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robertogreco : jesseschell   8

Why aren’t games about winning anymore?
"But if videogame achievements can make us ignore the end goal in favour of a little gold star, is there any doubt that real-life "achievements" can distract us from what’s actually important in life?

Certainly, incentives can be used to drive good behaviour, but there’s no guarantee that companies or organisations able to provide the most effective incentives will be the ones with the most altruistic motives. (And, of course, if I’m the one unconsciously making up my own achievements, I know they’re not always going to be what’s best for me.)

I’m not saying that achievements in videogames are inherently a bad thing. I’m just saying that perhaps we should take a step back and consider how they make us relate to the world."
games  gaming  videogames  jesseschell  motivation  achievements  competitions  productivity  gamedesign  infinitegames  process  goals  incentives  behavior  life  distraction  theory  via:blackbeltjones 
august 2010 by robertogreco
» Jesse Schell’s Recommended Reading - Long Views: The Long Now Blog
"During his Seminar, Jesse Schell recommended a number of books and other resources that have informed his conception of the Gamepocalypse. Here’s a list of the books for the curious:

Authenticity, by James H. Gilmore and B. Joseph Pine II; Finite and Infinite Games, by James P. Carse; The Singularity is Near, by Ray Kurzweil; The Innovator’s Dilemma, by Clayton M. Christensen; The Rational Optimist, by Matt Ridley; Good to Great, by Jim Collins; Punished by Rewards, by Alfie Kohn"
2010  books  games  gaming  longnow  jesseschell  alfiekohn  raykurzweil  rewards 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Game Design, Psychology, Flow, and Mastery - Blog - External Rewards and Jesse Schell's Amazing Lecture [Saves me the time of writing my response to Schell's lecture]
"I urge you to be vigilant against external rewards. Brush your teeth because it fights tooth decay, not because you get points for it. Read a book because it enriches your mind, not because your Kindle score goes up. Play a game because it's intellectually stimulating or relaxing or challenging or social, not because of your Xbox Live Achievement score. Jesse Schell's future is coming. How resistant are you to letting others manipulate you with hollow external rewards?"

[See also Ian Bogost: "when people act because incentives compel them toward particular choices, they cannot be said to be making choices at all": http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/4294/persuasive_games_shell_games.php?page=2 ]

[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20120531002102/http://www.sirlin.net/blog/2010/2/22/external-rewards-and-jesse-schells-amazing-lecture.html ]
jesseschell  design  gamedesign  ethics  flow  psychology  business  gaming  ludocapitalism  rewards  motivation  games  intrinsicmotivation  persuasion  videogames  education  culture  gamedev  via:preoccupations  gamification 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Is Your Life Just One Big RPG? -- Mind-Blowing Speech From DICE 2010 - G4tv.com
"You might think making games is all about putting 40 percent awesome in a box, throwing in a pinch of zazz and calling it a SKU, but that's not true. Games, you may have noticed, are all around us, all the time.
games  jesseschell  farmville  facebook  gaming  gamedesign  future  design  networks  mmo  2010  rpg  play  reality 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Raph’s Website » Gameifying everything
[see also: http://g4tv.com/thefeed/blog/post/702668/DICE-2010-Video-Design-Outside-The-Box.html ]

"The social games market makes extensive use of psych hacks, datamining, & incentive structures, in a small way very much like the above 3 concerns:

• There’s a reason why you invite people with gifts in those games — it triggers a reciprocity effect.
• The architecture of farming games exploits commitment.
• The whole premise is based on sitting atop the social graph — in other words, making use of the fact that you are supplying a giant pile of personal data to the service providers.
• And, of course, there’s been plenty of evidence that they can get you to do things using these structures.

There are plenty of valid concerns to be had here. But it’s not going to go away. Instead, we need to be thinking about what our accommodation is with these technologies and approaches. Almost all of this arises simply out of better knowledge of ourselves and our psychology paired with improvements in communications technology. And that is not a new problem — it’s an old one.""
ludocapitalism  socialgraph  games  trends  socialmedia  gaming  surveillance  2010  datamining  addiction  incentives  psychology  gamedesign  jesseschell  raphkoster  technology 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Beyond Facebook: How social games terrify traditional game makers but will lead us to gaming everywhere | VentureBeat
"Facebook games & others that use the “free to play” business model, where you can play a game for free & make money by selling virtual goods, hook their users via clever psychological tricks that convince you to buy things, either with real cash or by fulfilling some kind of special offer. These little incentives add up, creating a silly compulsion loop, forcing people to search for achievement points in everything they do. They keep playing because they get little rewards all of the time…"

[video: http://g4tv.com/thefeed/blog/post/702668/DICE-2010-Video-Design-Outside-The-Box.html]
facebook  games  trends  jesseschell  farmville  socialgames  reality  gaming  play  gamedesign 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Cool Tools: The Art of Game Design
"This is by far the best guide ever written for designing games. All kinds of games, simple and traditional, but of course video games too. This fat book is packed with practical, comprehensive, imaginative, deep, and broad lessons. Every page contained amazing insights for me. The more I read and re-read, the more important I ranked this work. I now view it as not just about designing games, but one of the best guides for designing anything that demands complex interaction. My 13-year-old son, who, like most 13-year-olds, dreams of designing games, has been devouring its 470 pages, telling me, "You've got to read this, Dad!" It's that kind of book: You begin to imagine your life as a game, and how you might tweak its design. Author Jesse Schell offers 100 "lenses" through which you can view your game, and each one is a useful maxim for any assignment."
games  kevinkelly  gaming  books  reference  design  gamedesign  edg  tcsnmy  srg  jesseschell 
february 2010 by robertogreco

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