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robertogreco : jeanlave   5

Why Situated Learning Matters — Medium
"Situated learning as an instruction model is based on observations made by anthropologists Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger. It argues that learning happens best where the knowledge is applied, whether in a specific social setting or a physical place. When learning is situated, it is an experience of a particular sort — one that is open for critical thought but guided by the practices of those who use the knowledge that is being learned in their everyday lives.

Even before Situated Learning was named and described by Lave and Wenger, John Dewey (not the Dewey Decimal System guy), recognized that experience is at the core of learning. He wrote a book called Experience and Education, which criticized the method that teaches something like mathematics independent of how it is used in the world around us. He argued that learning ideas from books and tests gives the appearance that knowledge is static and everything has already been discovered. It gives the impression that learning and discovery involves doing what one is told. While we want learners to understand and learn from the past, too often educational settings stop short of allowing learners to hypothesize and test ideas, and to learn from experiences that both succeed and fail.

Whether a learner is in a classroom, at home, or in the wild, his or her learning experiences are always in a context. The challenge educators face is how to design that context so that it supports the lessons being learned. They also need to be enjoyable and connected with the language and practices people actually use in the real world."
via:steelemaley  situatedlearning  learning  experience  experientiallearning  johndewey  jeanlave  étiennewenger  unschooling  deschooling  fielddaylab 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Learning in Landscapes: Research, Design, Praxis | T. Steele-Maley
"One of my summer research strands is to extend the work and design I am doing around participatory and practice based learning. I have found a few works exceptionally helpful and thought I would list them here in hopes others will too.

On my desk and causing an outpouring of thought and design is Learning in Landscapes of Practice: Boundaries, identity, and knowledgeability in practice-based learning.

What I like about this work is that it builds previous works of Wenger and Lave on situational learning, perspective and identity specifically: Wenger (1998) Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity: Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives on CoP’s and the foundational work of Lave and Wenger on situational learning (1991) Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation: Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives . I will also add the book all in education should read on critical ethnography by Lave (2011) Apprenticeship in Critical Ethnographic Practice .

I find each of these works intriguing and valuable towards the design of new professional development, organizational, and ultimately educational ecologies. Learning in Landscapes of Practice…. resonates because the concept of knowledgeability is so salient to schools and educational ecologies. In education, our silos for competency are legion and attempts to integrate professional development and participatory learning for the whole organization are very difficult. One of the main reasons for this, is our lack of robust frameworks to understand and critique the whole educational system that exists, quite often at this point, to perpetuate itself, as opposed to the needs of learners and communities.

This is tough work to tackle and the space of theory in schools often neglected. A common refrain in K-12 schools, “We do not have enough time for theory, we just need to….”, or, “we will leave that to the experts”. These views are at opposition with the reality that education is a social construct, that must be theorized, constructed/reconstructed through praxis, and care-taken by individuals in the community. No educator, parent or policymaker should leave the spaces of education, specifically praxis, unexamined. So where theory can open your eyes to a million valleys of thought and wonder, ultimately praxis allows for experience, knowledge building and networking towards both the boundaries and possibilities of education. These are critical conversations to have in education and society and I feel we need to tae a much closer look at what we are doing.

If you have considered these works in the K-12, Higher Ed or informal learning space please do reach out, via comment here or by way of Twitter, email…."
thomassteelemaley  lcproject  openstudioproject  experientialeducation  education  interdisciplinary  systemsthinking  raxis  2015  étiennewenger  ethnography  theory  practice  jeanlave  situationist  situatedlearning  community  communitiesofpractice  school  tcsnmy  professionaldevelopment  educationalecologies  knowledgeability  silos  transdisciplinary  organizations  organizationaldesign  socialconstructs  society  meta  experientiallearning 
june 2015 by robertogreco
The Mathematics of Child Street Vendors, by Geoffrey B. Saxe JSTOR: Child Development, Vol. 59, No. 5 (Oct., 1988), pp. 1415-1425
"The mathematical understandings of 23 10-12-year-old candy sellers with little or no schooling from Brazil's northeast were compared to 2 groups of nonvendors matched for age and schooling-a group from the same urban setting and a group from a nearby rural setting. Children's performances were analyzed on 3 types of mathematical problems: representation of large numerical values, arithmetical operations on currency values, and ratio comparisons. Vendors and nonvendors alike had developed nonstandard means to represent large numerical values, an expected result since problems involving large values emerge in the everyday activities of each population group. Most vendors, in contrast to nonvendors, had developed adequate strategies to solve arithmetical and ratio problems involving large numerical values, also an expected finding since these problem types emerge frequently only in the everyday activities of the vendor population. The findings are interpreted as supporting a model of cognitive development in which children construct novel understandings as they address problems that emerge in their everyday cultural practices."

[See also (.pdf): http://ci512-summer2011.wikispaces.com/file/view/Carraher+(1985)+Street+Math.pdf

Jean Lave's “Cognition in Practice,” “Everyday Cognition and Situated Learning” and “Everyday Math”
https://www.academia.edu/680601/Talja_Sanna_2010_Jean_Laves_Practice_Theory
http://www.aect.org/edtech/ed1/06.pdf ]
http://gradlectures.berkeley.edu/lecture/everyday-life-and-learning/ ]
geoffreysax  informallearning  math  mathematics  research  computation  1988  everydaylearning  everyday  streetvendors  streetkids  brazil  brasil  terezinhanunescarraher  davidcarraher  analúciaschliemann  mckenzieclements  paulusgerdes  jeanlave 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Situated learning - Wikipedia
"Situated learning was first proposed by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger as a model of learning in a Community of practice. At its simplest, situated learning is learning that takes place in the same context in which it is applied. Lave and Wenger (1991)[1] argue that learning should not be viewed as simply the transmission of abstract and decontextualised knowledge from one individual to another, but a social process whereby knowledge is co-constructed; they suggest that such learning is situated in a specific context and embedded within a particular social and physical environment."

[Also includes a section on "Situated Learning and Social Media"]
education  learning  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  tcsnmy  situationist  situatedlearning  jeanlave  étiennewenger  pedagogy  socialmedia  lifelonglearning  cooperative  apprenticeships  fieldtrips  cooking  gardening  interaction  experientiallearning  cognition  edtech 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Situated learning: legitimate peripheral participation ... - Google Books
"In this important theoretical treatise, Jean Lave, anthropologist, and Etienne Wenger, computer scientist, push forward the notion of situated learning--that learning is fundamentally a social process and not solely in the learner's head. The authors maintain that learning viewed as situated activity has as its central defining characteristic a process they call legitimate peripheral participation. Learners participate in communities of practitioners, moving toward full participation in the sociocultural practices of a community. Legitimate peripheral participation provides a way to speak about crucial relations between newcomers and oldtimers and about their activities, identities, artifacts, knowledge and practice. The communities discussed in the book are midwives, tailors, quartermasters, butchers, and recovering alcoholics, however, the process by which participants in those communities learn can be generalized to other social groups."
situatedlearning  learning  education  books  jeanlave  étiennewenger  society  social  community  tcsnmy  lcproject  apprenticeships  practice  relationships  situationist  participatory  participation  peripheralparticipation  process  via:leighblackall 
february 2011 by robertogreco

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