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robertogreco : intentionallyephemeral   2

The Radical New Institution to Liberate U.S. Data - Robinson Meyer - The Atlantic
"Creating an ecosystem like that—getting municipalities to publish their hunting season times and requirements, recruiting an organization to host those agglomerated data, and alerting app developers that the data are coming—requires a central advocacy organization capable of talking to developers and public servants. It’s the kind of community Jaquith hopes to set up—and then walk away from.

“Ideally, the U.S. ODI’s role is forgotten,“ he said.

Jaquith hopes the institute itself, in fact, will be forgotten. If this brief, experimental phase seems successful, he said, and the Knight Foundation establishes the institute, it will be designed to last only a few years.

“We’re gonna term limit it, and we’re thinking that limit will be four years,” he said. In other words, if the institute is widly successful, it will close in 2017.

Advocacy organizations, said Jaquith, either succeed in their advocacy or fail. If they fail, they should stop and let other organizations step in.

Jaquith said he hoped the defined end date would give the U.S. ODI a sprint-like atmosphere. An institute extant for four years would span a year into the term of the next U.S. president, bridging the gap between administrations. It would not, however, erect a zombie institution.

“If there’s never an end date,” he said, “then what’s the urgency?“

Right now, though, Jaquith is looking forward to a shorter, six-month sprint. The ODI, striving to be as lean as possible, won’t even have an office now. And, at this point, the ODI remains a plan rather than a place."
robinsonmeyer  2013  waldojaquaith  intentionallyephemeral  problemsolving  data  odi  usodi  advocacy  organizations  plannedobsolescence  adhoc 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Museum 2.0: Deliberately Unsustainable Business Models
"The underlying dysfunction...often an inability to focus on anything but survivability. To make it, museums need to survive AND succeed...important for museums to undergo an exercise in which you list out two types of things: 1. core services that people depend on and need to survive. ... 2. services you provide that make you awesome. What drives people through your door, gets them excited, and connects them passionately with your content? You should be able to point with pride to both the ways you support the community with reliable, consistent services and supreme awesomeness. The desire to survive will always exist, whether you run a small institution or a giant one. It's human nature to want to keep your job and keep doing what you're doing. The challenge is not to make it your primary goal."
museums  focus  mission  tcsnmy  machineproject  sustainability  lcproject  markallen  ephemeral  intentionallyephemeral  ephemeralinstitutions  openstudioproject  pop-ups  survival  survivability  risk  risktaking  success  2009  ephemerality 
march 2009 by robertogreco

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