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robertogreco : javierarbona   30

Seeing and killing with police robots | Javier Arbona
"Much more will need to be studied in the weeks, months, and years ahead. However, I wanted to touch on a question about how “unprecedented” this case was, given how oft the words “first” and “unprecedented” are being thrown around. Anyone familiar with the MOVE bombing in Philadelphia should not be so surprised by this supposed “first”. More recently, the outcome of a standoff with Chris Dorner, a Black officer, ended with a robot shooting smoke bombs that burned down the cabin Dorner was hiding in. So, since it was not unprecedented, in effect, how come ‘we’ (what we?) are caught by surprise, playing catch-up with the ethics and capabilities of the police? Perhaps this raises more questions about the culture around policing with a certain lack of critical memory, than about the policing itself."



"I’m curious about these two goals for the robot; one as a ‘seeing’ entity, and another as a killing machine. These separated endeavours, anticipated more than a decade-and-a-half ago, bring up many questions about the nature of identification and violence. As a relative of mine put it, they did not send a robot to capture or kill, for an example, white supremacist Dylann Roof, the suspect in the mass killing inside a Black North Carolina church. So, thinking about the writing of Simone Browne here, in the very same context of the Black Lives Matter protests that were going on in Dallas in the wake of more police killings this past couple of weeks, it’s impossible to separate who becomes targeted by automated or semi-automated killing machines, and who is taken alive, and how are the visual regimes of each sort of operation organized."
javierarbona  dallas  police  blacklivesmatter  automation  robots  seeing  simonebrown  lawenforcement  us  militarization  2016 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Findery | Javier Arbona - Academia.edu
"In sum, what makes Findery’s approach compelling is a deeply modern cartographic sensibility—a Cartesian map—that undergirds the represented com munity, which then clusters around a shared sense of place. If Findery presents places as a seamless, fluid, and utterly comprehensible environment, however, it glosses over the reality of place as a jumble of conflicting geographies. Put differently, Findery facilitates the combination of a modern cartographic sensibility with a community that shares a passion of—and for—a mediated place.

The peril of this powerful fusion is that although geography is not destiny, a community can come to believe it is, especially when the aerial viewpoint of maps is involved. What will the community end up doing to attain its presumed destiny if it involves, for example, land clearance or privatization? Or, in another sense, how much can a social network based on geography—and owned by a handful of founders and investors—popularize a given geographic destiny if it comes to be exploited by a territorial agency, colonial government, or larger corporation? And yet a geographical app can also work in the hands of communities struggling to free themselves from imposed destinies— whether it is used to document neglected public schools or illegal settlements."

Two final points will serve to navigate these opposing tensions.

First, the visual imagination of place-based communities along the imperceptible lines of vast and abstract electronic networks has a much longer trajectory than the contemporary web. Mark Wigley has written about the confraternity among Marshall McLuhan, Buckminster Fuller, and Constantinos Doxiadis. Findery is at the tail end of the network “echoes” (as Wigley calls these) predating the web that enmesh places into a lattice of tele-connected temporal frames for efficient spatial labor-production coordination. As far back as 1938, Fuller envisioned buildings giving way to what he called a “world wide dwelling services network,” and Findery contains the code to further such a vision. But Fuller hardly imagined the forms of totalizing governance, not to mention surveillance, that would thrive on today’s networks.

Second, the cartographic web has many roots, not the least of which is military (i.e., for targeting), and it also happens to depend on the military domination of the aerial and astral surveying spaces themselves. In the 1960s, the Central Intelligence Agency’s director, John McCone, instituted the agency’s science and technology branch to satisfy his lust for advanced aerial photography and U-2 spy planes. Sociogeographical apps echo this visual craving for information (and related information-gathering government and business enterprises) that intensified during the Cold War.

Fuller and McCone come together as two faces of the same coin to suggest that the view from above has a history not only of being monodirectional but also of serving as an infrastructure of control from afar. Geographic social media contribute to a subjectivity that remains ambivalent toward this uneven distribution of power and produces knowledge from an ultimately untenable standpoint: close-up at a distance. One can thus be misled by the false impression that one has godlike capabilities, simultaneously possessing a detached, celestial view and having an effective mode of up-close agency or contestation—literally—in one’s hands. These are, in other words, tools that are fundamentally disorienting in space and time—and they demand to be exploited as such.
javierarbona  maps  mapping  socialmedia  findery  2015  reviews  cartography  surveillance  place  geography  buckminsterfuller  marshallmcluhan  constantinosdoxiadis  markwigley  johnmccone  power  legibiity  community  destiny 
march 2015 by robertogreco
#JeSuisCharlieHebdo? | AL JAVIEERA
"I. It’s surprising to have to spell out these notions, but here goes…

One can condemn violence and at the same time sustain a critical stance against Charlie Hebdo.

One can condemn the “asymmetric warfare” of masked gunmen and also reject racism, tyranny, and hate.

One can denounce cold-blooded massacres while also unsubscribe from the horrible, orientalist titillation of Charlie Hebdo cartoons and the mental passivity of liberalism.

----------

II. It is imperative, at this frightening intersection, to resist the coercive call to stand behind a vacuous, hypocritical, shallow slogan about “free speech.” The response to the horrible tragedy in Paris already seems to become folded into the same previous mode of thinking that enabled the magazine to exist and thrive. It is a mode in which there is no deliberation of better or worse ideas; just a liberal “freedom” excuse to embrace hate (albeit hate selectively applied, despite liberal disclaimers otherwise).

Western culture is arbitrary in its principles; it is arrogant, self-centered, and self-deluded about its respect and care for the weak and oppressed. A glance at statistics about drone strikes tells the story. Ebola tells the story. Palestine tells the story. The migrant labor building imperial stadia for futbol and Olympics tell the story. The fact that a hashtag like #BlackLivesMatter exists. The deportations of millions and deaths on the high seas…

This is a frightening moment — a moment charged with reactionary simplifications and reductions. These reductionisms serve a purpose. Among other things, the point is to ignore the very complex circulations through which the killers were likely trained, funded, armed, and recruited. If we explored these circulations, more than the usual suspects that might be rounded up in the coming hours or days would be implicated.

Instead, political doctrinaires murmur slogans about an ancient religious cause behind the killings. They equate vast social processes with merely “terror,” nothing more; and none of it has anything to do with the actual, mediatized and quite modern ways in which the operation came about. These dimensions must remain unthought and unimagined.

Who identifies with “#JeSuisCharlieHebdo,” and who does not? It is exactly at these points where one should resist and explore ideas more critically and openly and generously, but this is politically dangerous for the neoliberal parties.

III. The cartoonists and reporters killed earlier cannot speak now, obviously. The voicelessness of death never dies. It lives on in martyrdom. We thus create Western martyrs, ventriloquizing with their corpses. Sadly, the victims themselves are appropriated. The dead suddenly appear solemn. They are actually being used as blunt tools against dissenting thought and radical ideas. The morbid fascination with the dead falsely assures the living that life isn’t meaningless. But ironically, it has been Charlie Hebdo and many more who have been complicit with precisely such a cheapening of life. The response pathetically shows exactly how we live in such terrible times; in societies of alienation. I would post the images of the covers, but it is not worth it to continue giving them more views.

To work in collective and common ways against alienation requires critical thought and analysis. But huge forces exist to force closure, such as #JeSuisCharlieHebdo. The massive public spectacles in plazas are smoothly incorporated into these forces.

To make matters worse, our Western governments and corporations have operated in the spaces of totalitarianism: they’ve spied, bombed, tortured, and killed in (semi-)secrecy.

What can be said or done to counter the outpouring of craven solidarity with nothing but an abstract notion of “free speech”? This outpouring insults real people who have differences and needs, but seek to live together. It also closes down a discussion that builds on a true public knowledge, exposing all that is done in our names. #JeSuisCharlieHebdo is patently antithetical to collective and common life, alienating entire groups of people who never saw their lives represented in this rag. And it is therefore contradictory to abdicate power, as happens at these moments, to the states which have proven time and again to be incapable of facilitating this shared life."

[See also Javier's RTs assembled by Kenyatta: http://finalbossform.com/post/107505352430/twitter-users-resurrect-the-invalidating ]
javierarbona  2015  charliehebdo  racism  islam  hate  tyranny  liberalism  freedom  freedomofspeech  religion  freespeech  #JeSuisCharlieHebdo  hypocrisy  satire  islamophobia  #JeSuisCharlie 
january 2015 by robertogreco
[IN]VISIBLE SITES : DEMILIT: Bryan Finoki, Nick Sowers, Javier Arbona : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive
"This is part of an extended and ongoing excavation about empire and urbanism. | This text was commissioned by Joseph Redwood-Martinez for The Exhibition of a Necessary Incompleteness, a part of Timing is Everything (October 3 to December 6, 2013) at the University Art Gallery, University of California, San Diego. Timing is Everything was curated by Michelle Hyun. The fiction was presented as a chapbook freely distributed throughout the duration of the exhibition."
demilit  2013  bryanfinoku  nicksowers  javierarbona  italocalvino  urbanism  empire  imperialism  fiction  architecture  military  militaryurbanism 
april 2014 by robertogreco
polis: Happy Fifty Years, Gentrification!
"A National Public Radio (NPR) journalist tweets that "yuppies can stop feeling guilty" because —based on a cursory glance — gentrification also benefits longtime residents. NPR ran her story with a URL extension that gives away the slant: "long-a-dirty-word-gentrification-may-be-losing-its-stigma." Another reporter — looking at the same neighborhood as NPR — asks rhetorically, "is bemoaning the gentrification of Washington, DC, a genre past its prime?" (File this one under: Writing by the Victims of Moaning About Gentrification.)"



"But gentrification, as a word, is incapable of projecting the benign "balm" that some in the media and academia make it out to be. Does anyone identify as gentry? Hardly anybody (though some people do, certainly). But do any of the gentrification-friendly journalists self-identify as gentry? The gentry are generally understood to be an over-advantaged lot. In the history of literature and art, the gentry hoard property and privilege as much as they can, yet they obsess over their manners and style in order to disguise their rapacity. These are the basic reasons why gentrification carries with it the power of biting satire. Glass (a Marxist) was well aware of this. It's precisely because no one likes to reveal themselves as such shameless climbers that periodic efforts emerge to revise the definition of the word and deaden its force. In reality, using the word without its satirical edge is a surefire recipe for sounding like a member of the gentry oneself.

Indeed, urban dwellers (or their scribes) are free to identify as the entitled members of a rigid caste system if they like, but that doesn't mean they can salvage the term gentrification for the better. One can't have it both ways. Either there is gentrification or there isn't. Period. And recalling Barton, I'd venture to say that the locals experiencing it have a better sense of what's going on. To give it any positive spin implies denial of the stratifying wave the process begets. In short, gentrification doesn't just happen."



"Here is another way to look at it: for these studies and articles to be on the mark, their authors must unfortunately be using gentrification wrong. If everyone's lot is improving, then we're not speaking of gentrification, or are we? Perhaps this is the case and the word has been poorly chosen. But NPR's Laura Sullivan and the scholars she cites do stress gentrification time and time again. They seem to celebrate what they see changing. She writes, "every other shop is a new restaurant, high-end salon or bar. The neighborhood is gentrifying." Whether this cohort realizes it or not, it takes gentrification to usher in the gentry, and vice versa. And even if some legacy residents stick it out, that is not evidence of gentrification's benevolent gifts trickling down to these folks."



"The core problem with these stories reflects a turning away from what gentrification precisely means, perhaps out of fear that one is, or could be, complicit in the process. And yet, at the same time, the classist anxieties over gentrification's Other — Brown's "slumification" comment, for example — show how phobias of the poor and colored rank higher than a concern over one's own role in the process. This hardly makes for good research or journalism.

I, for one, would be thrilled to read that gentrification is not happening — that we all misidentified one of the most significant urban restructuring processes of the past half-century. But if gentrification is taking place — and it certainly is (and has) — someone must be practicing it. Moreover, even among studies that acknowledge the detrimental effects of gentrification, there is a pattern of focusing on the seemingly independent decisions made by individual homebuyers (and, sometimes, renters). These housing consumers are in a putative "market" devoid of actual power brokers. Realtor groups, homeowners associations, business improvement districts, employers, public and private police forces, government policymakers, planning consultants, politicians, marketing agencies, banking and insurance firms, and the news media all cooperate, in different ways, to gentrify.

So the constant focus on the homebuyer/renter as the sole gentrifier can have a detrimental effect on anti-gentrification efforts. The consumer doesn't act alone. The usual hero or villain central to gentrification narratives — the consumer (if such an abstraction has any meaning) — is more likely to be the last ingredient in the mix. Therefore, the concerted pressure of gentrification suggests that communities should not cede possession of the term itself."
javierarbona  2014  gentrification  cities  inequality  housing  urbanism  urban  language  economics  power  justindavidson  rosalyndeutsche  caragendelryan  ruthglass  neilsmith  robgodspeed  laurasullivan  danielhartley  jerrybrown  oakland  washingtondc  jonathanmahler  raniakhalek  dc 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Studio-X NYC: An Unsolicited charter for the Very Large Organization
"A guest post by Javier Arbona, written to accompany the opening of Very Large Organizations, an exhibition by Jordan Geiger, at Studio-X NYC.
Outside of the purity of cultural scripts that we might regard to be politically authentic are rapidly mutating political scripts that may be the most immediate tools in the world’s urgent situations, despite their lack of national pedigree and reference to political theology. These are the dirty tools and techniques of an extrastatecraft that might be tilted toward many different political aims. (Keller Easterling)


1. Very Large Organization (VLO). The name itself, coined by Jordan Geiger, conjures an imagery of bubbles, air, foam, and inflatables filled with helium. The VLOs hover above us, They are atmospheric; orbital, even. Make no mistake about it, they need solid ground and touchdown points. They require earth-based networks of human communications, both digital and not. They must have a calculable, perpetual motion in order to ensure economic growth.

2. The bizarre, hidden architecture of the VLO is a mash-up of legal rights, aerial spaces, entrepots, and credit ratings. Under the burnished surface of its sheathing lies a fierce competition for finance, favor, advantage, and immediacy.



"11. Geographical imaginaries of the VLO can run the risk of mirroring the pastoralism of an idealized digital nomad. Therefore, a question on architecture’s role: how to challenge dominant imaginations that skirt democracy, or raise the difficult questions of collective rights, benefits, and opposition? Where do these citizenship rights become spatial, or put differently, in which spaces are rights ensured?"



18. It remains an imperative to take on much more, beyond the scope of this charter of the VLO: energy, scale, finance, secrecy, privatization, cronyism, governance, infrastructure, monuments, and so on. What are emergent notions of publicness, or lack thereof? Who’s left with the bill for that which is “too large to fail,” yet often does? The role of architecture is, in one sense, to inquire into the material dimensions of these questions. Architects can expand our notions, imaginations, and representations of the presence of the VLO in everyday life, multiplying possibilities for appropriation. But that can’t be all. The VLO scrambles social expectations of home, travel, privacy, work, and health. The most important act begins with drawing the first line."
javierarbona  organizations  power  politics  vlo  size  economics  control  manipulation  law  legal  darkmatter  capitalism  growth  architecture 
october 2013 by robertogreco
climate urbanism: Why a climate urbanism?
"Kimmelman becomes nostalgic for the meat axe approach of infamous planner Robert Moses…

[NYC] Lost something of its nerve. It is precisely my interest in this blog to speculate and explore how urban alliances, coalitions, and governments muster that so-called nerve, and decide what to do with it. Who carries the burden of transformations to the planet? How; where?

Finally, I hope to find other alternatives—other visions—that are not as limited in their pragmatism of the city that is possible, and that are more radical in their sensibility to the ultimate culprits. What theoretical approaches can be advanced to dissect what climate change even is? What would be a critical and political memory of how we got here, how we constructed vulnerability, and how we imagine a space to facilitate a democratic environmental politics?

This blog is a notepad for now, and any non-spammy and non-trolly comments are welcome."
cities  urbanism  urban  nyc  urbanplanning  socialagency  politicalcapital  hurricanesandy  sandy  michaelkimmelman  democracy  politics  2012  blogs  robertmoses  climatechange  climate  climateurbanism  javierarbona 
november 2012 by robertogreco
GEOG 181 MANUAL
"This site is a web archive of resources for a course I am teaching at UC Berkeley in the Fall of 2012, called Urban Geography of the San Francisco Bay Area (Geography 181). The class is mostly taught out doors and on foot.

Until 2011, the course was taught by my dissertation advisor, Richard A. Walker, who recently retired from full-time teaching (he seems to be pretty busy anyway). I owe a great debt to him, not only for the blueprint to the class, but also for years of training that I draw upon for the materials discussed.

This tumblr is used to share the weekly outlines of walking routes, additional scholarly and photographic resources for exploration, and other clippings of general interest related to the course topics. I make any and all efforts that I can to track down and credit sources. I apologize in advance for any errors or gross omissions. If you have any suggestions or feedback, please email or call me (see info below).

Thanks for visiting,

- Javier Arbona"
walking  2012  mapping  maps  history  bayarea  sanfrancisco  geography  javierarbona 
august 2012 by robertogreco
NCR PUZZLE: Terra Incognita
"A puzzle completed only in the player’s imagination. Conceived by the @Demilit collaborative for the New City Reader’s Istanbul Design Biennial 2012 edition, issue no. 3."

"Puzzles begin with placing the first piece. Take the plunge. Play a game. Enter Terra Incognita.

Start an infinite geographical puzzle. Explore your routine world in a way you wouldn’t even recognize. Study your city to discover something you had never imagined. Every piece of Terra Incognita you create can be the seed for a new puzzle or the newest addition to an expanding one.

TERRA INCOGNITA (TI) is played to cipher and decipher a city."

"There is only one rule: All play must be to keep the puzzle in play!"
puzzles  mapping  maps  rules  cv  collaboration  urbanism  urban  cities  play  games  instanbuldesignbiennial  newcityreader  2012  demilit  javierarbona  terraincognita 
august 2012 by robertogreco
3 BIG questions (and lots of smaller ones) about DARPA & Make · demilit · Storify
"Concluding, all of these questions are no mere trouble-shooting aiming to 'get things right.' These questions point to a more fundamental problem of how science and technology can best thrive. Is it under a culture of militarism, or under a culture where disagreement, debate and doubts can be fostered? While it's been shown here that DARPA and Make/Otherlab have somewhat disparate goals from each other, we know full well that DARPA pays for the program. Nonetheless, one can't help but marvel at how Make's version of MENTOR obviously poses no threat to DARPA's overarching dictates. Different goals, and yet harmless. Perhaps that is why it can sit so comfortably with them to take the money. It's almost enough to wonder if such complacency can lead to real science. Ironically, it's precisely what motivates the Pentagon to tap hacker teens: their irreverence and fresh take, only to then begin the process of disciplining that initial irreverence away."
saulgriffith  otherlab  policy  money  2012  darpa  oreilly  make  javierarbona  demilit 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Make, DARPA, and teens: A match made in hackerspace · demilit · Storify
"Well, well, well... What have we here? How painfully ironic this is. How shocking, in fact. And yet, this bit of news has flown under the radar for the past week. To put it bluntly, Tim O'Reilly's Make magazine and his cohort are working with the Pentagon. More specifically, DIY-zine Make and its folks are taking money from DARPA to create "makerspaces" for teens (aka the "Manufacturing Experimentation and Outreach," or "MENTOR" program)."
pentagon  teens  hackerspaces  makerspaces  militaryindustrialcomplex  military  education  2012  saulgriffith  oreilly  makemagazine  make  ethics  darpa  demilit  javierarbona 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Rafael Viñoly on a Sunday | Blogs | Archinect
"At a time when masses of people are protesting wealth inequality, or protesting, oh, the dismantling of schools like Cooper Union, it seems more than immodest to talk about the "one indulgence" of owning nine pianos. Or three homes. (How's that sustainability side of the business doing?) But at least he didn't mention the private jet (or did he have to tighten the belt?)

Meanwhile, some seem to be saying that perhaps Viñoly would benefit from a little more cover from the spotlight. All of this ostentatious display of wealth could draw scrutiny of Viñoly's period of building for the Argentine junta. There's that little detail that hangs over Viñoly's head—the busy period when he "was so concentrated on the work," he "almost didn’t notice the politics." Remember?"
rafaelviñoly  architecture  architects  wealth  disparity  2011  consumptions  incomegap  argentina  thesoulless  inequality  the99%  class  javierarbona 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Journey to the transnational narcopolitical city - Op-Ed - Domus
"Model of "Texanomic" success or a shadowy narcotics-fueled node? Either way El Paso is the model of the 21st-century transnational pivot point"

"I can just see myself peering at the big empty skies, probably finding nothing, wondering: Does Joel Kotkin, or anyone, for that matter, understand this city better than the drone does? As a spectre of a violent and militaristic narcourbanism, this desert apparition can be endlessly admired, traversed, measured, and quantified. One gets more and more absorbed by its ever-multiplying abstractions, while whatever it is that the cartel bosses and the politicians do simply continues, unabated."
elpaso  texas  ciudadjuarez  javierarbona  2011  cities  economics  drugs  narcotraficantes  narco  borders  mexico  us  neoliberalism  fraud  crime  moneylaundering 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Reaching Out for Who? « Javier Arbona
"But now the magic has worked. The demo has turned the raw data of the connections into a “community” that imbues the reader or user of the interactive maps with a warm and fuzzy feeling of belonging to something more “real” than the borders imposed by government bureaucrats. Not sure what I mean? These communities are our new neighborhoods, in a Jane Jacobs vein. In that neighborhoody way, they are reassuring and natural. It’s incumbent upon us to ask questions about the raw data, for this now has deep implications in terms of our political unions, loyalties, and economies. Who do your taxes support? Who’s interests are not represented in the political sphere when they live “across the river” in a less-powerful Congressional district, for example?"

"Back to the original question: What are you really looking at when you’re looking at The Connected States of America? I’d say you’re watching an ad produced for AT&T, but I’d like to hear arguments otherwise."

[Also at: http://storify.com/javierest/disconnecting ]
javierarbona  data  carloratti  maps  mapping  networks  senseablecities  community  communication  politics  borders  representation  janejacobs  neighborhoods  sms  cellphones  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Bezoar — War Resistance films and videos at Other Cinema
"Javier Arbona, Nick Sowers & Kate Chandler present an experimental live slide-, sound- and video-show on the emergence of drones as America’s killing machine of choice. PLUS Steev Hise’s American Business Adventures and Code Pink’s confrontation with the Blackwater mercenaries. Free bread and roses!"
javierarbona  nicksowers  katechandler  drones  sanfrancisco  events  film  multimedia  todo  military  war  warresistance  video  blackwater  militaryindustrialcomplex 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Ivory Towers of Debt | varnelis.net
"It's a giant ponzi scheme with little of value for students and, as Harper's described in a notorious graphic about the consequeneces of overbuilding in Brandeis (Brandeis has threatened a lawsuit and has accused Harper's of slander and libel over this piece), can collapse precipitously during times of economic crisis. But while bonds were hot, Wall Street couldn't have enough of them, so universities eagerly complied."
tcsnmy  fundraising  bonds  endowment  universities  highered  money  economics  recession  priorities  shortterm  longterm  kazysvarnelis  javierarbona  cities  architecture  buildings  finance  leadership  administration 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Bezoar: The sorrows of finance capital
""It's an outrage that the priority of this university is not in favor with the students," said Jessie Fernandez, an SFSU senior who attended the meeting. His major, **urban studies and planning**, is currently threatened by the plan." (emphasis mine)

Urban Studies, of all things! So, Michael Maltzan, that's the crux of the neoliberal frenzy here in California. Where does architecture step in? Do we proceed with bloated buildings as the idea of what an open, accessible city is, or do we defend the spaces of our own discipline?"
javierarbona  sdsu  universities  finance  capital  architecture  michaelmaltzan  priorities  2011  education  highereducation  highered  open  accessibility  cities  california  budgetcuts 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Dangers in the Air: Aerosol Architecture and Invisible Landscapes: Places: Design Observer
"Aerosolized pig brains [see first paragraph] and various forms of weaponized air suggest we have underestimated the presence of air, and what it can potentially do. Whatever the spur, we need to take seriously the materiality of air. And today, in fact, a growing number of artists and architects are engaging air in new ways. They are exploring air as a design component, studying how airborne particles can be manipulated into various textures, surfaces and spaces. They are transforming the scales at which architects typically work. And they are bringing the multiple temporalities of air into play through designs that actually collect and archive air from different times. This work could bring about a new consciousness and perhaps an expanded understanding of the meaning of a public architecture — an effort to reclaim the air from those who've attempted to control it in irresponsible and dangerous ways."
javierarbona  air  architecture  atmosphere  aerosol  aerosolarchitecture  history  design  smell  pollution  military  landscape  light  art  books  urban  urbanism  health 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Unspeakable Trip to San Francisco - Google Maps
My seventh and eighth grade students were asked to create an online document of our trip to San Francisco. One of the three groups, the Unspeakables, created this photo-and-text-enriched map that also shows the routes they walked each day. Don't miss their reflections (more to come as I bookmark this) — there are links to them at the top of the sidebar on the left and here below.

Ruby's Reflection: http://bit.ly/dm2VPN
Charlie's Reflection: http://bit.ly/acbcST
Anthony's Reflection: http://bit.ly/b3UpwY
Max's Reflection: http://bit.ly/bERssr
Tatiana's Reflection: http://bit.ly/bHWMK9
Brianna's Reflection: http://bit.ly/bp7bRL
Sofia's Reflection: http://bit.ly/b5MBoU

An early planning document with more information about the trip: http://bit.ly/cGaImK
tcsnmy  tcsnmy7  tcsnmy8  sanfrancisco  robinsloan  javierarbona  cv  classtrips  2010  october2010  maps  mapping  cartography  learning  space  place  landscape  publictransit  walking  travel  tours  photography 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Archinect : News : Erosion of Public Education in CA and Nationwide
"As we hear reports of Alameda County sheriffs entering the Berkeley campus with tear gas today, and (on the positive side) the University of California teams doing very well in the WPA 2.0 competition (winners UCLA's cityLAB as well as Berkeley faculty runners-up Rael and de Monchaux), it's worth listening to this report on Democracy Now. | Don't forget, we're also documenting the contribution of the UCs to the arts and design disciplines here."
education  colleges  universities  economics  money  javierarbona  berkeley  publiceducation  politics  california 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Architecture imagined as ecological « Javierest
"What is another avenue? I’m not sure I know what it looks like. I think we can see the contours of it in some of the work of artist duo Allora y Calzadilla or in the recent work of Natalie Jeremijenko. These two folks, Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, have been generating a series of works where they experiment with dialectical relations between an artifice and an organism without falling into preaching about imposing stability or balance. Along a somewhat parallel line, Jeremijenko has been using architectural devices to reveal how the city itself is not just a second nature to animals, but that these animals have already partaken in forming social networks with urban dwellers for a very long time. What architecture does is reveal them."
javierarbona  design  architecture  environment  marxism  ecology  capitalism  nature  sustainability  urbanism  housing  nataliejeremijenko  alloraycalzadilla 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Who’s Afraid of ‘Slumdog’ (and in love with the slums)? - Part III: The End « Javierest
"we have to throw a caution flag when architects, following in the footsteps of Venturi et al in Las Vegas, adopt or “learn” from informality with the well-meaning hope to dissolve or disrupt boundaries, because all that is actually happening is that the categories (informal/formal, unfinished/finished, etc) are staying the same (see Part I). Therefore, what architects might begin to do is to reveal the conceptual difficulties and failings of ‘informality’ in order to begin to disrupt the categories themselves. Rebar group’s PARKcycle is one small case study that hints at how informality can operate at multiple levels and with ambiguous boundaries without having to “look” , well, informal, nor operate exclusively in an exploited city of the global south."
javierarbona  architecture  informal  teddycruz  slums  informality  robertventuri 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Who’s Afraid of ‘Slumdog’ (and in love with the slums)? - Part II « Javierest
"Sometimes it seems like the better they try to do, looking at informality with a liberal reformist zeal, the more they naturalize it, distancing it from its root causes. Small wonder that architects and planners interested in alleviating informality often treat it with the same lens of biomimicry as green architects looking at nature. Furthermore, it’s no surprise either that Slumdog Millionaire is faulted precisely for resisting the lure to “learn” from the slums."
javierarbona  culture  architecture  urbanism  cities  favelas  slums  poverty  construction  squatters  informal  productionofspace  elementalchile  teddycruz  improvisation 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Who’s Afraid of ‘Slumdog’ (and in love with the slums)? - Part I « Javierest
"What does “informality” do for architects and why do they get so turned on by it? To many architects and planners, when it comes to housing and entrepreneurship, nobody does it better than those who shoulder the worst burdens of poverty. It’s an extreme spectator sport, watching in awe—often just through the web, the Economist, or the movies—as people build out of fridges, scrap metal or whatever comes along. Not to deny the skill of these folks; hey, I wish I could build like that. But once again, what does this fetish really ‘do’ for architects, planners, and even artists? Is it that it challenges our notions (us Westerners, that is) of scale and time?"
javierarbona  culture  architecture  urbanism  cities  favelas  slums  poverty  construction  squatters  informal  productionofspace  improvisation 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Responding to HTC Experiments « Javierest
"As far as I could tell, the writing above seems to implicate your colleagues within the history discipline, so I won’t assume that they should apply to geography (or anthropology, sociology, architecture…; some clarification in that regard would be certainly welcome). Nevertheless, I also think that once we start throwing up these disciplinary boundaries, then we might as well forget about experiments in any discipline. What else might experimental geography or experimental htc be if it doesn’t somehow borrow from others. (As an example, what else is Trevor Paglen’s own brand of geography if not some creative borrowing from traditions of landscape representation, ethnography, and performance)."
javierarbona  architecture  futurism  predictions  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  science  socialsciences  trevorpaglen 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Dude, where are my social networking wages? « javier.est
"For a minute there, it seemed like “open source” was going to be a people’s revolution...But to think that Silicon Valley is going to be the site of a digital Paris Commune? It would be like a successful Llano del Rio!"
javierarbona  opensource  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  labor  marxism  capitalism  linkedin  myspace  facebook  reddit 
june 2008 by robertogreco
javier.est.pr
Javier Arbona's new blog: "interested in descriptive thickness of a (mostly) visual and design sort."
art  blogs  landscape  javierarbona 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Inhabitat » VIDEO: Grow a Treehouse with Terreform
"As part of the ecological architecture nonprofit Terreform, Mitchell Joachim, Lara Greden, and Javier Arbona designed this living treehouse in which the dwelling itself merges with its environment and nourishes its inhabitants. Fab Tree Hab dissolves our
javierarbona  mitchelljoachim  terreform  architecture  design  environment  sustainability  construction  building  housing  green  technology  trees  video 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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