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robertogreco : johnstilgoe   8

Get out now
“GET OUT NOW. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people…. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run…. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore…. Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now…. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings…. Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around—the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic…all of it is free for the taking, for the taking in. Take it. take it in, take in more every weekend, every day, and quickly it becomes the theater that intrigues, relaxes, fascinates, seduces, and above all expands any mind focused on it. Outside lies utterly ordinary space open to any casual explorer willing to find the extraordinary. Outside lies unprogrammed awareness that at times becomes directed serendipity. Outside lies magic.”

—John Stilgoe, Outside Lies Magic
johnstilgoe  austinkleon  walking  noticing  looking  observing  seeing  exploration  landscape  attention  serendipity  outside  outdoors 
february 2017 by robertogreco
fieldnotes.in: A Fieldnote on Theory and Practice
"Thomas Steele-Maley @steelemaley:
@mosspike @mpowers3 @AshAusp @TheHeadKnuckle on that list—see Roberts (2012) Beyond Learning by Doing….and Stilgoe (2009) Outside Lies Magic

David Sebek @TheHeadKnuckle:
@steelemaley @mosspike @mpowers3 @AshAusp Stilgoe gets inconsistent feedback on Amazon, is it more theory or is it practical? #dtk12chat
5:47 AM - 16 Jul 2015

– It depends on the person, I suppose and our view of theorizing fields prior, amongst and after “practice”. Both Stilgoe and Roberts demand intellect from the reader, but are accessible in that they cause flights of imagination, aha moments, and connections. When we talk of teachers in the field, their experiences will have longer term benefit in terms of phenomenology and beyond, if they can grasp through narrative and theory their purpose of doing what we want them to do outside the school walls/in the field…. How many, will walk outside the school walls and do an experiential activity – love it and start to mutate the system of schooling they see for their kids– a few…. But more, may see the experience as a fun part of a training and grasp to connect and make pathways to learning anytime, anywhere – instead defaulting to the conventional (sometimes monolithic feeling) school structures and ideology. So yes, practical field guides to practice are nice at times and there *is* an elephant in every school which parlays the belief that teachers need guidebooks to follow…. To me, if teachers are outside more, seeing time differently, spending more time to drive their own learning and exploring – they are starting to see the unseen – one of the purposes of Stilgoe and Roberts work – and mine also. So whatever causes that to happen is better than it not happening. To turn catalyst moments to pathways of innovation in education though – we must theorize (research), design, prototype,experiment, retheorize…."
thomassteele-maley  johnstilgoe  jayroberts  theory  2015  education  practice  fieldguides  davidsebek  teaching  learning  outsideliesmagic  experience  experientiallearning  howwelearn  howweteach  outside  exploration  praxis 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Whyfinding: what pervasive gaming has taught me about 3D videogame design | Christy's Corner of the Universe
"The thing I came back to was my experience with pervasive games. Those games set in the actual world — on websites, social media, newspaper, in your street. Is my frustration because I’m corrupted by my background designing and playing pervasive games? In pervasive games I could actually pick up a bow. I could actually be crawling through the cave. Is the problem that I want the seamlessness of mission play and can’t get it in some 3D games? So I played with that idea. What is the difference in how the missions would be designed and experienced in a pervasive game versus a 3D digital game?"



"Looking for Internally-Motivated Navigation

I looked at works that seem to be about this internally-driven navigation of space: Michel de Certeau’s ‘Walking in the City’ in The Practice of Everyday Life [PDF], Gaston Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space [PDF]; Walter Benjamin’s The Arcade Project [PDF], John Stilgoe’s Outside Lies Magic, and Rebecca Solnit’s Wanderlust: A History of Walking. I jumped from flâneurs to the larp movement to (with the help of Johanna MacDonald) Laban drives (link, link) — all in the hope of finding design techniques relating to internal motivation. I remembered my theatre experiences and thought maybe that relates to my type of play.

These works are all about internally-driven movement, but specifically about a free-movement, where you walk (or run) where you please and with a particular way of seeing. This is related, but doesn’t explain exactly what I’m talking about. A common thread in these works, however, is that it is about being present in the moment…in the world…in the streets. I look around to the rise of digital exploration games, and see a similar trend. Indeed, I don’t think the growing attraction to open world games, experiential games, and thin play is  coincidental. These are parallel phenomena that speak of an urge for a different kind of experience: one of being present in the (digital) world. But these types of experiences are often couched in phrases such as agency or choice that an open world games affords, such as the “exploring freedom in World of Warcraft.

There are many reasons for the attraction to these types of experiences (both as designers and players), including having an alternative to the magical dad stories of first-person shooters, and the reflection a “walking simulator” affords. Indeed, there are more and more of these sorts of games, or “first person exploration games, ” “first person adventure,” “story exploration games,” “a game of audio-visual exploration,” “non-combative exploration games,” or “not games,” or whatever. There are well known ones such as Gone Home, Dear Esther, Proteus, Bientôt l’Été, as well as ones more recent or in development such as Ether One, Dream, Sunset, Firewatch, Virginia, and HomeMake, and Hohokum.

I believe that one of the attracting factors of these games is the desire for intrinsically-motivated movement. (This trait, however, certainly isn’t shared by all of the community-created “walking simulator” tags on Steam.)

It isn’t as if exploration is ignored in conventional videogame and theme park design though. For instance, Scott Rogers talks about enabling exploration by creating subpaths or alternate paths that people discover that get them to the main attractions. But this way of navigating space is different. It isn’t just about exploring space either. Most of the internally-driven movement I found though, was about exploring or viewing space differently. There is something else. Then I found it.”
videogames  situationist  worldofwarcraft  digital  sandboxgames  freedom  exploration  flaneur  derive  2014  johnstilgoe  larp  larping  gastonbachelard  micheldecerteau  walterbenjamin  rebeccasolnit  wandering  whyfinding  pervasivegames  gaming  games  play  maps  mapping  landscapes  landscape  gamedesign  motivation  visualattention  attention  christydena  experience  dérive 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Between the By-Road and the Main Road: Being in the Middle: Learning Walks
"So imagine a commitment to learning that involved making regular learning walks with high school students as a normal part of the "school" day. Now, these learning walks should not be confused with walking tours, which are designed based on planned outcomes. One walks to point X in order to see object or artifact Y. The points are predetermined, hierarchical in design.

Instead, learning walks are rhizomatic. They are inherently about being in the middle of things and coming to learn what could not been predetermined. Learning walks are part of the "curriculum" for instructional seminar (which I described here)."

[My comments cross-posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/7182110515/walking-and-learning ]
maryannreilly  comments  walking  walkshops  adamgreenfield  flaneur  psychogeography  derive  dérive  education  learning  schools  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  noticing  observation  seeing  2011  rhizomaticlearning  johnseelybrown  douglasthomas  unguided  self-directedlearning  serendipity  johnberger  willself  rebeccasolnit  sistercorita  maps  mapping  photography  alanfletcher  lawrenceweschler  kerismith  exploration  exploring  johnstilgoe  noticings  rjdj  ios  situationist  situatedlearning  situated  hototoki  serendipitor  flow  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  experience  control  ego  cv  coritakent 
july 2011 by robertogreco
J. B. Jackson - Wikipedia
"taught landscape history courses as adjunct professor at Harvard's GSD as well as at the College of Environmental Design & the Department of Geography at the UC Berkeley. He finished teaching in the late 1970s & then went on to give lectures especially those pertaining to urban issues. Jackson states that “We are not spectators; all human landscape is not a work of art.” He felt strongly that the purpose of landscape is to provide a place for living and working and leisure."

Quote from him: "The bicycle had, and still has, a humane, almost classical moderation in the kind of pleasure it offers. It is the kind of machine that a Hellenistic Greek might have invented and ridden. It does no violence to our normal reactions: It does not pretend to free us from our normal environment."
jbjackson  landscape  education  bikes  builtenvironment  via:javierarbona  geography  urban  urbanism  johnstilgoe  biking  environment 
february 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm: Admission » Admitted Students » Outside Lies Magic
"Get out now. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people at the end of our century. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run. Forget about blood pressure and arthritis, cardiovascular rejuvenation and weight reduction. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore.

Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now, and seek out the resting place of a technology almost forgotten. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings.

Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around--the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic."
architecture  books  via:britta  johnstilgoe  pedestrians  walking  biking  bikes  psychogeography  noticing  learning  landscape  classideas  openstudio  classtrips  fieldtrips  bighere  exploration  looking  cities  urban  urbanism  builtenvironment  visibility  meandering  deliberate 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Amazon.com: Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Places (9780802775634): John R. Stilgoe, John Stilgoe: Books
"What lies along the highway, just out of sight? How about behind that building? Or under the street? Most of us muse idly about such things as we take our walks or drive our cars, but only a few go further and explore the secret histories of the places where we live. Landscape historian John R. Stilgoe is one of these intrepid explorers; for years he has taught Harvard students to open their senses to the created environment we share, to gently dissect our neighborhoods and public spaces for the knowledge hidden in plain sight. In Outside Lies Magic, he lets us all in on these wonderful secrets."
history  local  johnstilgoe  classideas  books  cities  staycation  atemporality 
october 2010 by robertogreco

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