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robertogreco : jmledgard   6

All our imagined futures | A Working Library
"No, an end to growth will not look like Blade Runner, Mad Max, or The Hunger Games. These movies imagine what happens when we do not end growth soon enough.

So what would an end to growth look like? Writing in Dissent last spring, Daniel Immerwahr doesn’t paint the rosiest picture, but he also makes clear the alternative:
Such cuts can be made more or less fairly, and the richest really ought to pay the most, but the crucial thing is that they are made. Because, above all, stopping climate change means giving up on growth.

That will be hard. Not only will our standards of living almost certainly drop, but it’s likely that the very quality of our society—equality, safety, and trust—will decline, too. That’s not something to be giddy about, but it’s still a price that those of us living in affluent countries should prepare to pay. Because however difficult it is to slow down, flooding Bangladesh cannot be an option. In other words, we can and should act. It’s just going to hurt.

There’s the rub: those of us living in affluent countries must pay. Porter presumes that technology can get us out of climate change without that payment—that nuclear energy, renewables, carbon capture, and electric cars will let us continue to consume at current levels as if nothing had changed. (As an aside: you can follow the American love of cars all the way to Immortan Joe’s citadel.) But I don’t think it’s likely we’re going to get off that easy. Carbon capture is still a pipe dream, nuclear energy will take too long to ramp up even absent strong local objections, electric cars are hardly a panacea, and renewables such as solar and wind, while certainly promising, won’t help much if we continue to pull coal and oil out of the ground at the rates we are now.

As it happens, though, I think Porter’s instinct to reach for science fiction to understand the future is a useful one. In Submergence, J.M. Ledgard’s novel of planetary depths, Danny remarks: “If this was happening in a science-fiction world we would see it clearly for what it is, but we don’t because it’s happening here and now.” Fiction, and science fiction in particular, can help us imagine many futures, and in particular can help us to direct our imaginations towards the futures we want. Imagining a particular kind of future isn’t just day dreaming: it’s an important and active framing that makes it possible for us to construct a future that approaches that imagined vision. In other words, imagining the future is one way of making that future happen. Writing in Essence in 2000, Octavia Butler asked,
So why try to predict the future at all if it’s so difficult, so nearly impossible? Because making predictions is one way to give warning when we see ourselves drifting in dangerous directions. Because prediction is a useful way of pointing out safer, wiser courses. Because, most of all, our tomorrow is the child of our today. Through thought and deed, we exert a great deal of influence over this child, even though we can’t control it absolutely. Best to think about it, though. Best to try to shape it into something good. Best to do that for any child.

Butler’s Parable of the Sower is, like Mad Max, a tale of the road. And, like Mad Max, it’s a difficult but hopeful one. Maybe Porter should read it."
mandybrown  2016  octaviabutler  mikeculfield  eduardoporter  zizek  peterwirzbicki  submergence  hungergames  dystopia  optimism  hope  scifi  sciencefiction  danielimmerwahl  jmledgard  fiction  imagination  future  futurism  capitalism  growth  zerosum  change  economics  climatechange  globalwarming 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Submergence
"Submergence is a novel by the writer J.M. Ledgard. In this site we want to add a few thoughts and images which circled around the book as it was being written – and afterwards. We hope you enjoy."




Submergence was written in various countries in Africa. Sections were scribbled into small, clothbound notebooks while the author waited to interview politicians and civil servants for his job as a political and war correspondent. An early draft was completed during a writing fellowship in Hobart. The final draft was finished in Mogadishu.

The aim of Submergence was, in a small way, to alter the reader’s perspective of the planet we inhabit. The aim was planetary writing.

"“In a room with no windows on the eastern coast of Africa, an Englishman, James More, is held captive by jihadist fighters. Posing as a water engineer to spy on al-Qaeda activity in the area, he now faces extreme privation, mock executions and forced marches through arid Somali badlands. Thousands of miles away on the Greenland Sea, Danielle Flinders, a biomathematician, prepares for a dive to the ocean floor to determine the extent and forms of life in the deep. Both are drawn back, in their thoughts, to the Christmas of the previous year, and to a French hotel on the Atlantic coast, where a chance encounter on the beach led to an intense and enduring romance, now stretching across continents. For James, a descendant of Thomas More, his mind escapes to utopias, and fragments of his life and learning before his incarceration, now haunting him. Danny is drawn back to mythical and scientific origins and to the ocean: immense and otherworldly, a comfort and a threat. Submergence is a love story, a meditation on mortality, and a vivid portrayal of man’s place on Earth. With it J.M. Ledgard proves himself a writer of large horizons and vast ambition.”"
jmledgard  tumblrs  submergence  somalia  africa  planetarywriting  writing  howwewrite 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Selin Jessa on Twitter: "Phrases, lately: (0. "bits of poetry stick to her like burrs" Jenny Offill's Dept. Speculation)"
"Phrases, lately: (0. "bits of poetry stick to her like burrs" Jenny Offill's Dept. Speculation)"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549813158462775296

"i. "between kind wildness & wild kindness" @mojgani, https://twitter.com/mojgani/status/548544254339846144 …"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549813370346405888

"ii. "a practice of worlding" http://thomvandooren.org/2014/07/19/care-some-musings-on-a-theme/ …"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549813522259906561

"iii. "craftmanship of knowing" Latour in Visualization and Cognition"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549813748819439617

"iv. "to bring the body back in" Towards Enabling Geographies, Chouinard (ed)"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549814454817280000

"v. "your bones as piccolos" http://poeticise.tumblr.com/post/73755575134/how-to-love-bats-by-judith-beveridge …"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549814682618302464

"vi. "the bone of the planet" a misreading of @alexismadrigal's 11/05 5IT"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549814925434966017

"vii. "each cell shimmying on its little mitochondrial hilt" Carson, Red doc >"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549815236123844608

"viii. "the tree unleafing" http://www.poetryinternationalweb.net/pi/site/poem/item/18623/auto/TO-SPARENESS-AN-ASSAY …"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549815847921786881

"ix. "visitations of light" Ledgard, Submergence"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549815954545180672

"x. "May your listening be good!" http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/passerby-these-are-words …"
https://twitter.com/selinjessa/status/549816439117332480
selinjessa  language  phrases  jennyoffill  anismojgani  brunolatour  judithbeveridge  poetry  poems  alexismadrigal  redcarson  janehirshfield  jmledgard  submergence  yvesbonnefoy  verachouinard  thomvandooren  worlding  craftmanship  knowing  visualization  cognition  body  bodies  bones  biology  unleafing  plants  science  nature  light 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Build cargo drones, get rich — The Message — Medium
"I am a novelist, but I am also director of a future Africa initiative at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and for the last decade I travelled Africa as a foreign correspondent for The Economist newspaper. I was one of those who reported that Africa is rising, not falling. I want to detail here what I mean by cargo drones and the reasons why I think throwing up time dependent goods into the sky and moving them about with a flying robot is a good idea in Africa — and beyond."

[See also:
http://www.okayafrica.com/news/drones-are-coming-to-africa-we-hope-j-m-ledgard/
http://www.wired.com/2014/09/cargo-drones-in-africa/
http://afrotech.epfl.ch/page-115280-en.html ]
jmledgard  drones  cargo  cargodrones  africa  resilience  2014  mobile  phones 
november 2014 by robertogreco

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