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robertogreco : iste   5

Assorted Stuff : Wasted Spaces
"When I go to ISTE, I’m mostly looking for interesting and new-to-me ideas for using technology to enhance learning. For adults as well as kids. While you can do much of that inquiry online, there is something about being immersed live in the community that cannot be duplicated digitally.

At the same time I also make it a point to attend sessions by a small group of the same presenters, even if I pretty much know what they’re going to say. Because I also know they are people who will inspire me and jumpstart my thinking in unique ways. One of those people is Will Richardson.

During his ISTE talk, Will compared the very trendy concept of makers spaces with computer labs, saying that schools need a maker culture, not spaces. It was almost a throwaway line, a relatively small point in his talk but also one that got stuck in my warped little mind.

Wiil’s view of maker spaces as the new computer lab* perfectly encapsulates the uneasy, slightly negative feelings I’ve had towards the maker space concept, as the chatter and activity around it has has grown over the past four or five years.

It’s not that I disapprove of the idea of kids as makers. I love it. That’s exactly what school should be. But that’s not how the concept is applied in most schools.

As happened with computing devices, someone’s idea of a “maker space” is set up in a corner of the library, stored in a vacant room, or assembled in a cart rolled between classrooms. With students performing pre-planned activities for a fixed period of time, before returning to their “real” work.

In most schools I’ve observed, maker space is a pull out program for students that we know will pass the spring tests. A reward for completing that real work. An option for kids before or after school, or during lunch. An elective for students with space in their schedule.

Maker space is usually whatever the local advocate says it is. I’m interested in robots, so we buy robot kits. The dollar store had a sale on Popsicle sticks, so we construct towers. The principal bought a 3D printer, so we better use it. (Until the filament runs out and we can’t afford to buy more.)

I’ve seen all of this in schools and more.

A school with a maker culture, however, is one in which students are encouraged to explore all aspects of “maker” that interest them. Music, writing, science, video, coding, drawing, cooking, and many, many more topics that may not even occur to adults who think of “school” in very traditional ways. Auto shop, wood shop, metal shop were maker spaces when I was a kid, all of which have largely been removed from schools in this area.

Once upon a time, all of this was part of a liberal education. Providing kids the opportunity to explore a wide variety of subjects during their K12 years. Making them aware of their options. Preparing them for life, not just for college. I know, it’s an ideal view of school. One that in the real world America of my youth was never perfectly implemented.

That’s exactly what a school built around a maker culture would be. Rather than being a reconfigured computer lab.

*******

*An anachronism that should disappear but only seems to be reconfigured every few years with new devices."
makerspaces  computerlabs  making  makers  schools  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  timstahmer  culture  makerculture  cooking  science  woodshop  metalshop  autoshop  drawing  coding  music  writing  teaching  howweteach  classrooms  schooldesign  materials  iste  willrichardson  2016  vi:audreywatters 
july 2016 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Your Conference Session Is The Appetizer. The Internet Is The Main Dish.
"ISTE just wrapped. NCTM wrapped several months ago. What was accomplished? What can you remember of the sessions you attended? Will those sessions change your practice and in what ways?

Zak Champagne, Mike Flynn, and I are all NCTM conference presenters and we were all concerned about the possibility that a) none of our participants did much with our sessions once they ended, b) lots of people who might benefit from our sessions (and whose questions and ideas might benefit us) weren’t in the room.

The solution to (b) is easy. Put video of the sessions on the Internet. Our solution to (a) was complicated and only partial:

Build a conference session so that it prefaces and provokes work that will be ongoing and online.

To test out these solutions, we set up Shadow Con after hours at NCTM. We invited six presenters each to give a ten-minute talk. Their talk had to include a “call to action,” some kind of closing homework assignment that participants could accomplish when they went home. The speakers each committed to help participants with that homework on the session website we set up for that purpose.

Then we watched and collected data. There were two major surprises, which we shared along with other findings with the NCTM president, president-elect, and executive director.

Here is the five-page brief we shared with them. We’d all benefit from your feedback, I’m sure."

[Document: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1c2Gsa3yRyJS8etrosi6KvvwNXPO_Mnzoh_AIp5vA34c/edit

"We were surprised to find that engagement in the talks was much greater on Twitter than on the website we created to host that engagement. People would watch the talks and then debate and discuss its substance through tweets on Twitter rather than through comments on our website."



"We recommend that NCTM provides each of its speakers with an anchor for their talks – a webpage – even if initially that anchor is only loosely embedded in the ground. The speakers themselves must voluntarily drive that anchor deeper by adding supporting resources, linking to conversations off site, uploading video or audio of their talks, offering a call to action, and interacting with the attendees who choose to extend their engagement. NCTM cannot do that work for the speakers, nor should they if they could, but NCTM’s current website forecloses speakers from doing that work if they want to. NCTM’s current website only allows speakers to strengthen their attachment to their audiences by uploading handouts.

We ask NCTM’s leadership to consider that the number of people who view the talks in Boston will never increase. That number is fixed at the people who were in the room on that day, at that time, limiting both engagement and access. Meanwhile, talks hosted online can increase in viewership effectively without limit, edifying viewers, spreading ideas, populating pages of search results, and promoting NCTM itself as the leading organization for math teachers for decades. We encourage NCTM to take several large steps down that path in the months and years to come." ]
danmeyer  2015  conferences  professionaldevelopment  nctm  iste  callstoaction  internet  web  twitter  video 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Transcript of SLA student Sinnea Douglas's "When I Become a Teacher" as performed before Chris Lehmann's closing keynote at ISTE 2011
[Just the ending here. Click through for the full text.]

"My students will be poets

storytellers

actors

artists

analyst

activists

All while being beautiful

Everyday I will tell them they're beautiful"
sla  iste  poetry  poems  highschool  education  teaching  beauty  tcsnmy  learning  creativity  sinneadouglas 
july 2011 by robertogreco
critical-thinking - home
"Join Howard Rheingold and other noted educators in creating a world-class resource for teaching critical thinking and Internet literacies."
howardrheingold  criticalthinking  thinking  informationliteracy  community  collaboration  iste  education  crapdetection  classideas 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The ISTE opening keynote – what I wish had been said « Generation YES Blog
"* These global problems must be solved by including people who are traditionally not included in solutions...cannot be solved by “usual suspects” – governments, military, big corporations, etc...
* Technology is a solution to bringing these voices out...
* Youth must be at the table...They are the ones who will live there...who will solve problems.

...the OLPC movement is based on these ideas...

Educators are like sherpas for the future. By guiding students to develop a global perspective, problem-solving skills & voice, they are creating capacity for these students to gradually solve larger & more global problems. Students may not start by tackling global warming, but by helping to clean up local marsh...skills of collaboration, teamwork, creative problem solving are the same...

Rischard missed the point by saying that we should develop curriculum for K-12 that does this...students learn these things by DOING them..."
silviamartinez  olpc  global  tcsnmy  classideas  teaching  learning  problemsolving  collaboration  criticalthinking  globalwarming  iste  2010  jean-francoisrischard  globalvoices  teamwork  creativity  meaning  scale  doing  learningbydoing  schools  curriculum  curriculumisdead  practice  future  voice 
july 2010 by robertogreco

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