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Maker Movement Reinvents Education
"Ten years from now, primary and secondary education may look more like a scene from Tim Allen’s workshop in The Santa Clause than Ben Stein’s economics class in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. In some schools, like San Diego’s High Tech High, it already does."



"Tony Wagner, current expert in residence at Harvard University’s new Innovation Lab, and the founder of Harvard’s Change Leadership Group, calls High Tech High his “favorite school” and says of what goes on there, “That’s the future.” According to Wagner, the idea of school as a place where knowledge is transferred from teacher to student, whose success is measured by the accuracy of his/her regurgitation of it, is antiquated. This instructional model does not foster what Wagner believes is the most essential skill in today’s world: the ability to innovate.

In his most recent book, Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World, Wagner profiles some of America’s great innovators and observes a pattern in their youths: A childhood of creative play led to their development of deep-seated interests and curiosities, and these passions fueled their intrinsic motivation to set and achieve career and life goals. Another trend Wagner found was that the adults in these innovators’ young lives nurtured their imaginations and taught them to persevere and learn from failure. “What we’re learning about innovation,” says Wagner, “is the importance of failing early and failing often...failing forward, failing fast and cheap. The whole idea of trial and error is something that is antithetical to our formal systems of education.… In fact, we penalize failure.… So there’s a complete contradiction between the world of schooling and the world of innovation.”

THE MAKER MOVEMENT is a global community of inventors, designers, engineers, artists, programmers, hackers, tinkerers, craftsmen and DIY’ers—the kind of people who share a quality that Rosenstock says “leads to learning [and]…to innovation,” a perennial curiosity “about how they could do it better the next time.” The design cycle is all about reiteration, trying something again and again until it works, and then, once it works, making it better. As manufacturing tools continue to become better, cheaper and more accessible, the Maker Movement is gaining momentum at an unprecedented rate. Over the past few years, so-called “makerspaces” have cropped up in cities and small towns worldwide—often in affiliation with libraries, museums and other community centers, as well as in public and independent schools—giving more people of all ages access to mentorship, programs and tools like 3-D printers and scanners, laser cutters, microcontrollers and design software.

At schools with makerspaces, students are already starting to follow the pattern that Wagner observes among young innovators. Henry Simonoff, a ninth-grader at St. Ann’s School in the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood of New York City, is one such example. The summer after sixth grade, Simonoff went to a St. Ann’s computer camp, where his teacher, Lizbeth Arum, taught him how to model and make electronics cases using the 3-D design Web app Tinkercad. He discovered that he loved designing, so the following school year he took a 3-D printing elective and began experimenting with his own ideas. However, 3-D printing is a slow process, and the MakerBots in the classroom couldn’t keep up with Simonoff and his classmates’ creative demand."



"While this kind of education does result in the gain of measurable, practical skills, “it’s really about the problem-solving skills as opposed to the specific [technical] skills,” says David Wells, manager of creative making and learning at the New York Hall of Science. It’s about teaching kids how to break down their big ideas into smaller components in order to figure out a plausible first step. It’s about helping students become familiar not just with makerspace tools but, more important, with the process of finding, accessing and using information to teach themselves how to do whatever it is they want to do, and make whatever they want to make.

As Wells says, “We’re developing the ‘I can’ mentality.”"
lcproject  openstudioproject  education  schools  future  learning  hightechhigh  makermovement  makerspaces  2014  pammoran  tonywagner  larryrosenstock  making 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Out of the Box Learning Studio
"OUT OF THE BOX LEARNING STUDIO (OBLS) engages students in authentic learning that is personalized, active & connected.

Using the city of Seattle as the extended classroom, OBLS will prepare students for our complicated world by integrating academic content into experiential learning opportunities.

Students will showcase their learning & creativity through collaborative digital media arts projects & real-world problem solving challenges.

The outcome will be graduates with exceptional resiliency & agency as learners who excel in college, careers & life."
schools  charterschools  seattle  bigpictureschools  stevemiranda  jeffpetty  hannahwilliams  lindanathan  larryrosenstock 
february 2014 by robertogreco
What Schools Can Learn From Google, IDEO, and Pixar | Co. Design
"What would it mean for schools to have a culture centered on design thinking and interdisciplinary projects instead of siloed subjects? What if the process of education were as intentionally crafted as the products of education (i.e., we always think about the book report or the final project, but not the path to get there). What if teachers were treated as designers?"
education  learning  design  creativity  innovation  google  schooldesign  ideo  pixar  hightechhigh  larryrosenstock  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  projectbasedlearning  missedopportunities  tcsnmy  lcproject  2011  pbl 
august 2011 by robertogreco
If you truly want to engage pupils, relinquish the reins and give them the chance to learn by doing - News - TES Connect
"Innovations in education that engage young people and have the most profound impact will not occur because someone told teachers what to do and how they should do it. They won't come by tinkering with the curriculum or seeking the perfect balance of assessment. The most important changes in learning this decade will come around because someone, a teacher, maybe you, thought that things weren't what they could be and that something new was worth a try. They will get together with colleagues and make time to talk through the possible and seemingly impossible. And then they will go and try it out.

Don't think (too hard). Try."
education  ewanmcintosh  via:cervus  teaching  tcsnmy  innovation  student-centered  studentdirected  student-led  learning  unschooling  deschooling  make  making  doing  gevertulley  hightechhigh  larryrosenstock  tinkeringschool  tinkering  rogerschank  experience  experimentation  experientiallearning 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Project-based Learning at High Tech High | A 21st Century Education Film Series
"In this film, Larry Rosenstock, describes a vision for educaiton that blends the head, the heart, and the hands. High Tech High embraces learning that flows from personal interests, passion for discovery and a celebration of art, technology and craftsmanship."
education  learning  larryrosenstock  hightechhigh  projectbasedlearning  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  via:cervus  schooldesign  architecture  design  designthinking  designbasedlearning  classideas  presentationsoflearning  art  stem  respect  problemsolving  publicschools  us  charter  craft  make  making  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
A 21st Century Education Film Series
"The twelve first-person films that make up this series explore three related themes, each in its own way at the center of current debate about what works, and what's needed, to help students succeed during school and in life."
21stcenturylearning  21stcenturyskills  film  documentary  tcsnmy  student-centered  education  schools  lcproject  stephenheppell  larryrosenstock  via:cervus  projectbasedlearning  technology  online  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Online NewsHour: Report | Ca. High School Teaches High Tech | April 17, 2008 | PBS
"There is not one solution for a community of 100,000 people. Ergo, there is not one solution for a state; ergo, there is not one solution for a country. No, we need a quiver. That is what massive customization is about. That is what the future is about, and that's what globalization is about. We need a quiver of differentiated options for people. That's what we need. And this is one of them, and there are others."
education  policy  choice  variety  schools  public  larryrosenstock  change  reform  options  learning  technology  hightechhigh  sandiego  charterschools 
august 2008 by robertogreco
KPBS > News > Local News - High Tech High Leader Heads to DNC
"Rosenstock: I'm a strong believer in moving away from monolithic solutions. I think we need places like High Tech High and we need places like other types of schools that are differentiated from the norm in terms of practices. And we don't see enough of those."
education  policy  choice  variety  schools  public  larryrosenstock  change  reform  options  learning  technology  hightechhigh  sandiego  charterschools 
august 2008 by robertogreco

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