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robertogreco : labels   29

Rethinking Giftedness on Vimeo
"We decided to work with Citizen Film to make this short film after many years of my being a professor at Stanford and hearing from students about the labels they had received growing up. Many of the students had been labelled as “gifted” or “smart,” when they were in school, and these labels, intended to be positive, had given them learning challenges later in life. Most people realize that it is harmful to not be labelled as gifted when others are. The labelling of some students sends negative messages about potential, that are out of synch with important knowledge of neuroplasticity showing that everyone’s brains can grow and change. But few people realize that those labels are damaging for those who receive them too. At Stanford many students were labelled as gifted in Kindergarten or 1st grade and received special advantages from that point on, raising many questions about equity in schools. But labels and ideas of smartness and giftedness carry with them fixed ideas about ability, suggesting to students that they are born with a gift or a special brain. When students are led to believe they are gifted, or they have a “math brain” or they are “smart” and later struggle, that struggle is absolutely devastating. Students who grow up thinking that they have a special brain often drop out of STEM subjects when they struggle. At that time students start to believe they were not, after all, gifted, or that the gift has “run out” as one of the students in our film reflects.

In the film, which I really recommend that you watch, we also hear from students from a local elementary school who shared their experiences of learning without labels. Their school does not give students the idea that some students are smart or gifted and has instead shared our youcubed messages and videos about the high potential of all students to grow and change their brains. Their math community values all kinds of learners and communicates that all students have interesting and unique ideas to share. The teachers know that careful problem-solving takes time, conversation, and lots of questions from everyone. The fourth graders who are interviewed illustrate the different ideas students can develop when they are given messages of brain growth and high academic potential for everyone, rather than messages of high academic potential for only some students.

Both labels and dichotomies are damaging in education. Instead of deciding some students are “smart” or “gifted” we should acknowledge that everyone is on a growth journey and we should celebrate the growth potential of all students. If you like this film and think it is important please share it on Facebook, twitter, and any other social media you use. We would like it to help bring about important changes in education."
gifted  labels  children  learning  howwelearn  sfsh  joboaler  2017  neuroplasticity  smartness  equity  schools  schooling  education 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Archival Labels | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
"A selection of archival labels and stamps found on artwork in the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection. A zoom function permits close viewing of the backs of individual canvases."
labels  via:alexandralange  museums  archives  art  themet 
january 2017 by robertogreco
ADHD Diagnoses? Why the Youngest Kids in Class Are Most Affected | MindShift | KQED News
"By the time they’re in elementary school, some kids prove to be more troublesome than others. They can’t sit still or they’re not socializing or they can’t focus enough to complete tasks that the other kids are handling well. Sounds like ADHD. But it might be that they’re just a little young for their grade.

Studies done in several countries including Iceland, Canada, Israel, Sweden and Taiwan show children who are at the young end of their grade cohort are more likely to get an ADHD diagnosis than their older classmates.

The youngest students were between 20 percent and 100 percent more likely to get the diagnosis or ADHD medication than were the oldest students in the cohort, says Helga Zoëga, an epidemiologist at the University of Iceland who worked on the Icelandic and Israeli studies.

The most recent evidence comes from Taiwan, where an analysis showed the youngest students in a grade were roughly 75 percent more likely to get a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder than the oldest ones. It was published Thursday in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Kids are generally 6 years old when they start first grade. A scant few months can span a lot of mental growth at this age.

“Within that age range there is a huge difference in developmental and social and emotional maturity,” says Dr. Adiaha Spinks-Franklin, a developmental and behavioral pediatrician at Texas Children’s Hospital who was not involved in any of the studies. “A 6-year-old is just not the same as a 7-year-old.”

And yet a first-grader might stand shoulder to shoulder with another student nearly 12 months her elder. “And the way we diagnose ADHD is we talk to the parent about the child’s behavior, and we mail the teacher questionnaires,” Spinks-Franklin says. “The teacher will be comparing the child’s behavior relative to other children in the class.”

That could lead to a mistaken diagnosis of ADHD. Zoëga says the younger the student, the greater the likelihood that student will receive an ADHD diagnosis or medication. “If you look at the [students’ age] just month by month, you’ll see that the likelihood increases with each month,” she says.

Zoëga says the only country studied so far where the relative age of young children doesn’t seem to have an effect on ADHD diagnosis is Denmark, where there’s more flexibility for when children enter school. So this could be because Danish parents with kids who are born just before the cutoff date for grade school entry choose to hold their offspring back one year.

But if you’re an American parent with children born in the months of December, November or October, that doesn’t mean a child should repeat a grade for the fear their relative youth will handicap them, Spinks-Franklin says. “There is absolutely no data to support grade repetition for maturity issues. Children who repeat a grade are at a higher risk of dropping out of high school. They are more likely to be bullied.” If the child does have ADHD or another disorder, she notes, repeating a grade will not fix the disorder.

And relatively younger children diagnosed with ADHD might really have ADHD, says Dr. Mu-Hong Chen, a psychiatrist at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. “There’s a potential for the harm of overdiagnosis and overprescription.” That would unnecessarily subject kids to unwanted side effects of stimulant medication and the stigma of the disorder. But perhaps older, more mature-looking students are just being underdiagnosed and not get help they might need, he says. The studies didn’t look into that.

The best thing for worried parents to do is just give the kids a chance to grow up, Chen says. In most of the studies done on relative age and ADHD, the difference in diagnosis rates vanished by the time the students reached their teenage years. “I think we have to wait for a while, he says. “We have to have more time to evaluate their behavior, attention and brain development.”

The data also mean that doctors should take the child’s relative age into account when diagnosing ADHD, Zoëga says. “It has a sensible solution. Just treat the individual according to his or her age."
adhd  age  children  diagnosis  2016  taiwan  canada  us  israel  iceland  sweden  denmark  adiahaspinks-franklin  attention  labels 
march 2016 by robertogreco
What are all these mysterious Japanese car stickers? | News on Japan
"1 Japan adopted the shamrock symbol to designate handicapped drivers even though the international symbol of a wheelchair is recognized everywhere else in the world.

2 The weird butterfly mark is Japan’s “hard of hearing” symbol. Hard of hearing drivers must display these stickers, which forbids other drivers from cutting off or aggressively passing such cars. This butterfly-mark is an obscure, only-in-Japan symbol and other parts of the world use this easy-to-understand ear mark.

3 Officially called the Koreisha mark (kōrei untensha hyōshiki), the fallen leaf mark must be displayed by drivers over 75 (and strongly recommended for those over 70) to warn other drivers of the impending danger.

UPDATE:
On February 1, 2011, the “Autumn leaf” (Koreisha ) symbol to indicate “aged person at the wheel” was changed to the new, 4-leafed form

(Wikipedia).Japanese_Kourei_mark250
New Koreisha mark
Back in 2009 (The Mainichi / 2009 July 23) that Japanese Police Agency announced that it wanted to come up with a new design to replace the “autumn leaf” symbol which designates an elderly driver. A survey has indicated that only around half of people questioned had an idea of what it meant.

4 Officially called the Shoshinsha mark (shoshin untensha hyōshiki), new drivers must display the green leaf mark for one year after getting their license to warn other drivers that the driver is not very skilled."
symbols  japan  wakaba  wakabamark  driving  koreishamark  koreisha  shoshinshamark  hearing  deaf  deafness  disability  labels  disabilities 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Instagram’s Endangered Ephemera - The New Yorker
"The best accounts, like @graphilately, present a basic, steady stream of beautiful things, often against a neutral background. “I want it to be solely about the stamps—raising the profile of stamps and beauty in simple, modernist values,” Blair Thomson, the account’s creator, told me. “They’re about simple, graphic ideas conveyed through a highly visible yet tiny medium.” The husband-and-wife pair behind @purveyors_of_packaging present vintage boxes, bottles, and cans in the same vitrine-like format, making the reds, yellows, and blues really glow.

For some, Instagram has been an easy way to deal with personal collections. If you are the proud owner of thousands of vintage Valentines, embroidered tourist patches, or personalized book plates, digitizing them can feel overwhelming. The dailyness of Instagram—one photo, one day at a time—breaks the task down, and the endorphin boost of likes and followers keeps you rolling. A number of the collectors I spoke to originally included their ephemera in their personal feed, but spun the material off into a dedicated channel after a positive response. This also gave them a chance to polish their presentation. Bill Rose (@junktype) says, “Most of the objects in my feed are no bigger than a couple of inches wide. They are often so small that my phone has trouble focussing given the close range of my subject.” Charles Clarke (@matchbookdiaries) shoots his matchbooks against a white background. “I use the white background because it looks clean, and because you can scroll my profile page and it doesn’t look like there are any dividers between the photos. It looks like a big poster.”

These accounts also provide inspiration for working professionals and act as an early warning system for design revivals. Several of the ephemera accounts that I’ve spotted have turned out to be run by designers. Ara Devejian (@LetterGetter), a creative director, started his when he moved to Los Angeles’s superlatively-signed Theatre District. “Every day, I try to take a new route to work or wherever, especially going way out my way to discover new places on my bike or in the car, and in turn LetterGetter is the happy byproduct of that curiosity.” At first Devejian wanted to document typographic nightmares—the illegible, the mishandled—but, as with most Instagram accounts, things swung over to the positive. The platform’s users have such a strong preference for things that are pretty (however you define it) that it’s difficult to swim against the tide of posting “bests” rather than “worsts.” “@LetterGetter helps inform some of the typographic projects I work on,” Devejian said, “like the title card I designed for Gymkhana 7. The style of the photos is intentionally flat or sparse in order to see the letterforms as they were conceived.”"



"Business cards are probably next on the endangered list. In ten years, that drawer full of business cards could be Instagram gold. The Art Nouveau designer Hector Guimard’s business card, for example, part of the Cooper Hewitt collection, is beautifully out of date. But putting something on Instagram isn’t always the end result. These pieces can have different meaning in real life. “People have yelled at me—thinking I’m about to steal or break something—and then afterwards, realizing that I’m only taking pictures and admiring their car or whatever, tell me their life story,” Devejian says. “I’ve become painfully accustomed to just how fleeting signage is. It’s made me wonder whether I should become some sort of advocate for preservation, in attempt to postpone their inevitable disappearance.”"
instagram  culture  alexandralange  2015  design  businesscards  graphicdesign  graphics  photography  collections  inspiration  stamps  postagestamps  matchbooks  labels  clothinglabels  ephemera  everyday  objects  internet  socialmedia  packaging  typography  lettering  logos 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Labels, Digital Included, Assume New Importance at Museums - NYTimes.com
"“Labels have always been a big topic in museological practice,” said Seb Chan, director of digital and emerging media at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. He cites a blistering 1963 article, “Why Johnny Can’t Read Labels,” published in Curator: The Museum Journal. The author, George Weiner of the Smithsonian Institution, derided many midcentury museums as “veritable masterpieces of cryptography” because of terse, uninformative labels (called tombstones in curatorial jargon). He also railed against rambling labels “designed to frighten off all but the most persevering museum viewer.”

Some curators apparently use labels to show off their scholarship. (The Bad Label Hall of Fame website catalogs egregious examples.) “It often feels like museum labels are written for peers, not the public,” Mr. Chan said. Ms. Harland agreed. “If you need to write 50,000 words,” she advised colleagues, “do a talk for the local historical society.”

In a lecture, “Adventures in Label Land,” Ms. Rand, who tries to limit labels to about 50 words, highlights a vintage label that described a meteorite from the Field Museum in Chicago: “With the rise of the nickel content to around 14 percent, plessite prevails wholly, the kamacite becomes vestigial, and the structure becomes a nickel-rich ataxite (see label at right).” Written for mineralogists rather than families, the label, it seems, required its own label.

“The ‘label at right’ was a second, equally dense label,” Ms. Rand said.

Research by Stephen Bitgood, a psychology professor at Jacksonville State University in Alabama, proves that brevity pays off. Mr. Bitgood timed museum visitors reading a 150-word label and the same text divided into three 50-word panels. More than twice as many visitors read the shorter panels.

“Breaking down a long text passage into shorter ones changes the perception of the task, making it seem easier,” Mr. Bitgood wrote in an email. He likened labels to formal education. “If you break down a long chapter into smaller units and give a test for each unit, students do much better,” he said.

John Russick, director of curatorial affairs at the Chicago History Museum and coordinator of the annual label-writing competition by the American Alliance of Museums (winners get online accolades, not plaques), notices more experimental entries, including limericks and poems. To complement a portrait of the painter Waldo Peirce (who looked like Ulysses S. Grant), the de Young Museum in San Francisco published a poem by Ben Erickson, a fourth grader"



"Mr. Chan of the Cooper Hewitt previously worked at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney, Australia, one of the first to install Quick Response codes on labels, which provide visitors with smartphone access to an archive of information.

“We did it as an experiment and, of course, it failed,” Mr. Chan acknowledged. The codes now require a reader app, and many visitors resisted downloading it. “And that barrier is just too high for the casual person,” Mr. Chan said.

Learning from his mistake, Mr. Chan and his team at the Cooper Hewitt designed “the label whisperer,” software that enables visitors to snap a photo of a label and email it to an address, which then sends back the object’s collection records.

Visitors to the Cooper Hewitt, which reopened in December after a renovation lasting more than three years, will be able to borrow a pen, like a stylus, that interacts with Near-Field Communication technology incorporated into labels. “Behind each label there’s an N.F.C. tag,” Mr. Chan explained, “that allows you to basically collect objects as you walk around the galleries in a relatively straightforward way and then bring them back to explore on large interactive tables.”

Some museum directors view traditional labels as intrusive and would not object to a funeral for the so-called tombstones. In 2013, the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts staged a label-free exhibition of paintings by old masters. Instead, the museum set up iPad stations that focused on individual paintings and printed guides listing basic information, like the title, the artist’s name and the date it was acquired. Trained docents and museum guards milled about to act as truly interactive labels and provoke discussions with visitors about the art.

“Our ultimate goal in removing labels from the gallery walls was to create a deeper museum experience,” said the museum’s director, Matthias Waschek, by email. “We want our visitors to slow down and experience the art on their own terms.” The digitization of museums, he added, means that the landscape for labels “may be changing more radically than most of us dare to think.”"
museums  labels  museumdesign  cooper-hewitt  sebchan  matthiaswaschek  technology 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Russell Davies: The power of stickers
"There's a brilliant Swiss idea called Pumipumpe. It's just a set of stickers depicting the kind of stuff people have in their home. The idea is that you stick stickers on your mailbox in the communal hallway of your block of flats, declaring what things in your flat you're willing to share. It's brilliantly simple, solving splendidly with stickers the kind of thing people are always trying to solve with apps.

Stickers are like Minimum Viable Entities. They're just enough to demonstrate that something exists and is real, but they're lightweight and disposable and attachable in all kinds of places.

Tampon Club describes it as making it look proper. Stickers help with that."
stickers  russelldavies  2015  minimumviableentities  pumpipumpesharing  existence  tangibility  disposability  labeling  labels  tamponclub 
march 2015 by robertogreco
DrupalCon Portland 2013: DESIGN OPS: A UX WORKFLOW FOR 2013 - YouTube
"Hey, the dev team gets all these cool visual analytics, code metrics, version control, revision tagging, configuration management, continuous integration ... and the UX design team just passes around Photoshop files?

Taking clues from DevOps and Lean UX, "DesignOps" advocates more detailed and durable terminology about the cycle of user research, design and production. DesignOps seeks to first reduce the number of design artifacts, to eliminate the pain of prolonged design decisions. DesignOps assumes that the remaining design artifacts aren't actionable until they are reasonably archived and linked in a coherent way that serves the entire development team.

This talk will introduce the idea of DesignOps with the assumption that the audience has experience with a basic user research cycle — iterative development with any kind of user feedback.

DesignOps is a general approach, intended to help with a broad array of questions from usability testing issues, documentation archiving, production-time stress, and general confusion on your team:

What are the general strategies for managing the UX design process?
How do you incorporate feedback without huge cost?
What happened to that usability test result from last year?
How much space goes between form elements?
Why does the design cycle make me want to drink bleach?
WTF why does our website look like THIS?
* Features turnkey full-stack (Vagrant ) installation of ubuntu with drupal 7 install profile utilizing both php and ruby development tools, with all examples configured for live css compilation"
chrisblow  contradictions  just  simply  must  2013  drupal  drupalcon  designops  fear  ux  terminology  design  audience  experience  shame  usability  usabilitytesting  work  stress  archiving  confusion  relationships  cv  canon  collaboration  howwework  workflow  versioncontrol  versioning  failure  iteration  flickr  tracker  creativecommons  googledrive  tags  tagging  labels  labeling  navigation  urls  spreadsheets  links  permissions  googledocs  timelines  basecamp  cameras  sketching  universal  universality  teamwork  principles  bullshitdetection  users  clients  onlinetoolkit  offtheshelf  tools  readymadetools  readymade  crapdetection  maps  mapping  userexperience  research  designresearch  ethnography  meetup  consulting  consultants  templates  stencils  bootstrap  patterns  patternlibraries  buzzwords  css  sass  databases  compass  webdev  documentation  sharing  backups  maintenance  immediacy  process  decisionmaking  basics  words  filingsystems  systems  writing  facilitation  expression  operations  exoskeletons  clarification  creativity  bots  shellscripts  notes  notetaking  notebo 
may 2013 by robertogreco
The Art of Distraction - NYTimes.com
"Biological determinism is one of psychology’s ugliest evasions, removing the poetic human from any issue."

"As we as a society become desperate financially, and more regulated and conformist, our ideals of competence become more misleading and cruel, making people feel like losers. There might be more to our distractions than we realized we knew. We might need to be irresponsible. But to follow a distraction requires independence and disobedience; there will be anxiety in not completing something, in looking away, or in not looking where others prefer you to. This may be why most art is either collaborative — the cinema, pop, theater, opera — or is made by individual artists supporting one another in various forms of loose arrangement, where people might find the solidarity and backing they need."
anxiety  conformism  confomity  medication  medicine  ritalin  psychology  frustration  boredom  humiliation  diversity  human  labels  labeling  education  schools  attention  winners  losers  winnersandlosers  stigma  society  2012  hanifkureishi  dyslexia  adhd  learning  distraction 
february 2012 by robertogreco
School colour-codes pupils by ability | Education | The Guardian
"A secondary school has divided its students by ability, complete with different uniforms. Innovative way to lure the middle classes, or worrying segregation?"

[Sneeches and "A Class Divided" come to mind.]
education  grouping  tracking  labeling  labels  uk  class  sorting  2011  segregation  ability  economics  ranking 
july 2011 by robertogreco
I Wish This Was
"New Orleans is full of vacant storefronts and people who need things. These stickers are an easy tool to voice what you want where you want it. Fill them out and put them on abandoned buildings and beyond.

These stickers are custom vinyl and can be easily removed without damaging property. They're free and can be found in corner stores, cafes, bookstores, bars, hair salons, and other places around New Orleans. See select photos here and share more on Flickr (tag your photos "iwishthiswas") or email photos or locations.

This project was created by local designer Candy Chang and launched with exhibit Ethnographic Terminalia at DuMois Gallery. Come to the opening Nov 19 or visit the show until Dec 3 2010 for good times and free stickers."
candychang  crowdsourcing  stickers  urbanism  neworleans  location  labels  papernet  city  nola  activism  iwishthiswas  via:migurski  cities  classideas  civics  potential 
november 2010 by robertogreco
41Latitude - Bing Maps's Redesign: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
"As you can see from my examples, this was not some incremental improvement that Microsoft gave to Bing Maps—no, this was a vast overhaul. In truth, it seems as though Microsoft has left nothing unchanged in the “new” Bing Maps. And yet even though the “new” maps are unusually light on detail (especially in how few cities they seem to show), they’re now among the most aesthetically pleasing maps on the web.

On an unrelated note, I find the similarities between Windows Phone 7’s UI and the “new” Bing Maps to be quite curious: both use Segoe fonts, both are unflinchingly minimalistic, and both are dramatic breaks from their predecessors. Maybe this really is a new direction for Microsoft."
via:migurski  maps  mapping  microsoft  cartography  design  aesthetics  bing  labels 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Philip K. Howard: Four ways to fix a broken legal system | Video on TED.com
"The land of the free has become a legal minefield, says Philip K. Howard -- especially for teachers and doctors, whose work has been paralyzed by fear of suits. What's the answer? A lawyer himself, Howard has four propositions for simplifying US law."
broken  innovation  reform  health  law  simplicity  risk  authority  us  schools  medicine  teaching  learning  education  philiphoward  trust  constitution  values  principles  rules  ted  fear  freedom  lawsuits  gamechanging  fairness  playgrounds  passion  care  waste  money  productivity  decisionmaking  hiring  judgement  paralysis  dueprocess  rights  threats  government  litigation  recess  warnings  warninglabels  labels  psychology  society 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Millennial Muddle: How Stereotyping Students Became an Industry - Student Affairs - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Those who have shaped the nation's understanding of young people are not nearly as famous as their subjects, however. That's a shame, for these experts are colorful characters in their own right. Some are scholars, and some aren't. Many can recall watching the Beatles on a black-and-white television, and some grew up just before Barney the purple dinosaur arrived. Most can entertain an audience, though a few prefer to comb through statistics.
millennials  scamartists  generalizations  stereotypes  strauss&howe  netgen  generations  digitalnatives  truth  labels  tcsnmy  callingthemout 
october 2009 by robertogreco
PingMag - Audio Dregs: Ambient Noise from Portland
"When this year’s Sonar Festival proudly featured a nice video selection of experimental electronic music label Audio Dregs, we knew we had to investigate further. Although based in Portland, this label has a tight connection with Japan, releasing artists like Mumbleboy or Lullatone. How come? PingMag had a chat with co-founder Eric Mast a.k.a. E*Rock, the sympathetic musician, designer, clip director and multi-talented artist. Thanks to Ian Lynam for connecting us!"
music  video  labels  japan  oregon  portland  interviews  pingmag 
august 2008 by robertogreco
flof - el mundo en etiquetas
"flof es una colección de lugares catalogados por usuarios en forma libre. Así como guardás tus páginas favoritas, con flof vas a poder guardar, compartir y descubrir lugares dentro de una gran comunidad."
folksonomy  google  labels  maps  tags  argentina  buenosaires  mapping  community 
november 2006 by robertogreco

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