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robertogreco : infoliteracy   10

Equitable Schools for a Sustainable World - Long View on Education
"“The classroom, with all its limitations, remains a location of possibility. In that field of possibility we have the opportunity to labor for freedom, to demand of ourselves and our comrades, an openness of mind and heart that allows us to face reality even as we collectively imagine ways to move beyond boundaries, to transgress. This is education as the practice of freedom.” bell hooks

Instead of writing a review of Different Schools for a Different World by Scott McLeod and Dean Shareski, I want to try reading it differently, from back to front. I’ll start with the last topic, equity, and then proceed to talk about: innovation, boredom, learning, economics, and information literacy. But first, I want to touch on the book’s epigraph: Seth Godin tells us to “Make schools different.”

Different is an interesting word. It’s certainly a different word from what people have used to call for educational transformation in the past. If we were to draw up teams about educational change, I’m confident that McLeod, Shareski, and I would all be against the authoritarian ‘no excuses’ strand of reform that fears student agency. We’re also for meaningful engagement over glittery entertainment.

Yet, we also part ways very quickly in how we frame our arguments. They argue that we should “adapt learning and teaching environments to the demands of the 21st Century.” Our “changing, increasingly connected world” speeds ahead, but “most of our classrooms fail to change in response to it.” I start from a different position, one that questions how the demands of the 21st Century fit with the project of equity."



"What makes McLeod and Shareski’s take different from the long history of arguments about schools? Here’s their answer:

“In some respects, the concerns in this book are no different from the concerns of the authors of A Nation at Risk… We agree schools need to change, but that change should have to do with a school’s relevance, not just with its achievement scores.”

I think that relevance is exactly the right word, but we must ask relevant to what?

Their answer is the “demands of the 21st Century” that come from “shifting from an industrial mode to a global model and innovation model.” In Godin’s book, he presents the data center as a source of individual opportunity. While that can be true, the number of well-paying jobs at Google and Youtube stars will always be limited. Freedom of expression and civic participation can’t flourish in an age of economic precarity.

So what are the alternatives?

Jennifer M. Silva writes a counter-narrative to the worship of self-sufficiency and competition, and exposes “the hidden injuries of risk”, which often lead to isolation, a hardening of the self, and tragedy. One of her interview subjects died because she lacked affordable health-care.

What Silva finds is that “working-class young adults… feel a sense of powerlessness and mystification towards the institutions that order their lives. Over and over again, they learn that choice is simply an illusion.” Writing in a global context, (2014), Alcinda Honwana gives a name – waithood – to this experience of youth who are “no longer children in need of care, but … are still unable to become independent adults.” Honwana explicitly rejects the idea that waithood represents a “failed transition on the part of the youth themselves,” and she carefully documents the agency of the youth she interviewed in South Africa, Tunisia, Senegal, and Mozambique.
“Young people I interviewed showed strong awareness of the broader socio-economic and political environments that affect their lives. They are acutely conscious of their marginal structural position and they despise and rebel against the abuse and corruption that they observe as the elites in power get richer and they become poorer … They are critical of unsound economic policies that focus on growth but do not enlarge the productive base by creating more jobs.”

There’s no sustainable future in Western countries measuring educational success by the extent to which they out-compete the globalized Other. In her conclusion, Silva presents Wally, who is like her other working-class interview subjects in every respect except his political activism, as a token of hope. Instead of privatizing his problems, he is able to translate them into political issues. The alternative lies not in making schools different, but making the world ‘different’, sustainable, and just."
benjamindoxtdator  2017  equality  equity  socialjustice  schools  sustainability  education  children  economics  globalization  competition  bellhooks  scottmcleod  deanshareski  litercy  infoliteracy  sethgodin  capitalism  digitalredlining  digitaldivide  chrisgilliard  marianamazzucato  ha-joonchang  innovation  labor  work  rosslevine  yonarubinstein  jordanweissman  aliciarobb  carljames  race  class  boredom  richardelmore  mikeschmoker  robertpianta  johngoodlad  engagement  passivity  criticism  learning  howwelearn  technology  johndewey  democracy  efficiency  davidsnedden  neoliberalism  richardflorida  tonyagner  erikbrynjolfsson  andremcafee  carlbenediktfrey  michaelosborne  davidautor  inequality  surveillance  surveillancecapitalism  shoshanazuboff  jonathanalbright  henrygiroux  jennifersilva  alcindahonwana  change  precarity 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Verification Handbook: homepage
"A definitive guide to verifying digital content for emergency coverage
Authored by leading journalists from the BBC, Storyful, ABC, Digital First Media and other verification experts, the Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid providers. It provides the tools, techniques and step-by-step guidelines for how to deal with user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies."
books  crisis  journalism  socialmedia  verification  online  internet  web  information  literacy  infoliteracy  usergeneratedcontent 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Technology is a Tool | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"Technology is a tool, *not* a learning outcome."

[See also: https://www.flickr.com/photos/plugusin/5333410499/ ]

[via: http://www.teachingquality.org/content/edtech-reflections-preservice-teachers]

"What are some of your favourite technology tools that you use in your classroom?

This question always rankles me a bit simply because I don't have favorite technology tools. Instead, I have favorite instructional practices. Better yet, I have instructional practices that I think engage and empower students.

Specifically, I'm passionate about giving kids opportunities to experiment with collaborative dialogue [http://plugusin.pbworks.com/w/page/40688602/Exploring%20Collaborative%20Dialogue ] and evaluating information [http://plugusin.pbworks.com/w/page/40686064/Exploring%20Information%20Management ]. The way I see it, if you can't use conversations to build knowledge with one another and you can't evaluate the content that you come across in our information soaked reality, you are going to struggle to be a meaningful participant in our world.

Do digital tools help me to support those practices? Absolutely. VoiceThread has always played a role in the collaborative dialogue work that I do with students and Scoop.it is a tool that gives kids opportunities to think critically about content.

But thinking about tools first is dangerous. Instead, we need to think about the learning spaces that we are trying to create and the skills that we want students to master first. Finding tools is easy. Choosing the RIGHT tools for supporting the RIGHT practices is WAY more important.

See Technology is Just a Tool [https://www.flickr.com/photos/plugusin/9223386478/ ] and There's Nothing Magical About Technology [https://www.flickr.com/photos/plugusin/5333410499/ ]."
edtech  technology  education  teaching  pedagogy  learning  2013  billferriter  informationliteracy  infoliteracy 
april 2014 by robertogreco
As Media Lines 'Blur,' We All Become Editors : NPR
[link to transcript: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=140118092 ]

"We function as our own editors. We create our own news diet for ourselves. We create our own front page, if you will. ... We're no longer relying on seven white males at The New York Times to do that for us."

"But conventional wisdom didn't tell us how to ferret out the truth amid the farrago on radio and TV, on the newspapers and in the Internet. So whether you're a cop or a teacher or lawyer or an accountant, what technique from your job do you apply to judge whether a news story is fact or opinion? "

"Right, portable ignorance. He would go and say, I don't get this; explain it to me. What are you going to try and do? As opposed to being seduced into trying to look like you know everything and you're very knowledgeable, and that you're sort of in, you know - that you're astute. He used being not astute as a powerful tool."
editors  press  journalism  evidence  ignotance  knowledge  portableignorance  web  radio  internet  news  nealconan  infoliteracy  informationliteracy  blur  crapdetection  truth  information  infooverload  books  2012  tomrosenstiel  billkovach  via:lukeneff 
november 2012 by robertogreco
A Timeline of Information History » AI3:::Adaptive Information
"This timeline presents significant events and developments in the innovation and management of information and documents from cave paintings (ca 30,000 BC) to the present. Only non-electronic innovations and developments are included (that is, digital and electronic communications are excluded)."
information  history  timelines  via:hrheingold  education  technology  semanticweb  visualization  innovation  literacy  infoliteracy  classification  data  historyofinformation 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask
"Train eye & fingers to employ series of techniques that help quickly find what you need to know about web pages + Train mind to think critically, even suspiciously, by asking series of questions that help decide how much web page is to be trusted."
evaluation  internet  web  reference  informationliteracy  information  literacy  trust  tutorials  analysis  e-learning  research  infoliteracy  howto  education  technology  reliability 
april 2008 by robertogreco
QDN: Improving the classroom learning experience
"I gotta say, this idea — a professor intentionally introducing a single falsehood into each of his lectures, challenging the class to find it and expose it — is pretty great for a slew of reasons."
colleges  universities  factchecking  information  infoliteracy  literacy  skepticism  pedagogy  teaching  learning 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Seek and ye shall get confused at Joanne Jacobs
"The report finds “little time is spent in evaluating information, either for relevance, accuracy or authority” when young people use the web, he notes...Confident, but not competent. There’s a lot of that going around. "
technology  schools  education  learning  digitalnatives  google  search  literacy  information  curriculum  infoliteracy  online  internet  facebook 
january 2008 by robertogreco

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