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robertogreco : interestdriven   22

Intrinsic motivation in the classroom is key – but schools kill it
"Intrinsic motivators can be key to student achievement – but extrinsic motivation dominates classrooms"



"Destiny, 18, is like most students in the United States. Surveys reveal a steady decline in student engagement throughout middle and high school, a trend that Gallup deemed the “school engagement cliff.” The latest data from the company’s Student Poll found that 74 percent of fifth graders felt engaged, while the same was true of just 32 percent of high school juniors.

One of the key components of engagement is students’ excitement about what they learn. Yet most schools extinguish that excitement.

It all comes down to motivation. In many schools, students do their work because their teachers tell them to. Or because they need to do it to get a certain grade. For students like Destiny, getting a good grade and outshining their peers – not learning itself – becomes the goal of school. For other students, they need minimum grades to be on sports teams or participate in extracurricular activities or please their parents, and that becomes their motivation. Students who do their work because they’re genuinely interested in learning the material are few and far between.

But that’s exactly backwards.

The teacher demands, the grades, the promise of additional opportunities – they’re all external rewards. Decades of research, both about educational best practice and the way the human brain works, say these types of motivators are dangerous. Offering students rewards for learning creates reliance on the reward. If they becomes less interesting to the student or disappear entirely, the motivation does, too. That’s what happened to Destiny in middle school when she no longer got the reward of being celebrated as the top of her class.

Inspiring students’ intrinsic motivation to learn is a more effective strategy to get and keep students interested. And it’s more than that. Students actually learn better when motivated this way. They put forth more effort, tackle more challenging tasks, and end up gaining a more profound understanding of the concepts they study.

Still, Deborah Stipek, a Stanford University professor of education and author of the book “Motivation to Learn: From Theory to Practice,” is pragmatic about the role of extrinsic motivation.

“I think most realistic people in the field say that you’ve got to have both,” Stipek said. “You can rely entirely on intrinsic motivation if you don’t care what children learn, but if you’ve got a curriculum and a set of standards, then you can’t just go with what they’re interested in.”

The problem is that the balance, in most schools, is way off. While some schools around the country are trying to personalize learning and, in doing so, to tap into students’ interests, Stipek estimates that most teaching minimizes students’ internal desire to learn.

In traditional schools, it’s easier to offer a steady stream of rewards and punishments to keep students in line. And preparing students to succeed on state tests tends to discourage the lessons that let them explore their own interests. Teachers who want to inspire intrinsic motivation have to swim against the current.

That’s not the case everywhere, though. Destiny’s trajectory of diminishing engagement took a turn in high school. Instead of getting increasingly uninterested and disconnected from school, she became more engaged. That’s because she enrolled in the Metropolitan Regional Career and Technical Center, a public high school district in Rhode Island that goes by ‘The Met.’ She is now a senior.

The Met is at the extreme when it comes to tapping into intrinsic motivation. Students don’t take traditional classes. They spend virtually all of their time learning independently, with support from advisors or at internships. Students all have individual learning plans and accumulate credits toward traditional subject areas through projects, self-directed study, internship experience and dual enrollment with local colleges. Almost everything they do, all day, connects to a personal goal or something they’re interested in.

That’s what inspired Destiny to enroll at The Met. “I thought, oh my God, I have all this power to choose what I want,” she remembers.

Education researchers have been studying student motivation for decades, identifying the best classroom strategies to promote an intrinsic drive to learn. The Met puts many of them to use. Students learn through real-world, hands-on problem-solving; they tackle open-ended assignments that require sustained effort; they get the power to choose what and how they learn; they finish projects with something to show for their learning in portfolios and concrete products; they set their own academic goals; they need never focus more on a grade than the process of learning because they don’t get traditional grades. All of these things come straight out of playbooks for inspiring intrinsic motivation, including Stipek’s. And the impact on students can be profound.

Destiny started high school with the academic zeal she left middle school with – meaning very little. Her freshman-year report card reflected that. While The Met doesn’t give out traditional grades, students do get assessed on their mastery of the goals they set for each subject. The dominant note on Destiny’s report card from ninth grade is “meeting expectations.” She had very few instances of “exceeding expectations” and in some subjects, her mastery was only “in progress.” In her sophomore year, things started to shift, and “exceeding expectations” started to become a more common assessment. By junior year, Destiny exceeded expectations in almost every subject and “in progress” was nowhere to be found on her report card. Gone was the middle schooler who didn’t want to be in class. In her place was a driven young woman who again liked school.

Destiny’s experience is common for Met students. On state surveys, these students report being more interested in their coursework, more convinced that what they’re learning will matter to their futures, and more supported at school than their peers in almost every other district in Rhode Island. She and other students at The Met continually bring the conversation back to how much difference it makes to be in control of their learning."



"It tends to take a little while for students to rise to the challenge, though.

Beccy Siddons, Destiny’s advisor, considers watching that trajectory to be one of the most exciting parts of her job. As the main contact for an “advisory” of about 16 students who stay with her for their entire time at The Met, Siddons guides students through their internships, all of their academic work and, eventually, their college applications.

“Ninth graders who have spent their whole life being told what to learn, some of them don’t even know what they’re interested in because they haven’t been given the opportunity,” Siddons said.

That was Destiny as a freshman. Her first internship was at an elementary school in a bilingual classroom, a safe, familiar choice for the native Spanish- and English-speaker. Looking back, she’s grateful that experience made her realize she didn’t like teaching. But at the time, she didn’t know what to try next. As a sophomore, she saw another student present about an internship at the New England Aquarium, and it piqued her interest. She first worked there as a junior and quickly discovered a deep love of sea life. She now has a favorite creature she didn’t even know existed before: the puffer fish. And she has a career interest she otherwise might not have found until college, if ever: environmental science.

Siddons routinely oversees such meandering paths, and a key part of her job is helping students discover passions they didn’t know they might have. The freshmen she welcomes to The Met are a far cry from the seniors she sends out into the world.

The early part of that transformation does take work, though. And while it isn’t typical for schools to orient themselves around intrinsic motivation, hundreds do attempt it. Next Generation Learning Challenges has grown into a network of about 150 schools, all of which focus on tapping into students’ intrinsic motivation in one way or another. The Digital Promise League of Innovative Schools represents 102 school districts doing similar work; EdLeader21 has another 300 districts, many of whom aim to inspire students’ intrinsic desire to learn. And the Big Picture Learning network, built around the success of The Met, now counts more than 60 schools in the U.S. (and another 100 abroad)."
instrinsicmotivation  motivation  schools  schooling  schooliness  extrinsicmotivation  grades  grading  2019  taragarcíamathewson  deborahstipek  education  teaching  howweteach  howwelearn  learning  rhodeisland  providence  deschooling  unschooling  deprogramming  interestdriven 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Hive NYC Learning Network
[From the about page, which also includes a great directory of organizations.]

"Hive NYC Learning Network is a Mozilla project that was founded through The MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning initiative to fuel collaborations between cultural organizations to create new learning pathways and innovative education practices together. Hive NYC is composed of fifty-six non-profit organizations—museums, libraries, after-school clubs and informal learning spaces—that create Connected Learning opportunities for youth. Network members have access to funding to support this work through The Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust.

Core Beliefs:
• School is not the sole provider in a community’s educational system
• Youth need to be both sophisticated consumers and active producers of digital media
• Learning should be driven by youth’s interests
• Digital media and technology are the glue and amplifier for connected learning experiences
• Out-of-school time spaces are fertile grounds for learning innovation
• Organizations must collaborate to thrive

Hive NYC operates as a city-based learning lab, where members network with each other, share best practices and pedagogies, learn about and play with new technologies, participate in events, and most importantly, collaborate to create learning opportunities for NYC youth. As part of the network, members have access to the following support and services:

• Strategic guidance in seeking funding through the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in the New York Community Trust
• Brokered connections between member organizations based on shared ideas and potential programs
• Participation in events in and beyond New York City that illustrate the work of network members and promote Connected Learning principles, digital literacy AND webmaking skills
• Access to involvement with the NYC Department of Education and others seeking to build experimental and/or sustainable partnerships with Hive NYC
• Opportunity to promote new, programs and events through Hive NYC communications channels (blog, Facebook, Twitter, etc.), as well as youth and volunteer recruitment
• A knowledge exchange for members to share models, ideas, content, tools and best-practices with each other
• Professional Development sessions that develop staff through network peer mentoring, modeling and sharing
• Monthly, in-person meet-ups and conference calls that allow for members to share program updates, best practices, and learn about new opportunities
• Additional seed funding for technology development, research, etc.

Each year, more than 6,000 tweens and teens across NYC directly engage with Hive NYC. These youth take part in projects funded by the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust, private and community events, and programs resulting from network partnerships. Another 330,000 youth are indirectly impacted by these efforts, and through the broad dissemination of innovations and programs developed within the network."

[See also: http://hiveresearchlab.org/ ]
nyc  hivenyclearning  mozilla  informallearning  self-directed  self-directedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  learning  youth  openstudioproject  lcproject  macarthurfoundation  homago  museums  ncmideas  afterschool  clubs  learningspaces  funding  professionaldevelopment  bestpractices  digitalliteracy  networkedlearning  networks  collaboration  digitalmedia  newmedia  technology  interestdriven  amnh  bankstreetcollege  beamcenter  brooklynmuseum  brooklynpubliclibrary  carnegiehall  centerforurbanpedagogy  citylore  children'smuseumofthearts  coderjojo  dreamyard  exposurecamp  eyebeam  facinghistoryandourselves  glovbalkids  grilswritenow  maketheroad  thelamp  nycsalt  parsons  reelworks  wagnercollege  worldup  wnyc  wnycradiorookies  urbanword  toked  thepoint  rubinmuseum  momi  nypl  moma  iridescentlearning  habitatmap  cooper-hewitt  commonsensemedia  brooklyn  bronx  manhattan  groundswell  mouse  downtowncommunitytelevision  globalactionproject  globalkids  instituteofplay  joanganzcooneycenter  people'sproductionhouse  radiorookies  stoked  queens  statenisland 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Hive Research Lab
"Hive Research Lab an applied research partner of the Mozilla Hive NYC Learning Network and a project of Indiana University and New York University. It acts as an embedded research lab investigating and collaborating with network stakeholders including network stewards at Mozilla Foundation, funders associated with the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund at the New York Community Trust and, most importantly, the 56 Hive NYC member organizations throughout New York City.

Our mandate is to investigate and strengthen the Hive NYC Learning Network as a context for innovation in out-of-school learning organizations and as a support for interest-driven learning by young people. In the process, we aim to advance the theory and practice related to creating robust regional learning networks. We will leverage empirical data and insights from the literature in order to assist Hive NYC to achieve its collectively articulated network-level goals. Our central areas of investigation concern the development of youth trajectories and pathways within Hive NYC and the functioning of the network as an infrastructure for learning innovation. Our work is informed by literature in areas such as network theory, youth development and learning sciences. We’re guided by a design-based research methodology, as well as a core set of values in research."

[See also: http://explorecreateshare.org/ ]
mozilla  hiveresearchlab  informalearning  via:steelemaley  rafisanto  dixieching  kyliepeppler  chrishoadley  design-basedmethodology  research  youth  learning  education  self-directedlearning  self-directed  interestdriven  networks  networkedlearning  openstudioproject  unschooling  deschooling  nyc 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Make Summer
"MAKE. WRITE. REMIX.

Events and Projects All Summer Long Linked by a Powerful Shared Interest:

Making learning more relevant – connecting learning to people's interests, to real life, real work, real communities, and to the demands and opportunities of the digital age."

[From the about page:]

"This summer, major advocates for the potential of the Internet – including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Mozilla, the National Writing Project, and others – are putting Connected Learning into practice. The Summer of Making and Connecting organizes hundreds of events, projects and programs in communities across the nation, around the world, and online to help youth connect learning to their interests and to enable teachers to learn from and network with their innovative peers.

The campaign will engage hundreds of thousands of people in creating things on the web, with hardware, and on paper—working in schools and community spaces and at kitchen tables. The campaign brings together organizations from the worlds of DIY, making, writing, and learning to build the Connected Learning movement.

Our partners believe Connected Learning is an essential learning approach if we are to engage more students and better prepare today’s youth for real life and real work in a world of constant change. Just as previous generations harnessed the advancements of their times, schools and community spaces such as museums and libraries should leverage new technologies to deepen the connections between student interests, academic rigor and real world paths to success. Schools need to build on the basics so students graduate with the higher-order skills such as critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication they need to succeed. Because for education to be relevant and useful today, it must recognize that retreating from these realities means leaving a generation of children behind.

Learning Principles
1. Interest-powered
2. Peer-supported
3. Academically oriented

Design Principles
1. Production-centered
2. Openly networked
3. Shared purpose"
mozilla  making  makers  learning  summer  2013  networkedlearning  connectedlearning  change  interestdriven  doing  purpose  sharedpurpose  community  communities  peersupport  connectivism  constructivism  nationalwritingproject  nwp  macarthurfoundation  events  relevance 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Reading the dictionary - Joi Ito's Web [See also the comments.]
"My sister calls me an "interest driven learner."…code for "short attention span" or "not a good long term planner" or something like that. I can't imagine being able to read the dictionary from cover to cover…don't think most people could…

Although reading the dictionary & the encyclopedia from cover to cover may seem a bit extreme, it often feels like that's what we're asking kids to do who go through formal education…

I love videos of professors, amateurs & instructors putting their courseware online…great resource for interest driven learners like me. However, I wonder whether we should be structuring the future of learning as online universities where you are asked to do the equivalent of reading the encyclopedia from cover to cover online. Shouldn't we be looking at the Internet as an amazing network enabling "The Power of Pull" & be empowering kids to learn through building things together rather than assessing their ability to complete courses & produce the right "answers"?"
networkedlearning  motivation  2012  lcrpoject  interestdriven  dictionaries  encyclopedias  teaching  web  online  education  deschooling  unschooling  learning  joiito  dictionary 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Wood Tape ["I decide to keep my involvement to a minimum, partly for entertainment, mostly as a learning experience for Guy."]
"THAT'S what this has been about the whole time! He had all of this planned from the beginning. The tape, the table, its purpose, its placement, the paint, the colors, everything. Delight, pride, gratitude, disbelief, shock, and more and more pride, all swelling and swirling together. I can't think, I can't focus. My four-year-old wasn't showing me pictures, he was showing me blueprints. He certainly was not impulse shopping, he knew exactly what he needed, every step of the way. He had been looking for the blue masking tape we had used when painting his room. I had thought he wanted the tape to hold the pieces of the table together, but he knew to use screws for that. He wanted to tape the wood to mask the squares for painting. There is not an adult who could have planned it better or more thoroughly. Now I'm fighting back tears of pride, and my heart is about to burst."
children  unschooling  parenting  deschooling  learning  tape  planning  making  doing  tables  projectbasedlearning  appliedlearning  interestdriven  2004  pbl 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Escape from Childhood
"Young people should have the right to control and direct their own learning, that is, to decide what they want to learn, and when, where, how, how much, how fast, and with what help they want to learn it. To be still more specific, I want them to have the right to decide if, when, how much, and by whom they want to be taught and the right to decide whether they want to learn in a school and if so which one and for how much of the time.

No human right, except the right to life itself, is more fundamental than this…

We might call this the right of curiosity, the right to ask whatever questions are most important to us. As adults, we assume that we have the right to decide what does or does not interest us, what we will look into and what we will leave alone. We take this right largely for granted…"
childhood  children'srights  education  learning  schools  compulsory  curiosity  freedom  expectations  teaching  unschooling  homeschool  deschooling  interestdriven  escapefromchildhood  books  johnholt 
july 2011 by robertogreco
8 Big Ideas of the Constructionist Learning Lab « Generation YES Blog
"learning by doing…We all learn better when learning is part of doing something we find really interesting…

technology as building material…If you can use technology to make things you can make a lot more interesting things…

hard fun…We learn best & work best if we enjoy what we are doing…doesn’t mean “easy”…

learning to learn…Many students get the idea that “the only way to learn is by being taught.” This is what makes them fail in school & life…

taking time…students at school get used to being told every 5 minutes or every hour: do this, then do that…If someone isn’t telling them what to do they get bored. Life is not like that. To do anything important you have to learn to manage time for yourself…

you can’t get it right without getting it wrong…To succeed you need the freedom to goof on the way…

do unto ourselves what we do unto our students…

we are entering a digital world…where knowing about digital technology is as important as reading and writing…"
education  learning  technology  teaching  curriculum  tcsnmy  sylviamartinez  garystager  seymourpapert  constructionism  1999  howwework  howwelearn  cv  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learningbydoing  projects  projectbasedlearning  openstudio  time  persistence  interestdriven  failure  timemanagement  freedom  modeling  schools  digital  making  constructing  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Eide Neurolearning Blog: Cradles of Eminence?
"If you really learn more about the childhoods of men and women who would late  become eminent, the common factors were more that they were allowed to do what they wanted to do and immerse themselves in whatever interesting subject or idea struck them at the time. It looks very different from this scheduled routine of Junior Kumon, karate classes, and after preschool tutoring all before the age of 7. "
learning  motivation  eminence  flowtheory  neurolearning  deirdrelovecky  education  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  lcproject  freedom  independence  freetime  self-directedlearning  interestdriven  kumon  testing  testprep  math  mathematics  rote  rotelearning  non-traditional  alternative  experience  parenting  generalists  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Well, Duh! -- Ten Obvious Truths That We Shouldn’t Be Ignoring
1. Much of the material students are required to memorize is soon forgotten; 2. Just knowing a lot of facts doesn’t mean you’re smart; 3. Students are more likely to learn what they find interesting; 4. Students are less interested in whatever they’re forced to do and more enthusiastic when they have some say; 5. Just because doing x raises standardized test scores doesn’t mean x should be done; 6. Students are more likely to succeed in a place where they feel known and cared about; 7. We want children to develop in many ways, not just academically; 8. Just because a lesson (or book, or class, or test) is harder doesn't mean it's better; 9. Kids aren’t just short adults; 10. Substance matters more than labels"
education  alfiekohn  testing  discipline  interestdriven  teaching  standardizedtesting  learning  schools  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  memorization  toshare  facts  understanding  meaning  interests  coercion  childhood  parenting  policy  assessment  measurement  cv  progressive  classroommanagement 
april 2011 by robertogreco
CCK11: Educurator? « Connexions
"As a teacher/tutor, I will…create the space where learning can happen…create conditions that highlight know-how and “know-where.”…welcome learner interests…curate materials that learners may not know…model and demonstrate particular skills or approaches…enable learners to reflect and practice those skills or approaches…allow learners to teach each other (and me)…am extremely busy being present (an attentiveness to the network itself )."
connectivism  teaching  lcproject  tcsnmy  stephendownes  sugatamitra  via:steelemaley  curation  curating  learning  schools  presence  cv  studentdirected  interestdriven  modeling  accessibility  sharing  community  howwelearn  howwework  educurator  generalists  reflection 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Stump The Teacher: Innovation Day 2011
"Today was the actual “Innovative Day” as students came to school with their supplies, resources, and an abundance of enthusiasm. We broke the students into working areas based on their topics of choice and the resources needed. There was a section for building, art, music, technology, videos, cooking, physical education, and more. Variety was the name of the game as there were over 200 different learning projects being worked on over the course of the day. Many students were working independently but there were plenty of learning groups that developed throughout the day as well. Students started helping each other with projects and ended up learning more than they even originally planned. Here is just a sample of the great work that was done."
unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  cv  openstudio  interestdriven  studentdirected  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  schools  curriculumisdead  curriculum  innovationday  2011  students  google20%  unstructuredtime 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Three rules for bringing out the best in teachers « Re-educate Seattle
"My friend Nick wrote to me earlier this week and scolded me for constantly critiquing the existing paradigm while rarely proposing specific solutions. So, with a nod to Nick, here’s my specific advice:

1.    Hire talented teachers and let them teach what inspires them.

2.    Never require—in fact, never allow—a teacher to teach content that doesn’t inspire him or her.

3.    Allow teachers to bring their whole selves to work; don’t limit their ability to share talents and things they love simply because it falls outside of their academic department.

I know what you’re thinking: If we followed this advice, we’d have to completely re-invent the way we’ve structured our schools. The current model simply can’t accommodate these recommendations.

Exactly. We have to re-invent the way we structure our schools."
pscs  stevemiranda  tcsnmy  education  teaching  change  gamechanging  passion  interest  interestdriven  interestdriventeaching  standards  hiring  management  administration  curriculum  curriculumisdead  lcproject  schools  pugetsoundcommunityschool 
february 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: Passion-Based Learning
"we are assuming (1) that learning takes place best not when conceived as a preparation for life but when it occurs in the context of actually living, (2) that each learner ultimately must organize his own learning in his own way, (3) that "problems" & personal interests as well as "subjects" form a realistic structure by which to organize learning experiences, (4) that students are capable of directly & authentically participating in the intellectual & social life of their community, (5) that they should do so, and (6) that the community badly needs them."

—Alan Shapiro & Neil Postman 1969-1970

"We expect kids to learn to read by giving them meaningless exercises & meaningless stories. [examples]…& yet, we dismiss almost everything about their world - their interests, the things they most wonder about, the things they need to know, they way they need to move. We act not just as if we are disinterested, but as if we profoundly distrust kids, & really don't like them very much"
education  pedagogy  passion  alanshapiro  neilpostman  irasocol  deschooling  unschooling  teaching  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  howwelearn  projectbasedlearning  cv  schools  schooling  interestdriven  community  trust  pbl 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Why American Mothers are Superior
"Lots of middle managers like people to do exactly what told…

Schools really like people to do what they're told, & unis just love grad students who pay high out-of-state tuition, teach for low wages, or work in lab for free. Hey, don’t blame us if 30% of students we admit are from other countries, they did best on tests & had 4.0…

Someone ought to ask WHY we measure what we measure…tests we give & other admissions criteria were not handed down by God…

I doubt many unis would admit student like me today…I did have an intense desire to learn about world…my undergrad ed gave me gift of profs willing to respond to my interests, enough time not to interfere w/ my relationship w/ library, & classmates I argued w/ for pure intellectual exercise…

Dr. Chua is raising children to fit Ivy League…I’m raising…to be themselves…Her definition of success is to have…prodigies. Mine…who learn, live & love well. She’s a success by her standards as I am by mine."
parenting  education  culture  tcsnmy  freedom  interests  interestdriven  duty  cv  teaching  schools  schooling  schooliness  identity  prodigies  admissions  gpa  testing  standardizedtesting  passion  learning  well-being  china  society  success  meaning  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  amychua 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education | Video on TED.com
"Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education -- the best teachers and schools don't exist where they're needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching."
holeinthewall  outdoctrination  sugatamitra  unschooling  deschooling  education  teaching  learning  engagement  ted  technology  computers  india  africa  italy  autodidacts  self-directedlearning  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  interestdriven  interests  collaboration  internet  hyderabad  curiosity  speech  english  accents  speech2text  arthurcclarke  computing  cambodia  southafrica  games  play  gaming 
september 2010 by robertogreco
interactions magazine | Time Goes By, Everything Looks the Same.
"Working at the Annenberg Institute at Brown University, Elliot and I set up a small nonprofit, Big Picture Learning. Working with the commissioner of education in Rhode Island, we had the opportunity to start a high school, The Met, as a model of what the schools of the future should look like. We started with a simple concept: one student at a time and what’s best for kids?
bigpictureschools  dennislittky  interestdriven  student-centered  studentdirected  students  tcsnmy  learning  schools  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  curriculum  design  life  education  servicedesign 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Quote by Stanley Kubrick: "I think the big mistake in schools is trying to te..."
"I think the big mistake in schools is trying to teach children anything, and by using fear as the basic motivation. Fear of getting failing grades, fear of not staying with your class, etc. Interest can produce learning on a scale compared to fear as a nuclear explosion to a firecracker."
teaching  fear  schools  learning  children  education  motivation  unschooling  deschooling  stanleykubrick  interest  self-directedlearning  interestdriven  homeschool  grades  grading  assessment  power 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Bennington College: [Quantum Leap] Mentoring programs reconnect public school students to their education
"A Bennington College student's education has curiosity at its core. What are you passionate about? What do you want to know? How will you act on your ideas?
Ten years ago, two College faculty members—both professional mediators—began to think about the high school dropout rate in Vermont (at the time, twenty percent). They began to think about a different approach to truancy and dropout prevention. And they wondered what might happen if public school students were given the chance to connect with their education in the same way that Bennington College students do.

So began the experiment of Quantum Leap. ... The learning plan invites students to hone in on their interests in an academic way, making them active partners in their own education. Mentoring gives them one-on-one attention from someone who is passionate about education. Mediation bridges the gaps between students, schools, and families, while also giving them conflict resolution skills."
education  schools  interestdriven  studentdirected  projectbasedlearning  learning  change  reform  personallearning  tcsnmy  publicschools  mentoring  mentors  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  benniningtoncollege  pbl 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Spotlight on DML | Constance Steinkuehler: Digital Montessori for Big Kids
"Virtual worlds are like digital montessori for big kids. Virtual worlds are interest-driven learning environments in which the learner is purposefully surrounded with well chosen and well-designed symbolic and material tools and artifacts. They enable th
virtual  virtualworlds  children  teens  learning  interestdriven  self-directed  immersion  community  interests  technology  education  games  gaming 
may 2008 by robertogreco

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