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robertogreco : iran   40

Kurdistan: A Family Album • Susan Meiselas • Magnum Photos
"Susan Meiselas’ work on the Kurdish people’s historic, and ongoing, struggle for statehood"



"Magnum photographer Susan Meiselas’ retrospective show ‘Mediations’ is one of four bodies of work shortlisted for the 2019 Deutsche Borse Photography Foundation Prize. ‘Mediations’ drew on Meiselas’ work spanning four decades, and included projects like Prince Street Girls and Carnival Strippers, as well as her reportage on Nicaragua’s insurrection and revolution spanning 10 years, and her longterm work on the Kurds, which became the book Kurdistan: In the Shadow of History.


Described by New York Times reviewer Karl E. Meyer as a ‘family album of a forsaken people’, the project saw Meiselas create a visual archive of the Kurdish peoples’ struggle for nationhood through her own interviews and photographs as well as collected historical, ethnographic, and personal images. Christopher Hitchens, in the Los Angeles Review of Books wrote that, “Susan Meiselas has, with infinite labor and tenderness, composed a collage, framed a composition, designed a frame, confected a design and by means of a deft balance between text and camera, brought off a thing of beauty as well as instruction…”


Meiselas’ Kurdistan project is on show at The Photographer’s Gallery in central London, until June 2, as part of the Deutsche Borse exhibition. Here, we reproduce Meiselas’ introduction to Kurdistan: In the Shadow of History, alongside a selection of the book’s images."
susanmeiselas  2019  photography  kurds  kurdistan  turkey  iraq  iran  syria  ussr  history  1990s 
9 days ago by robertogreco
Recent Work - ASAD FAULWELL
[See also: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-cm-asad-faulwell-20180613-htmlstory.html

"The portraits depict about a dozen women who smuggled in bombs during the Algerian War of Independence 60 years ago, a time when Algerian nationalists were blowing up cafes in a campaign to expel French colonialists from their country.

“The women in the paintings killed people,” Asad Faulwell said, noting the contradictory feelings that the portraits evoke. “They killed civilians in the name of freeing themselves from colonialism. They then went through hell themselves. They were tortured by the French soldiers. They were ostracized by their own countrymen. They are victims, aggressors, killers. My interest was in the moral ambiguity of the whole thing.”

Eight of Faulwell’s new paintings can be seen through July 7 in “Phantom” at Denk gallery in downtown Los Angeles. It’s the artist’s first hometown solo show in 10 years.

Born William Asad Faulwell, the artist grew up thinking that he was an ordinary American kid. In Simi Valley he went to school, hung out with friends and played basketball on the high school team.

At home he spoke Farsi with his maternal grandmother, as well as with his younger brother, Said. With his dad, mom and two of her sisters, who lived nearby and were always around, he spoke English.

“I didn’t think anything of it,” Faulwell said. “There were just two languages that people spoke around me.”

The women in his family had emigrated from Iran in the 1970s and ’80s, just before and after the Islamic Revolution transformed that country from an authoritarian, pro-Western monarchy led by Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi to an authoritarian, anti-Western theocracy led by the Ayatollah Khomeini. Faulwell’s dad, a poet and professor, was born in the United States to parents who traced their roots back to England and Germany.

As a kid, Faulwell didn’t give that dichotomy a second thought.

“The women in my family did things one way, and my dad did things another way,” Faulwell said. “He would tell me one thing, and they would tell me something else. That was just what it was. It was normal.”

Faulwell enrolled in his first year of junior college when 9/11 changed everything.

“Right after that,” he said, “for the first time in my life I started feeling that maybe in other people’s minds I wasn’t an American.”

That confused the 20-year-old. “I felt psychologically and emotionally displaced,” he said. “I thought of myself as an American and suddenly I was seeing people on TV, meeting people in person, who were very much looking at me in a different way. Even though I was born in America, raised in America, American in so many ways.”

The next year, Faulwell transferred from Moorpark College to UC Santa Barbara. The uncertainty he experienced about his ethnic identity did not extend to his artistic identity.

“I went to UCSB knowing I was an artist,” he said. “I knew that since I was 3 or 4.”

His mom and dad tell this story about taking Faulwell to a museum when he was 4. “I started crying,” Faulwell said. “When they asked me what was wrong, I pointed to a painting and sobbed, ‘I want to make that but I don’t know how.’”"]
asadfaulwell  art  artists  losangeles  ucsb  iran  algeria  colonialism 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Y-Fi
"Experience Loading Animations / Screens in wifi speeds around the world. This website was inspired by this conversation I had on twitter. I was home (Nigeria) for a bit before I started work and was annoyed at how long I had to look at loading animations. I wondered how long people wanted to wait around the world screaming.

Notes / How this works

• Data about wifi speeds is from: Akamai's State of the Internet / Connectivity Report.

• I chose countries based on what suprised me and to get diversity across speeds.

• To get most data about loading times, I used a combination of Firefox DevTools and the Network Panel on Chrome DevTools. For Gmail I used this article on Gmail's Storage Quota.

• The wifi speeds and sizes of resources are hard-coded in so you can see them and the rest of the code at the repo.

• Any other questions / thoughts? Hit me up on twitter!"

[via: https://twitter.com/YellzHeard/status/890990574827851777 via @senongo]
omayeliarenyeka  internet  webdev  webdesign  wifi  broadband  nigeria  loading  speed  diversity  accessibility  paraguay  egypt  namibia  iran  morocco  argentina  india  southafrica  saudiarabia  mexico  china  chile  greece  ue  france  australia  russia  kenya  israel  thailand  uk  us  taiwan  japan  singapore  hongkong  noray  southkorea  perú 
july 2017 by robertogreco
10 Songs That Define Modern Iran de Nahid Siamdoust | Escúchalo gratis en SoundCloud
"From Persian classical music through rock and pop to rap and beyond, these tracks give you a feel for what it has been like to be an Iranian in Iran since the Islamic Revolution in 1979. This podcast is based on my book, "Soundtrack of the Revolution: The Politics of Music in Iran," published by Stanford University Press in 2017."
iran  revolution  music  politics 
july 2017 by robertogreco
teachartwiki - Shirin Neshat, Women of Allah Series
"Shirin Neshat’s Women of Allah series (1993-97) is comprised of four photographs. Each of these photographs depicts an image of a veiled, tattooed, and armed Muslim woman. The cropped images of women’s body parts adorned with organic forms while holding weapons seem to cause confusion with viewers. The persistent and repetitive use of visual elements that demonstrate the stereotype of the Middle Eastern woman as violent and old-fashioned, help portray the women as inferior. Neshat started her art career with photography in the early 1990s, and her photo-series Women of Allah (1993-97) became particularly famous. In that series she explores the notion of femininity in relation to male authority and Islamic fundamentalism in her home country. The images are portraits of women that are overlaid by Persian calligraphy and they refer to the contrast she experienced between the traditional society she was raised in and the modern society evolving after the Iranian Revolution. In her art, she resists stereotypes – of both women and representations of Islam. Instead, her works explores all the complex social forces shaping Muslim women’s identity. Many of her photographs are actually mixed-media pieces of silver gelatin with ink. The calligraphy is Persian poetry about themes such as exile, identity, femininity and martyrdom. Neshat’s work revolves around concept, she has always been inspired by photojournalism and she feels that photography works best with her topics, conveying realism, immediacy, and a sense of drama.

Neshat’s Women of Allah series was the artistic result of her visit to a country transformed by Islamic fundamentalism. Although Neshat claims that her Women of Allah series is not about her, she admits that “it has evolved around my personal interest in coming to terms with the ‘new’ Iran, to understand ideas, behind Islamic fundamentalism, and to reconnect with my lost past.” (Bertucci,1997, p. 84-87.) The photographs in this series enables Neshat to emulate the Iranian Muslim women who during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war became important elements of propaganda and the moral aids in support of the country’s resistance against foreign assault and continue to serve as such in remembrances of that war. This series was made after Neshat’s visit to Iran in 1990, includes self-portraits of the artist, and all female subjects are clad in chador, hold guns and rifles, and feature bodies adorned with calligraphy in the Farsi language. Neshat’s photographs of the Iranian women pertain to the emergence of a new era in Iranian history following the end of the Pahlavi dynasty, an era marked by an emphasis on the distinction between the self and other, and the culture, sexual, and physical division brought by an Islamic government (Graham-Brown, 1988, p.1925).

Within these images, four distinctive and incongruent elements occupy the limited space, and they combine within the framework to create a threatening message: the softness of the veil’s fabric, the rigidity of the gun’s metal, the fluidity of the black ink, and the young women’s flesh appear to coexist amidst physical and material differences. The written calligraphy invokes the Iranian woman’s silence and her inability to have a voice. Because Neshat’s residence in the West allows her the freedom of expression, she covers the entire visible surface of her female figure with her chosen words. However, Neshat’s chosen words are in total compliance with the militancy of the veiled Iranian women in that they are poetic words supporting Iranian martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war. "

[See also:
http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/486834
http://unframed.lacma.org/2012/04/24/new-acquisition-shirin-neshat-speechless

https://www.eyeartcollective.com/women-of-allah-series/
"She states: “In 1993-97, I produced my first body of work, a series of stark black-and-white photographs entitled Women of Allah, conceptual narratives on the subject of female warriors during the Iranian Islamic Revolution of 1979. On each photograph, I inscribed calligraphic Farsi text on the female body (eyes, face, hands, feet, and chest); the text is poetry by contemporary Iranian women poets who had written on the subject of martyrdom and the role of women in the Revolution. As the artist, I took on the role of performer, posing for the photographs. These photographs became iconic portraits of willfully armed Muslim women. Yet every image, every women’s submissive gaze, suggests a far more complex and paradoxical reality behind the surface.”"

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.act2080.0038.207
https://www.artsy.net/artwork/shirin-neshat-rebellious-silence-from-women-of-allah-series
"Internationally acclaimed artist Shirin Neshat takes on loaded themes in photography, film, and video works that delve into issues of gender, identity, and politics in Muslim countries, and the relationship between the personal and political. Her film Women without Men (2009), which won the prestigious Silver Lion award at the Venice Film Festival, follows four women—including a political activist, a prostitute, and a would-be mother—set in the context of 1950s Iran and featuring surreal elements to convey the psychological states of her characters. More recently Neshat has collaborated with American artist Larry Barns, taking portrait photographs of elderly, low-income Egyptian workers, including mechanics, street peddlers, teachers, grandmothers, and housewives, exploring the hardship experienced by individuals living under tumultuous regimes. “Today, again in the comfort of my sanctuary in New York, I look back and wonder how they are,” she says. “What is the future for Egypt? Is there any hope for return of that revolutionary fervor which seemed so pure, beautiful, and powerful?” Neshat has also collaborated with composer Philip Glass and the singer-songwriter Sussan Deyhim."

https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-art-history/global-contemporary/a/neshat-rebellious ]
shirinneshat  art  photography  gender  film  video  violence  iran  egypt  islam  philipglass  sussandeyhim  politics  larryburns 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Farhad Ahrarnia | Lawrie Shabibi
"Farhad Ahrarnia was born in Shiraz in 1971 and holds a degree in Experimental and Documentary Film Theory and Practice from the Northern Media School, Sheffield Hallam University, UK.

Farhad Ahrarnia’s practice comprises a diverse range of meticulously crafted works that cover questions of ideological narratives, national identity and intercultural exchange. He is deeply influenced by the traditions of his hometown Shiraz; his methodology consists of ancient techniques associated with its indigenous culture such as embroidery, metalwork and mosaic to draw on sociocultural constructions and motives that reference national codes. The series of silver-plated copper dustpans and shovels embossed with fragments of Shiraz, explore Iran’s perished glory. With a sense of irony, these mundane utensils are transformed to recall the country’s historical richness and forgotten grandeur.

Another key influence is Kazimir Malevich, the works of that modernist Suprematism being reminiscent of the urban labyrinth that was Shiraz in the seventies and eighties, where Ahrarnia grew up amidst modernist architecture overlaying ancient ruins to create a dynamic city. The sublime beauty and quasi-religious experience inherent to Malevich’s work address a universality which is transcendent of national cultures and identities.

Iconic models of American culture such as Hollywood portraiture, beauty pageants, Time magazine covers or heroic war photography are overlaid with embroidery which imbues them a further layer of meaning - tactile, personal and immersive, inviting reflection on the actual significance of these otherwise self-evident images. The stitching and loose threads inflicted on these mass-distributed images symbolize their media-constructed nature and the ideologies and power structures that are embedded within.

By juxtaposing traditional Orientalist craft techniques and paragons of popular culture, Ahrarnia thus explores the dichotomy between Islamic traditions and Western society’s aspiration for progress and modernity."

[See also:

"Farhad Ahrarnia | “Something for the Touts, the Nuns, the Grocery Clerks and You”"
http://www.selectionsarts.com/event/farhad-ahrarnia-something-for-the-touts-the-nuns-the-grocery-clerks-and-you/

"Lawrie Shabibi is delighted to welcome back Farhad Ahrarnia for his second solo exhibition at the gallery opening on 8 February. The exhibition brings together new works from his ongoing wall-based Khatam series based on the sparse compositions of Max Bill, El Lissitzky and Kazimir Malevich alongside a new series entitled Something for the Touts, the Nuns, the Grocery Clerks and You, which comprise works on cardboard with gilded illuminations painted on their surfaces."

"Farhad Ahrarnia Fuses High And Low Art At Lawrie Shabibi"
http://www.harpersbazaararabia.com/art/exhibitions/farhad-ahrarnia-fuses-high-and-low-art-at-lawrie-shabibi

"The Iranian artist’s exhibition mixes his ongoing Khatam series with a new series that elevates the humble cardboard box with gilded illuminations
Something for the Touts, the Nuns, the Grocery Clerks and You, Farhad Ahrarnia’s second solo exhibition at Lawrie Shabibi in Dubai, takes its playful name from the poem of the non-conformist Charles Bukowski.

This is an exhibition of two apparently contrasting halves. First, the refined Khatam with their intricate patterns formed of precious materials and then Ahrarnia's new series of reused cardboard boxes, stamped with Made in Iran logos. Yet, on closer inspection, these apparently worthless pieces of cardboard, which once contained everyday, locally-manufactured products such as kerosene lamps and hair spray, are embellished with delicate passages of Tazhib or gilding, a traditional technique of drawing patterns. Through such contrasting detail, Ahrarnia intends to “raise their significance and cultural value, turning them into critical and self-referential art.”

They are a commentary on the contrasts of contemporary Iran; a modern industrial society that still clings steadfastly to its rich cultural history. Through these pieces, Ahrarnia puts his own spin on Bukowski’s Dickensian way of exploring the “We have everything and we have nothing” paradox, a comment on the societal chasm that exists in Iranian society. Imbued with literary and artistic subtext, this series also takes a cue from the cardboard-based 1970s works of US artist Robert Rauschenberg.

Seemingly in contrast, yet sharing many of the same traditonal Iranian motifs, are new pieces from Ahrarnia’s ongoing Khatam series. For these creations, Ahrarnia explores the more lavish, “high art” side of Iran’s cultural history, employing the micro-mosaic technique of Khatam, using materials such as ivory, camel bone, wood, copper, silver and brass to create jewel-like, geometric patterns.

Although Ahrarnia is now largely based in the UK city of Sheffield, he remains strongly influenced by the traditions of his hometown Shiraz. Craft is the heart of Ahrarnia’s creations and both collections here use age-old Iranian techniques, fused with more modern geometric and abstract elements. Some particularly bear the influence of early 20th century Russian Constructivist art, reflecting the artist's admiration of the Russian Suprematist Kazimir Malevich in the strong geometry of their composition.

Through these works, Ahrarnia seems to say that, despite industrialisation, tradition still provides the unifying force behind Iranian society."

"Opening tonight: Farhad Ahrarnia at Lawrie Shabibi"
http://www.thenational.ae/blogs/the-art-blog/opening-tonight-farhad-ahrarnia-at-lawrie-shabibi

"An interesting collection of art is going up at Lawrie Shabibi Gallery in Dubai for their new exhibition. Something for the Touts, the Nuns, the Grocery Clerks and You is the title of the exhibition by Farhad Ahrarnia that opens at the gallery at 6pm tonight. The main body of the show consists of cardboard collected from Shiraz, Esfahan and Tehran in Iran with gilded illuminations painted on their surfaces. There are also new pieces from his on-going wall-based Khatam series. There is therefore, a mix of high art ornamentation and discarded cardboard boxes. The artist is interested in the potential of traditional craft, emphasising its engagement with the modern and embedding various cultural sensibilities onto two seemingly incongruous surfaces.

The unusual title is taken from a poem by Charles Bukowski, a German-born American poet, novelist, and short story writer who was notorious for writings that were influenced by his home surroundings and the impact of modernisation and industrialisation on the poor and working classes."]
art  artists  iran  farhadahrarnia  lawrieshabibi  cardboard  mosaics  khatam  robertrauschenberg  gilding 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Adults Have Become Shorter in Many Countries - The New York Times
"Average adult heights in many countries appear to have peaked 30 to 40 years ago and have declined slightly since then, according to a new study that the authors say is based on the largest set of such data ever gathered.

They combined results from 1,472 studies in 200 countries looking at the measured — rather than self-reported or estimated — heights of about 18.6 million people born from 1896 to 1996. The study was published in eLife.

Dutchmen born before 2000 were the world’s tallest, and Guatemalan women born before 1900 were the shortest, the study found. South Korean women and Iranian men had the greatest gains in height over the last century. But Guatemalan women also grew, rising from 4 feet 7 inches to 4 feet 11 inches, on average.

Latvian women are now the world’s tallest.

Height is strongly influenced by the mother’s nourishment during pregnancy, and the child’s during infancy. Height is also linked to overall health and well-being.

Taller people tend on average to live longer and to have fewer cardiac and respiratory problems. Some studies have shown that they receive more education and are paid higher salaries.

American men reached their maximum average height in 1996, and women in 1988. Two of the study’s authors, James Bentham and Majid Ezzati, both of Imperial College, London, speculated that the decline could be because of worsening nutrition standards for poor Americans but conceded that they had not measured the effects of immigration from, for example, Central American countries with substantially shorter citizens.

Average heights in North America, Western Europe and Japan rose quickly in the 20th century, then plateaued or shrank slightly, the authors said. African and South Asians have not grown very much and, in some countries, have shrunk slightly.

Africans were taller when the colonial era ended in the 1960s. They may have lost height because of collapsing health care systems, rising population density and less dietary diversity among urbanites, the authors said."

[See also: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13410 ]
humans  evolution  height  netherlands  latvia  2016  korea  iran  nourishment  1996  1988  1960s  health  japan  europe  us  asia  guatemala  jamesbentham  majidezzati 
july 2016 by robertogreco
mehrdad (@m1rasoulifard) • Instagram photos and videos
"mehrdad تاریخ معماری ایران Welcom to architecture history of iran☝☝ All photos are taken by me 📷( note4) mrasoulifard@yahoo.com"

[via: https://twitter.com/jqtrde ]
instagrams  instagram  architecture  iran  via:jtardie  design  art 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Wickham: U.S. terrorism list a lesson in hypocrisy
"But if Cuba had its own Most Wanted Terrorist list, Luis Posada Carriles would top it.

Posada is widely believed to have been one of the masterminds behind the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner near Barbados that took the lives of 73 people. Though he has a long history of violent attacks, the Cuban exile lives openly in South Florida, where he's widely regarded as a hero for his acts of terrorism, which allegedly include the bombing a Havana hotel that took the life of an Italian tourist.

Posada's partner in crime was a guy named Orlando Bosch. Former attorney general Richard Thornburgh, who served in the first Bush administration, once called Bosch, who died in 2011, "an unreformed terrorist." But that didn't stop President George H.W. Bush from pardoning Bosch to keep him from being deported. In return, Bosch renounced the use of force against Cuba — and then backed away from that promise.

"They purchased the chain," he told The New York Times, "but they don't have the monkey."

Posada and Bosch were alleged terrorists who aided the U.S. effort to maintain hegemony over this hemisphere. In return, they were given safe harbor in this country — which long ago undermined this nation's standing to accuse other nations of being a state sponsor of terrorism."
us  cuba  foreignpoilicy  dewayneockham  2015  history  iran  orlandobosch  luisposadacarriles  assatashakur  terrorism  ronaldreagan  nicaragua  iran-contraaffair 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Here's Some Stupid For Lunch - Esquire
"Is it important to care what Chuck Norris thinks about world history?

Oh, hell no. It's just fun.
Obama isn't the first to have a foreign policy of blissful appeasement and too-little-too-late interception. British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain did it with the Nazis. President Gerald Ford did it with communists. President Jimmy Carter did it with the ayatollahs.

Wait. Whoa there, human hardtack. Let's back up the ol' history chuck wagon and set a spell. See, what happened to Carter happened, not because he "appeased" the ayatollahs, but because he appeased (among other folks) a leaky bag of old sins named Henry Kissinger and allowed the Shah of Iran, the torturer and tyrant that we foisted on the people of Iran, into this country for medical treatment. That led to the assault on the American embassy and the taking of the hostages and the incredible boost to Ted Koppel's career. In response, Carter froze their assets and made the Iranian economy scream. He also tried an ill-fated rescue attempt that went wrong in the desert.

You know what appeasing the ayatollahs looks like?

Promising them if they hold the hostages, they'll get a better deal from another president. Unfreezing the assets almost as soon as you take the oath. Secretly selling them advanced weaponry because you had use for the profits of this illegal arms sale to fund an illegal war.

That's what appeasement looks like.

And that wasn't Carter.

That was the next guy."
ronaldregan  jimmycarter  iran  history  chucknorris  henrykissinger  1970s  1980s  2014  charlespierce 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Iran is sitting on a modern-art goldmine | Art and design | guardian.co.uk
"To prove their liberalism to the west – as that trenchant observer of Tehran's 1970s art splurge saw it, watching from New York – the autocratic rulers of what is now the Islamic Republic of Iran went overboard for modern art."
art  iran  via:rodcorp 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Conflict Kitchen
"Conflict Kitchen is a take-out restaurant that only serves cuisine from countries with which the United States is in conflict. The food is served out of a take-out-style storefront that rotates identities every six months to highlight another country.  Each iteration of the project is augmented by events, performances, and discussions that seek to expand the engagement the public has with the culture, politics, and issues at stake within the focus country. These events have included live international Skype dinner parties between citizens of Pittsburgh and young professionals in Tehran, Iran; documentary filmmakers in Kabul, Afghanistan; and community radio activists in Caracas, Venezuela."
kabul  tehran  iran  caracas  venezuela  afghanistan  restaurants  culture  politics  food  pittsburgh 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Twitter / @dcurtisj: I choose to think of this ...
"I choose to think of this as the world's first political defection by a robotic military asset"
americaland  drones  iran  via:straup 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Nonformality | The revolt of the young
"From revolutions and protests to riots and unrests: young people are taking their fight for the future to the streets. Intergenerational contracts have become obsolete, with many young people feeling robbed of their future in the light of the employment crisis, a damaged environment and social inequality. Observers and activists describe a world awakening with rage, and a revolt of the young that has only just begun. But what will happen next?"
2011  unrest  politics  policy  generations  generationalstrife  classwarfare  economics  environment  inequality  disparity  unemployment  youth  arabspring  crisis  wealth  awakening  engagement  uk  chile  egypt  tunisia  zizek  manuelcastells  wolfganggründiger  future  pankajmishra  dissent  revolt  revolution  algeria  iraq  iran  morocco  oman  israel  jordan  syria  yemen  bahrain  greece  spain  españa  portugal  iceland  andreaskarsten  change  protests  riots 
august 2011 by robertogreco
On Overestimation - Artichoke's Wunderkammern
"I am interested in what is claimed - in how I can know. This statistic surprised me - I had bought into the hype around the role of Twitter in the Iranian protests. My distrust of the motives of media and commerce moves me towards an increasing normlessness. Is there anything I can aspire to or hold as true? Leadbeater's analysis of "the cloud" is powerful and expressed with a simple elegance and logic. It has many other insights that provoke new thinking about stuff I thought I knew. Leadbeater is someone who has oftentimes provided a balance to what I hear claimed at educational conferences and read in blogs and other media. This article in The Edge reminds me that I must always seek the measured commentary."
twitter  iran  charlesleadbeater  artichoke  media  estimation  overestimation  truth  statistics  cloud  hypertext  artichokeblog  pamhook 
february 2010 by robertogreco
What's in store for the next decade? - By Anne Applebaum - Slate Magazine
"And what do these headlines tell us? If I had to read the tea leaves and make a grand prediction, I would say that in the closing days of the 2000s, the future does not look good for all authoritarian regimes. However, the signs are very positive for one particular authoritarian regime: China. Partly this is because the Chinese, unlike the Iranians and the Russians, continue to deliver prosperity, and in the current era it is prosperity, not ideology, that keeps authoritarian regimes in power."
china  via:cburell  capitalism  2009  ideology  authoritarianism  economics  prosperity  iran  russia  islam 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Mahmood Delkhasteh: The 21st Century's First Authentic Revolution
"The consequences of this revolution cannot be underestimated. Many argue that it was 1979 Iranian revolution which transformed Islamic fundamentalism into a global phenomenon. If this is correct, then it is possible that the present revolution might to do the 'unthinkable' and overthrow a corrupt, fundamentalist regime. Such a non-violent revolution could secularise the state, separating it from religion, and revolutionise religion itself by redefining Islam as a discourse of freedom and a method not for obtaining and managing power, but for expanding freedom. The principles of such an Islam are already being produced...An authentic Islamic renaissance is already sweeping through many Iranian cities, and its effect on other Islamic countries will be felt in the coming years and months."
iran  2009  islam  revolution  change  reform  authoritarianism  dictatorship  freedom  democracy 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Twitter / Harold Jarche: highly educated electorate ...
"highly educated electorate + experience with peaceful revolution + years of repression + 21st C technology= #Iran"
iran  revolution  2009  haroldjarche  education  repression  authoritarianism  technology 
december 2009 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Special Reports | Walls around the world
"Two decades since the Berlin Wall came down, BBC Mundo looks at walls and barriers around the world which are still standing - or have been put up - since 1989."
walls  borders  us  mexico  israel  korea  geography  urbanism  photography  politics  architecture  migration  landscape  botswana  zimbabwe  india  pakistan  iran  saudiarabia  ireland  westbank  ceuta  melilla  spain  riodejaneiro  cyprus  sahara  españa 
november 2009 by robertogreco
The demise of the dollar - Business News, Business - The Independent
"In the most profound financial change in recent Middle East history, Gulf Arabs are planning – along with China, Russia, Japan and France – to end dollar dealings for oil, moving instead to a basket of currencies including the Japanese yen and Chinese yuan, the euro, gold and a new, unified currency planned for nations in the Gulf Co-operation Council, including Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, Kuwait and Qatar."
via:javierarbona  2009  china  middleeast  currency  japan  business  economics  politics  europe  recession  world  money  finance  iraq  crisis  energy  iran  russia  geopolitics  oil  gold  dollar  us 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Ambassador of Fruit | Orion Magazine
"An Iranian pomologist transforms an Idaho landscape and helps its growers stay in business"
fruit  agriculture  farming  idaho  grapes  apples  iran 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Iran's Post-Election Uprising: Hopes & Fears Revealed [Persepolis 2.0]
"Disclaimer: The authors of Persepolis 2.0 were inspired by the work of Marjane Satrapi. This does not imply, however, that the views expressed here reflect her own."
persepolis  iran  activism  graphicnovels  comics  culture  art  politics  remix  2009 
july 2009 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » Jonathan Lyons on the Islamic resolution of science and monotheism
"This led him to the exploration of Islam’s influence on what we think of as western science and society. He focuses in particular on Adelard of Bath, wondering what kind of person goes to the Holy Land during the crusades not to kill, but to learn Arabic and bring back that scholarship?

His book, “The House of Wisdom“, starts with a description of the unschooled, barbarian European masses knocking on the gates of the learned and sophisticated Islamic lands. He explains that Fibonnaci’s father sent him to a Muslim family to learn his math - he would have learned double-entry bookkeeping, an innovation that hadn’t yet reached the North.

When European monestaries might hold a couple of dozen volumes, Arabic libraries held hundreds of thousands of books. When the sultan decided to donate books to a new school, he sent 80,000 from his personal collection."
science  history  spain  iran  islam  religion  philosophy  arabic  translation  ethanzuckerman  jonathanlyons  españa 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Columnist - Fragile at the Core - NYTimes.com
"As Michael McFaul, a democracy expert who serves on the National Security Council, once wrote: “In retrospect, all revolutions seem inevitable. Beforehand, all revolutions seem impossible.”"
change  revolution  gamechanging  iran  democracy  reform  perception  publicopinion 
june 2009 by robertogreco
The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan - Before The Battle - "[from] an Iranian blogger, with more courage than most of us will ever know."
“I will participate in demonstrations tomorrow. Maybe they will turn violent. Maybe I will be one of the...killed. I’m listening to all my favorite music...dance to a few songs...Yes, maybe I will go to the salon before I go tomorrow! There are a few great movie scenes that I also have to see. I should drop by the library, too. It’s worth to read the poems of Forough & Shamloo again. All family pictures have to be reviewed, too. I have to call my friends as well to say goodbye. All I have are 2 bookshelves which I told my family who should receive them. I’m 2 units away from getting my BA but who cares about that. My mind is very chaotic. I wrote these random sentences for the next generation so they know we were not just emotional & under peer pressure. So they know that we did everything we could to create a better future for them. So they know that our ancestors surrendered to Arabs & Mongols but did not surrender to despotism. This note is dedicated to tomorrow’s children…”
patriotism  iran  culture  politics  history  courage  revolution 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Obama *always* stays “two steps behind them” « ACCUMULATING PERIPHERALS
"I just wanted to point out that this has always been Obama’s MO. He’s always a step or two behind where his supporters want him to be, getting pulled along by their enthusiasm, rather than out ahead of them where he might get cut off. It’s a community organizer’s MO. You never get out ahead of your constituency. Instead you shape the playing field so that your constituency’s desires flow towards where you think they should go, and allow them to carry you along behind them."
via:migurski  barackobama  andrewsullivan  leadership  organization  community  politics  administration  iran  policy 
june 2009 by robertogreco
What Every American Should Know About the Middle East
"Most in the United States don’t know much about the Middle East or the people that live there. This lack of knowledge hurts our ability to understand world events and, consequently, our ability to hold intelligent opinions about those events."
middleeast  culture  religion  islam  iran  iraq 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Middle East Online - Iranians’ love-affair with texting
"Texting in Iran amounts to popular struggle to talk freely about politics, break social taboos."
texting  iran  workarounds  freedom  democracy  communication  mobile  phones  society 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Wired Magazine: How the CIA Used a Fake Sci-Fi Flick to Rescue Americans from Tehran
"How the CIA used a fake science fiction film to sneak six Americans out of revolutionary Iran."
scifi  history  iran  us  policy  foreign 
april 2007 by robertogreco
Rageh Inside Iran - Google Video
"Rageh Omaar embarks on a unique journey inside what he describes as one of the most misunderstood countries in the ... all » world, looking at the country through the eyes of people rarely heard - ordinary Iranians."

[Now here: http://www.veoh.com/watch/v852149k6ghYZeh/ragehinsideiran ]
bbc  documentary  iran  video  culture 
march 2007 by robertogreco
Abjeez : Video Team Melli
Bruce Sterling says "Abjeez: Indescribable Iranian Reggae Feminist Steampunk Turbofolk"
iran  music  video 
january 2007 by robertogreco

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