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Generation Z: Who They Are, in Their Own Words - The New York Times
[See also, the interactive feature:

"What is it like to be part of the group that has been called the most diverse generation in U.S. history? We asked members of Generation Z to tell us what makes them different from their friends, and to describe their identity. Here's what they had to say."

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/us/generation-z.html ]

"They’re the most diverse generation in American history, and they’re celebrating their untraditional views on gender and identity.

Melissa Auh Krukar is the daughter of a South Korean immigrant father and a Hispanic mother, but she refuses to check “Hispanic” or “Asian” on government forms.

“I try to mark ‘unspecified’ or ‘other’ as a form of resistance,” said Melissa, 23, a preschool teacher in Albuquerque. “I don’t want to be in a box.”

Erik Franze, 20, is a white man, but rather than leave it at that, he includes his preferred pronouns, “he/him/his,” on his email signature to respectfully acknowledge the different gender identities of his peers.

And Shanaya Stephenson, 23, is the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica and Guyana, but she intentionally describes herself as a “pansexual black womxn.”

“I don’t see womanhood as a foil to maleness,” she said.

All three are members of what demographers are calling Generation Z: the postmillennial group of Americans for whom words like “intersectionality” feel as natural as applying filters to photos on Instagram.

Born after 1995, they’re the most diverse generation ever, according to United States census data. One in four is Hispanic, and 6 percent are Asian, according to studies led by the Pew Research Center. Fourteen percent are African-American.

And that racial and ethnic diversity is expected to increase over time, with the United States becoming majority nonwhite in less than a decade, according to Census Bureau projections.

Along with that historic diversity, members of the generation also possess untraditional views about identity.

The New York Times asked members of Generation Z to describe, in their own words, their gender and race as well as what made them different from their friends. Thousands replied with answers similar to those of Melissa, Erik and Shanaya.

“It’s a generational thing,” said Melissa, the preschool teacher. “We have the tools and language to understand identity in ways our parents never really thought about.”

More than 68 million Americans belong to Generation Z, according to 2017 survey data from the Census Bureau, a share larger than the millennials’ and second only to that of the baby boomers. Taking the pulse of any generation is complicated, but especially one of this size.

Generation Z came of age just as the Black Lives Matter movement was cresting, and they are far more comfortable with shifting views of identity than older generations have been.

More than one-third of Generation Z said they knew someone who preferred to be addressed using gender-neutral pronouns, a recent study by the Pew Research Center found, compared with 12 percent of baby boomers.

“Identity is something that can change, like politics,” said Elias Tzoc-Pacheco, 17, a high school senior in Ohio who was born in Guatemala. “That’s a belief shared by a lot of my generation.”

Last summer, Elias began identifying as bisexual. He told his family and friends, but he does not like using the term “come out” to describe the experience, because he and his friends use myriad sexual identities to describe themselves already, he said.

Elias said he defies other expectations as well. He goes to church every day, leans conservative on the issue of abortion and supports unions, he said. He has campaigned for both Democrats and Republicans.

His bipartisan political activism, he said, was a natural outcome of growing up in a world where identity can be as varied as a musical playlist.

This is also the generation for whom tech devices, apps and social media have been ubiquitous throughout their lives. A Pew study last year found that nearly half of all Americans aged 13 to 17 said they were online “almost constantly,” and more than 90 percent used social media.

Wyatt Hale, a high school junior in Bremerton, Wash., has few friends “in real life,” he said, but plenty around the world — Virginia, Norway, Italy — whom he frequently texts and talks to online.

Their friendships started out on YouTube. “I could tell you everything about them,” he said. “But not what they look like in day-to-day life.”"

["as the boomers and millennials fight to the death, gen x and gen z will snuggle up to talk top emotional feelings and best life practices and I am here for it!!"
https://twitter.com/Choire/status/1111248118694187009 ]
genz  generationz  edg  srg  2019  nytimes  interactive  identity  us  diversity  photography  socialmedia  instagram  internet  online  web  change  youth  race  sexuality  gender  demographics  identities  choiresicha  generations  millennials  geny  generationy  genx  generationx  babyboomers  boomers  classideas 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Slices | Stories for the web
"Create and publish interactive multimedia stories for any screen size. Share, embed or integrate anywhere on the web. Built for journalists, visual storytellers and brands."



"Stories for the Web
Create and publish interactive multimedia stories for any screen size. Share, embed or integrate anywhere on the web. Built for journalists, visual storytellers and brands.

Start. Slice. Serve.
Publish your story in three simple steps. We take care of the rest.

Built for Storytellers
We don't like steep learning curves or comprehensive manuals. Whether you're a writer, photographer, or art director, Slices is easy to use right from the start.

Mobile Matters
Smartphone and tablet users make up more than 60% of all web browsing. We make sure your audience has a solid and optimised experience both on the small and the large screen.

Publish the way you want
Share, embed or fully integrate your stories on your website or app. We offer various integration and download options that fit your publishing needs."
web  online  storytelling  onlinetoolkit  stories  format  form  interactive  webdesign  ebdev 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Papier Machine
"Papier Machine, the first booklet of interactive electronic paper toys."
toys  classideas  paper  books  interactive  electronics 
january 2018 by robertogreco
School of Machines, Making & Make-Believe
"School of Machines, Making & Make-Believe is an organisation dedicated to the imaginative exploration of art, technology, design, and human connection. We’re passionate about interactivity and storytelling. We enjoy learning and playing with tools that make our brains and our dreams come to life! Wanna join us?

We curate experimental formats for learning, a creative work-holiday of sorts. We run several intensive full-time four-week programs in Berlin, Germany, each with well-known instructors and a unique topic and focus.

We've started taking our programs to other cities in Europe and plan to experiment in 2017 with new ways of bringing people together in the form of a machine learning residency, online classes geared towards art, tech, and activism, plus more! Stay tuned!

We invite creative people of all kinds -- artists, teachers, technologists, makers, engineers, designers, the curious, people passionate about learning and creativity, those who secretly desire to create something meaningful -- all are encouraged to participate."

[See also:
https://twitter.com/schoolofmaaa
https://www.instagram.com/schoolofma/ ]
art  diy  education  berlin  making  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  storytelling  interactive  creativity  racheluwa  kathrynzazenski  christiankokott  merediththomas  ritaeperjesi  zolazakiya  schoolofmaaa 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Imaginary Cities: An Interview with Darran Anderson – RhysTranter.com
"When a city is dominated by one vision, it becomes either a sterile corpse, however pretty it looks, or, at worst, an all-out tyranny. I’d go as far to say that the very idea of a city is predicated on it being a plurality. When it is singular, it becomes something else; namely a citadel that benefits the powerful, whoever that may be in a given society. That’s one of the reasons that planned cities very often (though not always) fall flat. We forget to build in accidents and resistances – the dialectics of urbanism where different ideas are colliding and synthesizing and pushing things creatively forward in the process. When cities, and indeed countries, adopt a siege mentality, they stagnate and the inhabitants go slowly mad. We’re about to find out a lot of things about what Britain really is. I suspect, given certain cherished illusions await shattering, it’ll be a huge and very dark wake-up call indeed. Nothing would delight me more than to be wrong on this incidentally but I can see it getting decidedly Children of Men sooner than we think. On a less pessimistic note, it will also be a real test of British cities as international outward-facing metropolises, a challenge that anyone with a progressive atom in their body needs to fight in advance rather than retreat. We are mongrel peoples on these islands. We do well not to begin attempting to dismantle ourselves or anyone else for that matter. The future, if we wish to be part of it, is plural."



"We have a tendency to think of books as ends in themselves, which has always seemed somewhat ludicrous, even a bit arrogant to me; the assumption because you’ve read Isherwood’s Berlin novels, you’ve got the Weimar Republic sussed (I don’t mean that detrimentally to Isherwood, whose work I love, incidentally). It’s like that bucket list approach to experience, when you hear someone say they’ve ‘done’ Europe or Thailand. However great a book is, however ‘definitive’ it is on a subject, it strikes me as only a point of beginning or as temporarily conclusive, as time and perspectives are constantly changing. I’ve always had enough self-doubt to be resistant to definitive narratives so I wanted Imaginary Cities to be full of points of departure, contradictions and questions. That’s one of the things I loved about Calvino’s Invisible Cities, which the title is also a nod to. The sense of poetic incompleteness to it. The feeling that the story is continuing on somewhere beyond its pages."



"I’ve always been interested in the thresholds and crossovers of disciplines. “Architecture begins where engineering ends”, the great Walter Gropius said. I think there’s a sort of shifting hinterland between the two, where often the most exciting things are happening. We limit ourselves when we separate things too much. That works for all disciplines. There’s a lot to learn from peering over the walls we’ve built. And I’d question the motives we have in building most of these walls; very often it’s quite petty obscurantism, which ultimately holds us all back.

The first writer I ever fell in love with was Robert Louis Stevenson and I think he had a lasting influence; by his example, you have the permission to wander, literally and figuratively – you can write adventure stories and fuse them with psychological, geographical and historical observations, you can write memoirs, children’s stories, explorations, you can travel with a donkey in the Cévennes if you want. And you can do it all with a continual voice and purpose that threads through everything, even when it seems like chaos or a cacophony.

The writers I’ve loved since, from Montaigne to Borges to Solnit have that same sense of roaming, of proving “why not?” when stepping over frequently-artificial boundaries. It’s not for everyone but I love literature that contains this tendency to roam. It goes beyond even literature I suppose. There’s a colossal amount of be gained from learning from people in other artforms, cine-essayists like Chris Marker or musicians like Brian Eno. I’m not really interested in literature that just speaks to itself. I’d rather literature be a dense and messy city than an ordered monastery."



"We might think of them as problems but I think they’re essential to keep cities alive. I spoke about this at the Venice Architecture Biennale a few months ago and every day since, post-Brexit, it’s got more and more apparent how vital this is. When a city is dominated by one vision, it becomes either a sterile corpse, however pretty it looks, or, at worst, an all-out tyranny. I’d go as far to say that the very idea of a city is predicated on it being a plurality. When it is singular, it becomes something else; namely a citadel that benefits the powerful, whoever that may be in a given society. That’s one of the reasons that planned cities very often (though not always) fall flat. We forget to build in accidents and resistances – the dialectics of urbanism where different ideas are colliding and synthesizing and pushing things creatively forward in the process. When cities, and indeed countries, adopt a siege mentality, they stagnate and the inhabitants go slowly mad. We’re about to find out a lot of things about what Britain really is. I suspect, given certain cherished illusions await shattering, it’ll be a huge and very dark wake-up call indeed. Nothing would delight me more than to be wrong on this incidentally but I can see it getting decidedly Children of Men sooner than we think. On a less pessimistic note, it will also be a real test of British cities as international outward-facing metropolises, a challenge that anyone with a progressive atom in their body needs to fight in advance rather than retreat. We are mongrel peoples on these islands. We do well not to begin attempting to dismantle ourselves or anyone else for that matter. The future, if we wish to be part of it, is plural."



"If you live in a city, every aspect of your life takes place within urban space. The journeys you make are charted through it. The experiences you undertake have a stage. Space seeps into your memories and, by association, your memories seep into space. There are very obvious examples to this – hospitals, churches, graveyards – but also train stations where you saw someone for the last time or pubs where you met for the first time. Streets that mean nothing to most have profound connotations for others. They are the setting of our own private mythologies."



"Bookish folks like you and I explore this largely with literature as an aid but, though I believe books will always have a place, they seem to be more peripheral than we’d like to admit. As much as culture helps define our perception of cities, it has its limits. For me, the starting point for Dublin is Ulysses, just as Kafka is for Prague, and Dostoevsky or Bely is for St Petersburg and yet when I go to places like those, I find that these presumptions are attractive illusions. So much time has passed since those works were written and it was all subjective to begin with. That’s the beauty: the city is not the same thing to any two people, no matter how it is branded. One of the things I’m interested in is how the urban influences us, and the way we see ourselves, in ways that are often overlooked or come by implication. When we look at the Romantics, Sturm und Drang or American Transcendentalism, we tend to take them at their word and focus on rural arcadias or encounters with the sublime in the wilderness. To me, they are profoundly urban. They are the glorious side-effects brought on by the rise of the Industrial Revolution and the huge drive of urbanisation that followed. So even our ideas of escaping to the sanctuary of the countryside, even our conceptions of what the countryside is and for, are profoundly shaped by the appearance and evolution of cities."



"In the near-future, I see the manner in which our identities merge with our surroundings becoming acutely apparent. In terms of technology, it’s easy to see the cumbersome interfaces that we navigate with, the smartphone for example, disappearing. I see this happening somewhat with the book as well (though I’ve no doubt it will remain as an escape into another type of space). The literary approach to cities will become much more interactive with the environment. This isn’t a new idea. The Situationists, who I’m not uncritical of, hinted at this by shifting the focus away from academic texts to games, maps, graffiti, and the streets themselves. With developments in augmented reality, I can see the city becoming a form of text, not just with buildings annotated but actually offering creative input and manipulation. We already read cities without thinking about it. We may come to write them too."
darrananderson  urbanism  architecture  cities  2016  community  society  siegementality  planning  urban  italocalvino  space  identity  memory  augmentedreality  books  writing  interactivity  interactive  situationist  urbanization  ar 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Apparatus: A hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams
"Apparatus is a hybrid graphics editor and programming environment for creating interactive diagrams.

The Apparatus Editor runs in the browser and interactive diagrams created with Apparatus can be shared and embedded on the web (coming soon).

Apparatus is free, open-source software."



"Apparatus is under active development. Discuss how Apparatus should evolve on the Apparatus Google Group.

Source code is available on Github under the MIT license. Contributions are very welcome! Big thanks to all who have contributed code to Apparatus.

Apparatus was originally developed by Toby Schachman as a research project within the Communications Design Group (CDG) sponsored by SAP Labs. Thanks to Bret Victor, Paula Te, Matthias Graf, Michael Nagle, Chaim Gingold, Robert Ochshorn, Glen Chiacchieri, Joshua Horowitz, Ian Johnson, Simon Last, Ivan Zhao, Emily Eiffler, Vi Hart, and Monique DeSalvo for design discussions, beta testing, and encouragement!"

[via: http://roomthily.tumblr.com/post/136019466687/apparatus-a-hybrid-graphics-editor-and ]
graphics  visualization  software  opensource  onlinetoolkit  interactive  programming  classideas  tobyschachman  communicationsdesigngroup  brettvictor  paulate  matthiasgraf  vihart  moniquedesalvo  joshuahorowitz  ianjohnson  simonlast  ivanzhao  michaelnagle  chaimgingold  robertochshorn  glenchiacchieri  drawing  edg  srg 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Haiti
"Four years after the earthquake, how is Haiti rebuilding itself? If you were part of the process, would you be able to make the right choices? Find out with this multimedia interactive story."
via:senongo  cyoa  haiti  interactive  history  if  interactivefiction 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Do Not Track: revolutionary mashup documentary about Web privacy - Boing Boing
"Brett "Remix Manifesto" Gaylor tells the story of his new project: a revolutionary "mashup documentary" about privacy and the Web."

[This article refers to:
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/1
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/2
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/3
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/4 ]

"I make documentaries about the Internet. My last one, Rip! A Remix Manifesto, was made during the copyright wars of the early 2000s. We followed Girl Talk, Larry Lessig, Gilberto Gil, Cory and others as the Free Culture movement was born. I believed then that copyright was the Internet's defining issue. I was wrong.

In the time since I made Rip, we’ve seen surveillance from both corporate and state actors reach deeper into our lives. Advertising, and the tracking that goes with it, have become the dominant business model of the web. With the Snowden revelations, we've seen that this business model has given the NSA and other state agencies access to the intimate details of our online lives, our location, our reading lists, and our friends.

So with my colleagues at Upian in Paris, the National Film Board of Canada, AJ+, Radio-Canada, RTS, Arte and Bayersicher Rundfunk, I decided to make a documentary series about this. The trouble is, privacy is a difficult issue for most people. They either quickly pull out the "nothing to hide" argument, or they give the shruggie ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. We wanted to find a way to make this personal for people, so we decided to use the viewer's own data to create each episode.

When you open Episode One, the narrator you hear will depend on your location. You'll likely see me if you link from Boing Boing -- I'm the English narrator on desktop. But if you connect on mobile, you'll meet Francesca Fiorentini from AJ+. In Quebec, you'll meet Sandra Rodriguez. In France, it'll be journalist Vincent Glad. The tone is conversational. You'll meet someone who speaks your own language discussing their online sharing addiction.

Once you've met us, we'll say different things to you. If it's raining where you are, we'll know it, because we've plugged into a weather API. This API will communicate with Giphy's API and present different GIFs. It's all edited together like a movie, but a movie that is created on the spot, just for you.

To go further, we ask you to tell us a bit more about you. If you tell us where you go for your news, we've partnered with the service disconnect.me to show you the third party trackers that advertisers and analytics folks place on your computer to follow you around the Web.

In Episode Two, we then take this data to create personalized ads within the program - while we talk to Ethan Zuckerman and Julia Angwin about how advertising came to dominate the Web. We'll ask you how much you would be willing to pay for a version of Facebook or Google that didn't have ads, and compare that with how much they make from you.

In Episode Three, we created a a corporation called Illuminus that practices "future present risk detection". If you log in with your Facebook profile, the corporation uses an API developed at the University of Cambridge, "Apply Magic Sauce," to determine which one of the "Big Five Personality Traits" applies to you. We discover how lenders are dipping their toes into making risk assessments based on your social media activity.

We varied our style in Episode Four and made a privacy cartoon. Journalist Zineb Dryef spent months researching what information she discloses on her mobile phone, and then Darren Pasemko animated what she learned. We meet Kate Crawford, Julia Angwin, as well as Harlo Holmes and Nathan Freitas from the Guardian project. It’s an episode told in four parts, and you can watch the first part in the video below.

If you watch the rest of this episode on donottrack-doc.com, it will be geo-located and interactive.

Our next episode, available May 26th, is produced by the National Film Board of Canada's digital studio, who have a well deserved reputation for creating beautiful interfaces for new types of documentaries. In this episode, we'll explore big data - by making correlations as you watch, you'll determine the outcome, while you meet danah boyd, Cory Doctorow, Alicia Garza and Kate Crawford.

We’re still catching our breath while we produce the final two episodes. One thing we know - we want these to be personal. As we learned in our first episodes, people understand the issues around privacy and surveillance when we let them explore their own data. Depending on how you behaved during the series, we want these final episodes to adapt. We’ll be exploring how the filter bubble shapes your view of the world in our 6th episode, and how our actions can shape the future in our 7th. What these episodes look like is up to you."
brettgaylor  film  interactive  interactivefilm  mashups  documentary  towatch  privacy  web  online  internet  2015  nfbc  nfb  katecrawford  corydoctoow  aliciagarza  danahboyd  location  zinebdryef  darrenpasemko  harloholmes  nathanfreitas  juliaangwin  ethanzuckerman  advertising  tracking  francescafiorentini  sandrarodriguez  giphy  api  trackers  cookies 
may 2015 by robertogreco
The rise of explorable explanations | Maarten Lambrechts
"It may be that I’m just late to the party, but the last couple of months some very interesting mixes of text and small, interactive graphics explaining quite complex mathematical, statistical and other concepts came into my view. Here I list some of these new and powerful explorable explanations.

The inspirator

The term ‘explorable explanation’ was coined 4 years ago by Bret Victor, in his essay with the same title. Victor argues that readers will be more engaged and will learn and remember better when they are ‘active readers’."
education  interactive  visualization  bretvictor  dataviz  understanding  2015  maartenlambrechts 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Lagos Wide and Close Online
"An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City"

"Every day, hundreds of people start new lives in Lagos, Nigeria. This megacity is home to an estimated 13 million people who very survival depends on improvisation, networking, and risk-taking.

In 2001, architect Rem Koolhaas and filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak went to Lagos to document one of fastest growing cities in Africa. Based on research by the Harvard Project on the City, this website represents a unique engagement with an exploding city, capturing multiple perspectives of a volatile moment in its evolution.

In this interactive documentary film, the information has been organised according to distance. Loosely based on the trajectory of bus driver Olawole Busayo, it presents intimate encounters with the city and its people on the one hand, and a more removed perspective of Lagos on the other. In the one hour film, viewers join Busayo for his daily journey in the yellow minivan. Switch between a wide and a close view of Lagos and choose between three audio tracks: comments by Rem Koolhaas, conversations with Lagos citizens, or city sounds."



"This interactive documentary is an online adaptation of the DVD Lagos Wide & Close - An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City (2004). As one of the first interactive documentaries ever made, and a rare documentation of Lagos at a volatile moment in its evolution, we decided to make it available on the Internet in 2014.

The interactive film presents a selection of video and audio of Lagos recorded in 2001. It separates the distant – wide — and the intimate – close — views of the city enabling the viewer to switch between these perspectives interactively. Rather than following a dramatic storyline, it aims to bring the viewer close to the reality of what it means to live and work in Lagos, to move alongside bus driver Olawole Busayo and other Lagosians, and to delve into the city’s layered fabric, slowly making sense of the rules, the possibilities, and lifestyles of Lagos.

Increased bandwidth makes it now possible to play the two video channels and three audio channels in parallel online. The Lagos research project by Rem Koolhaas and The Harvard Project on the City, on which this interactive film is based, has not been published yet. With this online adaptation, we hope to provide a permanent and accessible resource for those interested in understanding Lagos and rapid urban growth.

The Explosive Growth of Lagos

Reliable statistics are not available, but based on UN reports and the Lagos city census, it is estimated that every day, hundreds of people start new lives in the African city of Lagos. As the largest port and commercial centre of Nigeria, it is now home to approximately 15 million people. This dangerous, polluted, and in many ways, dysfunctional city, has drainage problems, relentless traffic jams, and shortages of water and electricity, but is somehow working for those who move there to start new lives.

How and why does a city with so many problems continue to grow against all odds? In 2000, architect Rem Koolhaas decided to study Lagos in an attempt to understand the hidden logic that makes a “dysfunctional” city function. His research revealed a population’s unique ability to cope inventively with an urban landscape of disorder and to bring order into it. Lagosians have equipped their expanding metropolis with a finely meshed web of efficient self-organizing networks, challenging the dominant idea that “Lagos doesn’t work.”

Loosely based on the trajectories of bus driver Olawole Busayo, this interactive film provides a wide and a close perspective on an expanding city. In three separate audio tracks, it provides a glimpse of the lives of eight Lagos inhabitants, revealing the creative relationships they develop with their urban environment. In parallel to Busayo’s journey and interviews with Lagosians, Rem Koolhaas voices his reactions, interpretations, and changing attitudes towards Lagos during his five years of research.

Recording in 2001

In 2001, Rem Koolhaas invited filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak to help document his research in Lagos with the Harvard project on the City and photographer Edgar Cleijne. To present Lagos through the eyes of Koolhaas, Van der Haak created the documentary Lagos/Koolhaas that premiered in the International Documentary Festival Amsterdam and the Volksbühne in Berlin in the fall of 2002. As the title suggests, Lagos/Koolhaas is as much a portrait of the architect and his research methods as it is an image of the city of Lagos.

But another, more personal interpretation of the city was embedded in the 55 hours of material she shot with cinematographer Alexander Oey during their three trips to Nigeria — a collection of up-close encounters with the people of Lagos and a tracing of the paths and rhythms of their daily lives. If Koolhaas looked at the patterns of Lagos from afar and then zoomed in on the details, Van der Haak started from within letting personal encounters gradually reveal clues for deciphering the larger picture.

No Event No History

Because filming had long been prohibited in Nigeria, very few images of Lagos existed before 2001. This project involves an extended, chaotic and intimate engagement with a then hardly documented city, capturing multiple perspectives of a unique moment in its evolution, presenting experiences and observations, rather than a linear argument.

As one of the few contemporary records of a city that has been largely ignored by western media – with the exception of ‘news events’ like religious riots and military coups - this project is an invitation to look and listen to Lagos – at a moment in which the energy of change may reveal valuable insights into the uncontrollable forces of urbanization.

Credits

This project has been developed by documentary filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak and designer Silke Wawro in close collaboration with architect Rem Koolhaas, photographer Edgar Cleijne, and the Harvard Project on the City. The concept and scenario for Lagos Wide & Close was developed by Van der Haak and Wawro during a masterclass of the Sandberg Institute and Dutch Cultural Media Fund in 2003 and produced by Submarine. Most of the footage was originally shot in 2001/2002 by Alexander Oey for the linear documentary Lagos/Koolhaas (2002, 55 minutes), directed by Bregtje van der Haak and produced by Pieter van Huystee Film & TV in co-production with VPRO Television. Alexander Oey also edited Lagos Wide & Close. The soundscape was designed by Rik Meier."
lagos  nigeria  via:litheland  cities  interactive  urban  urbanism  storytelling  documentaries  improvisation  risktaking  networking  megacities  remkoolhaas  bregtjevanderhaak  africa  2001  olawolebusayo  soundscapes  2004  2014  edgarcleijne  silkewawro  rikmeier 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Instagramming Dinosaurs: Clive Thompson on Museums in the Digital Age (4 of 4) | Moosha Moosha Mooshme
"Q: Clive, we’re sitting here talking about all these ways that digital media can augment our abilities to think, to access our minds, to connect with others, think with others and have deeper understanding and reflection after the event. We’re doing this in a museum that was founded in 1869, looking at dinosaurs that are millions of years old, where the tools that we are talking about that can empower that kind of thinking are like “a blip of a blip” in the timeline.

So if this museum was created today, if you were re-designing this hall, and you were thinking about what it would mean for a Natural History Museum to create a space that could support people to use these tools, what would you do?

A: That’s a really good question. I’ll start off by saying I have an enormous respect and fondness for people that create museum exhibits. They’re the first people to have had to think through the implications of multimedia. When they are communicating this to the public, trying to explain dinosaurs, they use text. There’s pictures. They had to decide what physical items should we have. And then there are these sound guys, the first people to start asking, “Why don’t we have the ability to walk through here and have someone talk on computers?” So in this room there’s four forms of media, being used right now, pioneered by museum people. People in the news media didn’t have to think this way. Teachers didn’t have to think this way. But museum exhibit people have been working in multimedia for like a 150 fifty years, frankly, so this room is already a lot richer than most other places you’d see.

If you wanted to add more to it, there are a couple of low hanging fruits. The dinosaurs are wonderful physical artifacts and it’s often startling to realize how big they are, or what their shape is. Look up there at how serrated that tooth is on that T-Rex. How big is that? Well, what would it be like if I held it in my hand? In fact one thing you can start to do is to make these physical objects shout using 3D printing. These days you have a lot of 3D printers that are becoming cheaper. This is essentially the transmission of physical piece of knowledge across the ether. What if I could go to an online site and download and print a copy of any parts of this dinosaur, because I would love one of those teeth, you know? Imagine: having just one of those just sitting on my desk would be a really cool way to reflect on the size and might of this enormous creature. So the physical sharing of these rich artifacts I think is a fantastic new form of media that’s coming along.

The second thing is you can actually do some really cool things with augmented reality. Augmented reality is the concept of being able to hold up the phone and having it overlay over what you’re seeing – information that helps you look at in a different way or learn things about it. And by and large a lot of our augmented reality has not worked very well in the everyday world, but I think it’s because in the everyday world, we often don’t really want a huge information rich experience as we walk down the street. But I could have a little app that I can load and pull it back and forth and be able to see different parts of that dinosaur, with labels, as I move it back and forth, or see the way that the jaw moved. These are ways that would really help me get new dimensions out of what’s physically in front of me. So there is a couple of things that I think we could start to do.

You could probably think a little bit about integrating public thinking into an environment like this. [re: part two of this interview]

Q: How can I, as a visitor to this hall, know what other people are thinking here?

A: Well, yeah, that’s a fun question: so how can we identify the most interesting things anyone has said about this dinosaur? You know, what are the three most up-voted smartest reflections. It could be someone’s having a thought, or a visitor who had some interesting visceral reaction to this, or it could be someone who has found an amazing quote in one of the newspapers in the 19th century when this thing was first uncorked. Those things are hard to engineer because the signal-to-noise ratio can be really high in public thinking. 90% of what people say online it pretty banal. And so we have that challenge, to find the best stuff people have said about this dinosaur, over and over again.

That’s a hard one to surmount, but pretty cool if you could do it.

Wow, I hadn’t seen that tail before. Holy Moses, that’s long!"

[The full set: http://www.mooshme.org/?s=clive+thompson ]
clivethompson  amnh  2014  barryjoseph  socialmedia  instagram  learning  museum  interactive  interactivity  multimedia  augmentedreality  publicthinking  3dprinting  museums  exhibitions  exhibits  exhibitdesign  design  ar 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Smart Stories: Matt Adams (Future of StoryTelling 2014) on Vimeo
"Artist Matt Adams’s work playfully explores the storytelling potential of new technologies. His present fascination is big data. How will stories be influenced by our ability to learn personal details about our audiences? What are the limits of personalization?"

[Also on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxxEy78EqYI ]

[See also: http://www.blasttheory.co.uk/news-item/matt-adams-will-be-speaking-at-the-fost-summit/
http://www.blasttheory.co.uk/?wysija-page=1&controller=email&action=view&email_id=53&wysijap=subscriptions&user_id=5691 ]
mattadams  storytelling  technology  blastheory  her  karen  data  bigdata  mobile  2014  interactivefiction  games  play  gaming  personalization  culture  psychology  interactive  if 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Burn the Seats: Audience Immersion in Interactive Theater on Vimeo
"“It’s about a heightened state of awareness,” says Felix Barrett about groundbreaking productions like Sleep No More and The Drowned Man. Punchdrunk productions transform existing architectural spaces into interactive theater pieces in order to disrupt the traditional, formulaic, and passive theater model. They demand the attention of all five senses."
theater  storytelling  2013  sleepnomore  felixbarrett  thedrownedman  architecture  immersive  senses  punchdrunk  interactive 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Brian Eno’s Diary: A Year With Swollen... - Austin Kleon
"Art is about scenius, not genius.

Eno rails against what he calls the “Big Man” theory of history, “where events are changed by the occasional brilliant or terrible man, working in heroic isolation.” Instead Eno believes that the world is “a cooperative enterprise,” “constantly being remade by all its inhabitants.”
The reality of how culture and ideas evolve is much closer to the one we as pop musicians are liable to accept — a continuous toing and froing of ideas and imitations and misconstruals, of things becoming thinkable because they are suddenly technically possible, of action and reaction, than the traditional fine-art model which posits an inspired individual sorting it all out for himself and then delivering it unto a largely uncomprehending and ungrateful world.

Art is not an object, but a trigger for experience.
Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences (Roy Ascott’s phrase). That solves a lot of problems: we don’t have to argue about whether photographs are art, or whether performances are art, or whether Carl Andre’s bricks or Andres Serranos’s piss or little Richard’s ‘Long Tall Sally’ are art, because we say, ‘Art is something that happens, a process, not a quality, and all sorts of things can make it happen.’ (…_ Suppose you redescribe the job ‘artist’ as ‘a person who creates situations in which you can have art experiences’.

“Try to make things that can become better in other people’s minds than they were in yours.”

Eno rejects the term “interactive,” and suggests “unfinished” instead. He suggests that new culture-makers will move away from providing “pure, complete experiences to providing the platforms from which people then fashion their own experiences.”
Once we get used to the idea that we are no longer consumers of ‘finished’ works, but that we are people who engage in conversations and interactions with things, we find ourselves leaving a world of ‘know your own station’ passivity and we start to develop a taste for active engagement. We stop regarding things as fixed and unchangeable, as preordained, and we increasingly find ourselves practising the idea that we have some control. Most importantly, perhaps, we might start to think the same way about ourselves: that we are unfinished (and unfinishable) beings whose task is constantly to re-examine and remix our ideas and our identities.

Art is where we go to become our best selves.
What a bastard Beethoven sounds — arrogant, paranoid, disagreeable. Why am I still surprised when people turn out to be not at all like their work? A suspicion of the idea that art is the place where you become what you’d like to be… rather than what you already are…

Stop obsessing over all the possible journeys you could take, and just start off on one.

Over and over, Eno expresses a desire for less choices in the process of art-making, not more. ”Less exploring of all the possible journeys you could make; more determination to take one journey (even if the choice of it is initially rather arbitrary) and make it take you somewhere.“
My ideal is probably based on the story I heard years ago of how the Japanese calligraphers used to work — a whole day spent grinding inks and preparing brushes and paper, and then, as the sun begins to go down, a single burst of fast and inspired action.
That cultural image — which you find throughout Japanese culture from Sumo to Sushi — is very interesting and quite different from ours. We admire people who stick at it doggedly and evenly (I also admire them) and put in the right amount of hours. But more and more I want to try that Japanese model: to get everything in place (including your mind, of course) first, and then to just give yourself one chance. It seems thrilling.

“If you don’t call it art, you’re likely to get a better result.”

Eno says, “people do much better when they don’t think they’re being artists,” and when they do think decide they’re being artists, they “suddenly turn out crap.”
Oldenburg’s earlier stuff — before he knew what he was doing — looked best. So often the case that people work best when they are stretching out over an abyss of ignorance, hanging on to a thin branch of “what-is-still-possible”, tantalized by the future.
"
brianeno  austinkleon  objects  art  experience  process  glvo  unfinished  interactive  royascott  culture  scenius  genius  andresserrano 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Kitsune : What would a game look like if it were designed to...
"What would a game look like if it were designed to encourage a process of reader engagement that consists of coming up with a narrative hypothesis and then testing it? If the discovery of layers of meaning and personhood were achieved through play?"
— 

Reading and Hypothesis | Emily Short’s Interactive Storytelling [http://emshort.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/reading-and-hypothesis/ ]

"I really like the idea of hypothetical reading as basis for interactive storytelling. It should matter what theories players come up with about the backstory that is gradually revealed. They should be able to act on it."
reading  hypothesis  hypotheticalreading  storytelling  karsalfrink  2014  emilyshort  interactivestorytelling  interactive  interactivefiction  games  gaming  play  theorizing  if 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Powering A Nation.org
"Our 2013 Fellows present a Powering a Nation special report, “Over Water Under Fire.”

The interactive documentary, "Over Water Under Fire," combines a video narrative with motion graphics and text to present the Colorado River as a living timeline of our nation's innovations and exploitations with water as the river's uncertain future echoes the precarious state of water resources in this country. The graphics and text pieces will focus on how humans have physically altered the environment along the river in response to limited water resources, how the river has responded to those changes and what choices the country will have to make in the future.

The narrative arc is integrated with a video story on Special Ops veterans who come back from battle zones with PTSD and take a river trip called "Warriors on Cataract" as a means of therapy. These veterans emphasize the human connection to water resources and subtly echo the theme of U.S. resource allocation."

[See also: http://www.poweringanation.org/water2013/ ]
activism  climate  coal  energy  water  veterans  storytelling  interactivefilm  interactive  ptsd  interactivedocumentary  documentary  climatechange  us  rivers  2013  coloradoriver 
october 2013 by robertogreco
LISA PARK
"Lisa Park (Yeon-Hee) was raised in Seoul, Korea and currently lives and works in New York. Her background was in Fine Art Media in her undergraduate degree at Art Center College of Design and her works range from painting, installation, photography, and film.She began to focus her artistic practice in interactive based works by integrating technology and art. She has her master’s degree in M.P.S from ITP (Interactive Telecommunications Program) at New York University. The program’s multidisciplinary education significantly extended her knowledge to use programming softwares like Processing, Arduino, Max/MSP to create into art works.

Over the past years, she used technology as an interface to create projects like Eunoia, Le Violon d’Lisa, and Obsession is sad Passion. She does performance and the recurring themes in her works deal with vulnerability, confrontation, suspension, self-control, and liberation."

[via: http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/eunoia-seeking-enlightenment-by-tracking-brainwaves ]
lisapark  art  artists  arduino  processing  physicalcomputing  eunoia  performance  interactive  technology 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Zeega
"Zeega is revolutionizing interactive storytelling for a future beyond blogs. Zeegas are a new form of interactive media, enabling anyone to easily combine animated GIFs, audio, images, text and video from across the web.

We’re living in a unique moment. More media than ever is recorded and shared. But the web today is dominated by a few platforms - all stories start to feel the same, trapped in rigid boxes and long lists. Zeega is ushering in an era when the web truly becomes an interactive, audiovisual medium made by everyone.

Interactive Storytelling
Everyone wants to tell stories that allow viewers to interact, but to remain captivated. A great example is how this blog post about urban explorer Steve Duncan is transformed into this Zeega [http://zeega.com/51818 ] that allows you to travel with him beneath New York, Paris and other cities. Or this recent report by NewsHour on the current debates of gun control.

Creating Memories
Anyone can use Zeega to create lasting artifacts of their favorite experiences. A scrolling list of photos on Tumblr, a stream of Instagrams or a photo set on Facebook simply doesn’t fill the same need for narrative memories like the old treasured scrapbook.

One our recent favorites is How I Got To Boston, a personal story of the post-college years.

Playing with the Web
Zeega is also a great platform for playing with the web. A large part of the community is starting to really get into making “audioGIFs,” simple combinations of animations and audio."

[via: https://vimeo.com/66603842 ]
zeega  storytelling  onlinetoolkit  blogging  interactive  media  multimedia  gifs  audio  images  text  video  audiovisual 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Infovore » Towards a canon of “hypertext literature / interactive fiction / digital narrative”
Kim asked on Twitter:

“Is there a canon for digital narratives / interactive stories / hypertext literature yet? A list of accepted classics and forms?”
What followed was a lot of us going “we don’t know”. And I wasn’t exactly helpful, by pointing out that those three things are (in some ways) completely different.

But. Nobody got anywhere but not being helpful, and to do so, I’m going to express (a bit) of an opinion, and hopefully something a little absolute. I hate list posts, but let’s put something down for people to argue about.

So, specifically: if I had to draw up a Canon – a canon of the interactive-story-thingies (we all know what they are – “things that the reader/audience interpret differently by interacting” is my best explanation) what would I include?

The rough goals were: not necessarily the best, but important pillars; no bias to high- or low- brow; trying to cover all media appropriately; interpret the question as broadly as you would like; don’t take too long over it. Here’s where I am:

Cent mille milliards de poèmes, Raymond Queneau, 1961
The Unfortunates, BS Johnson, 1969
Zork, Infocom, 1980
The Warlock of Firetop Mountain, Steve Jackson/Ian Livingstone, 1982
Trinity, Infocom, 1985
The Secret of Monkey Island, 1990
253, Geoff Ryman, 1996
The Last Express, Jordan Mechner et al, 1997
Spider and Web, Andrew Plotkin, 1998
Planescape Torment, Black Isle, 1999
Galatea, Emily Short, 2000
The Beast, 2001
Half-Life 2, Valve Software, 2004
Gravitation, Jason Rohrer, 2008
Dear Esther, thechineseroom, 2008/2012
Fiasco, Jason Morningstar, 2009
Sleep No More, Punchdrunk, 2011
The Walking Dead, Telltale Games, 2012
30 Flights of Loving, Blendo Games, 2012

Things I wanted represented: pre-digital works; early, web-based hyperfiction; text-based IF, both classic and modern; things that are clearly videogames; an ARG (and the Beast still, in many ways, feels like the best); tabletop roleplaying; mechanical storytelling; a selection of Infocom writers (Moriarty, Meretzky)."
fiction  games  hypertext  interactive  narrative  literature  hypertextliterature  2013  tomarmitage  zork  monkeyisland  writing  stories  storytelling  srg  if  interactivefiction 
january 2013 by robertogreco
The Uncataloged Museum: Checking out the Gallerie des Enfants: No French Needed!
"Like MassMOCA's children's gallery, which I also love, the museum [the Gallerie des Enfants, the Children's Gallery in Paris] assumes that children deserve and should see original artwork and that interactions should spring from that experience. Here's just a bit of what I observed. …

But here's the thing: there were virtually no labels telling you what to do or what to learn from the experience. When a little instruction was needed, it was provided graphically. Below, a pattern recognition and the hot pink illustration was the only information given.

This installation really made me think about my own practice. Could I do interactives with no instructions just symbols? Does this require a higher level of trust in your audience? Do we expect different kinds of learning from art and history organizations? What do you think?"
exhibitdesign  audience  trust  lindanorris  2012  ncmsd  ncm  interaction  interactive  experience  engagement  labeling  museums  art  children  children'smuseums  massmoca 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Exertion Games Lab
"The Exertion Games Lab researches the future of gaming in order to understand how to design better interactive experiences, in particular games that require intense physical effort from players. We call it the intersection between gaming and sports."

[Related: "Video game with biofeedback teaches children to curb their anger" http://childrenshospital.org/newsroom/Site1339/mainpageS1339P913.html ]
gamedesign  biofeedback  australia  interactive  exertion  physical  gaming  tangible  games 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Franz Erhard Walther: Work as Action - artreview.com
"Franz Erhard Walther counts among those artists who, in the 1960s, sought to undermine the authorial role of the artist in favour of a more democratic aesthetic dependent on the interaction of viewer and object. Others with similar ideas whose work has entered the curatorial limelight of late include Charlotte Posenenske, featured in the last Documenta and subject of a one-person show this summer at Artists Space here in New York. Unlike Posenenske ¬– who wished to divorce the hand from artmaking in favour of mechanised labour – Walther seems to take his cue from Leonardo’s Vitruvian Man: simple and individual acts such as folding and lying, leaning and stepping are either the source of his often minimal works or the means by which individual viewers may interact with them."

[See also: http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/events/16187 AND http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1294 ]
canvas  wearables  johnbock  martinkippenberger  santiagosierra  josephbeuys  firstworkset  workasaction  action  charlotteposenske  collaborative  participatory  1967  franzerhardwalther  democratic  interactive  glvo  art  wearable  ncm  participatoryart 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Anatomy of an interactive: a look at the code behind our Second Screen | Info | guardian.co.uk
"The Guardian's Second Screen project is an attempt at rethinking how live news can be consumed during events which produce large amounts of news updates. And with the Olympics and Paralympics coming to town, this presented the perfect opportunity to try it on.

Being mainly responsible for the client-side code, I'll try my best to explain how the application is built."
news  bookmarking  paralympics  london  2012  olympics  secondscreen  guardian  timelines  davidvella  interactive 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Robin Rendle · Call Me Interactivity
"We are all tempted by inter­ac­tiv­ity; video & audio snip­pets, data charts that can be flicked and pushed, let­ters that can be popped & pinched. But how many of these fea­tures enhance the rela­tion­ship between reader and writer? Due to the con­straints I men­tioned pre­vi­ously, we most likely won’t recog­nise the dig­i­tal book in a decade. This is because they won’t be built in the same way, they won’t be writ­ten in the same way & they won’t be funded & pub­lished in the same way either. These prob­lems, some eco­nomic, some tech­ni­cal, will force us to con­sider alter­na­tive meth­ods of think­ing about con­tent, space, sto­ry­telling & time.

The line that bor­ders pixel & paper has been crossed, bound­aries have been bro­ken, but the hori­zon swells with oppor­tu­nity. And so these uncharted, dig­i­tal spaces demand not only new types of think­ing, pub­lish­ing and design, but also a new form of sto­ry­telling, new kinds of heroes and mon­sters, new worlds to explore…"
technology  mobydick  leonwiedeltier  oliverreichenstein  craigmod  content  flexibility  control  mandybrown  design  ebooks  digitalpublishing  publishing  interactivity  interactive  2012  future  books  robinrendle  epub3  html  html5  moby-dick 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Tellart | Experience Design & Engineering
"People don’t interact with computers or devices, they interact with each other and the world around them; a world in which the borders between natural, material and virtual have blurred.

Tellart builds where these borders blur.

As we come to understand that the network isn’t in computers but inside everything we touch, we learn that “form” isn’t what we see, it’s what we use. Every day there’s a new surface to interact with. But, underneath these surfaces lie familiar human needs, desires, habits and hopes.

Emerging technologies aren’t built with the same tools or the same talents we know from the past. We are Tellart: we’re inventors and explorers. We believe the best way to explore an idea is to make it real. We don’t just dream and sketch, we prototype and manufacture. We are in the business of making things real.

For twelve years, Tellart has been building interactive objects and environments that connect to the web.

Twelve years of marketing stunts, building control systems, museum exhibitions, games for health, consumer electronics, and medical simulations. Technologies emerge, and we’ve set out to give them culturally and economically relevant form.

In a small factory in New England, we’ve been housing the brains, hands, and hearts of industrial designers, electrical engineers, graphic designers and software architects. We’ve built our own tools and we use them every day.

We are proud of our clients and partners and the work we’ve done together. Sometimes our work starts with workshops to reveal needs and goals, or to identify potential strategies and tactics. Sometimes we create long-term agreements over years to build out innovative lines of business. But we always share the same goals as our partners: to actually make things that change the way the world thinks and acts.

Tellart starts where you start: with a hunch, an idea, a stray piece of technology, a carefully articulated demand, a broad sense that something is possible if addressed with courage, care, attention, and commitment."

[via: http://twitter.com/moleitau/statuses/225703421397831680 ]
manufacturing  sketching  internetofthings  form  toolmaking  tools  uk  studios  interactive  design  interaction  webdesign  agency  technology  usability  prototyping  making  tellart  iot  webdev 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Featuring: Dan Augustine | Library as Incubator Project
That is all to say – if I had my druthers libraries would be some amalgamation of gallery and museum and library. Where one could learn and read, but also witness and interact. And I don’t mean gallery as in the massive oil paintings of the stodgy benefactors and philanthropists that funded the facility hung over the reference section. I want to see Hemingway’s self-decimated pages, or Shel Silverstein’s little scribbles, or Tolkien’s manuscripts (incidentally, a good chunk of Tolkien’s work is housed in some secret, underground vault far, far away from the eyes of the general public at Marquette University). All of these things, framed and on display – enhancing the experience of the library.
I take it as valuable on it’s face. An obvious turn-of-phrase. The collective knowledge of the known universe is housed in libraries all over the globe. It only stands to reason that libraries ARE truly incubators. Every idea ever committed to print can be found within the pages of a book in a library somewhere. How incredible to be able to pour through those pages, to gather up and store and ruminate on those conversations and discourses. Oh, and I could be mistaken, but libraries are free, are they not? Free knowledge? The most precious, valuable thing on the planet for free — and not taken advantage of. Astonishing…
Sue also gave me what remains to be one of my favorite children’s books, Kit Williams’ Masquerade. It changed everything for me. Williams gilded an elaborate golden hare, and ornamented the piece with precious jewels and metals. He then buried the treasure in a secret location in England and created a treasure map in the form of a children’s book. On it’s face, the elaborate illustrations told the story of the moon falling in love with the sun, so much so that she offered him a golden gift and entrusted it to a hare to be delivered. But, the hare lost the gift, and now it was up to the reader to find it. Clues in rhymes and visuals were hidden throughout the story and should one properly decipher Williams’ words, they lead right to his gilded golden hare.
storytelling  library  via:tealtan  libraries  incubators  galleries  museums  learning  lcproject  interaction  interactive  danaugustine 
july 2012 by robertogreco
NFB/Interactive - OUT MY WINDOW
"One highrise. Every view, a different city.

This is Out My Window -- one of the world's first interactive 360º documentaries -- about exploring the state of our urban planet told by people who look out on the world from highrise windows.

It's a journey around the globe through the most commonly built form of the last century: the concrete-slab residential tower. Meet remarkable highrise residents who harness the human spirit -- and the power of community -- to resurrect meaning amid the ruins of modernism.

With more than 90 minutes of material to explore, Out of My Window features 49 stories from 13 cities, told in 13 languages, accompanied by a leading-edge music playlist."
global  perspective  outofmywindow  towatch  glvo  international  living  life  highrises  modernism  urbanism  urban  via:sebastienmarion  2012  nationalfilmboardofcanada  nfbc  interactivedocumentary  documentary  interactive  design  nfb 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Children's Creativity Museum
"The Children’s Creativity Museum is an interactive art and technology museum for kids. Our mission is to nurture the 3C’s of 21st-century skills – Creativity, Collaboration and Communication – in all youth and families. We believe that the ability to think critically, collaborate broadly, communicate effectively and generate and prototype multiple solutions, is the core of a 21st-century education.

We envision a world where creativity, collaboration and communication inspire new ideas and innovative solutions. We believe that the success of the next generation will hinge not only on what they know, but also on their ability to think and act creatively as global citizens."

"Here are the ways in which we are changing the world for kids and families:

BECOMING A MODEL FOR 21ST-CENTURY LEARNING…

NURTURING LIFELONG LEARNING AND CREATIVITY…

CONNECTING FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES…

BUILDING ON THE IDEAS OF OTHERS…"
via:lizkowba  children'smuseums  interactive  art  prototyping  criticalthinking  collaboration  communication  museums  education  learning  lcproject  children  creativity  technology  sanfrancisco 
june 2012 by robertogreco
inkle | interactive literature
"inkle is a software and creative design company formed from videogame industry talent.

We specialise in finding new ways to tell stories on mobile devices, but our creative services extend to any kind of iOS app. We pride ourselves on the beauty and polish of everything we produce.We’ve developed a unique format for interactive literature: the “inklebook“. Our inklebooks can be of any genre or style, and are as versatile as the written word. The format is powering Frankenstein, written by Dave Morris, and published by Profile Books."

[InkleWriter is here: http://writer.inklestudios.com/ ]
[Frankenstein, as an example: http://www.inklestudios.com/frankenstein ]
appilications  ios  inklewriter  inkle  ebooks  books  fiction  publishing  cyoa  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  text  edg  srg  writing  interactivefiction  if  storytelling  interactive 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Playfic
"Welcome to Playfic, the online community that lets you write, remix, share, and play interactive text-based games with the world."
publishing  interactive  edg  cyoa  playfic  srg  writing  text  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  games  storytelling  interactivefiction  if 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Varytale
"Varytale is a publisher and retailer of interactive books.

Interactive books allow you to influence the narrative. From big choices that affect the whole story, through changes in viewpoint, to special features and extras that shed new light on the author's imagination.

The books we publish range from literary fiction, through to genre and young adult work. We also allow writers to self-publish through our site.

Varytale books can be read on any internet connected device, and your bookmarks are automatically up to date wherever you read from.

Writers

Varytale has the most comprehensive tools for authors wishing to create interactive books.

You create books through our on-line tools. They support individual authors, or large writing teams with editorial work flow.

Our tools show you exactly what readers are reading and enjoying about your book. You can start with a short story, and see how successful it is within a matter of days, adding and expanding content as readers demand…"
publishing  interactive  edg  games  storytelling  writing  cyoa  books  text-basedgames  text  text-basedadventures  srg  if  interactivefiction  varytale 
june 2012 by robertogreco
StoryNexus - A platform for storygames, by Failbetter Games
"A platform for storygames, by Failbetter Games

StoryNexus allows you to play, and build, storygames like Fallen London and The Night Circus."
publishing  games  gaming  failbettergames  storygames  text  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  thenightcircus  fallenlondon  interactive  writing  stories  cyoa  srg  edg  books  interactivefiction  if  storynexus 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Design Is History
Part of the graduate thesis of designer Dominic Flask, this site was created as a teaching tool for young designers just beginning to explore graphic design and as a reference tool for all designers. It is provides brief overviews of a wide range of topics rather than an in-depth study of only a few.
art  miscellany  design  history  graphicdesign  via:Anne  dominicflask  srg  timelines  introduction  interactive 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Imaginary Friend Books
"…a unique interactive platform that allows kids & parents to read & play together. We don't want to just add interactive elements to books. We want to build from the ground up a new type of book. Kids are going to experience books not just on the pages in front of them but all around them. They're gonna be able to interact with the characters & become a character in the story. The videos that they watch online, the messages that they're gonna get in their inbox, the games that they play are all going to relate to the story as it's happening and they are going to be a part of it. We are talking about a collaboration. It's going to be the author who wrote the story, the parent who controls and customizes the story and then the child who experiences the story. These books are gonna be immersive, not disruptive."

[Quote is caption to this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2ZMhLh7aME ]
imaginary  cowriting  immersive  imaginaryfriendsbooks  video  ebooks  interactive  social  reading  children  childrenliterature  interactivefiction  books  if  cyoa 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Choice of Games
"Choice of Games is a small partnership dedicated to producing high-quality, text-based, multiple-choice games. We produce games in house, beginning with Choice of the Dragon and Choice of Broadsides. We have also developed a simple scripting language for writing text-based games, ChoiceScript, which we make available to others for use in their projects, and we host games produced by other designers using ChoiceScript on our website. All of our games are available for free on the web. We also produce mobile versions of our games that can be played on iPhones, Android phones, and other smartphones."
coding  choicescript  interactivefiction  if  interactive  free  online  ios  iphone  edg  srg  applications  android  gaming  games  text-basedgames  text-basedadventures  choiceofgames  cyoa  kindle  appstore 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Moment Factory | HOME
"Moment Factory is a new media and entertainment studio specialized in the conception and production of multimedia environments combining video, lighting, architecture, sound and special effects to create remarkable experiences.

Since its beginnings in 2001, Moment Factory achieved more than 300 events, shows and installations in Canada, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East for such clients as the Cirque du Soleil, Disney, Céline Dion, Microsoft, the National Capital Commission in Ottawa and the City of Lyon.

Our team of 60 talented individuals occupies a dynamic, multifunctional 20 000 square-foot space in Montreal, Canada. In our industrial studios we develop, design and produce the groundbreaking—often interactive—new media installations for which we have earned our reputation as industry leader, building mockups and testing prototypes prior to executing our vision."
multimedia  video  sound  experiencedesign  architecture  events  montreal  installation  design  interactive  momentfactory 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Klynt
"Edit Rich Narratives
*Mixed Media Editing: Texts, images, audios, videos and hyperlinks
*Multiple Interactive Layers: Manage unlimited story nodes
*Visual Storyboard: Edit your storyboard like a mind map

Connect Your Story To The Web
*Mash-up Ready: Mix YouTube videos and FlickR images
*Facebook & Twitter Friendly: Share your favorite sequences on social networks
*Custom Maps: Geolocalize your content

Publish Anywhere
*Quick Publishing: Automatically export your final edit
*Embedable Anywhere: Show your program on any webpage
*Tablet and Mobile Device Compatible: iOS player available this Spring"

[See this project example "Journey to the End of Coal": http://www.honkytonk.fr/index.php/webdoc/ ]
[Related: http://nofilmschool.com/2012/02/advice-creating-transmedia-documentary/ ]
[See also Bear 71: http://bear71.nfb.ca ]
klynt  remixing  dailymotion  youtube  flickr  onlinetoolkit  twitter  facebook  geolocation  mapping  maps  storyboards  hypertext  audio  text  vimeo  cyoa  interactivedocumentary  webdoc  media  software  journalism  video  interactive  tools  multimedia  fiction  if  interactivefiction  filmmaking  remixculture 
february 2012 by robertogreco
NFB/Interactive - Bear 71
[an interactive film about grizzly bears from the National Film Board of Canada]

"It's hard to say where the wild world ends and the wild one begins."

"The forest has its own language."

"If you look backward from any single point in time, everything seems to lead up to that moment."

"They'll have to learn *not* to do what comes naturally, and I wonder. Maybe the lesson is too hard."
deschooling  unschooling  parenting  flash  video  film  2012  tracking  visualization  classideas  storytelling  interactivenarratives  nationalfilmboardofcanada  nfb  bear71  bears  nature  animals  documentary  interactive  cyoa  interactivefiction  if  nfbc 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Portals by Jayne Vidheecharoen — Kickstarter
"More specifically, my Portals will consist of a pair of boxes. Each box has a screen on the front and a gateway on the side where you can reach in with your hand. Through the magic of green screen your hand instantly appears to be in the virtual real-world of Google Streetview. And since you and your objects are now in this parallel world, real-world rules can be broken. For instance, a regular object from the real world could appear animated in this virtual one. These boxes are also connected to the internet which means you could share the space with other people. Here's some videos of where the current prototype is at right now (you can check out my thesis blog for more information too)."

[See also: http://nearfuturelaboratory.com/2011/11/27/introducing-jayne-idheecharoen/ ]
realvirtual  virtualreal  2012  2011  interactive  portals  kickstarter  jaynevidheecharoen  nearfuturelaboratory 
january 2012 by robertogreco
GET LAMP: THE TEXT ADVENTURE DOCUMENTARY
"…early 1980s, an entire industry rose over telling of tales, solving of intricate puzzles & art of writing. Like living books, these games described fantastic worlds to readers, & then invited them to live w/in them.

They were called "computer adventure games", & they used the most powerful graphics processor in the world: the human mind.

Rising from side projects at unis & engineering companies, adventure games would describe a place, & then ask what to do next. They presented puzzles, tricks & traps to be overcome. They were filled w/ suspense, humor & sadness. & they offered a unique type of joy as players discovered how to negotiate obstacles & think their way to victory. These players have carried memories of these text adventures to the modern day, & whole new generation of authors have taken up torch to present new set of places to explore.

Get Lamp is a documentary that will tell the story of the creation of these incredible games, in the words of the people who made them."
cyoa  computers  computing  getlamp  classideas  storytelling  writing  towatch  if  interactivefiction  documentary  history  gaming  text  games  edg  srg  via:litherland  interactive  fiction 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Bear 71: An Interactive, Experimental Documentary
"This interactive documentary blurs the line between wild and wired worlds"

"It’s usually a good thing when technology and creativity intersect, and that’s why it’s so easy to love projects like Bear 71, which surpasses everything I previously believed was possible to do with a documentary.

Produced by the National Film Board of Canada’s digital studio, the documentary is constructed as an interactive online experience that observes and records the intersection of humans, nature and technology.

The story follows a female grizzly bear, named Bear 71 by the park rangers who track her. The bear’s story speaks to how we coexist with wildlife in an age of networks, surveillance and digital information, and blurs the line between the wild and wired worlds."
nfbc  networks  storytelling  via:anterobot  surveillance  bears  animals  technology  nature  towatch  2012  bear71  documentaries  classideas  interactive  srg  edg  cyoa  interactivefiction  if  nfb 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Matthew Battles: It doesn’t take Cupertino to make textbooks interactive » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Schiller made a sentimental play to this constituency, opening his presentation with a series of excerpted interviews in which teachers sang the sad litany of challenges they face: cratering budgets, overcrowded classrooms, unprepared, disengaged students. The argument that Apple — founded by dropouts and autodidacts — is fundamentally motivated to change this set of conditions is as ludicrous as the notion that the company could ever hope actually to do any such thing…

We can never count Apple out — the company’s visions have an implacable way of turning into givens — but the future is undoubtedly more complex. There will still be overcrowded classrooms, overworked teachers, and shrinking budgets in an education world animated by Apple. But I prefer to think of teachers and students finding ways to hack knowledge and make their own beautiful stories to envisioning ranks of studens spellbound by magical tablets."
ibooksauthor  ibooks  technology  schooliness  rubrics  standardization  autodidacts  pearson  timcarmody  matthewbattles  publishing  tablets  knwoledgebowl  knowledge  interactive  textbooks  books  schools  learning  storytelling  teaching  education  2012  ipad  apple 
january 2012 by robertogreco
geologic time viewer
"The Geologic Time Viewer is an interactive graphic design. It offers a contemporary interpretation of the Geological Society of America's 1989 Geologic Time Scale.

Unlike the official Geologic Time Scale—our Viewer does not end with the present as culmination. Instead, we locate the present as the middle of geologic time. Neither beginning nor end, the present is where geologic and human forces are in the midst of unfolding and enfolding. The right represents time past, the left, how geologic time has been enculturated by human design in the present.

Through a window cut in the middle of a geologic time scale, users view their surroundings as the present geologic era--a qualitatively new era called the Anthropocene. Unlike all geologic strata that came before, the Anthropocene’s strata will include a distinct layer of sediment containing elements unique because of their human design (ie nuclear fallout and plastic)."
geology  visualization  timeline  timelines  smudgestudio  friendsofthepleistocene  anthropocene  geologictimescale  geologictime  interactive 
november 2011 by robertogreco
ARIS - Mobile Learning Experiences - Creating educational games on the iPhone
"ARIS is a tool for you to make mobile games, tours and interactive stories. Using the GPS and QR Codes, ARIS players will experience a virtual world of interactive characters, items and media placed in physical space."

[via: http://twitter.com/KornerstoneGuy/status/105744006423646208 ]
education  learning  design  technology  games  mobilegames  play  classideas  qrcodes  gps  interactive  storytelling  location-based  location  location-aware 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Technium: Generatives
"I've reduced the future of the internet to six verbs.

*Screening
*Interacting
*Sharing
*Flowing
*Accessing
*Generating

These stand for six large-scale trends moving through and comprising this new media. I expanded the notions in this 25-minute talk I did recently for Wired, at their Nextwork gathering in NYC."
kevinkelly  internet  screening  sharing  flow  access  generative  interaction  interactive  2011  future 
july 2011 by robertogreco
http://www.literateprogramming.com/adventure.pdf
"The ur-game for computers — Adventure — was originally written by Will Crowther in 1975 and greatly extended by Don Woods in 1976. I have taken Woods’s original FORTRAN program for Adventure Version 1.0 and recast it in the CWEB idiom.

I remember being fascinated by this game when John McCarthy showed it to me in 1977. I started with no clues about the purpose of the game or what I should do; just the computer’s comment that I was at the end of a forest road facing a small brick building. Little by little, the game revealed its secrets, just as its designers had cleverly plotted. What a thrill it was when I first got past the green snake! Clearly the game was potentially addictive, so I forced myself to stop playing — reasoning that it was great fun, sure, but traditional computer science research is great fun too, possibly even more so.

Now here I am, 21 years later, returning to the great Adventure after having indeed had many exciting adventures in Computer Science"
adventure  history  1977  programming  fiction  interactive  via:robinsloan  willcrowther  cweb  coding  games  gaming  videogames  cyoa  filetype:pdf  media:document  if  interactivefiction 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Visual novel - Wikipedia
"A visual novel (ビジュアルノベル bijuaru noberu?) is an interactive fiction game featuring mostly static graphics, usually with anime-style art, or occasionally live-action stills or video footage.[1] As the name might suggest, they resemble mixed-media novels or tableau vivant stage plays.

In Japanese terminology, a distinction is often made between visual novels proper (abbreviated NVL), which are predominantly narrative and have very little interactive elements, and adventure games (abbreviated AVG or ADV), which typically incorporate problem-solving and other gameplay elements. This distinction is normally lost in the West, where both NVLs and ADVs are commonly referred to as "visual novels" by Western fans. Visual novels and ADVs are especially prevalent in Japan, where they made up nearly 70% of the PC game titles released in 2006."
games  writing  japan  classideas  multimedia  media  nvl  avg  adv  visualnovels  interactive  interactivefiction  fiction  gaming  videogames  if  cyoa 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Punchdrunk
"Since 2000, Punchdrunk has pioneered a game changing form of immersive theatre in which roaming audiences experience epic storytelling inside sensory theatrical worlds. Blending classic texts, physical performance, award-winning design installation and unexpected sites, the company's infectious format rejects the passive obedience usually expected of audiences. Lines between space, performer and spectator are constantly shifting. Audiences are invited to rediscover the childlike excitement and anticipation of exploring the unknown and experience a real sense of adventure. Free to encounter the installed environment in an individual imaginative journey, the choice of what to watch and where to go is theirs alone."
art  culture  alternative  interactive  storytelling  london  theater  immersive  sleepnomore  classideas  sensory  experiencedesign  space  performance  audience 
july 2011 by robertogreco
State Of The Internet 2011
"The Internet is a strange, huge beast. It is getting bigger, faster and more mobile each day. Ferocious social networks fight each other to be on top and gain more of our attention and personal information. An entire economy is generated from our browsing habits.This is the face of the Internet now."
internet  visualization  statistics  socialmedia  interactive  online  web  dashboard  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Data Visualization: Journalism's Voyage West | Rural West Initiative
"This visualization plots over 140,000 newspapers published over three centuries in the United States. The data comes from the Library of Congress' "Chronicling America" project, which maintains a regularly updated directory of newspapers."
newspapers  history  us  maps  mapping  journalism  timelines  visualization  interactive 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Post by Robin Sloan: Thursday question 001: What's the future of offline role-playing games?
"had a fun Twitter back-and-forth…about Dungeons & Dragons…made me think about a few things:

* Board games like HeroQuest, which offered a sort of stripped-down D&D experience, played across a reconfigurable plastic-and-cardboard labyrinth.

* The fact that my friend +Robert Lavolette seems to enjoy the sourcebooks (detailing various monsters, locales, & lost civilizations) more than the games themselves.

* +Matt Penniman's love of new-school indie RPGs, many of which sport radically reduced rule sets—you can play some w/ just index cards.

So: What's the future of offline role-playing games?

Is the rise of a game like Settlers of Catan a sign that the mainstream is ready for nerdier fare? If there was going to be a breakout RPG (one played in person, around a table) what would it be? Do you have a dream RPG?

I'm interested to hear from folks who haven't played RPGs—who know them by reputation, or who have always been curious…"
robinsloan  games  rpg  arg  gaming  offline  play  cyoa  2011  settlersofcatan  larp  books  werewolf  mafia  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction 
july 2011 by robertogreco
this is the frontier.
"The Lone Ranger is dead.

We are a generation that no longer rides alone into the sunset. We are an era of collaborators, a union of communities. We are redefining what it is to be.

But the frontier is still here, it has always been here; it is the only constant. It is we who are changing, redefining, re-articulating.

So I ask you: What is the frontier?

THIS IS A COLLABORATION.

You can do one or both of the following:

OPTION ONE: Submit a word or phrase which answers the above question. When you participate, you will see other efforts of this kind. If you leave an address, I will send you a piece of our collaboration.

OPTION TWO: Click HERE and see what others have submitted. You can choose a word or phrase that someone else has submitted, maybe something that you resonate with, maybe not, and make something with it. There are examples. The idea is to redefine, articulate, invent an discover."

[Videos hosted here: http://vimeo.com/10357234 ]

[The two options: at http://www.thisisthefrontier.org/about/ AND http://www.thisisthefrontier.org/frontier/ ] [Via: http://flaneursociety.tumblr.com/post/5155960095/ ]
collaboration  frontier  exploration  genrations  classideas  video  photography  interactive  community  change  society  loneliness  togetherness 
july 2011 by robertogreco
More lingo « Snarkmarket
"In the context of formless/definite/interactive, this also deserves a mention: Brian Eno says the right word for “interactive” is… “unfinished.” Artful blockquoting, as usual, by Rob Greco."
snarkmarket  robinsloan  ego  brianeno  unfinished  interactive  cv  2011  remkoolhaas  brucemau  culture  work 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Week 315 – Blog – BERG
"Your sensitivity & tolerance improve only with practice. I wish I’d been given toy businesses to play w/ at school, just as playing w/ crayons taught my body how to let me draw.

I’ve written in these weeknotes before how I manage three budgets: cash, attention, risk. This is my attempt to explain how I feel about risk, and to trace the pathways between risk and cash. Attention, & how it connects, can wait until another day…

I said I wouldn’t speak about attention, but here’s a sneak peak of what I would say. Attention is the time of people in the studio, & how effectively it is applied. It is affected by the arts of project & studio management; it can be tracked by time-sheets & capacity plans; it can be leveraged with infrastructure, internal tools, and carefully grown tacit knowledge; and it magically grows when there’s time to play, when there is flow in the work, and when a team aligns into a “sophisticated work group.”
Attention is connected to cash through work."
design  business  management  berg  berglondon  mattwebb  attention  flow  groups  groupculture  sophisticatedworkgroups  money  risk  riskmanagement  riskassessment  confidence  happiness  anxiety  worry  leadership  tinkering  designthinking  thinking  physical  work  instinct  frustration  lcproject  studio  decisionmaking  systems  systemsthinking  manufacturing  making  doing  newspaperclub  svk  distribution  integratedsystems  infrastructure  supplychain  deleuze  guattari  cyoa  failure  learning  invention  ineptitude  ignorance  deleuze&guattari  gillesdeleuze  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction  félixguattari 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Muddying titles and Charlie Chaplin's Speech in "The Great Dictator (1940) - Artichoke's Wunderkammern
Chaplin [unmixed here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLci5DoZqHU ]: "Greed has poisoned men's souls; has barricaded the world with hate; has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge as made us cynical; our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost. The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in man; cries out for universal brotherhood; for the unity of us all."

Koolhaas: "Conceptually, each monitor, each TV screen is a substitute for a window; real life is inside, cyberspace has become the great outdoors..."
pamhook  charliechaplin  machines  technology  life  humans  humanity  humanism  human  freedom  independence  levmanovich  remkoolhaas  schools  education  inception  hanszimmer  collaboration  newmedia  2011  democracy  remix  remixing  collage  opensource  interactive  interactivity  authorship  internet  web  online  literacy  kindness  gentleness  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  socialemotionallearning  relationships  artichokeblog  socialemotional  remixculture 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Home | Method
"Method is an independent design & innovation consultancy. We solve business challenges through design thinking and create inspired products, services and brand experiences."
design  web  identity  interactive  branding  nyc  raphaelgrignani 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago: Profiles: Nick Cave
"My work, clothing & fiber-based sculptures, collages, installations, & performances, explore use of textiles & clothing as conceptual modes of expression & pose fundamental questions about human condition in social & political realm…

I believe that what happens in my studio & living life as an artist are the single most important things I bring to the classroom. Artists must design their own pathways, work through plateaus in their work & understand that they will find themselves humbled by the very process of art-making.

I encourage my students to build their work w/ conviction, come face-to-face w/ truth of what they are attempting to create, & be open to experimentation.

I have been lucky to have been mentored by talented artists who taught me to challenge myself & build level of confidence & trust in my creative judgment…I hope to provide my students w/ knowledge that their art making holds the possibility for acting as a vehicle for change on a larger, global scale."
nickcave  art  performance  textiles  classideas  performanceart  design  collage  assemblage  life  living  teaching  education  learning  artists  glvo  cv  sound  interactive  sculpture  installation  expression  humancondition  society  politics  sensemaking  experimentation  doing  making  understanding  self  confidence  trust  wearable  fabric  sewing  change  costumes  dance  soundsuits  tcsnmy  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  pedagogy  howwework  wearables 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Animate Field on Vimeo
"Animate Field presents a cloud of low-hanging fiber-optic filaments which create a volumetric mass for participants to directly engage in by physically occupying and moving through it. The red lit endpoints of the filaments are locally activated by people’s positions in the cloud. As the participants wade through the thicket of hanging filaments, their movement through the field creates trails of yellow light which persist as a kind of temporal residue, leaving a ghostly memory of their presence and their traveled paths. <br />
<br />
The mass of hanging fibers delicately grazes the skin of people whose physical presence in turn causes ripples and waves of movement throughout the mass.<br />
<br />
The field of lights in Animate Field constitutes a type of mediated architectural “skin”, but unlike most applications of this concept, this skin takes on volumetric dimensions and makes direct contact with the body."
justinlui  interactive  installation  video  thesis  fiber  architecture  design  space  movement  mass 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Vanished
"An environmental disaster has taken place on Planet Earth and we need your help.<br />
Smithsonian Institution & MIT Education Arcade invite all scientists-in-training ages 10½-14 to log onto VANISHED & help decipher clues that unravel one of the world’s biggest mysteries. An online/offline interactive event, VANISHED is an 8-week episodic quest that will transform you into principal scientific investigators who must collaborate to find the answers. You will race against time as you solve games, puzzles, & other online challenges; visit real museums; collect samples from in & around your homes; and even partner w/ some of the Smithsonian’s world renowned scientists & investigators, to help unlock the true secrets of this catastrophe—before it’s too late."
games  learning  vanished  smithsonian  mit  miteducationarcade  simulations  arg  museums  puzzles  mysteries  collaboration  tcsnmy  classideas  interactive 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Beautiful web-based timeline software
"Welcome to TikiToki, a web app that makes it dead easy to make stunning, animated timelines that work in your browser. Our basic account is completely free."
timeline  tools  visualization  webdesign  web  onlinetoolkit  classideas  via:preoccupations  timelines  tikitoki  interactive  webdev 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Introducing: Helicopter Taxi | Toca Boca
"As our first digital toy, we are proud to announce the release of Helicopter Taxi for iPhone! The story is that Rita and Skip, our pilots, run a helicopter taxi that picks up five different characters that need to get to certain places. Your kids can fly the helicopter by walking around in the room and moving the iPhone. Since it is in 3D, you can look at the helicopter from all angles by simply turning the iPhone. After picking all of the characters up and flying them to where they want to go, you fly the helicopter home so Rita and Skip can rest for the night. After that, you’re ready to play again!

Helicopter Taxi uses the camera on the iPhone in an innovative way in order to create an augmented reality effect. It looks like the helicopter is flying in the room with you! You pick the characters up by simply laying the iPhone down on a flat surface, and then they get in or out."
children  gamedesign  toys  iphone  applications  ios  helicoptertaxi  tocaboca  interactive  fun  augmentedreality  ar 
march 2011 by robertogreco
WeatherSpark | Interactive Weather Charts
"A rich, interactive map with the current conditions from thousands of locations worldwide.

Incredibly smooth radar playback for the last two hours - or any period in the last five years. US only, extended playback is subscription only

Pan and zoom through a graphical forecast, seamlessly transitioning to averages and historical data.

Compare the weather across locations for any time period.

Multiple forecasts shown in seventeen graphs - get precisely the data you want."
weather  visualization  data  history  interactive 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Magpie
"Magpie is a trans-national, interdisciplinary, and interactive performative public art collective. Magpie’s projects invite unusual cross-disciplinary collaborations. All our projects exist in public places and are dependent on audience interaction. We aim to inspire wonder by redefining the notion of “public art” to mean not only public access, but public as collaborative contributor to the work."
art  sandiego  interactive  california  artists  melindabarnadas  taehwang  collective  collaboration  publicart  glvo  audience  performance  interdisciplinary  trans-national  interaction 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Curveship: Interactive Fiction + Interactive Narrating
"Curveship is an interactive fiction system that provides a world model (of characters, objects, locations, and things that happen) while also modeling the narrative discourse, so that the narration and description of the simulated world can change. Curveship can tell events out of order, using flashback and other techniques, and can tell the story from the standpoint of particular characters and their perceptions and understandings.<br />
The system has been developed up to this point with advanced users, such as researchers and programmer/authors, in mind. Some understanding of narrative theory, some understanding of interactive fiction, some ability to program in Python, and a willingness to use a command-line system are important to effective use of Curveship at this point. While I hope that Curveship, or components of it, will eventually be of use to a wide variety of users and developers, my initial goal has been to develop a system that will be of value to these groups of people:"
writing  interactive  fiction  development  code  via:robinsloan  classideas 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Plutopia 2011: The Future of Play Monday March 14, 2011 at SXSW Interactive
"The Future of Play will explore the concept of play as transformative, in terms of four key aspects: Social Play (including community and communication); Action Play (sports, gaming, etc.); Mental and Emotional Play (including exploration, adventure and imagination); and Sound Play."
sxsw  events  technology  community  interactive  play  plutopia  2011  plutopia2011  communication  social  socialplay  mentalplay  emotionalplay  soundplay  actionplay  sports  gaming  imagination  adventure  exploration  brucesterling  djspooky 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Dunne & Raby — DO YOU WANT TO REPLACE THE EXISTING NORMAL? 2007/08
"Design can only follow our needs and desires, it can't create them. If our desires remain unimaginative and practical, then that is what design will be. In this project we are hoping for a time when we will have more complex and subtle everyday needs than we do today. These objects are designed in anticipation of that time. Patiently waiting. Maybe they are utopian." [via: http://www.well.com/conf/inkwell.vue/topics/400/State-of-the-World-2011-Bruce-St-page01.html ]
art  design  media  interactive  designfiction  dunne&raby  needs  desires  fionaraby  anthonydunne 
january 2011 by robertogreco
masahiko sato: 'the definition of self' exhibition at 21_21 design sight
"The exhibition 'the definition of self' takes a look at the issue of identity through a variety of cutting-edge technologies - a fully interactive and thought-provoking experience. curated by communication designer masahiko sato, professor at tokyo university of the arts, the show has translated the essence of complicated ideas to simple and intimate forms through new methods of expression. it aimed to create an opportunity for the visitors to identify their undeniable 'self.'

the exhibition searched for a new perspective on what makes us 'us'. visitors could explore 'intrinsic attributes of ourselves' through a number of hands-on installations, a blend of scientific technologies and art works - starting off with euclid’s ‘pool of fingerprints’ (viewers scanned in their fingerprints)."
fingerprints  identity  interactive  self  exhibitions  masahikosato  technology  society  biometrics  phantomlimbs  handwriting  self-knowledge  self-defintion 
january 2011 by robertogreco
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