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iPad Pro (2018) Review: Two weeks later! - YouTube
[at 7:40, problems mentioned with iOS on the iPad Pro as-is for Rene Ritchie keeping it from being a laptop replacement]

"1. Import/export more than just photo/video [using USB drive, hard drive, etc]

2. Navigate with the keyboard [or trackpad/mouse]

3. 'Desktop Sites' in Safari [Why not a desktop browser (maybe in addition to Safari, something like a "pro" Safari with developer tools and extensions?]

4. Audio recording [system-wide like the screen recording for capturing conversations from Skype/Facetime/etc]

5. Develop for iPad on iPad

6. Multi-user for everyone [like on a Chromebook]"

[I'd be happy with just 1, 2, and 3. 6 would also be nice. 4 and 5 are not very important to me, but also make sense.]

[Some of my notes regarding the state of the tablet-as-laptop replacement in 2018, much overlap with what is above:

iOS tablets
no mouse/trackpad support, file system is still a work in process, no desktop browser equivalents, Pro models are super expensive given these tradeoffs, especially with additional keyboard and pen costs

Microsoft Surface
tablet experience is lacking, Go (closest to meeting my needs and price) seems a little overpriced for the top model (entry model needs more RAM and faster storage), also given the extra cost of keyboard and pen

Android tablets
going nowhere, missing desktop browser

ChromeOS tablets
underpowered (Acer Chromebook Tab 10) or very expensive (Google Pixel Slate) or I don’t like it enough (mostly the imbalance between screen and keyboard, and the keyboard feel) for the cost (HP x2), but ChromeOS tablets seem as promising as iPads as laptop replacements at this point

ChromeOS convertibles
strange having the keyboard in the back while using as a tablet (Samsung Chromebook Plus/Pro, ASUS Chromebook Flip C302CA, Google Pixelbook (expensive)) -- I used a Chromebook Pro for a year (as work laptop) and generally it was a great experience, but they are ~1.5 years old now and haven’t been refreshed. Also, the Samsung Chromebook Plus (daughter has one of these, used it for school and was happy with it until new college provided a MacBook Pro) refresh seems like a step back because of the lesser screen, the increase in weight, and a few other things.

Additional note:
Interesting how Microsoft led the way in this regard (tablet as laptop replacement), but again didn't get it right enough and is now being passed by the others, at least around me]

[finally, some additional discussion and comparison:

The Verge: "Is this a computer?" (Apr 11, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7imG4DYXlM

Apple's "What's a Computer?" iPad ad (Jan 23, 2018, no longer available directly from Apple)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llZys3xg6sU

Apple's "iPad Pro — 5 Reasons iPad Pro can be your next computer — Apple" (Nov 19, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUQK7DMys54

The Verge: "Google Pixel Slate Review: half-baked" (Nov 27, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOa6HU_he2A
https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/27/18113447/google-pixel-slate-review-tablet-chrome-os-android-chromebook-slapdash

Unbox Therapy: "Can The Google Pixel Slate Beat The iPad Pro?" (Nov 28, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lccvHF4ODNY

The Verge: "Google keeps failing to understand tablets" (Nov 29, 2018)
https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/29/18117520/google-tablet-android-chrome-os-pixel-slate-failure

The Verge: "Chrome OS isn't ready for tablets yet" (Jul 18, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eu9JBj7HNmM

The Verge: "New iPad Pro review: can it replace your laptop?" (Nov 5, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LykS0TRSHLY
https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/5/18062612/apple-ipad-pro-review-2018-screen-usb-c-pencil-price-features

Navneet Alang: "The misguided attempts to take down the iPad Pro" (Nov 9, 2018)
https://theweek.com/articles/806270/misguided-attempts-take-down-ipad-pro

Navneet Alang: "Apple is trying to kill the laptop" (Oct 31, 2018)
https://theweek.com/articles/804670/apple-trying-kill-laptop

The Verge: "Microsoft Surface Go review: surprisingly good" (Aug 7, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7N2xunvO68
https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/7/17657174/microsoft-surface-go-review-tablet-windows-10

The Verge: "The Surface Go Is Microsoft's Hybrid PC Dream Made Real: It’s time to think of Surface as Surface, and not an iPad competitor" (Aug 8, 2018)
https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/8/17663494/microsoft-surface-go-review-specs-performance

The Verge: "Microsoft Surface Go hands-on" (Aug 2, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmENZqKPfws

Navneet Alang: "Is Microsoft's Surface Go doomed to fail?" (Jul 12, 2018)
https://theweek.com/articles/784014/microsofts-surface-doomed-fail

Chrome Unboxed: "Google Pixel Slate: Impressions After A Week" (Nov 27, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfriNj2Ek68
https://chromeunboxed.com/news/google-pixel-slate-first-impressions/

Unbox Therapy: "I'm Quitting Computers" (Nov 18, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3oRJeReP8g

Unbox Therapy: "The Truth About The iPad Pro..." (Dec 5, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXqou3SVbMw

The Verge: "Tablet vs laptop" (Mar 22, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm_zQP9JIJI

Marques Brownlee: "iPad Pro Review: The Best Ever... Still an iPad!" (Nov 14, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1e_voQvHYk

Engadget: "iPad Pro 2018 Review: Almost a laptop replacement" (Nov 6, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZzmMpP2BNw

Matthew Moniz: "iPad Pro 2018 - Overpowered Netflix Machine or Laptop Replacement?" (Nov 8, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0ZFlFG67kY

WSJ: "Can the New iPad Pro Be Your Only Computer?" (Nov 16, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMCyI-ymKfo
https://www.wsj.com/articles/apples-new-ipad-pro-great-tablet-still-cant-replace-your-laptop-1541415600

Ali Abdaal: "iPad vs Macbook for Students (2018) - Can a tablet replace your laptop?" (Oct 10, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIx2OQ6E6Mc

Washington Post: "Nope, Apple’s new iPad Pro still isn’t a laptop" (Nov 5, 2018)
https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2018/11/05/nope-apples-new-ipad-pro-still-isnt-laptop/

Canoopsy: "iPad Pro 2018 Review - My Student Perspective" (Nov 19, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4dgHuWBv14

Greg' Gadgets: "The iPad Pro (2018) CAN Replace Your Laptop!" (Nov 24, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3SyXd04Q1E

Apple World: "iPad Pro has REPLACED my MacBook (my experience)" (May 9, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEu9Zf6AENU

Dave Lee: "iPad Pro 2018 - SUPER Fast, But Why?" (Nov 11, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aj6vXhN-g6k

Shahazad Bagwan: "A Week With iPad Pro // Yes It Replaced A Laptop!" (Oct 20, 2017)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhHwv9QsoP0

Apple's "Homework (Full Version)" iPad ad (Mar 27, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IprmiOa2zH8

The Verge: "Intel's future computers have two screens" (Oct 18, 2018)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deymf9CoY_M

"The Surface Book 2 is everything the MacBook Pro should be" (Jun 26, 208)
https://char.gd/blog/2018/the-surface-book-2-is-everything-the-macbook-pro-should-be-and-then-some

"Surface Go: the future PC that the iPad Pro failed to deliver" (Aug 27, 2018)
https://char.gd/blog/2018/surface-go-a-better-future-pc-than-the-ipad-pro

"Microsoft now has the best device lineup in the industry" (Oct 3, 2018)
https://char.gd/blog/2018/microsoft-has-the-best-device-lineup-in-the-industry ]
ipadpro  ipad  ios  computing  reneritchie  2018  computers  laptops  chromebooks  pixelslate  surfacego  microsoft  google  apple  android  microoftsurface  surface 
november 2018 by robertogreco
As more schools assign laptops, students say they learn differently
"More students report emailing teachers, collaborating with peers in schools with 1:1 programs"



"High schoolers assigned a laptop or a Chromebook were more likely to take notes in class, do internet research, create documents to share, collaborate with their peers on projects, check their grades and get reminders about tests or homework due dates. Among high school students assigned these devices, 60 percent said they had emailed their teachers with questions. That’s compared to 42 percent among students without an assigned device.

In focus groups, students explained that emailing their teachers was somewhat of an anxiety release, said Julie Evans, Speak Up’s CEO and the author of a brief about the findings.

“It isn’t as if they need the teacher to respond to them in that moment,” Evans said. “It’s more that they want to share the problem with someone.” And when they go to class the next day, they can arrive knowing their teacher is already aware of the problem.

Most high schoolers have a way to send an email from home, whether it’s from a smartphone or a family computer. But students with assigned devices from their schools are more likely to actually draft those emails and hit send.

Evans said sending those emails indicates students are independent learners who have the benefit of a school support system. She connected it to the portion of students who get electronic reminders about tests and homework due dates. Among high schoolers with assigned laptops or Chromebooks, 53 percent get those electronic reminders, compared with 39 percent of students who don’t have school-assigned devices, the survey found.

“The student can be responsible for their own learning and feel good about being responsible for their own learning,” Evans said. This can make students more confident in their own capabilities and perhaps create an environment where they are more willing to take educational risks, she said.

Schools that distribute mobile devices to students more often lay this foundation, the survey shows. They also give students chances to collaborate with their peers on projects. Nearly half of high schoolers with an assigned laptop or Chromebook say they get to do this, while just one-third of high schoolers without those assigned devices say the same.

In focus groups, students say they really like the idea of peer-to-peer learning, Evans said. Sometimes teachers can’t explain things in ways they understand. Their peers can fill in the gaps.

Schools that distribute mobile devices to all students seem to create opportunities for this type of work more than schools that don’t. It’s not that a 1:1 student-to-device ratio necessarily means more group work for students or better peer leadership. But technology can help facilitate these classroom experiences, Evans said."
laptops  education  schools  teaching  learning  1to1  2018  edtech  technology  communication  relationships  tcsnmy  1:1 
september 2018 by robertogreco
PINEBOOK – PINE64
"Light and Thin 64-bit ARM based Open Source Notebook
PINEBOOK is an 11.6″ or 14″ notebook powered by the same Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-Bit Processor used in our popular PINE A64 Single Board Computer. It is lightweight and comes with a full size keyboard and large multi-touch touchpad for students and makers.

As a new open source platform, Pinebook development is an ongoing process and represents a great opportunity to get involved with computing on a different level, to customise and personalise the portable computer experience, to understand what is going on beneath the surface. Your input can help shape and define what a Pinebook can be."
hardware  openspource  linux  laptops 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Ana Mardoll on Twitter: "The thing about every "I did [ableist thing] and everyone was happy with me" article is that it relies heavily on human confirmation bias.… https://t.co/2wRZLAj4yF"
"The thing about every "I did [ableist thing] and everyone was happy with me" article is that it relies heavily on human confirmation bias. https://twitter.com/nrsmithccny/status/934032393572356096

Most humans are poised to believe that our decisions will have good outcomes. That's why we MAKE the decisions, after all. We pick what seems like the best decision and we hope it turns out well.

Recognizing that the decision was a BAD one in retrospect is REALLY HARD, and becomes even harder when we have to grapple with the fact that we hurt people in the process.

So when teachers ban laptops or fidget spinners or whatever, or when employers force everyone to wear fitbits and take the stairs, they're STARTING with the belief that this will have a good outcome.

Then we look at the words Nicholas has used there: "Low cost" to ban electronics. Well, for him it surely was!

For the students who had to scramble to buy paper and pens and bags to carry them in when they'd been EXPECTING to use the laptop they already owned... a bit more cost.

"Minimal Resistance". That isn't really surprising when we understand that disabled students aren't the majority--which is why they're so easy to stomp all over.

Also not surprising when we understand the high COST of "resisting". Easier to drop the class.

"Learning improved dramatically" but based on what? Knowing that this is a situation heavily prone to bias, how do we measure that?

This isn't pedantry. We're talking about a school. Research methods are important.

We also need to understand how fucked up it is when the goal is to maximize the experience for the geniuses in the class and if the bottom 10% drop out because it's too hard, that's considered a GOOD thing.

If banning electronics causes a "sharpening" of the grade curve--fewer "middle" students, but the higher ones get higher and the lower ones go lower--that means embracing the destruction of the weak in order to elevate your preferred students.

The American school system is competitive in really messed up ways, and electronics bans play into that. If you can't "cut it" with paper notes, you're left behind. Teaching as social Darwinism.

I am going to add, and folks aren't going to like this, that professors are some of the most ableist people on the planet. In my experience.

They've risen to the top of a heavily ableist system that is DEEPLY invested in pretending that it's merit-based.

In the midst of that merit-based pretense, they're also urged to believe that they're biologically better, smarter, cleverer, deeper thinkers.

So you have people who believe they are biologically better than disabled people but also think they know how to accommodate us. Red flags right there.

They're also steeped in a competitive atmosphere where learning takes a backseat to rankings and numbers games and competition.

So very quickly any accommodation seems like "cheating".

You need an extra hour to take the test? How is that FAIR to the OTHER students?

We wouldn't ask these questions if we weren't obsessively ranking and grading and comparing students to each other in an attempt to sift out the "best".

Why do we do that? Well, part of it is a dance for capitalism; the employers want a shiny GPA number so they know who will be the better employee.

But a lot of professors don't really think about that. They just live for the competition itself, and they view us as disruptive.

They also view us, fundamentally, as lesser. No matter how much we learn, we'll never be peak students because we're disabled.

That means we're disposable if we threaten the actual "peak" students and their progress.

That's why laptop ban conversations ALWAYS devolve into "but if you allow laptops for disabled kids, the able-bodied students will use them and be distracted!"

The worry is that the abled-kids who COULD be "peak" students won't be.

If the options are:

(1) Disabled kid, 3.5 GPA. Abled kid, 3.5 GPA.

(2) Disabled kid, 2.0 GPA, Abled kid, 4.0 GPA.

They'll pick #2 every time. They don't want everyone to do moderately well; they want a Star.

Professors want STARS, because a STAR means they're doing well. They're the best coach in the competitive sports they call "school".

Throwing a disabled student under the bus to make sure the able-bodied Star isn't distracted? No brainer. 9 out of 10 professors will do it.

I had very few professors--over 7 years and 2 schools--who recognized the ranking system was garbage.

One of them told us on the first day of class that we would all get As, no matter what we did. Told us that we didn't even need to show up, but that he HOPED we would because he believed we could learn from him.

I learned more from that class than maybe any other I took that year. The erasure of all my fear, anxiety, competition, and need to "win" left me able to focus SO much better.

It's INTERESTING that we don't talk about banning GRADES and instead we ban laptops.

We could improve learning dramatically if we banned grades. But we don't. Why not?

- Capitalism. We want employers to pick our students.

- Ableism. We LIKE ranking humans from better to worse.

- Cynicism. We don't believe students WANT to learn, we think we need to force them.

So in an effort to forced Abled Allen to be the best in a competition for capitalism, we ban laptops.

If Disabled Debbie does poorly after the laptop ban, it's no great tragedy; she was never going to be a 4.0 student anyway. Not like Abled Allen, the winner.

Anyway. Laptop bans are ableist. So is a moratorium on any notes whatsoever. Let students learn the way they feel comfortable learning.

And asking students to "trust" teachers will put disabled students first is naive in the extreme.

I don't "trust" a team coach to prioritize the needs of a third-string quarterback. Maybe some will, but most won't.

(Final note that there ARE good teachers out there and even good DISABLED teachers. I'm talking about systemic problems, not saying that all professors are evil. The problem is the system, not necessarily the people.)

(Although some of the people ARE trash. But only some.)

The original tweet is gone and please don't harass the teacher in question. Here's a screenshot for context, otherwise my thread makes little sense.

I want to add something that I touched on in another thread: Teachers are PROFOUNDLY out of touch when it comes to note-taking.

I guaran-fucking-tee these college teachers who "insist" their students note-take by hand aren't hand-writing to this extent.

For example, the quoted tweet has a professor saying "you just type whatever I say without thinking". That is so ridiculous.Ana My mobile still could load it.

Hardly anyone I know types fast enough to transcribe human speech.

When I take typed notes, I'm choosing what to include and what to leave out. Those choices are interacting with the material.

I'm not recording like a robot.

These professors have been out of the "student seat" for so long that they don't know what studenting is like.

They think we're transcriptionists when we're not. They think pen-and-paper students are paying perfect attention when they're not.

They think writing notes for 4-5 classes a day for 4-7 years is easy on the hands, when it's not.

They just don't KNOW, but (scarily!) they think they do."
notetaking  ableism  laptops  highered  highereducation  learning  education  meritocracy  capitalism  cynicism  grades  grading  sorting  ranking  teaching  howweteach  howwelearn  disabilities  disability  transcription  typing  lectures  resistance  socialdarwinism  elitism  competition  anamardoll 
november 2017 by robertogreco
How Chromebooks Are About to Totally Transform Laptop Design | WIRED
"That’s not to say the Chrome OS crew are fortune-tellers, of course. They did miss out on one very important thing: smartphones. You may have heard of them. “Back when we were starting Chrome OS,” Lin says, “the web and mobile were in a dead heat. We were betting big on the web, and the Android team was betting big on mobile.” He doesn’t say the obvious next part, which is that mobile and Android won.

There are still times when you want a keyboard and trackpad, though, or a screen larger than the palm of your hand. And lucky for the Chrome team, Android’s also part of Google. So the two teams started talking about how to integrate. They had lots of concerns about performance, integration, and above all security. A couple of years ago, a Chrome engineer ran an experiment: He took containers, a way of separating parts of a system that’s common in data centers, and ran them on a local machine. Android in one, Chrome OS is another. “A few of us saw it,” Sengupta says, “and our eyes literally opened up.” That was the answer.
Android apps solve a couple of Chrome OS’s lingering problems. Most important, they bring all the software people are now accustomed to using, onto a new platform. Remember when people used to complain about Chromebooks not having Word? There are now billions of people who now reasonably expect their laptop to have Snapchat and Uber. Apps also offer offline support in a much more robust way, and they bring the kind of multi-window, desktop-app functionality that feels familiar to the old-school Windows users. Of course, they also require totally different things than traditional computer software. Most apps assume you’re using them on small, touch-enabled screens, running on devices with cellular connections and a bunch of sensors that you definitely don’t have in your laptop.

So, OK, new question: what does a laptop look like in the age of mobile?

New Puzzle Pieces

Imagine you want to build a Chromebook. Great idea! Before you can do anything, you have to deal with Alberto Martin Perez, a product manager on the Chrome OS team. Perez is the keeper of Google’s documentation, the huge set of requirements and standards given to all Chromebook makers. The documentation is an ever-changing organism, concerned with everything from how much RAM and battery life a Chromebook needs, to how hard you have to press the trackpad before it registers as a click. If your Chromebook takes more than ten seconds to boot, or the power button isn’t on the top right? Get on the plane back to China and try again. The long, complex document is written in engineer-speak and is remarkably detailed. It’s Google’s first line of defense against corner-cutting manufacturers.

When Google decided to integrate Android apps with Chrome OS, Perez and his team combed through the documentation. “We wanted to make sure we were ahead,” Perez says. “It’s really easy to change a web app, it’s really hard to change a laptop.” Google now strongly recommends—which is a lightly-veiled warning that it’ll be mandatory soon—that every Chromebook include GPS, NFC, compass, accelerometer, a fingerprint reader, and a barometer. Those are all smartphone parts that have made little sense in a laptop before. But Android apps are inspiring manufacturers to make devices that move, that adapt, that take on different forms in different contexts.

Computer industry execs believe Chrome OS has come into its own, that people will now choose it over Windows for reasons other than price. For many new customers, says Stacy Wolff, HP’s global head of design, “their first device was a smartphone. And they look for the cleanliness, the simplicity, the stability of what we see in those devices.” That’s the thinking behind the sharp and business-like HP Chromebook 13, the company’s new $500 laptop. Wolf sounds eager to continue down the fancy road, too: When I ask why the Chromebook 13’s not as nice as the Windows-powered Spectre 13, which is one of the best-looking and lightest laptops ever made, he pauses to make sure he’s not giving too much away. “I can’t talk about the future, but there’s nothing that stops us from continuing to go and revolutionize that space.” The $1,000 Chromebook used to be a silly sideshow, Google’s way of overshooting. Soon enough, it’ll be a totally viable purchase.

The next few months are shaping up to be the PC market’s most experimental phase in a long time. The addition of Android apps “begs for higher performance hardware and new form factors to support these new use cases,” says Gary Ridling, Samsung’s senior vice president of product marketing. Batteries are more important than ever, as are touch-friendly displays. Windows manufacturers have been experimenting with convertible and detachable devices for the last few years, but the combination of Android and Chrome will actually make them work.

The results are already starting to trickle out. Acer announced the Chromebook R13, which has a 1080p, 13-inch touchscreen that flips 360 degrees, along with 12 hours of battery, 4 gigs of RAM, and up to 64 gigs of storage. It’ll only get crazier from here: you’ll see laptops that are maybe more like tablets, a few that are maybe even a little bit like smartphones, and every imaginable combination of keyboard, trackpad, and touchscreen. Google and its partners all see this as the moment Chromebook goes from niche—for school, or travel, or your Luddite dad—to mainstream. “The ability to run their favorite apps from phones and tablets,” Ridling says, “without compromising speed, simplicity, or security, will dramatically expand value of Chromebooks to consumers.”

When the legendary Walt Mossberg started his personal technology column at the Wall Street Journal in 1991, he opened with a now-classic line: “Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it isn’t your fault.” 25 long years later, that story’s finally changing. Chromebooks are exactly the computer the world needs now: simple, secure, usable. They just work. And starting this fall, they’ll work they work the way people do in 2016: online everywhere, all the time, in a thousand different ways. “Personal computing” left desks and monitors behind a long time ago, and personal computers are finally catching up."
chromebooks  laptops  2016  martiperez  android  chromeos  google  acer  srg 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Andromium's $99 Superbook turns your Android phone into a laptop (crowdfunding) - Liliputing
[See also:

"Superbook"
https://getsuperbook.com/

"The Superbook: Turn your smartphone into a laptop"
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/andromium/the-superbook-turn-your-smartphone-into-a-laptop-f

"Superbook is a $99 laptop shell for Android smartphones"
http://liliputing.com/2016/04/superbook-is-a-99-laptop-shell-for-android-smartphones.html

"This $99 gadget can turn your Android phone into a laptop — here's how it works"
http://www.techinsider.io/andromium-superbook-photos-android-phone-laptop-2016-8

"The Superbook is a $99 laptop shell for your Android phone: The dream of the Motorola Atrix lives"
http://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2016/7/11/12152850/superbook-laptop-shell-android-phone

"HP's Elite x3 is designed to be your Windows phone, laptop, and desktop: A powerful phone meant to be your one and only device"
http://www.theverge.com/2016/2/21/11068496/hp-elite-x3-announced-specs-windows-10-mwc-2016

"In Less Than Two Years, a Smartphone Could Be Your Only Computer"
https://www.wired.com/2015/02/smartphone-only-computer/ ]
superbook  chromebooks  android  laptops  hardware  2016  windows  windowsphone 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Apple Offers to Replace iPads With MacBooks in Maine State Classrooms - Mac Rumors
"Apple and the Maine Department of Education have offered to swap school iPads for MacBooks at no additional cost, after it emerged that students and teachers overwhelmingly favor the use of laptops in class.

According to a report in the Lewiston-Auburn Sun Journal, schools in Auburn and other districts in Maine are set to benefit from the "Refresh" swap, following surveys of students and teachers across grades 7 through 12, which revealed that 88.5 percent of teachers and 74 percent of students preferred laptops over iPads. "



"One teacher wrote in the survey that iPads "provide no educational function in the classroom. Students use them as toys. Word processing is near to impossible. I applaud this change."
chromebooks  ipads  laptops  edtech  technology  education  schools  sfsh  learning  apple  teaching  via:lukeneff  ipad 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Databite No. 76: Neil Selwyn - live stream - YouTube
"Neil Selwyn presents (Dis)Connected Learning: the messy realities of digital schooling: In this Databite, Neil Selwyn will work through some emerging headline findings from a new three year study of digital technology use in Australian high schools. In particular Neil will highlight the ways in which schools’ actual uses of technology often contradict presumptions of ‘connected learning’, ‘digital education’ and the like. Instead Neil will consider ….

• how and why recent innovations such as maker culture, personalised learning and data-driven education are subsumed within more restrictive institutional ‘logics’;

• the tensions of ‘bring your own device’ and other permissive digital learning practices • how alternative and resistant forms of technology use by students tend to mitigate *against* educational engagement and/or learning gains;

• the ways in which digital technologies enhance (rather than disrupt) existing forms of advantage and privilege amongst groups of students;

• how the distributed nature of technology leadership and innovation throughout schools tends to restrict widespread institutional change and reform;

• the ambiguous role that digital technologies play in teachers’ work and the labor of teaching;

• the often surprising ways that technology seems to take hold throughout schools – echoing broader imperatives of accountability, surveillance and control.

The talk will provide plenty of scope to consider how technology use in schools might be ‘otherwise’, and alternate agendas to be pursued by educators, policymakers, technology developers and other stakeholders in the ed-tech space."

[via: "V interesting talk by Neil Selwyn on ed-tech and (dis)connected learning in school"
https://twitter.com/audreywatters/status/718900001271783424 ]

"the grammar of schooling"
neilselwyn  edtech  byod  via:audreywatters  logitics  technology  teaching  learning  howweteacher  power  mobile  phones  ipads  laptops  pedagogy  instruction  resistance  compliance  firewalls  making  makingdo  youth  schools  design  micromanagement  lms  application  sameoldsameold  efficiency  data  privacy  education  howweteach  regimentation  regulation  rules  flexibility  shininess  time  schooliness  assessment  engagement  evidence  resilience  knowledge  schedules  class  leadership  performativity  schooldesign  connectedlearning  surveillance  control  accountability  change  institutions  deschooling  quest2play  relationships  curriculum  monitoring  liberation  dml  liberatorytechnology  society  culture  ethnography  schooling  sorting  discipline  ipad 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Rule of Three and other ideas
"and other handy thoughts: so many folks have asked me for a "quick start" set of rules for the design of 3rd Millennium learning spaces...
... this Rule of Three section and some of the other ideas here (see top of this page), have all been well received in conferences, seminars and most importantly adopted / shared with success by practitioners. These are proven, working ideas, so I thought it was time to park some of them on a web page:

***

rule of three - physical

I guess rule one is really that there is no absolutely right way to make learning better - schools are all different, their communities, contexts vary and as I have often observed on a windy day they become different places again. So you build your local recipe for great learning from the trusted and tested ingredients of others, adding a bit of local flair too. But this rule of three helps:

one: never more than three walls

two: no fewer than three points of focus

three: always able to accommodate at least three teachers, three activities (for the larger spaces three full "classes" too)

make no mistake - this is not a plea for those ghastly open plan spaces of the 1960s with their thermoplastic floors under high alumina concrete beams - with the consequent cacophony that deafened their teachers. Today's third millennium learning spaces are multi-faceted, agile (and thus easily re-configured by users as they use them), but allow all effective teaching and learning approaches, now and in the future, to be incorporated: collaborative work, mentoring, one-on-one, quiet reading, presentation, large group team taught groups... and more.

***

rule of three - pedagogic

one: ask three then me

A simple way to encourage peer support, especially in a larger mixed age, stage not age space, but it even works fine in a small 'traditional" closed single class classroom. Put simply the students should ask 3 of their peers before approaching the teacher for help. I've watched, amused in classes where a student approaches the teacher who simply holds up 3 fingers, with a quizzical expression and the student paused, turned and looked for help for her peers first. Works on so many levels...

two: three heads are better than one

Everyone engaging in team teaching reports that, once you get over the trust-wall of being confident that your colleagues will do their bit (see Superclasses) the experience of working with others, the professional gains, and the reduction in workloads are real and worthwhile. You really do learn rapidly from other teachers, the children's behaviour defaults to the expectations of the teacher in the room with the highest expectations, and so on. Remarkably schools especially report on the rapid progress of newly qualified teachers who move forward so quickly that people forget they are still NQTs. And older teachers at career end become rejuvenated by a heady mix of new ideas and of self esteem as they see that their "teaching craft" skills are valued and valuable.

three: three periods a day or fewer

Particularly in 2ndary schools a fragmented timetable of 5 or 6 lessons a day wastes so much time stopping and starting. Children arrive and spend, say, 3 minutes getting unpacked, briefed and started, then end 2 minutes before the "bell" and have 5 minutes travelling time between classes. On a 5 period day that is (3+2+5) x 5 = 50 minutes "lost" each day, 50 x 5 = 250 lost each week, which is effectively throwing away a day a week. Longer blocks, immersion can be solid blocks of a day of more, some schools even adopt a week, gets students truly engaged - and serves as a clear barrier to Dick Turpin teaching ("Stand and Deliver!") - which simply cannot be sustained for long blocks of time - thank goodness. This doesn't mean that the occasional "rapid fire" day (a bit like pedagogic Speed Dating!) can't be used to add variety. But longer blocks of time work better mainly.

***

rule of three - BYOD / UMOD

some schools adopting Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), or more recently Use My Own Device (UMOD - somehow, bringing them wasn't enough!) initially adopted really comprehensive "acceptable use policies" - bulging folders of policy that were neither understood nor adhered too (see for example the "sacrificial phones" mention under "What young people say" in the 2011 Nominet funded Cloudlearn research project).

Today though (2015) schools around the world, from Scandinavia to Australasia, are simpifying all this by three simple rules.

one: phones out, on the desk, screen up

Not everyone has a "desk" anymore of course, but the point here is that a device hidden under a work surface is more likely to be a problem than one on the worksurface, screen up. This makes it quick and easy to use, where appropriate, and simple to monitor by teachers or peers.

two: if you bring it, be prepared to share sometimes

This is more complex that it looks. Obviously handing your phone or tablet over to just anyone isn't going to happen, but the expectation that friends, or project collaborators, might simply pick up "your" device and chat to Siri, Google for resources, or whatever, means that bullying, inappropriate texts / images, or general misdemeanours are always likely to be discovered. Transparency is your friend here, secrecy masks mischief - and the expectation of occasional sharing is transparency enough. It also helps students develop simply safety / security habits - like logging out of social media to prevent Frapping or similar.

three: if you bring it, the school might notice and respond positively

If you've brought your own device along, the least you might expect is that the school gives you useful things to do, that you could not otherwise do, or couldn't do so well, without that device.

This requires a bit of imagination all round! A simple example would be the many schools that now do outdoor maths project tasks using the devices GPS trace capability (the device is sealed in a box during the excercise) like the children below tasked with drawing a Christmas tree on the park next to their school: estimating skills, geometry, measurement, scale, collaboration.... and really jolly hard to do with a pencil!

[image of a GPS traced tree]

***

knowing the 3rd millennium ABCs

A

ambition: how good might your children be?

agility: how quickly can we reconfigure to catch the wave - at a moment, only over a year, or at best across a generation?

astonishment: we want people to be astonished by what these children, and teachers, might achieve - how do we showcase this? how do we respond to it ourselves?

B

brave: what are others doing, what tested ideas can we borrow, how can we feed our own ideas to others? Brave is not foolhardy or reckless!

breadth: learning reaches out to who? embraces what? what support do you give for your school's grandparents for example?

blockers: you will need help with beating the blockers - if you run at the front, you need resources that win arguments: what is the evidence that...? why doesn't everyone do this...? where can I see it in action...? why should I change, ever...? all this exists of course (see top of page for example), but you need to organise it and be ready with it. A direct example is this workshop manual we developed for the new science spaces at Perth's Wesley College in Australia.

C

collegiality: that sense of belonging, of us-ness, sense of family, sharing, co-exploring, research. Also a sense of us (the team working on this innovation) being learners too - and able to show that we are trying cool stuff too - you won't win hearts and minds by saying but not doing;

communication: how does a learning space / building communicate what happens within? and this is about symmetry: how does the school listen to what happens outside school? how do we share and exchange all this with others?

collaboration: we don't want to be told, but we want to do this with others. How do we share what we learn as we do it? Who do we share with? How do we learn from them?"
tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  edtech  technology  schooldesign  stephenheppell  via:sebastienmarion  pedagogy  howweteach  howwelearn  education  teaching  learning  schools  collaboration  byod  umod  sharing  ambition  agility  astonishment  bravery  breadth  blockers  collegiality  communication  simplicity  mobile  phones  desks  furniture  computers  laptops  etiquette  conviviality  scheduling  teams  interdependence  canon  sfsh 
march 2016 by robertogreco
The Digital Disparities Facing Lower-Income Teenagers - The New York Times
"The study found some overarching themes. Teens and tweens, for instance, generally reported spending much more time watching television than they did on social media.

The study also analyzed the differences in children’s media use based on entertainment prototypes — such as mobile gamers, social networkers and heavy consumers of television and music — and by race, gender, household income and parents’ level of education.

The stark differences in daily activities among teenage and tween subgroups are likely to spur further research into the implications of such divergent media access and use.

“The reason that we need to be concerned about disparities here is that technology and media are now part and parcel of growing up in America,” said Ellen Wartella, the director of the Center on Media and Human Development at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. A professor of communication, she has conducted research on children, media and race.

“When there are disparities, even if it’s a question of how smart your phone is, teens and tweens may not have access to what they need — not just for school, but for other parts of their lives as well,” Dr. Wartella said. “They aren’t able to participate in the way that more wealthy teens and tweens are able to.”

The study also found that, while black teenagers and teenagers in lower-income households had fewer computers at home, those who did have access to smartphones and tablets typically spent more time using them each day than their white or higher-income peers."
us  inequality  digitaldivide  2015  teens  youth  socialmedia  media  television  tv  smartphones  laptops  computing  internet  web  online  ellenwartella 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Your Nostalgia Isn’t Helping Me Learn — The Synapse — Medium
[See also: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:fe14a9668c31 ]

"These stories keep popping up, recycling the same studies and confirming someone’s intuition that the “good old-fashioned way” is better.

But contrary to these claims, I would not have made it through my years of university courses without the technology I use every day. And I don’t mean specific “assistive technology” designed with “disabilities” in mind. I’m talking here about the notes I make on my phone when I’m chatting with someone, which serve as an extension of my brain — the course project documents, folders of articles, collected syllabi, images, screenshots, and more that are always available on my laptop or anywhere through my synchronized folders.

I rely on the over 170 notebooks in Evernote where I practically wrote my entire MA thesis and where I track all current projects, personal and academic. I worked a full time job for much of my undergraduate education and part of my MA and was able to do this because of the ability to search through all 70,000+ email messages from the last 15 years, the ability to search inside a journal article, search a PDF of a book and copy/paste the text. This technology is assistive for me as a student very simply because all technology is assistive technology.



“Research Shows”

Surely we can agree then that all technology is assistive. But what about in the classroom? What’s missing from these popular articles when they claim technology is a distraction in the classroom? How do they conclude assistive technology is getting in the way of learning when so many students like myself rely on it? And what are the consequences of banning technology in the classroom?

I’ll start by taking that article from Vox and looking at some of the claims. After that, I’ll look at what’s happening in classrooms where technology is banned.

I. The Vox article defines learning as remembering information. That’s funny, because learning is not memorizing, and I think all educators would agree on that.

At the same time that many educators will tell us testing misses the mark in evaluating students and that learning isn’t about facts and figures but about critical thinking skills, articles like this are shared widely with the opposite message: learning is your “ability to remember information.” But it isn’t, it’s your ability to synthesize information, think critically, and evaluate claims.

II. This article claims the problem with taking notes on laptops is that students “usually just mindlessly type everything a professor says.” But this isn’t actually a claim about taking notes on laptops vs. paper notebooks, this is an issue of note taking skills. I wouldn’t conflate the Vox article with the study it cites here, but on this point what Vox reports matches the abstract of the study quite well. I don’t agree, instead I’d suggest that if you have good note taking skills you can take good notes in any format.

If you are taught to discern what matters in a lecture or discussion or while reading, you can learn to take useful notes about anything in any format. This problem they bring up of students acting as stenographers is an issues of learning to learn, learning to think critically and yes these are skills that students need. The fact that they don’t have them certainly isn’t the fault of laptops, in fact we should be grateful that we can see they don’t have them by how they are (mis)using the laptops. As educators do we really like the idea that students can only decide what matters because “they can’t write fast enough to get everything down”?

III. The article says students who use laptops “have something unrelated to class” on the screen about 40% of the time. So…. they’re actually talking about a failure to “learn” among students who aren’t using the technology to engage in the class at all? These students are chatting with friends, shopping, doing whatever. So, what does this have to do with the technology or taking notes on a laptop? What does this have to do with using a laptop to learn? Nothing. But still, we get this summary “Research shows students who use laptops perform more poorly in classes.”

IV. Of course, the whole argument is all summed up as common sense, validated by science! What could go wrong with that and with popular reporting about it? If science AND common sense are clear on this — well, it must be true for all students, or maybe not? It certainly isn’t true for me or for other students I’ve seen and spoken with.

I’m picking on this Vox article because it is precisely this kind of article that is shared on Facebook and Twitter and through email lists, without being carefully read, without being critically analyzed. And it winds up standing in for well thought out technology policy and pedagogy in classrooms. I think it’s pretty ironic that the same people who get so excited about the article’s title (“Why you should take notes by hand — not on a laptop”) because it validates their pre-existing distrust of “technology” (i.e. everything invented after they were born), these same people then fail to think critically about the argument in the article. Hmmm…. Maybe they’re actually the ones who have trouble thinking critically when using a laptop?"



"Classrooms on the Anti-Tech Bandwagon

I’m now seeing Professors jumping on this bandwagon and proudly banning technology in the classroom. And even those who don’t are giving students lectures in class about how we should ban e-books at the university library, and telling students who use laptops in class they should really be writing in a notebook, that is, if they really want to learn… Faculty are even adding notes to their syllabi …"



"The pressure to use “real books” and write in a notebook (preferably a moleskine, right?) has emerged as part of a growing anti-technology fetish among academics, and popular culture broadly. I get the appeal and I love books! I would love it if I could do that, I want all paper books, a room full of them, with ferns and armchairs and whisky and whatever — but it just isn’t how I learn. And it’s expensive, and you have to move them around. And you can’t search in them in the same way. The more precarious academic lives become the more a book collection is a luxury many can’t afford in terms of cost and other factors.

For students like me, technology use in the classroom comes down to a question of how we learn. I need to be able to search a book, copy and paste passages. I’m a scholar because I have technology that allows me to organize, sort, and synthesize information that I wouldn’t otherwise be able to work with. I didn’t learn to be a scholar with paper and pen, or with a typewriter. And I wouldn’t have been able to make it through my degree programs, and excel at my studies, write a thesis, publish papers — without being able to use this technology. I, and many students out there like me, rely on laptops, tablets, phones, and online software in the classroom because it is all assistive technology."
michaeloman-reagan  notes  notetaking  assistivetechnology  ableism  laptops  education  technology  notebooks  memorization  learning  howwelearn  engagement  thinking  howwethink  howweteach  media  2015  typing  handwriting  copying  summarizing  transcribing  sarahendren  commonsense 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Michael Oman-Reagan on Twitter: "In which I point out some issues w/ a "you learn better without a laptop!" article. #ableism https://t.co/q49L9TfetU http://t.co/3gfwk5Db48"
[Update: This has now been expanded into an article: https://medium.com/synapse/your-nostalgia-isn-t-helping-me-learn-141bd0939153 ]

"In which I point out some issues w/ a "you learn better without a laptop!" article. #ableism https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578393387667206145 "

[In response to “To Remember More, Take Notes by Hand — Not on a Laptop: http://bit.ly/1AHy97v pic.twitter.com/0qewhIKsAU
https://twitter.com/calestous/status/578390475217973249 ” ]

"Or not, depending on how you learn, think, act, what media you're engaging with, etc. @calestous @SallieHanAnthro"
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578393387667206145

"While we're on it - let's look at what's going on in this article about taking notes in writing vs typing: http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578396742758084609

"First: They define learning as remembering information. Huh? Learning =/= memorizing. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/GSJs0llaN5 "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578397319701348352

"Second: They aren't talking abt laptops vs notebooks, they're talking abt note taking skills. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/RjrF01IBdF "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578397705476665345

"Third: They're talking abt students who aren't using tech to be engaged in the class at all. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/1QOfoHORIs "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578398374866628608

"And finally, of course, it's common sense, validated by science. What could go wrong... http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop pic.twitter.com/VbvJHdoKqi "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578398820377186304

"Of course what's wrong is they are ignoring fact that the tech is assistive for students who know how to use it. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578399129073774592

"So the key is to teach people how to use the tech. Not use those who take useless notes and shop as excuse. http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop "
https://twitter.com/OmanReagan/status/578399523581620224
michaeloman-reagan  notes  notetaking  assistivetechnology  ableism  laptops  education  technology  notebooks  memorization  learning  howwelearn  engagement  thinking  howwethink  howweteach  media  2015  typing  handwriting  copying  summarizing  transcribing 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Handwriting v. Laptops? Why People Ask the Wrong Question (and Why Think Pair Share Rules Yet Again) | HASTAC
"You wouldn't learn to play golf by attending a lecture about how to play golf. Of course. But there are other things that are important to your life that you have to just memorize and lectures don't work there either: You would not prepare for the written portion of your driver's test from a lecture. You would not prepare for a written citizenship test by attending a lecture about citizenship. The Kaplan people don't charge $$$ to help you prep for standardized college entrance tests by lecturing at you--and if they did, you would demand your money back.

Think about that. You know how you learn important things that you need in your daily life and it isn't from a lecture. If you had to take a test and you needed to retain content for a test that really mattered in your life, you would not choose to do it by sitting in someone's lecture about the content and taking notes (not notes by laptop, not notes by longhand). You would read the booklet or the website, you might take practice tests, you would see what you got right and what you got wrong, you would retake the practice tests, and on and on.

Now, if you teach at a university where you have hundreds of students in a class, you might think you have to lecture. Perhaps. But there are low cost ways of engaging students even in a large lecture hall. There's been a lot of talk about the "flipped classroom," where students watch a video of a lecture, read the material, and then come in and, instead of a lecture, there's a Socratic form of the dialogic question and answer session. Law schools have operated that way for decades.

But even better is the method called Think-Pair-Share. It's done low cost, with index cards, and you can read about it in detail here, "Single Best Way to Transform Classrooms of Any Size" I learned this method from a second-grade teacher. At any point in a class (in school or I do it in every lecture I give to a general audience too), you have students write the answer to a question you pose on an index card. I typically have them write three things. 90 seconds. Tops. Quick is best. Then I have them turn to another person, compare their six things, and together decide on the one best answer they want to present ("share") with the group as a whole where, of course, there will be other answers also arrived at through a similar dialogic process. When they share their answer with the larger group, they hear it in a new way, in a context of other answers. Sometimes we'll even have a "redo" after the general presentation, starting with three things, a discussion with one other partner, and then sharing--rarely do we hear the same things on the redo. This is brilliant method and structure for introverts, because somehow writing down on a card first makes it less painful to then discuss it with someone else and offer an idea out of seemingly nowhere. It tames that too-extroverted student who usually dominates class time. It makes for a far more diverse set of ideas and a richer experience.

Plus, unlike the binary of handwriting down a lecture versus typing down lecture notes, which persists with the same model of learning that we know is least effective for retention, applicability, and improvement, this turns content into process, dialogue, requires active engagement. And it is practical. One prof in the comment section on the blog cited above has her students sign their cards and turn them in: attendance, pop quiz, AND great learning exercise all at once."
education  learning  technology  laptops  handwriting  lectures  typing  2014  memorization  testing 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Laptops are quaint. | A Stick in the Sand
"This is an extraordinary exploitation of a mobile phone by the folks who brought the very slick Morpholioapps suite of creative apps for the iPad. While watching, I remembered very recently I caught myself looking at my Macbook Air, not even a year old yet, and thinking, “How quaint!” It is the best laptop I’ve ever used, arguably the best laptop, full stop, but, it suddenly occurred to me, it is still the legacy of the typewriter. The one thing that makes my Air great is the web.

But, the thing that web great is a mobile device.

I understand that for most of our schools–all that I know of, in fact–a laptop program is still the first step. We’re just not ready yet to let go of this old technology. But even as we are building our laptop programs, we need to be having a very serious discussion about how we will implement our mobile programs, or we are going to be caught flat-footed, again. The world is going mobile:

Indeed, a laptop program doesn’t ask us to really change our pedagogy. The same one we’ve been using for 200 years works pretty good on the device so rolling out a even a 1:1 program is comparatively easy. But mobile-based teaching/learning both enables and requires a significant change in pedagogy and methodology.

I get asked all the time, “Laptop, tablet or smartphone: if you could have just one for your students, which would it be?” The answer is, without hesitation or qualification, a smartphone. My second choice would be a tablet, like the iPad. My last option would be a laptop. You just get way more leverage from a smartphone (a topic for another post.) It will be mobile technologies that we will later call the catalyst for the educational renaissance."
mobile  phones  2014  1:1  laptops  technology  teaching  pedagogy  internet  howweteach  howwelearn  sensors  bradovenell-carter  1to1 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Raspberry Pi - Lapdock Connection
"Now that you have your nifty new Raspberry Pi, you'll need a display for it. Teensy analog monitors are pretty cheap, but what you really want is a decent HDMI display. Unfortunately, they're expensive, running from $150 on up into the thousands for the huge ones. But, for about $75 (or even as low as $40, used, on eBay) you can get a discontinued model of the notorious Motorola Atrix Lapdock, the one that sold for $500 a couple of years back, and it was a bargain at that price. The lapdock incorporates a razor-sharp 11" HDMI display, an almost-adequate keyboard-with-trackpad, twin speakers, and a high-capacity battery -- all in a thin two-pound package.

The Atrix Lapdock was manufactured to mechanically connect with the now-discontinued Motorola Atrix smartphone, in effect turning it into a laptop computer. The lapdock has two plugs on a foldout hinge -- a male micro-HDMI plug and a male micro-USB-A plug. These neatly mate with an Atrix phone, slipping right into appropriately positioned jacks on the side of the phone.

Fortunately for us, the lapdock's USB and HDMI ports are electrically standard, even if the physical connectors aren't. If we could just find the correct cables and adapters, we might be able to hook up our Raspberry Pi.

Maybe. Hopefully. . . .

Yes, it can indeed be done!

See http://rasathus.blogspot.com/2012/10/a-raspberry-pi-laptop-easy-way.html
for example.

In this Instructable I will break down the process in detail, with appropriate explanation and close-up pictures."

[See also: http://liliputing.com/2012/06/turn-a-raspberry-pi-into-laptop-with-a-70-motorola-lapdock.html and http://www.adafruit.com/blog/2012/09/05/make-a-raspberry-pi-laptop-with-an-atrix-4g-dock-video/ ]

[via (kinda): https://www.flickr.com/photos/http_gallery/sets/72157643689705505/ ]
diy  edg  raspberrypi  laptops  motorola 
april 2014 by robertogreco
The Failure of One Laptop Per Child
"The mission of the non-profit organization always stressed something broader, bigger -- One Laptop per Child meant empowerment, engagement, and education:

We aim to provide each child with a rugged, low-cost, low-power, connected laptop. To this end, we have designed hardware, content and software for collaborative, joyful, and self-empowered learning. With access to this type of tool, children are engaged in their own education, and learn, share, and create together. They become connected to each other, to the world and to a brighter future.
No mention of improving standardized test scores in there, you'll notice. No talk of "student achievement." "The best preparation for children," according to the OLPC website isn't test prep. It is "to develop the passion for learning and the ability to learn how to learn."

Standardized test scores in math and in language do not reflect "the ability to learn how to learn" -- they don't even purport to. But we fixate on test scores nevertheless.
laptops  computers  standardizedtesting  testing  learning  education  minimallyinvasiveeducation  holeinthewall  sugatamitra  nicholasnegroponte  2012  audreywatters  olpc 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Lament for the iGeneration | torontolife.com
"When I started teaching at Ryerson three years ago, I was 28—barely older than my students. Like them, I’m attached to my cellphone, laptop and Facebook account. So why is teaching in the digital age such a nightmare?"
teaching  via:jeeves  mobile  phones  laptops  facebook  attention  tcsnmy  learning  highereducation  highered  disconnect  generations  technology  online  web  internet  ubiquitouswebconnections  society  schools  education  twitter  universities  colleges 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Least Restrictive Environment - Practical Theory
"I was thinking about Special Ed concept of Least Restrictive Environment & idea that many of the concepts of special education, such as an IEP, are concepts we should want for every student...

Banning all these devices when there are many kids who can use them wisely & well is not putting kids into the least restrictive environment for their own learning.

Yes, there are some kids who struggle—despite many opportunities to figure how to manage it—to use technology in a classroom without it serving as a distraction. Let's admit that. [some examples & solutions]...Those instances are absolutely the exception, not the rule. (In talking w/ colleagues, I'd say that cell phone misuse is much lower at SLA than it is at schools that theoretically ban their existence.)...

But banning their use or locking up every laptop would hamstring so much of what we do, & it would not be, for the overwhelming majority of students, the least restrictive environment in which they could—& do—learn."
chrislehmann  specialed  leastrestrictiveenvironment  cellphones  mobile  phones  laptops  filtering  learning  empowerment  tcsnmy  individualized  teaching  schools  policy  blanketpolicies  restrictthemallforthedifficultiesoffew  millennials  technology  theyrealldifferentbutweshouldtreatthemthesame  ieps  digital 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Society of Surveillance | John C. Dvorak | PCMag.com
"Very few schools teach civics or ethics anymore, and apparently few school teachers or administrators know what these terms mean. I have not heard much in the way of outrage by any other schools regarding this practice, which began with monitoring stolen goods and appears to have deteriorated into out-and-out spying and surveillance for fun. What does this tell you about American school systems? They're top heavy with administration and out of touch with reality. No wonder parents want to home-school."
education  schools  ethics  spying  privacy  security  surveillance  johndvorak  tcsnmy  civics  laptops  1to1  1:1 
july 2010 by robertogreco
City Brights: Howard Rheingold : Attention literacy
"Mindfulness and norms, my students helped me see, are essential tools for those who would master the arts of attention.

The point of this story isn't to get everyone to pay attention to me or professors in general - it's that I want my students to learn that attention is a skill that must be learned, shaped, practiced; this skill must evolve if we are to evolve. The technological extension of our minds and brains by chips and nets has granted great power to billions of people, but even in the early years of always-on, it is clear to even technology enthusiasts like me that this power will certainly mislead, mesmerize and distract those who haven't learned - were never taught - how to exert some degree of mental control over our use of laptop, handheld, earbudded media."
education  howardrheingold  pedagogy  multitasking  laptops  learning  attention  1to1  1:1  21stcenturylearning  21stcenturyskills  literacy  learning2.0  classroom  tcsnmy  mobile  phones  media  socialmedia  lindastone  continuouspartialattention  productivity  mindfulness  listening  conversation  focus  classrooms 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Anytime Anywhere Learning Foundation
"The goal of the Anytime Anywhere Learning Foundation (AALF) is to ensure that all children have access to unlimited opportunities to learn anytime and anywhere and that they have the tools that make this possible. To achieve this, AALF helps schools develop visionary leadership and knowledgeable, innovative educators.

We want to hear from you! Is your school conducting research around your 1-to-1 initiative? What type of research is it? Please share your experience with us here. We would love to hear from you! What Blogs and Twitterers do you follow? Check out our list here, and send us your favorites! In the next few months we will be celebrating the 20th anniversary of 1-to-1, and will be devoting an issue to this important benchmark. If you have any stories you'd like to share about the early years of 1-to-1, please let us know."
1:1  elearning  1to1  laptops  21stcenturyskills  education  learning  21stcenturylearning  aalf  edtech  tcsnmy 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Summer Institute : Constructing Modern Knowledge
"minds-on institute for educators committed to creativity, collaboration and computing. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in intensive computer-rich project development with peers and a world-class faculty. Inspirational guest speakers and social events round out the fantastic event. Alfie Kohn, Deborah Meier, Dr. James Loewen and Peter Reynolds are guest speakers.

Rather than spend days listening to a series of speakers, Constructing Modern Knowledge is about action. Attendees will work and interact with educational experts concerned with maximizing the potential of every learner. ...

list of potential themes for exploration: Creativity and learning, Constructivism and constructionism, Project-based learning, 1:1 Computing, Problem solving across the curriculum, Student leadership and empowerment, Reinventing mathematics education, Computer science as a basic skill, Storytelling, School reform, Tinkering, Effective professional development, Sustaining innovation"
education  technology  summer  1:1  teaching  laptops  e-learning  conferences  events  2010  constructivism  alfiekohn  deborahmeier  math  compsci  creativity  learning  constuctionism  problemsolving  reform  schoolreform  tcsnmy  tinkering  innovation  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  1to1 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Israel’s Time To Know Aims To Revolutionize The Classroom
"Time To Know designs and produces what it calls ‘full digital curriculum coverage,’ which is a complete year’s worth of lesson plans, learning activities, and homework assignments. To grasp just what an immense undertaking this is, multiply these by the four subjects matters Time To Know targets—math, science, language arts and social studies—and now multiply that by 13 year’s worth of education (kindergarten plus 12 formal years of schooling). To put this into perspective, in a single year Time To Know produces animation with a combined length of one and a half feature films." [Sites constructivism, but doesn't sound like it.]
constructivism  learning  technology  innovation  curriculum  computers  elearning  entrepreneurship  e-learning  techcrunch  1:1  israel  lms  startup  education  laptops  classroom  differentiatedlearning  timetoknow  classrooms  1to1 
february 2010 by robertogreco
tcsnmy7 - An open letter to those in attendance at The Children’s School Board of Trustees pre-board forum on Monday, January 25
Follow-up to a presentation about the NMY program and Q&A with students including reference to articles mentioned and an introduction to others not mentioned during the talk. Topics include progressive education, one-to-one laptop programs, transparency, high scool and college admissions, and the purpose or 'big meaning' of education. Also posted at: http://tcsnmy6.tumblr.com/post/358630658/an-open-letter-to-those-in-attendance-at-the-childrens
cv  comments  tcsnmy  school  schooling  putpose  1to1  laptops  technology  philosophy  meaning  why  del.icio.us  bookmarks  transparency  hollandchristian  ap  future  appreciation  admissions  highereducation  highschool  colleges  universities  reflection  1:1 
january 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: When rethinking the school itself... [This sounds so familiar, validates much of our thinking.]
"Holland Christian decided a few years ago to become a 1:1 school...realized that changing student tools was just one part of rethinking...needed to rebuild & reorganize - new tools would only be meaningful if educational environment altered in ways that let the tools really change things...dropping text books for authentic materials & acceptance of multiple - & student chosen - ways of demonstrating knowledge...rebuilding classrooms so there was no "front"...1:1 initiative that had been shaped by a commitment to rethinking school, & centering the form of school on what students need now - collaboration, access to & effective use of global information, trust in students, belief in leveraging the world of today rather than avoiding it, and universal design..."The equipment really isn't important, we've learned to embrace the student control and interaction & we'll keep doing that.""
1:1  apple  education  lcproject  tcsnmy  learning  deschooling  gamechanging  slow  rethinking  unschooling  student-led  reorganization  schools  schooling  laptops  technology  mobilephones  smartboards  hollandchristian  michigan  1to1 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Insane XO prices!!! Every Laptop must go!! - OLPC News
"Nicholas is insane. Rather like Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo, Galileo, or the Wright brothers, or Nikola Tesla, in their various ways. & he is insane enough to get funding for the project, manufacturing, buyers, volunteers. Is he insane enough to get countries to buy computers for up to a billion children? Time will tell. But he is not completely insane...crazy to offer 1080p video on a 1024×600 display, & it would be. But notice the HDMI output. & this isn't a $75 laptop or tablet. We don't have a price yet, although a lot of people...hoping for $300. We'll find out at CES...But what does it become if you cut out features that an XO doesn't require? Android, GPS & other sensors, NVIDIA graphics chipset, HDMI, some storage, some resolution...?
olpc  nicholasnegroponte  xo-3  xo  laptops 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Barbarians with Laptops - robertogreco {tumblr}
Hi Katie. Thank you for the mention over at Clay Burell's blog and thanks for all the thought provoking quotes and links. I’ve got a few thoughts directed to you in a comment that doesn't appear to have made it through Clay's comment filter (not surprising given the length). So, I put it together with my previous comment and posted it to my not-quite-a-blog on Tumblr.

[commenting on: http://beyond-school.org/2009/12/29/barbarians-with-laptops-an-unreasonable-fear/ ]
comments  tcsnmy  laptops  1to1  learning  education  cv  clayburell  teaching  technology  content  skills  students  time  1:1 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Barbarians with Laptops: An Unreasonable Fear? at Beyond School
"I’ll start with saying I’m still uncomfortable with the opportunity cost notion. As a history teacher — which to me means “preparation for informed citizenship” teacher — I’m not sure I want to sacrifice time that could be used learning and drawing conclusions from human history on the altar of failed web 2.0 experimentation. ... Whatever your subject matter, I’d love to see specific examples of digital tools and practices that, either through research-based evidence or your own direct observation, you think enhance the learning of content or the development of skills in the classroom."

[my comments here too: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/309355692/barbarians-with-laptops ]
comments  teaching  technology  1to1  laptops  education  clayburell  content  skills  learning  students  time  tcsnmy  1:1 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Op-Art - The Daily Grind - NYTimes.com
"In New York City, where the unemployment rate remains at 10.3 percent, the jobless have started leaning hard on coffee shops and bookstores to get out of their tiny one-bedrooms and away from their annoying roommates. In these harsh, career-vanishing times, the members of this laptop brigade do everything they can to re-create the office environment they no longer have to complain about."
unemployment  mobile  office  work  thirdplaces  neo-nomads  nomads  laptops  thirdspaces  cafes  openstudioproject 
november 2009 by robertogreco
How Researchers Can Silence Teachers’ Voices « Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice [via: http://www.tuttlesvc.org/2009/11/problem-with-teachers-self-reporting-on.html]
"Over the years, I have interviewed many teachers...have told me that using computers, Smart Boards & other high-tech devices have altered their teaching significantly...listed changes they have made such as their Powerpoint presentations & students doing Internet searches in class. They told me about using email w/ students. Teachers using Smart Boards said they can check immediately if students understand a math or science problem through their voting on the correct answer. I then watched many of these teachers teach. Most teachers used the high-tech devices as they described in their interviews. Yet I was puzzled by their claim that using these devices had substantially altered how they taught. Policymaker decisions to buy and deploy high-tech devices was supposed to shift dominant ways of traditional teaching to student-centered, or progressive approaches. That is not what I encountered in classrooms."
teaching  technology  pedagogy  progressive  smartboards  laptops  learning  school  education 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Always Innovating: Introducing the Touch Book
"The world's first netbook with a detachable keyboard. More than 10 hours of battery life*. Touchscreen with 3D user interface. Internal USB slots."
hardware  computing  opensource  linux  touch  mobile  netbooks  laptops  technology  touchscreen 
august 2009 by robertogreco
On What it Would Mean to Really Teach Naked ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"I agree with this: "Eliminating technology produces not the effect of a more engaged literate student populous, rather it produces the reverse, an ill informed, uncritical, unengaged student populous who will become at the very best passive consumers of the technology being resisted, and at the worst its willing victims." Which is why it's a shame that the Chronicle's report on SMU professor Jose Bowen is framed as as an anti-technology stance, instead of what it really is, an effort to improve, not eliminate, technology."
stephendownes  technology  education  criticalthinking  teaching  laptops  learning  schools 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Trojan Horse Yourself: XO not Kindle
"If we're giving every kid a "laptop," people will start worrying about whether they can do video editing on it, etc and all of a sudden it costs $600. And if it is a "laptop project" it will be expected to provide a significant return on investment in the form of test scores, and the evidence for that is, well, not conclusive enough to convince those who aren't inclined to believe it.
tomhoffman  olpc  laptops  kindle  ebooks  education  technology  schools 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Asus Eee PCs in USA Schools: A First-Hand Report - OLPC News
"Laptops make a good school better, but they don't make a bad school good.
schools  education  computers  laptops  technology  1to1  writing  learning  tcsnmy  1:1 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Laptop Tips from Current Parents to Incoming Parents
"We have gathered the following tips and thoughts about the 1-1 laptop program from 6th, 7th, and 8th grade parents at Nueva. They have shared these thoughts with the hope that they might help other parents have a smooth transition into this new program. While every family is different, as is each child, some of these comments might help you and your child to avoid problems and maximize the benefits of the laptop program. You might also want to download and review the booklet, "Growing Up Online" from the PBS Frontline episode."
laptops  schools  parenting  nuevaschool  education  learning  1to1  internet  tcsnmy  1:1 
april 2009 by robertogreco
City Brights: Howard Rheingold : Attention literacy
"The point of this story isn't to get everyone to pay attention to me or professors in general - it's that I want my students to learn that attention is a skill that must be learned, shaped, practiced; this skill must evolve if we are to evolve. The technological extension of our minds and brains by chips and nets has granted great power to billions of people, but even in the early years of always-on, it is clear to even technology enthusiasts like me that this power will certainly mislead, mesmerize and distract those who haven't learned - were never taught - how to exert some degree of mental control over our use of laptop, handheld, earbudded media."
howardrheingold  attention  learning  teaching  technology  distraction  mobile  phones  laptops  media  socialnetworks  socialmedia 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Survey Says Baby Boomers Think Playing With Your Blackberry During A Meeting Is Rude
"The generation gap all too often expresses itself as a technology gap. A survey of white collar workers (most of them in the legal profession) commissioned by NexisLexis offers a glimpse at changing attitudes towards technology between Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Gen Yers. ... My advice to anyone who finds Blackberry or laptop use during meetings rude or distracting: have fewer meetings or get to the point faster. Invariably, the conversations people are having on their laptops, iPhones, and Blackberries are increasingly more interesting than the ones that are going on in the room."
attention  genx  geny  netgen  boomers  babyboomers  generations  technology  communication  work  etiquette  laptops  mobile  phones  twitter  facebook  email  continuouspartialattention  meetings 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Digital Citizenship | the human network
"the younger generation has different values where the privacy of personal information is concerned, but even they have limits they want to respect & circles of intimacy they want to defend. Showing them how to reinforce their privacy with technology is a good place to start in any discussion of digital citizenship. Similarly, before a child is given a computer – either at home or in school – it must be accompanied by instruction in the power of the network. A child may have a natural facility with the network without having any sense of the power of the network as an amplifier of capability. It’s that disconnect which digital citizenship must bridge. It’s not my role to be prescriptive. I’m not going to tell you to do this or that particular thing, or outline a five-step plan to ensure that the next generation avoid ruining their lives as they come online. This is a collective problem which calls for a collective solution. Fortunately, we live in an era of collective technology."

[video here: http://blog.futurestreetconsulting.com/?p=141 ]
markpesce  education  learning  pedagogy  children  tcsnmy  computers  laptops  mobile  phones  constructivism  digitalcitizenship  socialmedia  etiquette  networkliteracy  literacy  future 
april 2009 by robertogreco
In-class laptop use sparks backlash, possibly lower grades - Ars Technica
"1:1 laptop programs do seem to help with the students' ability to use the technology they're exposed to & a variety of studies show what might be an unexpected benefit: improved writing skills...ease of using a word processor + ability to go back & modify things that would otherwise have been committed to paper, helps students learn how to write more coherent and persuasive text. Outside of these areas...benefits of 1:1 ...mixed. Different studies have found changes in math & science test performance...inconsistent. In general...benefits of laptops come in cases where the larger educational program has been redesigned to incorporate their unique capabilities, and the teachers have been trained in order to better integrate laptop use into the wider educational experience. Both of these processes are resource-intensive, and the degree of their success may vary from classroom to classroom even in a single school, which is likely to explain the wide variability in the results."
laptops  1to1  education  colleges  universities  assessment  engagement  teaching  attention  learning  writing  edtech  highereducation  tcsnmy  1:1 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The Netbook Effect: How Cheap Little Laptops Hit the Big Time
"about 95 percent of what I do on a computer can now be accomplished through a browser. I use it for updating Twitter and Facebook and for blogging. Meebo.com lets me log into several instant-messaging accounts simultaneously. Last.fm gives me tunes, and webmail does the email. I use Google Docs for word processing, and if I need to record video, I can do it directly from webcam to YouTube. Come to think of it, because none of my documents reside on the netbook, I'm not sure I even need the trash can. Netbooks have ended the performance wars. ... Most of the time, we do almost nothing. Our most common tasks—email, Web surfing, watching streamed videos—require very little processing power. ... What netbook makers have done, in effect, is turn back the clock: Their machines perform the way laptops did four years ago."
clivethompson  netbooks  laptops  computers 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Mobiles versus Laptops at Many Possibilities
"To argue that laptops are a solution as opposed to mobiles reinforces a dichotomy between mobile networks and the Internet that frankly should not exist." ... "The future is not mobile or laptops. It’s an unpredictable mash-up of phones, computers, and innovative connectivity solutions. The single most important thing that needs to happen is to lower the network charges and get mobile phones and networks running over IP so that the networked innovation that we beginning to see in the developing world can really take off."

[via: http://www.experientia.com/blog/the-olpc-versus-the-mobile-phone-a-false-dichotomy/ ]
olpc  mobile  phones  laptops  netbooks  future  connectivity  africa  corydoctorow 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The OLPC versus the Mobile Phone - A False Dichotomy | MobileActive.org
"Song is right when he says that "the future is not mobile or laptops. It’s an unpredictable mash-up of phones, computers, and innovative connectivity solutions." With definite trends towards greater openness in the mobile walled garden, it is a matter of time and pressure to achieve lower communication costs, IP-connectivity, open systems and standards, and bottom-up innovations develivered over a variety of devices. Mobile phones are an integral part of the equation because of their prevalence and ease of use for people all over the world. It is undeniable that there is much work to be done for the potential of mobile phones for social and economic evelopment to be realized, but leaving mobiles out of the universe of networked innovation is foolish. All Doctorow has to do is look around in every community in the world and he would not, in Steve Song's words, "underestimate what people with achieve with a tiny piece of screen real-estate as long as it's connected.""

[via: http://www.experientia.com/blog/the-olpc-versus-the-mobile-phone-a-false-dichotomy/ ]
olpc  phones  mobile  laptops  netbooks  corydoctorow  connectivity  africa 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Sci-Tech Today | Getting Mobile Technology into Schools
"Rather than spending a bundle on building a sophisticated wireless infrastructure and another bundle on maintaining it, a school could make use of cell-phone computers and the telecoms' existing wireless infrastructure for Internet access. Besides connectivity at school, the students would then have wireless access to the Internet at home."
mobile  phones  schools  education  tcsnmy  learning  mobile-computing  mobilelearning  leapfrogging  laptops  information  teaching  lcproject 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Wiki:this very short warning | Social Media CoLab
"This is definitely related to the mindfulness-about-laptops-in-class issue. The technology has leaped ahead of social norms -- the ways we integrate social processes like college courses with media like Wi-Fi. So I'm interested -- as you should be -- in finding what the advantages and dangers of unfettered use of laptops during class meetings are, then exploring ways to leverage the advantages and avoid the dangers. My hypothesis, formulated inductively by experimenting with four previous classes, is that it's a mixture of attention-training (just as note-taking is a form of attention-training) and social norms (if most people put their laptop away most of the time, when they aren't using it to look up something class-related, then most people will be able to Facebook, email, or Twitter part of the time). So there is a collective action social dilemma involved, akin to the tragedy of the commons. Individual self-interest, if aggregated enough, can act counter to the interests of all."
learning  laptops  society  etiquette  teaching  information  multitasking  attention  pedagogy  overload  filtering  via:preoccupations  newmedia  flow  time  rss  gtd  socialmedia 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: One Laptop Per Child - what went wrong? | Technology | guardian.co.uk
“Mobile phones are necessarily an interim step. Adding software...difficult or impossible without permission of a central carrier...very hard for local technologists who have a very particular, local itch that needs scratching ...Mobile phone use is always metered, limiting their use and exacting a toll on people who can least afford to pay it. Worst of all, the centralised nature of mobile networks means that in times of extremis, governments and natural disasters will wreak havoc on our systems, just as we need them most.
olpc  corydoctorow  technology  mobile  phones  education  digitaldivide  laptops  development  it  africa  future 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Inflection Points | the human network
"Make no mistake, this inflection point in education is going inevitably going to cross the gap between tertiary and secondary school and students. Students will be able to do for themselves in ways that were never possible before. None of this means that the teacher or even the administrator has necessarily become obsolete. But the secondary school of the mid-21st century may look a lot more like a website than campus. The classroom will have a fluid look, driven by the teacher, the students and the subject material.
markpesce  education  itunes  ratemyteachers  ratemyprofessors  ratemylectures  alacarteeducation  universities  colleges  explodingschool  teaching  learning  gamechanging  lcproject  tcsnmy  network  itunesu  students  online  internet  1to1  laptops  australia  lifelonglearning  unschooling  deschooling  elearning  e-learning  onlinelearning  self-directedlearning  1:1 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Fluid Learning | the human network
"What’s most interesting about the computer is how it puts paid to all of our cherished fantasies of control. The computer – or, most specifically, the global Internet connected to it – is ultimately disruptive, not just to the classroom learning experience, but to the entire rationale of the classroom, the school, the institution of learning. And if you believe this to be hyperbolic, this story will help to convince you." ... "In this near future world, students are the administrators. All of the administrative functions have been “pushed down” into a substrate of software. Education has evolved into something like a marketplace, where instructors “bid” to work with students."
education  learning  future  socialnetworking  curriculum  crowdsourcing  networkedlearning  connectivism  laptops  pedagogy  networks  control  administration  leadership  management  open  sharing  gamechanging  flattening  e-learning  web2.0  community  freelanceteaching  organization  lcproject  universities  colleges  markpesce 
december 2008 by robertogreco
OLPC News: Open Source XO Bag for Open Source XO Laptop
"Over on the OLPC News Forum there is a whole conversation around custom XO laptop bags. In one group, you have people like Mike Lee who searches for colorful bags that that fit the XO perfectly. In the other group, you have people like eclaire99 who made her own bag. Still, my favorite XO laptop bag is the Open Source Hansel & Gretel XO bag from OLPC Austria. Just check out ChristophD's H&G XO bag demonstration at OLPC-LCDC back in December 2007:"
olpc  sewing  make  diy  bags  glvo  laptops  edg  srg 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Digital Nomads [via: http://www.experientia.com/blog/dells-digital-nomads/]
"Digital Nomads is a community site for individuals that work or play without regard for their physical location. It is a place where they can come together to read about other digital nomads, share ideas, tips and tricks, and best practices, and read the latest nomad-oriented news. Digital Nomads live a lifestyle where their laptop and other electronic devices create the center of their office and/or play-space. Digital Nomads is Powered By Dell."
nomads  technology  dell  marketing  laptops  mobile  neo-nomads 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Why Microsoft and Intel tried to kill the XO $100 laptop - Times Online
"Nicholas Negroponte had a vision: to build a $100 laptop and give away millions to educate the world’s poorest children. And then the fat-cat multinationals got scared and broke it... "
olpc  microsoft  intel  capitalism  competition  negroponte  linux  laptops  education  technology  economics  business  opensource  mit 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Proyecto CEIBAL Florida: Y si hablamos de creadores...
"Agustín Gallo y Cristian Fleitas son dos alumnos que concurren a la Escuela Nº 116 "República Argentina" de Florida. Ellos, luego de experimentar todos los recursos que nos brinda la XO, sintieron que estaban "aburridos". Gracias a la prima de Cristian descubrieron el Scratch y desde ese momento no lo abandonaron más."
olpc  uruguay  laptops  scratch  programming  learning  children  proyectoceibal  edg  srg  glvo  planceibal  coding  teaching 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Adeona: A Free, Open Source System for Helping Track and Recover Lost and Stolen Laptops
"the first Open Source system for tracking the location of your lost or stolen laptop that does not rely on a proprietary, central service. This means that you can install Adeona on your laptop and go — there's no need to rely on a single third party. W
security  opensource  tracking  software  mac  linux  windows  location  utilities  free  laptops 
july 2008 by robertogreco
On the Uses and Abuses of Laptops in Education | Beyond School [lots to think about here]
it’s not enough to “give professional development workshops” to teachers about 21st century education...laptop schools that don’t truly, really, really have true, true, true “coordination” of instruction risk burning students out
1to1  laptops  schools  blogging  teaching  learning  curriculum  professionaldevelopment  training  technology  leadership  administration  management  online  internet  filmmaking  students  classideas  gamechanging  change  reform  clayburell  development  edtech  education  1:1 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Laptops in lectures: Doonesbury on the value of laptops in lecture theatres, 16/05/08, Autology: John Dale's blog
"when you think about it, is he really saying that it’s a good thing or a bad thing? Googling to find the answer to a (lecture-related!) question is way more constructive than checking your Facebook page, and is just the sort of thing that advocates of
attention  education  laptops  colleges  universities  learning  lectures 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect: English Caff Condiment Norms + different ways to encourage laptop wielding customers to leave
"Part of the issue with laptops being perceived as anti-social is that it is a black box - you could be engaged in a task that takes 5 minutes or 5 hours, an uncertainty that creates tension. What is it that makes using a mobile phone or reading a newspap
etiquette  society  behavior  public  norms  laptops  technology  mobile  phones 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Liliputing: Comprehensive list of low-cost ultraportables
"Some will run Linux, while others will be preloaded with Windows XP or Vista. Some will have flash memory, while others will have hard drives. But every one will be smaller, lighter, and cheaper than most existing laptop computers. Here's a roundup of so
hardware  laptops  eeepc  UMPC  technology  computing  computers  portable 
april 2008 by robertogreco
RIP laptop formfactor: you served us well
"I love my laptops and have to really stretch my brain to think that in 3-5 years, I'll be looking back at this svelte Macbook Air in the same way that I saw the last desktop tower I ushered out of the house last fall. But it's coming"
iphone  computing  future  hardware  laptops  mobile  mobilecomputing  via:preoccupations  mobility  gamechanging 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Advocating for Boring
"many initiatives in current 1:3 or 1:4 student to computer ratio schools have failed not because of lack of training, but lack of ubiquity & consistency...teacher must feel that computers are here, work, aren't going away, ever."
technology  schools  professionaldevelopment  ubiquity  computers  laptops  mobile  phones  it  leadership  administration  management  teaching  olpc 
march 2008 by robertogreco
ScribeMedia.Org » Mary Lou Jepsen at Greener Gadgets: XO Laptop Keynote
"Every manufacturer...claimed that using recyclable & non-toxic materials would add $30 to cost...Faced with these challenges, the OLPC team wound up designing the most environmentally-friendly laptop ever, almost by accident."
olpc  energy  environment  sustainability  technology  ecology  laptops  design  maryloujepsen 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Emily’s Playground » G1G2 - Get One Give Two XO OLPCs [on donating the G1G1 laptop to a program in Haiti and...]
"really love powerful MacBook Air with XO’s ruggedness, openness and flexibility...elegant, sophisticated, slim, lightweight Fisher Price My First Mac case with Pro brains...easily replacable, recyclable components to cut down on the massive amounts of
olpc  donations  laptops  design  comments  haiti  apple  macbookair  mac 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The MacBook Air could easily be the only machine - (37signals)
"I think we’ve reached the point where the computational firepower for laptops is simply Good Enough in the Innovator’s Dilemma sense of the term. Meaning that the puck is going to go somewhere else. That we’ll start caring about other things now."
computers  computing  laptops  mac  macbookair  future  power  cloud  cloudcomputing  trends 
february 2008 by robertogreco
A School That's Too High on Gizmos
""technolust" -- a disorder affecting publicity-obsessed school administrators nationwide that manifests itself in an insatiable need to acquire the latest, fastest, most exotic computer gadgets, whether teachers and students need them or want them"
1to1  criticism  edtech  technology  schools  money  trends  administration  leadership  learning  education  opinion  laptops  1:1 
february 2008 by robertogreco
edublogs: Who needs OLPC? Just get the 'C' bit involved...
"this is also a sign of where the students are given large doses of trust and responsibility - they can just bring in their own laptops and gaming devices and hook them up to the wifi network that runs throughout the schools"
schools  laptops  1to1  learning  sharing  education  trust  policy  technology  1:1 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Remote Access: Who Cares About the Box? The box matters less less. It is simply a channel.
"used to dream of 20 iBooks...All connected...Now I have 2 old desktops, 1 Asus Eee (10 coming), 8 students own laptops...Dell, Gateway, Toshiba & Sony...2 students who realize they can use new iPods as more then containers for music."
classroom  schools  technology  1to1  laptops  diversity  platformagnostic  online  internet  ipod  ipodtouch  touch  anymeans  teaching  learning  students  classrooms  1:1 
january 2008 by robertogreco
bunnie’s blog » Blog Archive » OLPC XO-1
"its mechanical design is brilliant...fairly clean-sheet redesign of traditional notebook PC mechanics around the goal of survivability, serviceability, and robustness"
olpc  laptops  analysis  unboxing  hacking  hardware  design  reviews  technology 
january 2008 by robertogreco
OLPC versus eeePC « Toni’s Garage
"I’d feel good recommending either one, though I’m currently more excited about the XO, because it’s more innovative and has more potential. Next step is to let my kids try them and see what happens."
olpc  laptops  children  schools  education  learning  hardware  eeepc  via:preoccupations 
december 2007 by robertogreco
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