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robertogreco : irc   5

TL;DR: Choire Sicha | Full Stop
Where does the most interesting (innovative in form and content) writing find its home right now?

I would say the most fascinating and challenging writing is happening on GroupMe, Hipchat, IRC, Campfire, maybe Snapchat and Whisper, and then on the more conversational corners of Tumblr and maybe sometimes Twitter, but not that often, because Twitter is for the olds, and it calcifies really fast.

As writing gets more diverse and possibly more insane in daily practice, as more people are engaged publicly in issuing text to each other, writing in traditional forms—which includes Teh Blogz—has calcified. There are, after all, only so many ways of making a point. The rise of published amateurs is a good thing, overall, though it leads to many hiccups. But everyone has to create her juvenilia somewhere! Meanwhile, everyone else has decided that [animated GIF "lol nothing matters]"



"The internet makes possible new forms of collaboration and discussion. How has this changed the concept of authorship online?

We’re not there yet, but it’s coming. Although, of course, authorship was weirder historically than it is now. Editor-writer relationships were more complex in the past; of course, in many eras, writer-reporter arrangements were far more complex. (What a dreamy job, to be the writer who waits in the office for the reporters to notebook dump at your desk, and then to make it all purple! I suppose we have a bit of that now, it’s just that the reporters don’t work for the same publication as the writers. You know.) Collaboration is incredibly difficult in writing; there aren’t a great number of successful examples. But it’s coming, because all the new online writing tools are being built by engineers and nerds, who think “transparency” and “collaboration” are worthwhile goals. (They are in life, but not in writing.) So the tools encourage peer review, multiple “suggestions,” a role of advisor rather than editor. This is probably a mistake, though it’ll lead to some good experiments. But. Editing really at its best is probably bullying."
choiresicha  writing  online  internet  groupme  hipchat  irc  campfire  snapchat  whisper  tumblr  twitter  collaboration  web  interviews  editing  editors  journalism  2014  books  howwewrite  classideas 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Textual: IRC for Mac OS X
"Textual is a lightweight IRC client created specifically for Mac OS X. It was designed with simplicity in mind. Textual has taken the best of IRC and built it into a single client. Its easy-to-use functionality combined with scripting support makes it an ideal IRC client for novice to advanced users."
irc  mac  osx  software 
october 2013 by robertogreco
The IRC in San Diego
"The IRC provides opportunities for refugees to thrive in America. Each year, thousands of refugees are invited by the U.S. government to seek safety and freedom.  Forced to flee conflict or persecution, many have survived for years against incredible odds. They step off the plane with next to nothing but their dignity, hope and determination.  In San Diego and many other regional offices across the country, the IRC helps refugees to rebuild their lives."
irc  sandiego  refugees  nonprofit  nonprofits 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Nearly a million users, and no spam or trolls - RussellBeattie.com
"any online community system ever created - Usenet, The WELL, IRC, Slashdot, Digg...have dealt w/ core problem of idiots on Internet...Twitter w/ ~million members, thriving community, lots of discussions...doesn't have spam/troll issues...pretty amazing."
twitter  trolls  spam  filtering  digg  usenet  thewell  irc  slashdot  microblogging  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  community  internet  web  online  users  social 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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