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robertogreco : latebloomers   10

The Long Game Part 1: Why Leonardo DaVinci was no genius on Vimeo
"All of history’s biggest achievers found success in exactly the same way, and it’s the complete opposite to how we think today. This video essay reveals the hidden secret to creativity through the life story of Leonardo da Vinci."

[Part 2: https://vimeo.com/87448006 ]

"This missing chapter in the story of success reveals the secret to doing meaningful work. But in the modern world, full of distraction, do we have what it takes to do great things?

The second in a two-part series about creativity."

[See also: http://delve.tv/the-long-game-part-one/ ]
latebloomers  persistence  via:rushtheiceberg  2014  history  youth  age  practice  success  leonardodavinci  slow  longterm  accretion 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Wired 14.07: What Kind of Genius Are You?
"A new theory suggests that creativity comes in two distinct types – quick and dramatic, or careful and quiet."



"Which leads to the second gap. Consider the word genius. “Since the Renaissance, genius has been associated with virtuosos who are young.

The idea is that you’re born that way – it’s innate and it manifests itself very young,” Galenson says. But that leaves the vocabulary of human possibility incomplete. “Who’s to say that Virginia Woolf or Cézanne didn’t have an innate quality that simply had to be nourished for 40 or 50 years before it bloomed?” The world exalts the young turks – the Larrys and the Sergeys, the Picassos and the Samuelsons. And it should. We need those brash, certain, paradigm-busting youthful conceptualists. We should give them free rein to do bold work and avoid saddling them with rules and bureaucracy.

But we should also leave room for those of us who have, er, avoided peaking too early, whose most innovative days may lie ahead. Nobody would have heard of Jackson Pollock had he died at 31. But the same would be true had Pollock given up at 31. He didn’t. He kept at it. We need to look at that more halting, less certain fellow and perhaps not write him off too early, give him a chance to ride the upward curve of middle age.

Of course, not every unaccomplished 65-year-old is some undiscovered experimental innovator. This is a universal theory of creativity, not a Viagra for sagging baby boomer self-esteem. It’s no justification for laziness or procrastination or indifference. But it might bolster the resolve of the relentlessly curious, the constantly tinkering, the dedicated tortoises undaunted by the blur of the hares. Just ask David Galenson.

Conceptualists

Many geniuses peak early, creating their masterwork at a tender age ...

LITERATURE: The Great Gatsby
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Age 29

PAINTING: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon
Pablo Picasso
Age 26

FILMMAKING: Citizen Kane
Orson Welles
Age 26

ARCHITECTURE: The Vietnam War Memorial
Maya Lin
Age 23

MUSIC: The Marriage of Figaro
Wolfgang Mozart
Age 30

Experimentalists

... while others bloom late, doing their best work after lifelong tinkering.

LITERATURE: Huckleberry Finn
Mark Twain
Age 50

PAINTING: Château Noir
Paul Cézanne
Age 64

FILMMAKING: Vertigo
Alfred Hitchcock
Age 59

ARCHITECTURE: Fallingwater
Frank Lloyd Wright
Age 70

MUSIC: Symphony No. 9
Ludwig van Beethoven
Age 54"
latebloomers  creativity  genius  via:litherland  danielpink  conceptualists  experimentation  experimentalists  persistence  fscottfitzgerald  jacksonpollock  pablopicasso  orsonwelles  mayalin  wolfgangmozart  marktwain  cézanne  alfredhitchcock  franklloydwright  beethoven  davidgaleson 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Stealing Sheep | Jason Santa Maria
"Those things are more than enough to make me like the guy, but what made me a Goudy superfan is that he did all this and more after he was 40 years old. Before that he busied himself keeping books for a realtor in Chicago.

He didn’t start making type seriously until after he was 40, and despite being a lover of lettering and appreciator of type, was pretty new to the craft of actually making type. As Popular Science put it in this 1942 article:

During the next 36 years, starting almost from scratch at an age when most men are permanently set in their chosen vocations, he cut 113 fonts of type, thereby creating more usable faces than did the seven greatest inventors of type and books, from Gutenberg to Garamond.

Whenever I hear people talking about it being too late to learn a new skill, or when I feel like something might be out of reach for me, I think of what Goudy accomplished “when most men are permanently set in the chosen vocations.”"
nevertoolate  careerchanges  lifelonglearning  learning  fredericgoudy  cv  2012  jasonsantamaria  via:caseygollan  latebloomers 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Long, Slow, Constant, Mindful Writing Life - The Conversation - The Chronicle of Higher Education
"One of my favorite cultural critics, Albert Murray, began publishing his writing at age 46. I imagine him during his 19-year career in the Air Force, mulling over the ideas that one day would dazzle me and many others. I imagine him practicing thought riffs and idea phrases so that when he decided to set words to the page, they sparkled with their elegant composition and elucidation. It strikes me as beside the point to call him a late bloomer. I’d rather call him a man who wrote on his own time—the right time. If we are open, we can see that possibility in us all."
via:ayjay  mindfulness  slowness  slow  2012  imaniperry  cv  readiness  time  writing  latebloomers  albertmurray 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Ten design lessons from Frederick Law Olmsted, the father of American landscape architecture - (37signals)
"1. Respect “the genius of a place.”…

2. Subordinate details to the whole…

3. The art is to conceal art…

4. Aim for the unconscious…

5. Avoid fashion for fashion’s sake.…

6. Formal training isn’t required. Olmsted had no formal design training and didn’t commit to landscape architecture until he was 44. Before that, he was a New York Times correspondent to the Confederate states, the manager of a California gold mine, and General Secretary of the United States Sanitary Commission during the Civil War. He also ran a farm on Staten Island from 1848 to 1855 and spent time working in a New York dry-goods store. His views on landscapes developed from travelling and reading…

…7. Words matter…

8. Stand for something…

9. Utility trumps ornament…

10. Never too much, hardly enough."
design  landscape  fredericklawolmstead  via:lukeneff  art  architecture  latebloomers  cv  autodidacts  genius  philosophy  simplicity  education  utility  yearoff  training  formaleducation  formal  informal  travel  experience 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Book Club for Life - reading books masterpieces | Ask MetaFilter
"I'm 30. Each year until I'm 60 I want to read a masterpiece by an author the same age as I am when s/he wrote it. Help compile my list.

This is for a sort of lifetime book club I'm planning with a dear friend who lives halfway across the world.

We don't mind cheating a little bit; even if the author wasn't exactly our age when the book was first published, it's fine as long as s/he attained that age in the year of publication. (So The Mysteries of Udolpho would be an acceptable choice for this year, for example, even though it was published in May 1794 and Ann Radcliffe didn't turn 30 until July of that year.)

No limitations on genre, and we'll consider works of poetry and music if they're epic enough to sustain a year of contemplation and conversation."

[via: http://twitter.com/tcarmody/status/41693970912256000 ]
books  lists  metafilter  booklist  reading  latebloomers  age  aging  cv  bookclub  lifetime  toread 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Annals of Culture: Late Bloomers: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker
"Late bloomers’ stories are invariably love stories, and this may be why we have such difficulty with them. We’d like to think that mundane matters like loyalty, steadfastness, and the willingness to keep writing checks to support what looks like failure have nothing to do with something as rarefied as genius. But sometimes genius is anything but rarefied; sometimes it’s just the thing that emerges after twenty years of working at your kitchen table."

[more at: http://www.kottke.org/08/10/gladwell-on-early-and-lateblooming-geniuses ]
malcolmgladwell  genius  art  creativity  work  success  relationships  writers  writing  culture  history  publishing  books  psychology  education  life  age  latebloomers  cezanne 
october 2008 by robertogreco

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