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robertogreco : informatics   10

Golan_Levin_ETA_2012
"Hello, I’m Golan Levin. Today I’d like to talk about getting better results from your informatics researchdivision. You know: -- all those people that you employ in your R&D; department? The ones working on the development of new algorithms for computer vision, computational design, cultural informatics. And new artistic applications of these technologies. To judge from your some of your recentadvertising campaigns, you must’ve hired a bunch of PhD’s, huh?

YOU ARE TROLLINGPSFKWMMNACREATIVEAPPLICATIONSAND WE BOTH KNOW IT
NO YOU DIDN’T.

For those of you who saw Evan Roth’s talk at E.T.A. last year [2011] -- my talk today issimilar. And the reason for this, is that certain problems have not only persisted, but, inways, gotten worse.

NEW-MEDIA ARTISTSARE THE UNPAIDR&D; DEPARTMENTOF AD AGENCIES

… AND THIS IS NOT SUSTAINABLE

IN THE FUTUREYOUR AGENCIES WILL FAILUNLESS YOU FIND WAYSTO PARTNER WITHARTISTS…"
dishonesty  inequity  adagencies  partnerships  evanroth  culturalinformatics  informatics  r&d;  credit  thievery  ads  2012  golanlevin  attribution  newmediaart  newmedia  opensource  advertising 
october 2012 by robertogreco
The Glass Bead Game - Wikipedia [via: http://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/eight-diagrams-of-the-future/]
"The Glass Bead Game takes place at an unspecified date, centuries into the future. Hesse suggested that he imagined the book's narrator writing around the start of the 25th century. The setting is a fictional province of central Europe called Castalia, reserved by political decision for the life of the mind; technology and economic life are kept to a strict minimum. Castalia is home to an austere order of intellectuals with a twofold mission: to run boarding schools for boys, and to nurture & play the Glass Bead Game, whose exact nature remains elusive & whose devotees occupy a special school within Castalia known as Waldzell. The rules of the game are only alluded to, and are so sophisticated that they are not easy to imagine. Playing the game well requires years of hard study of music, mathematics, & cultural history. Essentially the game is an abstract synthesis of all arts and sciences. It proceeds by players making deep connections between seemingly unrelated topics."
existentialism  fiction  gamedesign  literature  philosophy  lifeofthemind  hermanhesse  german  knowledge  informatics  ideas  books  history 
november 2010 by robertogreco
MicroPublicPlaces | Situated Technologies
"In response to two strong global vectors: the rise of pervasive information technologies and the privatization of the public sphere, Marc Böhlen and Hans Frei propose hybrid architectural programs called Micro Public Places (MMPs). MPPs combine insights from ambient intelligence, human computing, architecture, social engineering and urbanism to initiate ways to re- animate public life in contemporary societies. They offer access to things that are or should be available to all: air, water, medicine, books, etc. and combine machine learning procedures with subjective human intuition to make the public realm a contested space again."
mobile  ambient  opendata  architecture  pervasive  design  informatics  urban  community  public  human  humanintuition  intuition  air  water  medicine  books  society  ubicomp  humancomputing  computing  urbaninformatics  urbanism  socialengineering  ambientintelligence  ambientawareness  technology  information 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The overarching vision « Adam Greenfield's Speedbird
"In 2010, anyway, this is my own personal vision of informatic technology at the service of the full range of human desire and complexity. Not a word of it is intended as a “solution” to what are inevitably and correctly local social or political challenges…but it is intended to give people everywhere better tools with which to join such struggles. I hope you find it useful, and invite you to subject its claims and assumptions to the same skepticism I’ve applied to other visions of ubiquitous technology."
ubicomp  ubiquitous  urban  urbanism  rfid  cities  adamgreenfield  momcomp  complexity  informatics 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Textbook remix « Snarkmarket
"This is super cool, both in con­tent and process: Python for Infor­mat­ics is a new text­book that Chuck Sev­er­ance, a pro­fes­sor at the Uni­ver­sity of Michi­gan, com­piled in eleven days. It’s based on an exist­ing Python text­book that was released under a Cre­ative Com­mons license; Sev­er­ance culled, sharp­ened, and extended it.'
informatics  python  books  programming  creativecommons 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Yawnlog: A Social Sleep Tracker - ReadWriteWeb
"Yawnlog is a wacky new site that lets you track how much sleep you're getting, note how good the sleep was, record your dreams and compare all of that information with your friends. This is no laughing matter! Imagine cross referencing aggregate sleeping hours and moods with a timeline of historically significant events. Silly as this service might sound, we think it sounds pretty cool, too."
personalinformatics  sleep  tracking  data  analytics  informatics 
february 2009 by robertogreco
cityofsound: The Adaptive City
"Sadly, the history of technology and the city is not actually one of smooth implementation, shared standards, and open access. It progresses awkwardly, in fits and starts, rather than smoothly and equitably. Yet the history of urban development itself is also awkward. Nonetheless, here is the hint of a promise that a city could heal itself, as if the adaptive membrane of earlier cities is present at the scale of later cities.
urban  adaptive  urbancomputing  danhill  cityofsound  cities  urbanism  informatics  urbanplanning  history  everyware  ubicomp 
september 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Web 2.0, Ubiquity, Sustainability and Consumer Rights
"If we are going to interact with companies in intimate ways -- in ways that impact our deepest life choices -- those interactions ought not only to be held to a higher standard of transparency and public accountability; they ought to be safe-guarded in formal ways as well by having corporate decision-making structures that protect the user rights of the people involved."
sustainability  servicedesign  mattjones  tomcoates  ubicomp  everyware  socialmedia  worldchanging  dopplr  environment  ethics  informatics  privacy  unproduct  innovation  urban  web 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Blackbeltjones/Work » Polite, pertinent and pretty: a talk at Web2.0expo SF, April 2008
"It was a presentation by Tom Coates and myself on an area that fascinates us both – the coming age of practical ubicomp/spimes/everyware. Although hopefully grounded in some of the design ideas explored in our respective current projects, it was a whistlestop tour around the ideas and conversations of many."

[Now at: http://magicalnihilism.com/2008/07/01/polite-pertinent-and-pretty-a-talk-at-web20expo-sf-april-2008/ ]
mattjones  tomcoates  personalinformatics  ubicomp  spimes  informatics  information  mobile  place  fireeagle  dopplr 
july 2008 by robertogreco
The long here and the big now « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"The “long here” part is, I think, a little easier to make out; we’ve already seen how easily we can lay a persistently retrievable history of the things that are done and witnessed there over any place that can specified with lat/long coordinates. Whenever I’ve used the phrase “anchoring subjectivities,” this is what I was thinking of: place now has visible depth in time.

What about “the big now,” though? It’s shorthand for the enhanced and deepened sense of simultaneity – of the world’s massive parallelism – that certain digital artifacts lend us. The most concrete example I can come up with is my experience of Twitter, which, like one of the great NYTE visualizations, though more subtly and expressively, quite clearly reveals the great waves of activity and slumber sweeping over the globe. A ten-minute interval may see reports of friends’ experiencing rush-hour frustrations in the Bay Area, dining out in New York, and late night dancing in London, a notable lacuna in pings from Brussels or Torino or Helsinki, and then the first groggily pre-caffeinated dispatches from Seoul and Tokyo. For me, at least, it’s been difficult to see my New York through quite the same eyes, when every time I get my phone out I feel the entire planet’s deeper rhythms working themselves out.

I’m willing to bet that these are among the factors which will do the most to bend and shape our experience of urban place in the next few years to come."
adamgreenfield  experience  flickr  place  urban  twitter  time  technology  space  history  gamechanging  ephemeralization  urbanism  ubicomp  ubiquitous  location  locative  location-based  everyware  informatics  longhere  bignow 
may 2008 by robertogreco

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