be “cautious consumers of words” as he puts it) but they are rarely taught the same skills about maps.

Education about using maps (and geography as a whole) is not thorough or common in U.S. schools. The high school Advanced Placement exams for human geography only started being offered in 2001*, for example, and many top private universities do not offer geography as a subject. Harvard dropped it in 1948, which some academics blame for kicking off a decrease in the learning of geography across the country.

Numerous studies report that the vast majority of Americans lack geographic literacy and are unable to find places like Afghanistan or Iraq on a map, let alone understand more complex spatial relationships about them—where are things, why are they there, how does that influence other things? (Harvard, to its credit, formed a Center for Geographic Analysis in 2006.) If they think of it at all, many Americans think geography is just memorizing a list of state capitals or looking at pictures of cool animals in National Geographic.

It’s no surprise then that people often assume maps are accurate, because it’s so often unclear how they are made—maps are “arcane images afforded undue respect and credibility” that are “entrusted to a priesthood of technically competent designers and drafters,” as Monmonier puts it. Almost everybody can write, but not everyone can make a map.

At the same time, the use of geographic information systems (GIS) has exploded as computers and software get more powerful and less expensive. New web mapping tools and the availability of data are democratizing cartography, allowing almost anyone to attempt mapmaking—something that was formerly possible only for experts or users of specialized software. That means many more people are creating their own maps, which is surely a good thing, but it also means that there are many more inaccurate, incorrect maps out there—either by design (to push viral or push a viewpoint) or because the creators don’t fully understand what they’re doing.

Maps are still fun, even the inaccurate ones. But there are a few steps you can take and concepts you can keep in mind to avoid being fooled by a map."
data  maps  mapping  infographics  cartography  epistemology  geography  education  literacy  classideas  andrewwiseman  markmonmonier  deception  titles  viaLshannon_mattern 
july 2015 by robertogreco
The Humane Representation of Thought on Vimeo
"Closing keynote at the UIST and SPLASH conferences, October 2014.
Preface: http://worrydream.com/TheHumaneRepresentationOfThought/note.html

References to baby-steps towards some of the concepts mentioned:

Dynamic reality (physical responsiveness):
- The primary work here is Hiroshi Ishii's "Radical Atoms": http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/
- but also relevant are the "Soft Robotics" projects at Harvard: http://softroboticstoolkit.com
- and at Otherlab: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gyMowPAJwqo
- and some of the more avant-garde corners of material science and 3D printing

Dynamic conversations and presentations:
- Ken Perlin's "Chalktalk" changes daily; here's a recent demo: http://bit.ly/1x5eCOX

Context-sensitive reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/

"Explore-the-model" reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/ExplorableExplanations/
- http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/
- http://ncase.me/polygons/
- http://redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html
- http://earthprimer.com/

Evidence-backed models:
- http://worrydream.com/TenBrighterIdeas/

Direct-manipulation dynamic authoring:
- http://worrydream.com/StopDrawingDeadFish/
- http://worrydream.com/DrawingDynamicVisualizationsTalk/
- http://tobyschachman.com/Shadershop/

Modes of understanding:
- Jerome Bruner: http://amazon.com/dp/0674897013
- Howard Gardner: http://amazon.com/dp/0465024335
- Kieran Egan: http://amazon.com/dp/0226190390

Embodied thinking:
- Edwin Hutchins: http://amazon.com/dp/0262581469
- Andy Clark: http://amazon.com/dp/0262531569
- George Lakoff: http://amazon.com/dp/0465037712
- JJ Gibson: http://amazon.com/dp/0898599598
- among others: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embodied_cognition

I don't know what this is all about:
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/responses.html

---

Abstract:

New representations of thought — written language, mathematical notation, information graphics, etc — have been responsible for some of the most significant leaps in the progress of civilization, by expanding humanity’s collectively-thinkable territory.

But at debilitating cost. These representations, having been invented for static media such as paper, tap into a small subset of human capabilities and neglect the rest. Knowledge work means sitting at a desk, interpreting and manipulating symbols. The human body is reduced to an eye staring at tiny rectangles and fingers on a pen or keyboard.

Like any severely unbalanced way of living, this is crippling to mind and body. But it is also enormously wasteful of the vast human potential. Human beings naturally have many powerful modes of thinking and understanding.

Most are incompatible with static media. In a culture that has contorted itself around the limitations of marks on paper, these modes are undeveloped, unrecognized, or scorned.

We are now seeing the start of a dynamic medium. To a large extent, people today are using this medium merely to emulate and extend static representations from the era of paper, and to further constrain the ways in which the human body can interact with external representations of thought.

But the dynamic medium offers the opportunity to deliberately invent a humane and empowering form of knowledge work. We can design dynamic representations which draw on the entire range of human capabilities — all senses, all forms of movement, all forms of understanding — instead of straining a few and atrophying the rest.

This talk suggests how each of the human activities in which thought is externalized (conversing, presenting, reading, writing, etc) can be redesigned around such representations.

---

Art by David Hellman.
Bret Victor -- http://worrydream.com "

[Some notes from Boris Anthony:

"Those of you who know my "book hack", Bret talks about exactly what motivates my explorations starting at 20:45 in https://vimeo.com/115154289 "
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574339495274876928

"From a different angle, btwn 20:00-29:00 Bret explains how "IoT" is totally changing everything
https://vimeo.com/115154289
@timoreilly @moia"
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574341875836043265 ]
bretvictor  towatch  interactiondesign  davidhellman  hiroshiishii  softrobotics  robots  robotics  kenperlin  jeromebruner  howardgardner  kieranegan  edwinhutchins  andyclark  jjgibson  embodiedcognition  cognition  writing  math  mathematics  infographic  visualization  communication  graphics  graphicdesign  design  representation  humans  understanding  howwelearn  howwethink  media  digital  dynamism  movement  conversation  presentation  reading  howweread  howwewrite  chalktalk  otherlab  3dprinting  3d  materials  physical  tangibility  depth  learning  canon  ui  informationdesign  infographics  maps  mapping  data  thinking  thoughts  numbers  algebra  arithmetic  notation  williamplayfair  cartography  gestures  placevalue  periodictable  michaelfaraday  jamesclerkmaxell  ideas  print  printing  leibniz  humanism  humanerepresentation  icons  visual  aural  kinesthetic  spatial  tactile  symbols  iot  internetofthings  programming  computers  screens  computation  computing  coding  modeling  exploration  via:robertogreco  reasoning  rhetoric  gerrysussman  environments  scale  virtualization 
march 2015 by robertogreco
style.org > The Weight of Rain
[An older Jonathan Corum production: http://13pt.com/projects/nyt110425/ ]

"So when I’m looking at data, or working on an explanatory graphic, these are the moments I’m looking for.

Little “Aha!” moments that I can point to, and say “Look here, something happened,” and then try to explain.

Often those small moments can help lead a reader into the graphic, or help to explain the whole."



"I think many of the infographics we see are really just counting: 190 beers, 190 cups of coffee.

If the only thing you’re doing is coming up with a single number, then you’re doing arithmetic, not visualization.

So I want to make sure that in showing planets I’m not doing some variant of this: 190 planets.

This might be an exaggeration, but it’s the kind of thing I want to avoid.

And I think that the goal of visualization is not finding elaborate ways to encode information. I try to encode as little as possible.

You could imagine taking the same planet data and coming up with any number of geometric shapes to encode it. Maybe the vertical bar is star temperature and the horizontal bars are planet orbits.

But to me this feels like imposing a design on the data, and drawing attention to the design more than the data.

I don’t want my readers to have one finger up here on the key, and another finger down here on the graphic, looking back and forth trying to understand the design. I want the design to disappear.

And I don’t want the reader to have to work hard to decode the information — that’s my job as the designer.

I also want to make sure that I’m not introducing any patterns that don’t exist in the data.

For example, this diagram has the star numbers on the left, and the planet names — the planet letters — on the right. It looks impressive, but the X-like patterns of connecting lines are meaningless. It’s just a reflection of the way the items are ordered, and doesn’t have any interesting meaning in the real world.

There are an infinite number of ways of encoding information.

But just as I wouldn’t ask my readers to learn semaphore or Morse code to read one of my graphics — both of these say “Visualized” — I also don’t want to write microlanguages for my data that readers have to translate. If I do that, I’ve lost my reader before I’ve even started.



And most importantly, I try to keep in mind that visualization is not the same thing as explanation.

If I visualize something and walk away, I’ve only done half the job.



CLOSE
I haven’t shown you many projects this morning, but they do have a theme.

The Curiosity mission is a search for evidence of past water on Mars.

And the Kepler mission is a search for Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone, where liquid water might exist on the surface of a planet.

Both are examples where we — we as humans — are looking for evidence that another form of life might have responded to, or felt, or perhaps even been conscious of ...

... the weight of rain."
jonathancorum  visualization  design  data  2014  mars  change  infographics  space  planets  science  explanation  via:jenlowe 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Wealth Inequality in America - YouTube
"Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actual numbers. The reality is often not what we think it is."
inequality  incomeinequality  wealth  us  wealthdistribution  video  2012  infographics  perception  fairness  income  economics  finance  reality 
march 2013 by robertogreco
How to Join the Ranks of the Digital “Supercreatives:” An Interview with Leslie Bradshaw | Business 2 Community
"of course we could make the infographic, but we need to keep pushing ourselves as an agency to do larger, more programmatic engagements…

Infographics are a high-level tactic that is good for educated audiences; they are not actually good for consumer audiences…

We look for a clearly demarcated point of contact; someone who is either empowered with decision-making abilities themselves or who can internally “socialize” ideas and come back to us…

We also look for focus…

I rely on three pillars for inspiration. Pillar No. 1 is entrepreneurship & leadership. I look for entrepreneurial leaders that have been in my shoes at some point building a company, people like Sheryl Sandberg [COO of Facebook]. Seeing how other people are thriving and surviving inspires me.

The second pillar would be social sciences. I have a background in gender studies, anthropology, political science and economics, & they all frame how I think about approaching client problems.

The last pillar is agriculture."
infographics  2012  howwework  challenge  genderstudies  anthropology  politicalscience  digitalhumanities  socialsciences  economics  agriculture  committees  focus  clientwork  interviews  lesliebradshaw  datavisualization  clients 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Story Maps | Use ArcGIS and Web maps to tell your story.
"Story maps use the concepts and tools of geography to tell stories about the world. They combine intelligent Web maps with text, multimedia content, and intuitive user experiences to inform, educate, entertain, and inspire people about a wide variety of topics. Most story maps are designed for non-technical audiences.

Story maps are at the focal point of the rapid evolution of GIS from a technology available primarily to highly-trained specialists to an array of services and resources that can benefit everyone.

Learn how to create your own story maps in our Workflows and Best Practices summary. Read about characteristics and types of storytelling maps in our Telling Stories with Maps white paper."
infographics  multimedia  mapping  data  via:joguldi  geography  gis  maps  storytelling 
february 2012 by robertogreco
The importance of being axonometric - interview - Domus
What are the relations between digital cartography and hand-drawn maps?
The science is dividing the field of knowledge into disposable knowledge and reusable knowledge. Google maps are falling into the first category, while axonometric maps belong to the second, because they're suitable for being reused. An 11-year-old hand-drawn map still looks beautiful, whereas 11 years from now Google maps will be dated. Google and others are failing to present the beautifulness of our planet to us when doing their digital atlases.

Are you familiar with Baidu? The Chinese can't show satellite images of their cities so they model these detailed axonometric cityscapes.
Baidu shows very beautiful representations, similar to hand-drawn maps. They're like the depiction of a promise, telling you that it's a beautiful country to live in, whether it's true or not.

Reparieren leicht gemacht (1972), Verlag Das Beste, Stuttgart, 23 x 26 cm, 568 pp
Do you think the actual possibility of processing big datasets will affect other fields of visual design beyond data representation?
The digital has had a great impact not only on the production of information, but also on how to get to the sources. But this speed comes at a cost that shouldn't be underestimated, and that cost is precision. In the early days, information designers controlled the entire process and physically possessed the information. Nowadays, if you're doing a data visualisation using bytes that aren't on your hard drive, or that you don't even own, then you're dependent on other people. That's the digital drawback. The moment authoritarian countries decide to cut the wires, all the knowledge will be gone.
visualization  cartography  mapping  interview  infographics  via:migurski 
february 2012 by robertogreco
How to Use Google Search More Effectively [INFOGRAPHIC]
"Sadly, though web searches have become and integral part of the academic research landscape, the art of the Google search is an increasingly lost one. A recent study at Illinois Wesleyan University found that fewer than 25% of students could perform a “reasonably well-executed search.” Wrote researchers, “The majority of students — of all levels — exhibited significant difficulties that ranged across nearly every aspect of the search process.”…

The infographic below offers a helpful primer for how to best structure searches using advanced operators to more quickly and accurately drill down to the information you want. This is by no means an exhaustive list of search operators and advanced techniques, but it’s a good start that will help set you on the path to becoming a Google master."

[Also at: http://www.hackcollege.com/blog/2011/11/23/infographic-get-more-out-of-google.html ]
google  search  tips  infographics  howto  googlescholar  internet  web  online  classideas  glvo  srg  edg  teaching  learning  queries  via:lukeneff  toshare 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Inundated with placenames « Derek Watkins
"I like this map because it illustrates the range of cultural and environmental factors that affect how we label and interact with the world. Lime green bayous follow historical French settlement patterns along the Gulf Coast and up Louisiana streams. The distribution of the Dutch-derived term kill (dark blue) in New York echoes the colonial settlement of “New Netherland” (as well as furnishing half of a specific toponym to the Catskill Mountains). Similarly, the spanish-derived terms rio, arroyo, and cañada (orange hues) trace the early advances of conquistadors into present-day northern New Mexico, an area that still retains some unique cultural traits. Washes in the southwest reflect the intermittent rainfall of the region, while streams named swamps (desaturated green) along the Atlantic seaboard highlight where the coastal plain meets the Appalachian Piedmont at the fall line."

[See also: https://sites.google.com/site/streamgenerics/ ]
history  language  geography  infographics  linguistics  placenames  creeks  streams  us  maps  mapping  toponyms  genericplacenames  2011  derekwatkins 
september 2011 by robertogreco
How big is the problem? | The wrong cure | False Economy
"No country can run huge deficits every year for ever.

The bigger the national debt that builds up, the more expensive it is to meet interest payments. At some point it becomes more difficult and more expensive for governments to borrow extra money because people become reluctant to lend to them.

But we are nowhere near that point in the UK. Let's look more closely at the national debt. "
uk  debt  nationaldebt  2011  infographics  charts  economics  statistics  policy 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Forgotten Infographic Masterpieces by W.E.B. DuBois's Students Show Black History | Co.Design
"W.E.B. DuBois's sociology students hand-drew these charts plotting the plight of African Americans in the decades after the Civil War."
history  visualization  racism  statistics  infographics  webdubois  reconstruction  civilwar  classideas 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Per Square Mile
"Per Square Mile is a blog about density. It’s about what happens when people live like packed sardines. It’s also about what happens when people live so far apart they can go days without seeing another soul. It’s about living amongst trees and prairies, and living in places miles away from them. It’s about the trees and the prairies, too. And lakes and streams and animals and insects. In short, this is a blog about density of all types."
maps  geography  urbanism  planning  density  mapping  infographics  statistics  demographics  classideas  sustainability 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Horoscoped
"Ready? Sure? Whatever the situation or secret moment, enjoy everything a lot. Feel able to absolutely care. Expect nothing else. Keep making love. Family and friends matter. The world is life, fun, and energy. Maybe hard. Or easy. Taking exactly enough is best. Help and talk to others. Change your mind and a better mood comes along..."

[via: http://kottke.org/11/01/horoscopes-all-the-same ]
infographics  visualization  statistics  astrology  psychology 
january 2011 by robertogreco
What a Hundred Million Calls to 311 Reveal About New York | Magazine | Wired.com
"Whether it happens through government services such as 311, private-sector startups, open source initiatives, or, most likely, a combination of all three, it’s clear that the 21st-century city is going to be immensely more efficient at solving clear, definable problems like graffiti and transportation routes. The question is whether these platforms can also address the more subtle problems of big-city neighborhoods—the sins of omission, the holes in the urban fabric where some crucial thread is missing. After all, when people gripe about their neighborhood, it’s usually not the potholes or clogged storm drains they have in mind; it’s the fact that there isn’t a dog run nearby or a playground or a good preschool with space available. “We’re really interested in tackling things that are problems not because they’re broken but because they don’t exist,” Ashlock says."
stevenjohnson  infographics  crowdsourcing  government  mapping  maps  nyc  opendata  statistics  datavisualization  information  visualization  urbanism  urban  infographic  community  cities  data  open311  311 
november 2010 by robertogreco
DavidByrne.com - Tree Drawings / Arboretum
"Drawing/diagrams in the form of trees, which both elucidate & obsfucate roots of contemporary phenomena & terminology. Sort of like borrowing evolutionary tree format & applying it to other, often incompatible, things. In doing so a kind of humorous disjointed scientism of mind heaves into view.

Published by McSweeney's...Straight from sketchbook, smudges & all, plus a 4-foot foldout guide. It’s an eclectic blend of faux science, automatic writing, satire, & an attempt to find connections where none were thought to exist—a sort of self-therapy, allowing the hand to say what the voice cannot. Irrational logic, it’s sometimes called. The application of logical scientific rigor * form to basically irrational premises. To proceed, carefully & deliberately, from nonsense, with a straight face, often arriving at a new kind of sense. The world keeps opening up, unfolding, & just when we expect it to be closed—to be a sealed, sensible box—it shows us something completely surprising."

[via: http://bobulate.com/post/849400482/blood-sweat-and-felt-markers ]
davidbyrne  information  design  visualization  infographics  culture  books  diagrams  art  maps  mcsweeneys  sensemaking  logic  diagramming  order  ordering  terminology  scientismofmind  fauxscience  automaticwriting  satire  connections  forcedconnections  irrationallogic  drawings 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Patrick O'Brian Mapping Project
"To accurately map the progress of Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin over the course of the 21 novels by Patrick O'Brian."
classideas  via:migurski  maps  mapping  literature  infographics  history  googlemaps  gis  fiction  books  patrickobrian  jackaubrey  stephenmaturin  novels 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Locals and Tourists - a set on Flickr
"Some people interpreted the Geotaggers' World Atlas maps to be maps of tourism. This set is an attempt to figure out if that is really true. Some cities (for example Las Vegas and Venice) do seem to be photographed almost entirely by tourists. Others seem to have many pictures taken in piaces that tourists don't visit.

Blue points on the map are pictures taken by locals (people who have taken pictures in this city dated over a range of a month or more).

Red points are pictures taken by tourists (people who seem to be a local of a different city and who took pictures in this city for less than a month).

Yellow points are pictures where it can't be determined whether or not the photographer was a tourist (because they haven't taken pictures anywhere for over a month). They are probably tourists but might just not post many pictures at all.

The maps are ordered by the number of pictures taken by locals."
mapping  maps  geotagging  geography  flickr  infographics  information  visualization  tourists  tourism  photography  cities  infographic  culture  data  density  design  graphics  travel  experience 
june 2010 by robertogreco
as-built on the pitch – mammoth // building nothing out of something
"Just in time for the World Cup, English architect-turned-artist David Marsh has executed a fantastic series of drawings based on England’s (sole) World Cup finals appearance, their 4-2 victory over West Germany in 1966. Using archival footage played back at quarter- and half-speed in combination with a coordinate system derived from the markings on the pitch, Marsh traced the movements of each of the twenty-two players involved in the game (substitutions were not allowed in the World Cup until 1970) onto sheets of trace."
sports  football  occer  worldcup  diagrams  graphics  infographics  drawings  data 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Nonformality | The quality of dialogue
"The nature of our conversations determines the quality of the ideas we share, and therefore it’s worth reflecting on the ways that we talk to each other – check out this infographic on dialogue by Peter Stoyko:"
communication  dialogue  groups  meetings  roles  organizations  conversation  tcsnmy  peterstoyko  learning  conflict  infographics  dialog 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Paper-Based Visualization Competition: The Winner and More - information aesthetics
"The "jury", who were Nicholas O'Leary and infosthetics, have chosen the winner of the paper-based visualization competition. First of all, a great thank you for all those who have submitted their entries! It is amazing to see the amount of creativity, time and effort has been put into each single submission.

Petals [charlenelam.com] by Charlene Lam merged the qualities of beauty, originality, and usability the best. As an independent object, it looks clean and sophisticated. The curves give it a real organic feel whilst the relation between daylight hours is clear. It is also definitely something that can be picked up and examined for a closer look. The price, the book Tactile: High Touch Visuals will be on its way soon.

Check out all the other entries below. Let us know what you think about the entries, and having competitions on infosthetics in general."
paper  papercraft  infodesign  infographics  informationdesign  inspiration  visualization  craft  data  design  mapping  maps  2009  informationaesthetics  papernet 
may 2010 by robertogreco
The art of data visualization: Stamen Design event wrapup | Hacks/Hackers
"The art of making sense of data — and it is truly an art — is a key element in building the future of journalism. Interactive presentations created from data can be personalized by the reader, giving a more engaging news experience. Data-based applications can also lead to new business models, through paid or subscription-based applications that give extra value to readers by providing a new dimension on news coverage.

One of the leaders in data visualization is Stamen Design, which has worked with news organizations and museums alike to help make sense of the world through its unique views of data.

Speaking to a Hacks/Hackers event this week at the Gray Area Foundation For The Arts, Stamen founder Eric Rodenbeck discussed some of his firm’s work and philosophy."
gaffta  graphicdesign  infographics  mapping  maps  stamen  visualization  art  data  design 
april 2010 by robertogreco
$11,000 for the First Apple Portable Computer! The Real Cost of Apple Products - What's the Big Deal?
"On the eve of Apple's iPad launch, we thought it would be interesting to see whether the cost of the iPad really is an 'unbelievable price' compared to previous Apple product launches.

Looking back through the archives, to the launch of the first Apple computer in 1976, we've worked out how much it would cost to buy each of Apple's new major product releases today - accounting for inflation.

So, is the iPad as good value as Steve Jobs would like us to believe? We'll let you make your own mind up."
visualization  infographics  inflation  infographic  statistics  apple  computers  mac  money  prices  gadgets  comparison  hardware  ipod  iphone  ipad 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Kurt Vonnegut at the Blackboard - Lapham’s Quarterly
"Now let me give you a marketing tip. The people who can afford to buy books and magazines and go to the movies don’t like to hear about people who are poor or sick, so start your story up here [indicates top of the G-I axis]. You will see this story over and over again. People love it, and it is ..."
vonnegut  storytelling  charts  graphs  humor  infographics  narrative  literature  writing  philosophy  tcsnmy  kurtvonnegut 
march 2010 by robertogreco
The making of the NYT’s Netflix graphic – The Society for News Design
"One of The Times’ recent graphics, “A Peek Into Netflix Queues,” ended up being one of our more popular graphics of the past few months. (A good roundup of what people wrote is here). Since then, there have been a few questions about the how the graphic was made and Tyson Evans, a friend and colleague, thought it might interest SND members. (I bother Tyson with questions about CSS and Ruby pretty regularly, so I owe him a few favors.)"
visualization  howto  infographics  nytimes  gis  maps  design  information  mapping  netflix  journalism  graphics  interactive  data 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Charting the minutes of night in Helsinki - Core77
"Helsinki is one of those places that experiences extremes of light and dark, with nearly endless nights in the wintertime and almost none in the summer. Anotonio Scarponi of Conceptual Devices in Zurich, Switzerland has devised a calendar that maps out this extreme seasonal change throughout the year on a bar graph.

The months march across the horizontal axis while the hours, listed vertically from noon to midnight, index the minutes of night experienced by each particular calendar day, which is then infilled in black. It results in a solid curve of changing light, jogged twice for the time change."
infographics  visualization  time  light  helsinki  finland  charts  graphs  daylight 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The Happiness Index - The Atlantic (January 5, 2010)
"Imagine someone reading your Facebook status updates and parsing your words to assess how happy or sad you are at any particular moment. Now imagine applying that same parsing technology not just to you, but to all of Facebook’s 100 million American users. The result: Facebook’s Gross National Happiness index, a measure of the national mood. The methodology is somewhat complicated—Facebook counts the number of “positive” and “negative” words used in each status update, converts them to percentages, f"inds average percents based on all users that day, then subtracts the “negative percent” from the “positive percent” to get a value for the y axis—but the results are clear: Weekends and holidays are better than midweek, and Mother’s Day and Father’s Day ’09 recorded more happiness than ’08 (probably because more celebrating moms and dads had Facebook pages in ’09.) And the bottom line: Despite a deepening recession and prolonged wars, Americans seemed to be happier in 2009 than 2008."
happiness  facebook  visualization  statistics  behavior  socialmedia  infographics  2008  2009 
january 2010 by robertogreco
NGM Blog Central - The Cost of Care - National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com
"The United States spends more on medical care per person than any country, yet life expectancy is shorter than in most other developed nations and many developing ones. Lack of health insurance is a factor in life span and contributes to an estimated 45,000 deaths a year. Why the high cost? The U.S. has a fee-for-service system—paying medical providers piecemeal for appointments, surgery, and the like. That can lead to unneeded treatment that doesn’t reliably improve a patient’s health. Says Gerard Anderson, a professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who studies health insurance worldwide, “More care does not necessarily mean better care.”"
politics  visualization  health  infographics  healthcare  insurance  graphic  infographic  us  cost  costs  reform  spending  via:kottke 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Climate Change Deniers vs The Consensus | Information Is Beautiful
"I’m fascinated by climate deniers. How could anyone deny the climate change is happening?

What evidence is there? Surely it’s unambiguous?

Curious, I investigated the key statements made by climate denialists and sought out the counter-views, as presented by climate research scientists. The result is this image."
emissions  statistics  evidence  politics  science  climatechange  globalwarming  visualization  information  infographic  infographics  change  environment  data  charts 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Visualizing empires decline on Vimeo
"This is mainly an experimentation with soft bodies using toxi's verlet springs.

The data refers to the evolution of the top 4 maritime empires of the XIX and XX centuries by extent. The visual emphasis is on their decline."

[Via: http://kottke.org/09/11/the-fall-of-empires
"The fall of empires: A visualization of the decline of the world's four maritime empires (British, Portuguese, French, Spanish) from 1800 to 2009."]
portugal  france  spain  colonialism  geography  data  datavisualization  history  geopolitics  uk  politics  globalization  maps  visualization  infographics  empires  españa 
november 2009 by robertogreco
The cost of getting sick : GE
"To gain a deeper understanding of healthcare costs, we've combined the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) with 500K records from GE's proprietary database. By combining MEPS with GE's data, we gain a more complete picture of the costs associated with chronic conditions."
healthcare  datavisualization  infographics  processing  information  visualization  health  benfry  medical  disease  conversation  data  interactive 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Humanising data: introducing “Chernoff Schools” for Ashdown – Blog – BERG
"In one of our brainstorms, where we were discussing ways to visualise a school’s performance – Webb blurted “Chernoff Schools!!!” – and we all looked at each other with a grin. Chernoff Schools!!! Awesome. Matt Brown immediately started producing some really lovely sketches based on the rough concept… And imagining how an array of schools with different performance attributes might look like… Whether they could appear in isometric 3D on maps or other contexts… And how they might be practically used in some kind of comparison table… Since then Tom and Matt Brown have been playing with the data set and some elementary processing code – to give the us the first interactive, data-driven sketches of Chernoff Schools."
education  cognition  faces  datavisualization  infographics  identity  mattjones  chernofffaces  psychology  data  schools  berg  berglondon  accessibility  design 
november 2009 by robertogreco
cyoa [Choose Your Own Adventure visualizations]
"To get a sense for the distribution of pages within the actual cyoa books, I’ve prepared a dataset of 12 books. They earliest date from 1979 and at the later edge are a handful from 1986. They are laid out chronologically (or according to series order for books released in the same year) with the oldest at the top left and more recent books below. Each book has been arranged into rows of ten pages apiece."
visualization  books  cyoa  chooseyourownadventure  infographics  reading  design  games  play  gaming  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction 
november 2009 by robertogreco
maxgadney.com: World Cup Qualifying Graphic
"England are going to the Next World Cup. That's good news for us Englishmen. It is good to have qualified early - good to avoid the stress of playoffs (always used to be against Poland it seemed). The victory stirred my general WC2010 interest. Who were we going to play? Who would we need to beat? But also who is having the kind of trouble we used to have? Which 'fancied teams' are giving their fans a rough run-in? The sports-media had these kind of details in text and the odd table on view - but I felt something was missing. It turns out there are quite a few big teams that are having difficulty but no way of working out the scale of this upset - or if the 'mighty' were indeed falling. So I thought of an idea for a graphic (the basic idea of which could fit any media). The Story Idea is "are big teams having difficulty qualifying for the word cup?" To do this, the graphic would need to show two main variables in it's search for a correlation - Strength Of Team and Qualifying Status."
football  sports  worldcup  2010  soccer  charts  infographics  via:rodcorp  futbol 
september 2009 by robertogreco
the preservation of favoured traces | ben fry
"We often think of scientific ideas, such as Darwin's theory of evolution, as fixed notions that are accepted as finished. In fact, Darwin's On the Origin of Species evolved over the course of several editions he wrote, edited, & updated during his lifetime. The 1st English ed was approximately 150,000 words, the 6th a much larger 190,000. In the changes are refinements & shifts in ideas — whether increasing the weight of a statement, adding details, or even a change in the idea itself. 2nd edition adds a notable “by the Creator” to the closing paragraph, giving greater attribution to a higher power...the phrase “survival of the fittest” — usually considered central to the theory & often attributed to Darwin — instead came from British philosopher Herbert Spencer, & didn't appear until the 5th edition of the text. Using the 6 editions as a guide, we can see the unfolding & clarification of Darwin's ideas as he sought to further develop his theory during his lifetime."
science  history  darwin  complexity  text  benfry  processing  words  visualization  change  writing  evolution  editing  biology  data  animation  infographics  books  charlesdarwin 
september 2009 by robertogreco
How Different Groups Spend Their Day - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com
"The American Time Use Survey asks thousands of American residents to recall every minute of a day. Here is how people over age 15 spent their time in 2008." [compare with people in Tokyo: http://infosthetics.com/archives/2008/10/tokyos_statistics_right_now.html ]
time  us  datavisualization  nytimes  infographics  demographics  visualization  work  life  statistics  society  culture  data  interactive  timelines 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Mashup DJ Girl Talk Deconstructs Samples From Feed the Animals
"In the modern laptop era, any monkey with Pro Tools can make a mashup. But Pittsburgh-based computer maestro Girl Talk (known to the IRS as Gregg Gillis) has turned the cut-and-paste process into a jams-packed jigsaw puzzle. His latest album, Feed the Animals (released digitally in June with hard copies out September 23), brims with 300 song snippets in just over 50 minutes (compared to around 250 in his previous effort). "People want to see the bar raised," Gillis says. Below, a beat-by-beat breakdown of a single track."
music  infographics  visualization  mashups  samples  diagram  charts 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Wanderlust: GOOD traces the most famous trips in history
"When Spain commissioned Ferdinand Magellan to find a westward route to the Spice Islands in 1519, the explorer commanded five ships and 240 men. Six years later, nearly every member of the expedition, including its commander, was dead. When the American writer Jack Kerouac tried in 1951 to find the words to convey his wayward journey through the United States and Mexico, he commanded a typewriter and a massive stash of Benzedrine. After a few weeks, the first draft of On the Road was completed. These are just two of the journeys that have left indelible marks on our collective maps, and are endless sources of fascination. Here is compilation of some of the most famous jaunts of all time—both factual and fictional—that show us how far we’ve come, and where we might go next."
maps  mapping  history  adventure  exporation  roadtrips  travel  visualization  geography  world  literature  education  cartography  socialstudies  interactive  writing  infographics  tcsnmy 
june 2009 by robertogreco
RoamBi: Dynamic Data Visualization for the iPhone - information aesthetics
"I am one of those two people still not owning an iPhone (sniff), but RoamBi [roambi.com] might ultimately change my mind. RoamBi (short for 'roaming business intelligence') aims to transform existing datasets from a variety of sources into interactive visualizations for the iPhone. Its design beautifully merges the typical shiny and slick iPhone interface graphics with a more serious and dark business application visual style. Try "spinning" the pie charts, or tap the line graphs, either from your own iPhone or the online simulator."
iphone  applications  visualization  data  datavisualization  statistics  infographics  ios 
june 2009 by robertogreco
NPR: Power Hungry: Visualizing The U.S. Electric Grid
"The U.S. electric grid is a complex network of independently owned and operated power plants and transmission lines. Aging infrastructure, combined with a rise in domestic electricity consumption, has forced experts to critically examine the status and health of the nation's electrical systems."
via:preoccupations  us  maps  mapping  electricity  energy  power  environment  infographics  solar  wind  infrastructure  visualization 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Social Collider: ready to collide
"The Social Collider reveals cross-connections between conversations on Twitter.

With the Internet's promise of instant and absolute connectedness, two things appear to be curiously underrepresented: both temporal and lateral perspective of our data-trails. Yet, the amount of data we are constantly producing provides a whole world of contexts, many of which can reveal astonishing relationships if only looked at through time.

This experiment explores these possibilities by starting with messages on the microblogging-platform Twitter. One can search for usernames or topics, which are tracked through time and visualized much like the way a particle collider draws pictures of subatomic matter. Posts that didn't resonate with anyone just connect to the next item in the stream. The ones that did, however, spin off and horizontally link to users or topics who relate to them, either directly or in terms of their content."
socialcollider  visualization  twitter  socialnetworks  infographics  socialnetworking  socialmedia 
march 2009 by robertogreco
March of Democracy
"Where has democracy dominated and where has it retreated? This map gives us a visual ballet of democracy's march across history as the most popular form of government. From the first ancient republics to the rise of self-governing nations, see the history of democracy: 4,000 years in 90 seconds...!"
maps  democracy  history  culture  geography  politics  government  visualization  infographics  mapping 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The Eames’ “A Communications Primer” on Vimeo
"in glorious MONO. this is how it all works: feedback loops, etc. one of the films they did at IBM, mercifully in the public domain and available here: archive.org/details/communications_primer"
eames  communication  information  film  infographics  ibm  video 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Dopplr presents the Personal Annual Report 2008: freshly generated for you, and Barack Obama…
"We’ve generated what we call the Personal Annual Report for all our users. It’s a unique-to-you PDF of data, visualisations and factoids about your travel in 2008, that we’re delivering over the next week via email to every Dopplr user who travelled in 2008.

To give you an example, we thought we’d show you the Personal Annual Report of someone who’s had a very busy 2008 - President Elect Barack Obama."
dopplr  infographics  data  statistics  visualization  barackobama  2008  politics  maps  graphics  personalinformatics  travel  mapping  carbon  design 
january 2009 by robertogreco
DAYTUM
"Daytum is a home for collecting and communicating your daily data. Begin tracking anything you can count and display the results immediately... or just look around and see what other members are recording."
datavisualization  lifestream  visualization  infographics  statistics  personalinformatics  life  charts  tracking  self  onlinetoolkit 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Marks and Meaning, version zero by Dave Gray (Book) in Business & Economics
"Warning: DON'T BUY THIS BOOK if you are uncomfortable with unfinished work! This is version zero, much of the content is still in a vague and formative stage. Marks and meaning is a work in progress; an evolving exploration of visual language, visual thinking and visual work practices by the founder and Chairman of XPLANE, the visual thinking company. An unfinished work, it's a hybrid: part sketchbook, part textbook, part workbook, and continuously updated by the author, based on feedback and conversations with readers. This is version zero: the first version available to the public."
learning  collaboration  infographics  thinking  process  communication  tcsnmy  connectivism  davegray  visualthinking  xplane  unbook  unproduct  evolvingbook  evolution  language  visualization  sketching  notebooks  sketchbooks  workbooks  textbooks  lulu  unfinished 
november 2008 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Wi-fi structures and people shapes
"Sensing the wi-fi like this is almost akin to dowsing - detecting the presence of unseen forces - and mimics the sensation of users attempting to discern where the wi-fi signal is strong."
cityofsound  wireless  wifi  3d  visualization  architecture  internet  infographics  data  mapping  design  technology  australia  drawing  libraries  body  posture  bodies 
november 2008 by robertogreco
The Future of Food: How Science Will Solve the Next Global Crises.
"Forty years ago, advances in fertilizers and pesticides boosted crop yield and fed a growing planet. Today, demand for food fueled by rises in worldwide consumption of meat and protein is again outpacing farmers ability to keep up. It's time for the next Green Revolution. To explore the Wired Atlas, use the thumbnails to navigate from page to page. Click the main image to zoom, and click again for the navigation box to scroll through the spread."
food  science  future  consumption  infographics  farming  global  agriculture 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Tokyo Tuesday: Japan, right now. | 東京の火曜日
"And five minutes ago, in three hours, or at 9:55 on Saturday night. What's Japan up to? Let's find out with some graphs. Let's get specific, too. How many women with part-time jobs are walking their dog at 3am? Yeah, we've got that. Let's jump right into this: Japan has the absolute best census in the history of my known world. Not only does it include normal things like age, sex, and the height of each of your pets, but it also legitimizes the gossipy question of What Are You Doing Right Now? Japan slapped a bunch of people with notebooks and a sacred Numbers Mission: keep a log of what you do during the day, in fifteen minute intervals. And those people did!"

[via: http://www.kottke.org/08/10/what-are-the-japanese-up-to-right-now ]
infographics  japanese  japan  visualization  behavior  statistics  census  culture  graphs 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Can a President Tame the Business Cycle? - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com
"Today, Americans save less and earn a lower minimum wage — in real, or inflation-adjusted, terms — than at nearly any other time since 1950. Can voters reasonably expect these and other indicators to change significantly after a new president takes office in January?"
visualization  infographics  government  nytimes  economics  history  data  heatmap  presidents  politics 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Wolfram Blog : Stock Market Returns by Presidential Party
"The New York Times recently published an “Op-Chart” by Tommy McCall on its Opinion page showing what your returns would have been had you started with $10,000 in 1929 and invested it in the stock market, but only during the administrations of either Democratic or Republican presidents. His calculations showed that if you had invested only during Republican administrations you would now have $11,733 while if you had invested only during Democratic administrations you would now have $300,671. Twenty-five times as much! That’s a pretty dramatic difference, but does it stand up to a closer look? Is it even mathematically plausible that you could have essentially no return on your investment at all over nearly 80 years, just by choosing to invest only during Republican administrations? To answer these questions, I of course turned to Mathematica."
politics  economics  democrats  republicans  history  investing  finance  charts  datamining  us  data  infographics  misleadingwithstatistics 
october 2008 by robertogreco
5 Ways To Visualize The U.S. Elections - ReadWriteWeb
"1. Visualize Political Contributions By Industry 2. Visualizing Earmarks 3. Visualizing Election Polls 4. Electoral College Prediction Tracker 5. The 2008 Presidential Election In The Blogosphere"
2008  elections  transparency  infographics  politics  charts  visualization  us 
october 2008 by robertogreco
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