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robertogreco : irony   26

Virgil Abloh - YouTube
"Young architects can change the world by not building buildings."

"Irony is a tool for modern creativity."

[via: https://twitter.com/bobbyjgeorge/status/1024691065843081218 ]
virgilabloh  via:bobbygeorge  unproduct  nonproduct  2017  creativity  opportunity  irony 
august 2018 by robertogreco
The Irony of the Overprotected Child | Family Studies
"There’s an irony in parents’ flawed perceptions, and their very real consequences: at the same time parents significantly limit the freedom and autonomy of their kids, they also want their kids to “think for themselves” and be independent. The same parents that won’t let their child out of their sight want her to be independent, make her own decisions, and think for herself. Parents value autonomy and independence, but they’re reluctant and frightened to give much of it.

It’s not that parents are unaware of this contradiction. They observe a “real culture for overprotecting kids,” as one mother put it, and many weren’t entirely comfortable with it, but most felt powerless to do anything about it.

Parents are bothered by the changing nature of childhood—they feel it was “better” to have more freedom and independence; they think their children are missing out on important formative experiences. But very few parents can even imagine giving their own children that freedom. Ironically, parents today both lament a world gone by and actively participate in the construction of a new world of constant monitoring and control."
parenting  children  helicopterparents  2014  jeffreydill  autonomy  fear  safety  irony  helicopterparenting 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Young Minds in Critical Condition - NYTimes.com
"It happens every semester. A student triumphantly points out that Jean-Jacques Rousseau is undermining himself when he claims “the man who reflects is a depraved animal,” or that Ralph Waldo Emerson’s call for self-reliance is in effect a call for reliance on Emerson himself. Trying not to sound too weary, I ask the student to imagine that the authors had already considered these issues.

Instead of trying to find mistakes in the texts, I suggest we take the point of view that our authors created these apparent “contradictions” in order to get readers like us to ponder more interesting questions. How do we think about inequality and learning, for example, or how can we stand on our own feet while being open to inspiration from the world around us? Yes, there’s a certain satisfaction in being critical of our authors, but isn’t it more interesting to put ourselves in a frame of mind to find inspiration in them?

Our best college students are very good at being critical. In fact being smart, for many, means being critical. Having strong critical skills shows that you will not be easily fooled. It is a sign of sophistication, especially when coupled with an acknowledgment of one’s own “privilege.”

The combination of resistance to influence and deflection of responsibility by confessing to one’s advantages is a sure sign of one’s ability to negotiate the politics of learning on campus. But this ability will not take you very far beyond the university. Taking things apart, or taking people down, can provide the satisfactions of cynicism. But this is thin gruel.

The skill at unmasking error, or simple intellectual one-upmanship, is not totally without value, but we should be wary of creating a class of self-satisfied debunkers — or, to use a currently fashionable word on campus, people who like to “trouble” ideas. In overdeveloping the capacity to show how texts, institutions or people fail to accomplish what they set out to do, we may be depriving students of the chance to learn as much as possible from what they study.

In campus cultures where being smart means being a critical unmasker, students may become too good at showing how things can’t possibly make sense. They may close themselves off from their potential to find or create meaning and direction from the books, music and experiments they encounter in the classroom.

Once outside the university, these students may try to score points by displaying the critical prowess for which they were rewarded in school, but those points often come at their own expense. As debunkers, they contribute to a cultural climate that has little tolerance for finding or making meaning — a culture whose intellectuals and cultural commentators get “liked” by showing that somebody else just can’t be believed. But this cynicism is no achievement.

Liberal education in America has long been characterized by the intertwining of two traditions: of critical inquiry in pursuit of truth and exuberant performance in pursuit of excellence. In the last half-century, though, emphasis on inquiry has become dominant, and it has often been reduced to the ability to expose error and undermine belief. The inquirer has taken the guise of the sophisticated (often ironic) spectator, rather than the messy participant in continuing experiments or even the reverent beholder of great cultural achievements.

Of course critical reflection is fundamental to teaching and scholarship, but fetishizing disbelief as a sign of intelligence has contributed to depleting our cultural resources. Creative work, in whatever field, depends upon commitment, the energy of participation and the ability to become absorbed in works of literature, art and science. That type of absorption is becoming an endangered species of cultural life, as our nonstop, increasingly fractured technological existence wears down our receptive capacities.

In my film and philosophy class, for example, I have to insist that students put their devices away while watching movies that don’t immediately engage their senses with explosions, sex or gag lines. At first they see this as some old guy’s failure to grasp their skill at multitasking, but eventually most relearn how to give themselves to an emotional and intellectual experience, one that is deeply engaging partly because it does not pander to their most superficial habits of attention. I usually watch the movies with them (though I’ve seen them more than a dozen times), and together we share an experience that becomes the subject of reflection, interpretation and analysis. We even forget our phones and tablets when we encounter these unexpected sources of inspiration.

Liberal learning depends on absorption in compelling work. It is a way to open ourselves to the various forms of life in which we might actively participate. When we learn to read or look or listen intensively, we are, at least temporarily, overcoming our own blindness by trying to understand an experience from another’s point of view. We are not just developing techniques of problem solving; we are learning to activate potential, and often to instigate new possibilities.

Yes, hard-nosed critical thinking is a useful tool, but it also may become a defense against the risky insight that absorption can offer. As students and as teachers we sometimes crave that protection; without it we risk changing who we are. We risk seeing a different way of living not as something alien, but as a possibility we might be able to explore, and even embrace.

Liberal education must not limit itself to critical thinking and problem solving; it must also foster openness, participation and opportunity. It should be designed to take us beyond the campus to a life of ongoing, pragmatic learning that finds inspiration in unexpected sources, and increases our capacity to understand and contribute to the world — and reshape it, and ourselves, in the "
criticalthinking  criticism  cynicism  2014  intellect  debate  skepticism  creativity  immersion  attention  inquiry  education  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  engagement  investment  michaleroth  philosophy  participatory  irony  spectators  sophistication 
may 2014 by robertogreco
On Smarm
"It is also no accident that David Eggers is full of shit."

"Smarm should be understood as a type of bullshit, then. It is a kind of moral and ethical misdirection."

"The old systems of prestige are rickety and insecure. Everyone has a publishing platform and no one has a career."

"What carries contemporary American political campaigns along is a thick flow of opaque smarm."

"Romney clambered up to a new higher ground, deploring the divisiveness of dwelling on his divisiveness."

"Through smarm, the "centrists" have cut themselves off from the language of actual dispute. In smarm is power."

"A civilization that speaks in smarm is a civilization that has lost its ability to talk about purposes at all."

"Joe Lieberman! If you would know smarm, look to Joe Lieberman."

"The plutocrats are haunted, as all smarmers are haunted, by a lack of respect. On Twitter, the only answer to "Do you know who I am?" is "One more person with 140 characters to use.""

"To actually say a plain and direct word like "corrupt" is more outlandish, in smarm's outlook, than even swearing."

"Anger is upsetting to smarm. But so is humor and confidence."

"Immense fortunes have bloomed in Silicon Valley on the most ephemeral and stupid windborne seeds of concepts. What's wrong with you, that you didn't get a piece of it?"
criticism  culture  smarm  snark  daveeggers  malcolmgladwell  2013  tomscocca  buzzfeed  heidijulavits  isaacfitzgerald  daviddenby  bambi  arifleischer  lannydavis  leesiegel  cynicism  negativity  tone  politics  writing  critique  mittromney  barackobama  michaelbloomberg  ianfrazier  centrists  power  redistribution  rebeccablank  civilization  dialog  conversation  purpose  jedediahpurdy  irony  joelieberman  marshallsella  billclinton  mainstream  georgewbush  maureendowd  rudeness  meanness  plutocrats  wealth  publishing  media  respect  niallferguson  alexpareene  mariabartiromo  gawker  choiresicha  anger  confidence  humor  spikelee  upworthy  adammordecai  juliachild  success  successfulness  niceness  tompeters  bullshit  morality  ethics  misdirection  insecurity  prestige  audience  dialogue 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Guilty Particulars
[Now at this URL: http://tanmade.com/writing/2012/12/10/guilty-particulars/ ]

"It takes attention and patience to learn the particulars of your own taste. Saying you liked a bad movie doesn’t mean you have to like everything about it – maybe the score was genius, or one character’s lines were spot-on. Being able to pinpoint what’s good about your guilty pleasures lets you talk about them without feeling ashamed by the bad parts.

Otherwise, it means being bound by a vague sense of what you’re supposed to like, and being instinctively skeptical of things that seem a bit too popular – as if that’s an automatic black mark. And the most dangerous thing as a critic is to feel like you’re learning to be discerning and critical when really, you’re only learning not to look foolish."
irony  skepticism  constructivecriticism  patience  noticing  attention  why  judgement  preference  bias  shame  guiltypleasures  allentan  2012  pleasure  criticism 
december 2012 by robertogreco
We Will Be Close | Photos by Jesse Ragan
"Words and letters catch my eye pretty much everywhere I go. Some are ugly, some are beautiful, and some are simply bizarre. All are working hard to communicate something, but sometimes they communicate more than they mean to: humor, irony, poetry, or even something mysteriously poignant. That’s when I take out my camera.
We will be close... staring from now into forever."
vernaculartypography  quickfixes  hand-paintedsigns  hand-letteredsigns  brooklyn  handmade  via:litherland  irony  humor  words  letters  photography  nyc  signs  typography  jesseragan 
october 2012 by robertogreco
A New Sincerity — I.M.H.O. — Medium
"So what is the New Sincerity? It’s a belief and commitment to truth. It’s arguing for truth, not aggressively as a weapon, but in order to illuminate. It’s thinking critically. It’s being fair. It’s being open to having our own ideas questioned and to incorporate what we learn into our world view. And it’s holding public figures and journalists to the same standards. It’s about attempting to abandon ironic detachment and embarrassment and embracing the world for what it is. But most importantly, it’s about abandoning the idea that the truth is something bendable, flexible, relative, unreal.

Truth is not something that everyone has their own particular special equally appropriate version of. It’s much more than that.

It’s one very real, beautiful thing, unfathomable in scope, unknowable in its totality, revealed in part by the combination of our billions of perspectives and by the employment of our minds…"

[Alternate URL: https://medium.com/i-m-h-o/1de355cf573b ]
values  habitofmind  criticalthinking  openminded  irony  ironicdetachment  society  2012  tomcoates  truth  sincerity 
august 2012 by robertogreco
OFF MY LAWN! – Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report
"It is publishing. It is humanity. It is the vanguard of ideas clashing against the rearguard of commerce. This is not new. This is all to be expected. We must stop raising our eyebrows and chuckling at it. We must decide to accept the world as it is, or to roll up our sleeves and help."
web  webdev  publishing  design  irony  responsivedesign  webpublishing  change  changemaking  html5  standards  2011  responsivewebdesign  webdesign 
november 2011 by robertogreco
A Sister’s Eulogy for Steve Jobs - NYTimes.com
"…worked at what he loved…really hard…opposite of absent-minded…never embarrassed about working hard, even if results were failures…wasn’t ashamed to admit trying…

Novelty was not…highest value. Beauty was…didn’t favor trends or gimmicks…philosophy of aesthetics…“Fashion is what seems beautiful now but looks ugly later; art can be ugly at first but it becomes beautiful later.”…willing to be misunderstood…Love was his supreme virtue, god of gods…believed love happened all the time, everywhere…never ironic, cynical, pessimistic…choices he made…designed to dissolve walls around him…humble…liked to keep learning…cultivated whimsy…had surprises tucked in all his pockets…had a lot of fun…treasured happiness…set destinations…

We all—in the end—die in medias res. In the middle of a story. Of many stories…

character is essential: What he was, was how he died…

…final words were: OH WOW. OH WOW. OH WOW."
life  death  work  happiness  stevejobs  monajobs  2011  eulogy  living  wisdom  storytelling  beauty  parenting  love  attention  failure  character  stories  fun  pessimism  cynicism  irony  virtues  art  time  timelessnessm  durability  workethic  ethics  philosophy  aesthetics 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Why Arabic is Terrific [Bookmarking this twice, this time for the footnote.]
"There's something about intelligence agencies - maybe the familiar comfort of a three-letter acronym on the wall, maybe the late-night spanking parties - that draws fraternity boys like ants to a picnic, and right now the road to bro advancement leads through an Arabic classroom. Their complete lack of a sense of irony allows these students to combine sincere appreciation for The Fountainhead with a desire for a lifelong career in government service, and the hardest part of studying Arabic is having to listen to their asinine opinions after they have gained enough proficiency to try to express them."
maciejceglowski  irony  aynrand  thefountainhead  libertarianism  objectivism  government  2011  maciejcegłowski 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Freedom Is Free - Mark A. DeWeaver - Mises Daily
"Many people imagine authoritarian regimes have an advantage over free societies because they can force people to conform to a rational plan. Freedom, it would seem, isn't free…comes at cost of irrationality. Free enterprise results in Hilferding's "anarchic production," democracy in Marx's "parliamentary cretinism." Surely better outcomes could be achieved by an all-wise, incorruptible philosopher king, if only a suitable person could be found for the job…<br />
<br />
…free society is a playful society…constantly innovating…coming up w/ new ideas…trying new things…thrives on irony & humor rather than on certainty…typically cannot even account for its own success…simply accepts anything that works.<br />
<br />
The moral…free societies…"accomplish everything by doing nothing."…are…"like the flower, who has no rational plan to provide for herself, but still ends up dressed more richly than Solomon…"<br />
<br />
[via: https://twitter.com/bopuc/status/71130524705492992 ]
freedom  marxism  anarchism  authoritarianism  power  society  life  innovation  play  democracy  irony  humor  experimentation  books  toread  danielcloud 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Death is Not the End: David Foster Wallace, James Murphy, and the New Sincerity « Thought Catalog
"And so those of us unfashionable enough to point out that the emperor has no clothes—or simply to look for a way to mean what we say and say what we mean, and to ask the same of others—are cowed into not taking any stance at all, for fear we’ll be exposed as irrelevant the ones with no clothes—the last thing anybody wants to be. But the more we worry about how others perceive us, the less we do anything worth perceiving at all.

Artists like Wallace and Murphy are crucial because they can save us from this spiral of second-guessing and self-doubt. These artists, who are more concerned with being up-front and unguarded than being cool, represent the current antidote to all this ironic hollowness."

[from page 2, which this bookmark points to]

[via: http://tumble77.com/post/4895514030/and-so-those-of-us-unfashionable-enough-to-point ]
postmodernism  davidfosterwallace  jamesmurphy  surfjanstevens  irony  hollowness  authenticity  cv  truth  sincerity  openness  cool  coolness  self-doubt  segond-guessing  directness  thepaleking  values  meaning  purpose 
april 2011 by robertogreco
6-Year-Old Stares Down Bottomless Abyss Of Formal Schooling | The Onion - America's Finest News Source
"Basic math—which the child has blissfully yet to learn—clearly demonstrates that the number of years before he will be released from the horrifying prison of formal schooling, is more than twice the length of time he has yet existed. According to a conservative estimate of six hours of school five days a week for nine months of the year, Bolduc faces an estimated 14,400 hours trapped in an endless succession of nearly identical, suffocating classrooms.
education  schools  schooling  humor  compulsory  satire  irony  cynicism  children  society  parenting  kids  theonion  existentialism 
october 2009 by robertogreco
A New Day for Intellectuals - ChronicleReview.com
"not so much that Americans oscillate btwn periods of anti & pro-intellectualism, but tend to harbor simultaneously an "ingrained distrust of eggheads" & "a genuine yearning for enlightenment & culture."...Rather than telling ourselves a back&forth tale of virtue vs vigilantism, academics concerned with the life of the mind generally & the academic humanities in particular, might be better served by looking inward & asking what we can do to earn public trust...Among the purposes of liberal education is the inculcation of self-questioning & self-doubt, qualities that many academics have lately — & rightly — found lacking in our political & managerial elite. But can we honestly say that we have held ourselves to the same standard?...balance btwn curatorial & critical has always been essential if humanistic education is to have power & meaning for young. Yet in recent decades the academic humanities have been overwhelmingly ironic and iconoclastic & thereby failed to sustain the balance"
education  academia  politics  us  culture  society  humanities  colleges  universities  intellectualism  barackobama  enlightenment  self-questioning  self-doubt  habitsofmind  elitism  irony  iconoclasm  persuasion  listening  conversation 
february 2009 by robertogreco
In Defense of Teasing - NYTimes.com [via: http://joannejacobs.com/2008/12/08/teasing-is-educational/]
"Our rush to banish teasing from social life has its origins in legitimate concerns about bullies on the playground and at work. We must remember, though, that teasing, like so many things, gets better with age. Starting at around 11 or 12, children become much more sophisticated in their ability to hold contradictory propositions about the world — they move from Manichaean either-or, black-or-white reasoning to a more ironic, complex understanding. As a result, as any chagrined parent will tell you, they add irony and sarcasm to their social repertory. And it is at this age that you begin to see a precipitous drop in the reported incidences of bullying. As children learn the subtleties of teasing, their teasing is less often experienced as damaging."
teasing  children  learning  relationships  schools  policy  psychology  bullying  tcsnmy  sarcasm  irony  complexity  reasoning  nicknames  social  society  parenting  teaching 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Pharyngula: Where's Charlton Heston when you need him?
"Some Christian fanatics are concerned, quite reasonably, about the economy, and have chosen, quite absurdly, to try and correct the problem with prayer. So far, so typical, but then … well, they picked a peculiarly oblivious way to do it. They prayed before a statue of a golden bull on Wall Street."
humor  christianity  politics  culture  economics  wallstreet  irony  goldencalf 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Irony mark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [see laso sidebar with additional punctuation marks]
"irony mark or irony point (؟) (French: point d’ironie; also called a snark or zing) is a punctuation mark that purports to indicate that a sentence should be understood at a second level...small, elevated, backward-facing question mark"
typography  punctuation  language  irony  symbols 
june 2008 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | 'Free Tibet' flags made in China
"Police in southern China have discovered a factory manufacturing Free Tibet flags, media reports say...Police believe that some may already have been sent overseas, and could appear in Hong Kong during the Olympic torch relay there this week."
china  tibet  politics  manufacturing  capitalism  search  internet  irony  humor  globalization  flags 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Pharyngula: EXPELLED!
"There is a rich, deep kind of irony that must be shared...I went to attend a screening of the creationist propaganda movie, Expelled, a few minutes ago. Well, I tried … but I was Expelled! "...keep reading
evolution  politics  creationism  religion  humor  richarddawkins  propaganda  censorship  irony 
march 2008 by robertogreco
If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be 2008 by Kevin Guilfoile & John Warner - The Morning News
"Hillary Clinton & Barack Obama are like HD-DVD & Blu-Ray, respectively, Mitt Romney is DVD, John McCain is VHS, & Ron Paul is a View-Master dug out of a box in basement with “Great Wonders of Engineering Vol. 12: The Hoover Dam” permanently jammed in
elections  barackobama  2008  hillaryclinton  us  humor  irony  cynicism  politics 
february 2008 by robertogreco
PD was wonderful « JD2718
"I listened to a woman talk for an hour and forty-five minutes about how listeners can’t process more than 15-20 minutes worth of material. She certainly involved her audience in proving that point!"
professionaldevelopment  meetings  schools  teaching  administration  leadership  irony  humor  management 
november 2007 by robertogreco
One Plus One Equals Three: The Irony Mark
"How does one express irony or that one is 'taking the piss' in writing?"
irony  humor  punctuation  typography  typeface  fonts  expression  writing  design  language 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Underware
"Irony mark, and the need for new punctuation marks."
fonts  irony  type  typography  punctuation  humor  writing 
june 2007 by robertogreco
BPS RESEARCH DIGEST: Do young children understand irony?
"Some children as young as six already understand the idea that people make sarcastic remarks, saying one thing but meaning another, according to psychologists Penny Pexman and Melanie Glenwright."
children  psychology  irony  development 
january 2007 by robertogreco

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