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La Scuola Open Source: Education and Research for cultural, social and technological Innovation
"We’re a community of digital artisans, makers, artists, designers, programmers, pirates, dreamers and innovators. We act together, testing new research, teaching, mentoring, co-living practices and models. We are involved with: research for public and private interest; teaching for learners, freelancers and managers of all ages. We design social and technological innovation.

☛ Non-linear learning paths
☛ Learning by doing
☛ New professions & skills
☛ A sharing space to grow up"

[from: http://lascuolaopensource.xyz/en/manifesto

"La Scuola Open Source is a space dedicated to social and technological innovation, where to perform educational activities, cultural performances and research projects:

☛ A hackerspace, where people with shared interest in the fields of craftsmanship, technology, science, visual arts, poetry, editing, robotics, domotics, biology, electronics and more can gather, socialize and/or cooperate;

☛ A re-use promotion center where obsolete technology is collected with the aim of promoting their smart upcycling;

☛ A FabLab: a small workshop offering customized digital fabrication services, equipped with a kit of fast prototyping tools (3d printing, laser cut, etc.)

♥ This opens up to new opportunities.

↓ We believe in

☆ Non-linearity
Founding principle of Plato’s accademia: “a free individual should not be forced, as a slave, to learn any discipline”, diametrically opposed to the monastic principle (and that of today’s school system), well represented by Benedict’s rule: “Speaking and teaching is a teacher’s job, staying silent and listening is what a disciple should do”.

☆ Co-design
Design as a “catalyst to collectively redefine our relationship with reality”, envisioning things for how they could be, altogether.

☆ Open work
The School’s structure allows us to build - by co-designing it - its teachings offering in an open way, allowing us to evolve each of its aspects with time.

☆ Multiverse
In modern physics, multiverse is a hypothesis postulating many co-existing universe beyond our space-time dimensions.

☆ Antifragility
The world around us is mutating and ever-changing. Upon this constant transformation we are building a model capable to adapt to mutations and making good of any erraticity and change happening. (N.Taleb, Antifragile).

☆ Learning by doing
We believe that teaching should be always combined with a continuous activity of research and exploration. Doing things and learning while doing, situational learning, are absolutely central in our vision and in the project we intend to realize.☆ Do it yourselfWe promote an alternative and aware approach to designing and production processes, stimulating self-production as a form of self-employment.

☆ Opensource
Open source, in its incremental logic, represents the blueprint for a collaborative, adaptive and recursive cultural system. We believe that such approach needs to be used in all fields of knowledge, so to enable possibilities for everyone.

☆ Hacker ethics
Linux’s big innovation was not the Operating System, but the open social dynamic that was set up to make that project happen.

☆ Sharing
We welcome people, ideas and projects to share space, knowledge and values. Through a constant and mutual exchange, both a collective consciousness and a better informative quality can be quickly developed.

☆ Osmosis
La Scuola Open Source intends to facilitate and generate osmotic processes between experiences and skills, aiming to increase everyone’s intrinsic value for the community.

↓ Our value proposition

☛ Access to future, a better one
We therefore need to train ourselves, learn by doing, fail, consult with others, cooperate, work on projects with a tangible impact on the real world.

☛ Customized and non-linear learning paths
We believe that people need to be pushed to ask questions, curiosity being the engine of progress. We therefore want to apply the open source approach to humanities as well, promoting a transversal and peer-to-peer approach to the learning topic.

☛ Spaces for social aggregation to learn in a cooperative context
It is necessary to restore sharing spaces and practices, re-discovering the ability to build relationships and team up to achieve common objectives, leveraging on education and learning as vehicles for a social and economical renewing process. Spaces where to discover and cultivate curiosity, turning it into the engine to each one’s learning path, a self-built path within a virtuous system, providing input and stimula on several channels and levels.

☛ New professional figures
Tomorrow new jobs will rise, while others could disappear. Things change, therefore we need to change things. We have to reform this educational sector in a generative way, keeping in mind the context’s evolution into account and making it mutate within time, continuously adapting."
lcproject  openstudioproject  altgdp  learning  communities  community  design  pirates  nonlinear  learningbydoing  unschooling  deschooling  sharing  space  italy  glvo  italia  bari  non-linear  opensource  linux  osmosis  hacker  hackerethics  antifragility  multiverse  co-design  resuse  hackerspaces  art  technology  alinear  linearity 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Outside the Skinner Box
"There are two commonly repeated tropes about educational technology impeding progress and clouding our judgment. The first such myth is that technology is neutral. This is untrue. All technology was designed to influence behavior; the fact that a handful of people can stretch a technology beyond its normal trajectory does not change this fundamental truth.

It is not uncommon for a school committed to progressive learner-centered education to undermine its mission by investing in a well-intentioned school-to-home communication package that allows Dad to sit at his office desk and day-trade his eight-year-old when the expectation of continuous numerical reporting is offered by such a system. Similarly, I have encountered many independent schools committed to whole language development that then contradict their missions by using phonics software on iPads for no other reason than, “There’s an app for that.”

In schools, all hardware and software bestow agency on one of three parties: the system, the teacher, or the learner. Typically, two of these actors lose their power as the technology benefits the third. Ask a group of colleagues to create a three-column table and brainstorm the hardware or software in your school and who is granted agency by each. Management software, school-wide grade-book programs, integrated learning systems, school-to-home communication packages, massive open online courses (MOOCs), and other cost-cutting technologies grant maximum benefit to the system. Interactive whiteboards, worksheet generators, projectors, whole-class simulations, plagiarism software, and so on, benefit the teacher. Personal laptops, programming languages, creativity software, cameras, MIDI keyboards, microcontrollers, fabrication equipment, and personal web space primarily benefit (bestow agency to) the learner.

The second oft-recited myth is that technology changes constantly. If only this were the case in schools. Regrettably, much of what schools do with technology is exactly the same, or less than, what they did 25 years ago. Wordles, note taking, looking stuff up, word-processing essays, and making PowerPoint presentations on topics students don’t care about for audiences they’ll never encounter represent the state-of-the-art in far too many classrooms. We can do better.

I enjoyed the great fortune of leading professional development at the world’s first laptop schools nearly a quarter century ago. Those Australian schools never saw laptops as an experiment or pilot project. For them, laptops represented a way to rescue kids explicitly from a failing hierarchical bureaucracy. Every student learned to program from every teacher as a means to encounter powerful ideas, express oneself, and change the nature of the educational experience.

When teachers saw what was possible through the eyes and the screens of their children, they demanded rapid changes to scheduling, assessment, classroom furniture, and even school architecture. They blurred the artificial boundaries between subject areas, shared expertise, challenged peers, and transformed many schools to benefit the children they served. Those early “laptop teachers” often viewed themselves in new and powerful ways. An amazing number of them went on to become school principals, Ph.D.s, policy makers, and entrepreneurs. A school like Methodist Ladies’ College in Melbourne, Australia, changed the world with its existing teaching staff through a coherent vision articulated clearly by a bold, charismatic leader, David Loader, who focused on benefiting the largest number of stakeholders in any school community: the students.2"



"A Bold Vision for the Future of Computers in Schools

The future of schools is not found in a shopping list of devices and programs, no matter how interesting or revolutionary the technology may be. In order for schools to seize the power of computers as intellectual laboratories and vehicles for self-expression, the following traits need to be in place.

Awareness

Educators, parents, and policy makers need to understand that, currently, their investment in technology is not maximizing its promise to amplify the human potential of each student. Alternative models must be made available.

Governance

Too many schools conflate instructional and noninstructional technology. Such an inability to reconcile often-competing priorities harms the educational enterprise of a school. One role is of the plumber and the other of a philosopher; both are important functions, but you would never consciously surrender the setting of graduation standards to your maintenance department. Why, then, is educational policy so greatly impacted by IT personnel?

Vision

Schools need a bolder concept of what computing can mean in the creative and intellectual development of young people. Such a vision must be consistent with the educational ­ideals of a school. In far too many cases, technology is used in ways contrary to the stated mission of the school. At no point should technology be used as a substitute for competent educators or to narrow educational experiences. The vision should not be rigid, but needs to embrace the serendipitous discoveries and emerging technologies that expand the power of our goals.

Consistent leadership

Once a vision of educational technology use is established, school leadership needs to model that approach, enact rituals and practices designed to reinforce it, and lend a coherent voice leading the entire community in a fashion consistent with its vision to improve the lives of young people.

Great leaders recognize the forces that water down innovation and enact safeguards to minimize such inertia.

Professional development for professionals

You cannot be expected to teach 21st-century learners if you have not learned in this century. Professional development strategies need to focus on creating the sorts of rich constructive learning experiences schools desire for students, not on using computers to perform clerical tasks. We must refrain from purchasing “teacher-proof” curricula or technology and then acting surprised when teachers fail to embrace it. PD needs to stop rewarding helplessness and embrace the competence of educators.

High Expectations and Big Dreams

When we abandon our prejudices and superstitions in order to create the conditions in which anything is possible, teachers and children alike will exceed our expectations.

Some people are excited by using technology to teach what we have always wanted kids to know, perhaps with greater efficiency, efficacy, or comprehension. I am not interested in using computers to improve education by 0.02 percent. Incrementalism is the enemy of progress. My work is driven by the actualization of young people learning and doing in ways unimaginable just a few years ago.

This is not a fantasy; it’s happening in schools today. Here are a few vignettes from my own work.

Learning by Doing"
2015  garystager  computing  schools  education  technology  makers  makermovement  seymourpapert  edtech  physicalcomputing  governance  awareness  vision  leadership  nais  learningbydoing  learning  constructionism 
january 2015 by robertogreco
The Restaurant and the Kitchen — Teaching, Learning, & Education — Medium
"If you’re like me, you’ve spent most of your education at schools that resemble restaurants — where you show up, sit down and expect to have your hunger satisfied. The food, some of which you selected and some of which was chosen for you, is cooked and served by other people. Depending on the talent of the cooks and quality of the ingredients, sometimes the meal will be great. Other times, it will be disappointing.

This metaphor is one that is shared with each new cohort of students on their first day of Dev Bootcamp. The school does this to set expectations — because Dev Bootcamp is not a restaurant. It is a kitchen.

In a well-run kitchen, you should have all the tools, ingredients and guidance you need to make anything that might satisfy your hunger. You don’t need to follow a recipe. You can add ingredients that suit your diet. And while your first attempt at a soufflé may not look or taste as good as one you’d find in a fancy restaurant, it will be yours. You will be able to make it on your own and eat it whenever you like.

My first year at the Stanford GSB has been, what I might imagine, a meal at The French Laundry to be like — tough to get a reservation, obscenely expensive, and exciting to name drop to friends and strangers. While it has been an incredible experience, allowing me to meet inspiring people and get exposure to interesting concepts, I can’t shake the feeling that this is not the education I might have designed for myself at the outset.

Throughout my life, I have been guilty of holding one school or another responsible for my education — paying more attention to the question: “did I like this class?” rather than “did I get what I wanted to learn from this class?” I’ve grown to understand that instead of trying to adjust my career path to fit a set degree or attempting to gain mastery in a subject based on the curriculum outlined in a syllabus, it’s essential to start with the simple question: what do I want to learn?

A typical university is trying to serve many purposes at the same time; from producing cutting-edge research to providing its students with a brand that signals excellence. Schools do their best to cover a very broad range of subjects; however, there are limits to the depth they are able to reach. Often you may be more equipped to prepare yourself for your dream career than your school. Taking a class will sometimes be the perfect recipe, but many times it’s worth considering resources like MOOCs, books, or doing unpaid work for a company you admire.

Students at Dev Bootcamp spend the majority of their days working in groups on code challenges and on building web apps. During the few hours of lecture time each week, students are encouraged to decide for themselves whether a lecture is the best use of their time, and if not, to find something to learn or practice that they find more valuable. At Tradecraft, an immersive program that trains people to fill traction roles at startups, students have the space to find companies that they admire and do usability tests of their products. By setting their own educational priorities, students, in these immersive programs and others like it, have been able to enhance their skills and land great entry-level jobs in the course of only 3–4 months.

Each of us is responsible for building a foundation for the life we want to live. So go out, source the ingredients yourself, and don’t be afraid to roll up your sleeves and get messy."
education  ownership  responsibility  2014  nickdewilde  learning  schools  schooling  howwelearn  messiness  learningbydoing 
september 2014 by robertogreco
On BERG's hibernation
"Today BERG Cloud (Formerly BERG, formerly Schulze and Webb) announced it was shutting shop. I spent about 2 years all together working for or with BERG, so I wanted to share some thoughts on my time there. All of this is purely from my point of view, is not official, and I am certain the others would have differing opinions.

I never went to university, but after working with BERG on Mag+ my interest in interaction design grew. I nearly applied for the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design but when BERG offered me a full time position, my recurring theme of choosing experience over formal education got the better of me. And it was not a mistake.

To describe a company as a family is incredibly cheesy, but of everywhere I’ve worked it applies most to BERG. My favourite times were definitely on Scrutton Street, when the 13 (or there about) of us were squeezed into an office far too small for us. We had an airport express that anyone could play tunes on, and only one conversation could really happen at once. Of course there were times we would rub each other the wrong way, but one thing that never wavered was the immense respect I had for everyone.

This enabled us to work in a way I’ve never seen anywhere else, and what I half-jokingly dubbed ‘emotion driven development’. If Kanban is the more fluid state of a trusted and able team compared to scrum, then what we had was a step beyond that. We trusted in our own, and importantly each others, strong opinions and (this sounds cheesy again) feelings to drive us forward. This is probably a fragile and unscalable way of working, but without it, I think much of the work would be very different, and BERG wouldn’t have attracted the attention it did. We worked in a different way, and the work was often different because of it.

BERG had an interesting cult following. It certainly punched way above its weight in the design world for such a small company. It was able to create work that turned the heads of both the industry and mass audiences alike. One thing I was always impressed with was how easily new aesthetics were created, something that others spend entire careers developing was almost effortless to my colleagues. Making Future Magic (a project I had nothing to do with) perhaps most exemplifies this.

I am now focusing on working in the public sector, and I went into much detail as to why, but I will always miss my time at BERG. For me it will always feel like my university time; a time to spend learning and experimenting on what we found interesting with very few constraints.

For a group of people who were professionals on thinking about “what’s next”, I think we’re a bit knocked back as we truly don’t know what’s next. It’s an interesting (and scary in a very high up Maslow’s hierarchy kind of way) time. BERG was a major part of East London’s tech culture, and its demise is another blow to it. I imagine there are plenty of people wondering where their friends are going next. I know I am."

[See also: http://morning.computer/2014/09/for-berg-my-london-launchpad/ ]
berg  berglondon  autodidacts  srg  experience  learningbydoing  jamesdarling  2014  design  howwework  tcsnmy  families  workenvironments  teams  respect  groups  howwlearn  learning  mattwebb  emotions  feelings  culture  workculture  creativity 
september 2014 by robertogreco
This is Our Moment - YouTube
[See also: http://www.inventtolearn.com/moment/

"Abstract - In this plenary address, the speaker will share three societal trends that validate and vindicate decades of leadership by the constructionism community. The growing acceptance of learning-by-making represented by the maker movement, a newfound advocacy for children learning computer programming, and even the global education crisis, real or imagined, are evidence of predictions and efforts made by constructionists being realized. This conference offers a brief opportunity for celebration before returning to the “hard fun” required to harness the momentum of these trends and improve the learning ecology." ]
constructionism  math  mathematics  education  programming  making  2014  garystager  howweteach  cv  tcsmnmy  teachablemoments  turtleart  art  children  schools  learning  learningbydoing  projectbasedlearning  pedagogy  schoolreform  seymourpapert  policy  politics  via:audreywatters  makermovement  makerfaires  coding  pbl 
august 2014 by robertogreco
‘Getting In On the Act’: Exploring Participatory Arts Practice | Art Museum Teaching
"A recent study published by the James Irvine Foundation (October 2011) entitled Getting In On the Act: How Arts Groups are Creating Opportunities for Active Participation draws insights from nonprofit arts groups and experts to explore a new model for understanding and supporting participatory arts practices, a growing trend here in the United States as well as across the globe. Here is how the reports’ authors begin to frame this “siesmic shift” towards a participatory arts culture:
“Technology has fundamentally changed the way people interact, learn, and think about culture. Contemporary notions of creativity, shaped by Web 2.0, center on shared construction of cultural identity and an ethos of participatory experience…. The open, free and instantaneous exchange of digital content affords people the resources to control their own creative experiences and make their own meaning. Interactive experiences of all sorts are now an expected norm.” (6)

But, then the report got a lot more interesting to me…
“This shift is about more than just technology. People are thinking about the experience of culture differently than in the past, placing value on a more immersive and interactive experience than is possible through mere observation…. Americans are activating their own creativity in new and unusual ways … [as] part of a larger ‘participatory economy’ in which social connection eclipses consumption. Americans want to meet the people who make our products, share in the work of the makers, and make things ourselves.” (6)

The report’s human-centered focus brings much-needed attention to the ability of the arts (and arts institutions) to connect people, to create shared experiences, and to contribute to the cultural fabric of the communities in which we live and work.

For art museums (and museum educators, especially), the report provides an extremely meaningful tool for reflecting on how we involve audiences in shaping their own experiences and making their own meaning. The report’s “Audience Involvement Spectrum” provides a nice, workable model for audience engagement, from “receptive” involvement (the type of spectating and educational enrichment occurring in the vast majority of arts museums) to increasingly “participatory” involvement (the types of crowd-sourcing, co-creation, and public artistic experiences that more and more art museums are slowly striving toward).

The report is worth a close read. It asks some essential questions about arts programming in the 21st century, and I think art museums would have much to gain by thinking more about how they fit into this new landscape of active arts participation. As museum educators, we have our hands on the wheel when it comes to programs — and the Irvine report clearly and strongly states that “attracting the next generation of audiences and visitors will require a transformation in programming” (11). At the core of this transformation is both thinking outside the box (‘the box’ in this case being the rigid walls and traditions of art museums) and letting go of institutional and curatorial authority so that visitors can feel comfortable and empowered to shape their own creative experiences.

If you have a chance to peruse the Irvine Foundation’s report, I’d love to hear how your institution’s programs (or your own teaching philosophies) fit on their spectrum of audience involvement. Has your institution embraced any of these aspects of participatory arts practice? Do you value these types of creative, artistic experiences when you visit art museums yourself (or do you shy away from them for more passive types of engagement)?"
art  arts  mikemurawski  2012  education  museums  participatory  participation  openstudioproject  technology  learning  learningbydoing  irvinefoundation  audienceinvolvement  teaching  arteducation  museumeducation  creativity 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Stanford: Day 3 (Aaron Swartz: The Weblog)
"If I wanted to start a more effective university, it would be pretty simple: Hire the smartest people and accept the smartest students, get them to work on projects that interest them, get them to work together on stuff that interests them, organize a bunch of show-and-tells and mixers, and for the most part let them figure stuff out on their own. (This system might be cheaper too.)"
highered  highereducation  openstudioproject  lcproject  unschooling  aaronswartz  2005  education  learning  learningbydoing  via:lukeneff 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Outliers School. información general
"Design Thinking. Learning by doing, sin desplazamiento físico o híbrido • Nuevas ideas de Diseño Educativo, en Comunicación PostDigital y Narrativas Transmedia con aprendizaje basado en resolución de problemas y prototipado de soluciones • Perfil multidisciplinario, juniors y seniors • Podrás replicar la experiencia con tu Outliers School LAB o BLENDED."

"Hugo Pardo Kuklinski, Carlos A. Scolari y Cristóbal Cobo - y un grupo de colegas de Iberoamérica como Max Ugaz, Yan Camilo Vergara y Anderson Hartmann - hemos diseñado Outliers School con el convencimiento de que podemos aprender divirtiéndonos, compartir conversando en red y prototipando ideas en Educación, Comunicación y Cultura PostDigital y Narrativas Transmedia que hoy son disruptivas y serán mainstream en la próxima década."

"Metodología de Design Thinking

5 fases de trabajo, desde el problema a la presentación del prototipo.

1. Definición de problema a resolver y benchmarking; 2. Divergencia-emergencia (generación de ideas); 3. Convergencia (seleccionar las mejores ideas); 4. Prototipado (integrando al usuario en el proceso); 5. Presentación de prototipo (el arte del pitching) • Empatía. Comprender las necesidades de aquellos para quienes estamos diseñando / Definir. Evaluar problemas como oportunidades para soluciones creativas / Idear. Generar un rango de posibles soluciones / Prototipar. Comunicar los elementos esenciales de solución a otros para mejorarlos / Testear. Aprender que trabaja y que no trabaja para mejorar las soluciones."
education  learning  outliersschoolcristóbalcobo  latinamerica  medellín  medellin  portoalegre  colombia  brasil  panamá  hugpardokuklinski  carlosscolari  maxugaz  yancamilovergara  andersonhartmann  communication  unschooling  learningbydoing  designthinking  brazil  post-digital 
october 2013 by robertogreco
The Lowest Level: Pickup Soccer in America | The Other 87
"Except in soccer, where one of the commonly given reasons for why the U.S. doesn’t produce as many or as high-quality soccer players as other nations is because our kids practice too much, and too early on, as opposed to just going out and playing. We hear of Zidane learning his close control in the housing projects of Marseille, Ronaldo lying to his mother about going to school, of players in Italy, Argentina, or Ghana who wake up and go play with their friends in the street until dinner, or until they’re scooped up and signed to a local club’s youth team by a sharp-eyed scout passing through town, whichever comes first."



"Pickup’s absence underlines its importance. Nearly every coach now realizes that small-sided games — like those you typically have playing pickup — are important because they maximize touches and time spent with the ball for young players. What’s missing when a player participates in small-sided games in practice with his or her teammates is the mystery, the unknown variables that change a game. Pickup is an incredibly useful teaching tool not just because of its numbers, but because of its informality which means coaches — those who might be the pickup advocates — couldn’t create the ideal pickup scenario even if they wanted to. It has to be organic.[1]

That’s because pickup necessitates flexibility. As the cast of characters in your group rotates, you’re finding your way into a new game each time you play. Without a coach, it’s a constant exercise for your personal tactical acumen as you search for where you can be most effective on the field for this game, and for your skill set as you try to adapt to playing there. Even that changes drastically based on who you’re playing with and where they’ve decided they’re going to be most useful."

[via: http://zunguzungu.wordpress.com/2011/04/10/sunday-reading/ ]
pickup  soccer  futbol  sports  improvisation  collaboration  flexibility  squishynotslick  cv  howwelearn  learningbydoing  adultintervention  intervention  2011  ericbetts  unschooling  deschooling  learning  informality  informal  informallearning  self-directedlearning  football 
june 2013 by robertogreco
iTunes - Books - Beyond Learning by Doing by Jay W. Roberts
“In many ways, experiential education, when framed as “learning by doing,” becomes equated with a method or…”

"What is experiential education? What are its theoretical roots? Where does this approach come from? Offering a fresh and distinctive take, this book is about going beyond "learning by doing" through an exploration of its underlying theoretical currents.

As an increasingly popular pedagogical approach, experiential education encompasses a variety of curriculum projects from outdoor and environmental education to service learning and place-based education. While each of these sub-fields has its own history and particular approach, they draw from the same progressive intellectual taproot. Each, in its own way, evokes the power of "learning by doing" and "direct experience" in the educational process. By unpacking the assumed homogeneity in these terms to reveal the underlying diversity of perspectives inherent in their usage, this book allows readers to see how the approaches connect to larger conversations and histories in education and social theory, placing experiential education in social and historical context."
jayroberts  experientialeducation  toread  books  learning  learningbydoing  via:steelemaley  environmentaleducation  place  place-basededucation  experientiallearning  place-basedlearning  place-based  place-basedpedagogy 
april 2013 by robertogreco
News from the Executive Suite, Los Angeles Bureau | Near Future Laboratory
"they are projects and they reflect the more complete aspects of the Laboratory as a practice. They are a reflection of our additional interests, curiosities and explorations. Some of them are exercises of a more proto-professional nature, to explore ways of studying the world around us, short probes into a field of practice about which we want to understand by doing rather than by idle observation. In sum, they represent ways that the Laboratory is always curious, always learning, never set or fixed in what it does and how it does it. This makes me understand the Laboratory as a practice. A bit like a studio. But, I understand now even more as we grow and as more people join in, that it is better to communicate the multivalent character of the Laboratory through more aspects of what we here do.

There are no “side projects” in this practice. There are we all who are always following our curiosities."
julianbleecker  2013  projects  creativity  curiosity  curiosities  nearfuturelaboratory  learning  howwelearn  glvo  understanding  learningbydoing  observation  iteration  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject 
march 2013 by robertogreco
LEARNING BY DOING / MUSHON ZER-AVIV | Open Design Now
"Mushon Zer-Aviv describes his efforts to teach open source design as an attempt to investigate why collaborative work combined with individual autonomy has not been common practice in design, as it is in open source software development. He discusses whether what worked for code might just as easily be transferred to design: the physical object as binary structure."
designeducation  projectbasedlearning  pbl  learningbydoing  deschooling  unschooling  peer-to-peer  github  revolution  standards  blueprints  teaching  hacking  knowledge  cocreation  danphiffer  shiftspace  collaboration  collaborative  collaborativeworks  design  learning  education  autonomy  opensource  opendesign  open  mushonzer-aviv 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Why kids hate school — subject by subject - The Answer Sheet - The Washington Post
"Recently an article I wrote about why algebra is useless and shouldn’t be taught in high school was published…

The hate mail that followed…was unbelievable. Most accused me of being irrational and incapable of thought, and stated that math teaches people to think. This is pretty funny because if math is supposed to teach one to think, as they argue, they might have looked me up and discovered that not only was I a math major in college, but I was also a professor of computer science.

Of course, it is not only high school math that I oppose. I believe that every single subject taught in high school is a mistake…

A Barcelona newspaper recently published an interview that it did with me. I said in that iterview that the only way we learn is by doing — and to do that we must practice constantly. Schools rarely teach doing.

So here’s my advice: Learn what matters to you. If you want to graduate from high school, go ahead and memorize a lot of nonsense but don’t expect it to matter…"
highschool  deschooling  unschooling  learningbydoing  learning  education  2012  rogerschank 
september 2012 by robertogreco
San Francisco School Takes Experiential Learning to the Next Level - Education - GOOD
"Imagine receiving an electric drill to use at school—and the freedom to learn and explore while building things with it. That’s what happens at Brightworks, a year-old nonprofit private alternative school located in San Francisco’s Mission District.

The school is tiny—just 20 students between 6 and 13 years old—but it's building quite the reputation for its innovative learning philosophy. Brightworks takes its cues from the maker and tinkering movements, which do away with formal classroom instruction in favor of project-based experiential learning.

Students aren’t divided into traditional grade levels, either: The school allows kids to interact naturally across age groups—older students work on more sophisticated projects while younger ones learn primarily through play. And, instead of relying on tests to measure learning, the school's students create portfolios. …"

[Video embedded]
hybridskills  behavior  social  kidcity  learning  confidence  radicalschooling  alternative  radical  projectbasedlearning  mixed-age  smallschools  lcproject  video  sanfrancisco  make  making  learningbydoing  democraticlearning  democraticschools  democraticeducation  deschooling  unschooling  collaboration  schooldesign  schools  cv  education  lizdwyer  assessment  self-directedlearning  2012  brightworks  gevertulley  pbl 
july 2012 by robertogreco
A Cloud of My Own (Pinboard Blog)
"I have no idea what I'm doing. I do it, I write it up, and then wisdom pours down from the Internet."
tinkering  servers  hardware  twitter  crowdsourcing  web  internet  2012  learningbydoing  experimentation  learning  doing  maciejceglowski  pinboard  maciejcegłowski 
june 2012 by robertogreco
AU 2011: Otherlab's Saul Griffith, Part 1 - Pneubotics Yields Soft Robots on Vimeo
"At Autodesk University 2011, Saul Griffith, founder of Otherlab, discusses his pioneering work in Pneubotics. Otherlab is working on soft, fabric-based robots that are actuated by compressed air."

"At Autodesk University 2011, Saul Griffith, founder of Otherlab, talks about inventing and the type of follow-up required to see that invention go out into the world." [ http://vimeo.com/33131553 ]

"Part 3 of our video chat with Saul Griffith, co-founder of Otherlab, at Autodesk University 2011. Griffith answers questions about Theory vs. Making Stuff in education, advice for design students, and how to enable yourself to make truly unique things." [ http://vimeo.com/33131913 ]

[Later: "Solve for X: Saul Griffith on inflatable robots" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqP3IpEqkk4# ]
design  tools  toolmaking  saulgriffith  education  projectbasedlearning  2011  core77  glvo  making  doing  learning  learningbydoing  advice  robots  invention  failure  howwework  howwelearn  pneubotics  otherlab  pbl 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Apprenticeships and internships « Re-educate Seattle
"I’m using these two words—apprenticeship and certification—in a way that’s overly simplistic, but I’m doing it to make a point: when your daughter heads off to school each morning, does she treat it like an apprenticeship or an internship?

Is she more concerned with learning something interesting, or her GPA? Is she developing deep relationships with mentors, or merely securing snazzy letters of recommendation? Is she learning something useful right now, or participating in a ritual as preparation for the future?

* * *

Here’s perhaps the most important question: does your daughter’s school view it’s work as closer to providing apprenticeships, or internships?"
stevemiranda  2011  pscs  learning  apprenticeships  internships  unschooling  deschooling  learningbydoing  credentials  grades  grading  tcsnmy  toshare  usefulness  meaning  purpose  pugetsoundcommunityschool 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Geoff Mulgan: A short intro to the Studio School | Video on TED.com
"Some kids learn by listening; others learn by doing. Geoff Mulgan gives a short introduction to the Studio School, a new kind of school in the UK where small teams of kids learn by working on projects that are, as Mulgan puts it, "for real.""
geoffmulgan  studioschool  studioclassroom  lcproject  tcsnmy  learning  education  uk  2011  wordofmouth  learningbydoing  collaboration  howwework  cv  schools  schooldesign  projectbasedlearning  resilience  employability  teens  motivation  non-cognitiveskills  pbl 
october 2011 by robertogreco
We, Who Are Web Designers — Jon Tan 陳
"I’m self-actualised, without the stamp of approval from any guild, curriculum authority, or academic institution. I’m web taught. Colleague taught. Empirically taught. Tempered by over fifteen years of failed experiments on late nights with misbehaving browsers. I learnt how to create venues because none existed. I learnt what music to play for the people I wanted at the event, and how to keep them entertained when they arrived. I empathised, failed, re-empathised, and did it again. I make sites that work. That’s my certificate. That’s my validation."
posteducation  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  certification  pln  authority  curriculum  curriculumisdead  problemsolving  2011  design  webdesign  webdev  empathy  learningbydoing  web  making  makers  make  do  autodidacts  jontan 
september 2011 by robertogreco
8 Big Ideas of the Constructionist Learning Lab « Generation YES Blog
"learning by doing…We all learn better when learning is part of doing something we find really interesting…

technology as building material…If you can use technology to make things you can make a lot more interesting things…

hard fun…We learn best & work best if we enjoy what we are doing…doesn’t mean “easy”…

learning to learn…Many students get the idea that “the only way to learn is by being taught.” This is what makes them fail in school & life…

taking time…students at school get used to being told every 5 minutes or every hour: do this, then do that…If someone isn’t telling them what to do they get bored. Life is not like that. To do anything important you have to learn to manage time for yourself…

you can’t get it right without getting it wrong…To succeed you need the freedom to goof on the way…

do unto ourselves what we do unto our students…

we are entering a digital world…where knowing about digital technology is as important as reading and writing…"
education  learning  technology  teaching  curriculum  tcsnmy  sylviamartinez  garystager  seymourpapert  constructionism  1999  howwework  howwelearn  cv  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learningbydoing  projects  projectbasedlearning  openstudio  time  persistence  interestdriven  failure  timemanagement  freedom  modeling  schools  digital  making  constructing  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Joichi Ito Named Head of M.I.T. Media Lab - NYTimes.com
"For centuries diplomas have been synonymous w/ the nation’s universities.

That makes MIT’s decision to name a 44-year old Japanese venture capitalist who attended, but did not graduate, from 2 American colleges as director of one of the world’s top computing science laboratories an unusual choice…

Mr. Ito first attended Tufts where he briefly studied computer science but wrote that he found it drudge work. Later he attended the U of Chicago where he studied physics, but once again found it stultifying…later wrote of his experience: “I once asked a professor to explain the solution to a problem so I could understand it more intuitively. He said, ‘You can’t understand it intuitively. Just learn the formula so you’ll get the right answer.’ That was it for me.”

Mr. Ito’s colleagues minimize the fact that he is w/out academic credentials. “He has credibility in an academic context,” said Lawrence Lessig…"
mit  medialab  joiito  larrylessig  innovation  dropouts  postcredentials  credentials  alternative  alternativeeducation  learningbydoing  2011  creativecommons  unschooling  deschooling  connectivism  connections  mozilla  venturecapital  mitmedialab 
april 2011 by robertogreco
March 21, 2011 : The Daily Papert
“Every deep thinker who has looked at our education system, and I think of everyone, from Voltaire, Rousseau, Piaget, Vygostgy, John Dewey, they’ve all focused on one point, that our school is much too focused on information, on getting facts, far to little on doing things, on learning by doing, by action.”
seymourpapert  rousseau  voltaire  piaget  vygostgy  johndewey  rote  rotelearning  facts  factoryschools  learningbydoing  unschooling  constructivism  projectbasedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  pbl  jeanpiaget 
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Stelton Modern School: A Brief History of Fransisco Ferrer
"The concepts of rational education did not grow out of a vacuum. [explained]  … The ideals of free education begin in response to the ideals of classical education that were particularly prevalent at that time.  The first part of the free education system begins with the belief that imitation and repetition perverted or inhibited the natural development of the pupil.  The learning of new skills, both simple and complex should instead be done in a natural fashion.  In contrast to the development of ivory tower scholarship, the proponents of rational education believed in knowledge derived from both experience of, and interaction with the world - "learning by doing.""
education  history  anarchism  anarchy  freeschools  learningbydoing  lcproject  progressive  teaching  learning  pedagogy  franciscoferrer  peterkropotkin  schools  escuelamoderna  modernschools  interaction  experientiallearning  mikhailbakunin  trinidadsoriano  paulrobins  tolstoy  rousseau  frederichfroebel  steltonmodernschool 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Tate Papers - Josef Albers, Eva Hesse, and the Imperative of Teaching
"Albers believed that one learned as a result of a direct interaction with life & required that his students become familiar w/ the physical nature of the material world. This was due, in part, to the influence of John Dewey, who advocated for laboratory-based education & coined the phase ‘learning by doing.’ For Dewey, ‘the conditions of daily life’ determined the ‘nature of experience’ & thus, art (aesthetic experience) was to be actively engaged. Indeed, he often praised Dewey, whose ideas were fundamental to the founding of Black Mountain College, where Albers first taught in America from 1933 to 1949. & like Dewey, his pedagogic emphasis lay in practical, concrete exercises: in the artist-educator’s own words ‘learning through conscious practice.’ Similar notions, including the Montessori method as well as those of Froebel, Pestalozzi, & others key to discourse on early childhood development were fundamental to the educational programme of the Bauhaus…"
josefalbers  evahesse  teaching  johndewey  pedagogy  art  education  arteducation  bauhaus  learningbydoing  blackmountaincollege  materials  color  sollewitt  learning  progressive  johannesitten  lászlómoholy-nagy  experimentation  empathy  visualempathy  form  order  aesthetics  engagement  instruction  bmc 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Slow=Know – Danny Gregory [via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/1032617624]
"The point is not what your lines look like or how accurate your crosshatching might be. The point is not the drawings on the page or the pages in the book. The point is not the opinions of others who love/hate/ignore those lines you made on the page. The point is not the money you make selling your work to galleries or publishers. The point of practicing your craft is not to rise in the rankings of those who draw. It’s not to have your style dominate (sorry, Dan!). The point is to more easily gain access to the moment, to the deeper more peaceful recesses of your Self. The point is to live as well and as fully as you can today, right now, whether your pen is in your hand or not. The point is to See and to Be."
drawing  seeing  slow  knowing  understanding  learningbydoing  thinking  howwework  dannygregory  glvo 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Design Thinking: Dear Don . . . - Core77
"Design thinking harnesses the power of intuition. It is a process, evolved gradually by designers of all kinds, which can be applied to create solutions to problems. People of any background can use it, whether or not they think of themselves as designers. It uses the subconscious as well as the conscious mind, subjective as well as objective thinking, tacit knowledge as well as explicit knowledge, and embraces learning by doing. I like the analogy of an iceberg that has just a little ice above water level, with a vast mass submerged. Rigorous explicit thinking, of the kind encouraged in institutions of higher learning, limits people to conscious thinking and hence to using just a tiny proportion of the potential in their minds - like the ice above the water. The design thinking process allows us to follow our intuition, valuing the sensibilities and insights that are buried in our subconscious - like the ice below the water..."
architecture  core77  designthinking  industrialdesign  graphicdesign  process  constraints  tcsnmy  evaluation  criticalthinking  prototyping  visualizaton  slection  uncertainty  iteration  iterative  synthesis  framing  ideation  envisioning  learning  making  doing  handsonlearning  learningbydoing  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  methods  design  billmoggridge 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The ISTE opening keynote – what I wish had been said « Generation YES Blog
"* These global problems must be solved by including people who are traditionally not included in solutions...cannot be solved by “usual suspects” – governments, military, big corporations, etc...
* Technology is a solution to bringing these voices out...
* Youth must be at the table...They are the ones who will live there...who will solve problems.

...the OLPC movement is based on these ideas...

Educators are like sherpas for the future. By guiding students to develop a global perspective, problem-solving skills & voice, they are creating capacity for these students to gradually solve larger & more global problems. Students may not start by tackling global warming, but by helping to clean up local marsh...skills of collaboration, teamwork, creative problem solving are the same...

Rischard missed the point by saying that we should develop curriculum for K-12 that does this...students learn these things by DOING them..."
silviamartinez  olpc  global  tcsnmy  classideas  teaching  learning  problemsolving  collaboration  criticalthinking  globalwarming  iste  2010  jean-francoisrischard  globalvoices  teamwork  creativity  meaning  scale  doing  learningbydoing  schools  curriculum  curriculumisdead  practice  future  voice 
july 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - JP Rangaswami - 2020 Shaping Ideas
"JP Rangaswami is chairman of the social enterprise School of Everything. In 2020 - Shaping Ideas he talks about how the educational institutions of the past have overlooked our human urge to feel free and to participate. In social networks and the open source movement he sees the potential for a whole new approach to learning."

[Also at: http://www.ericsson.com/campaign/20about2020/jp-rangaswami.html#video-4 ]
jprangaswami  learning  learningbydoing  tcsnmy  change  schools  socialnetworks  opensource  lcproject  mentorship  apprenticeships  2010  relationships  schoolwithoutwalls  toshare  topost  communication  teaching  wikipedia  cheating 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Facebook and the Enterprise: Part 5: Knowledge Management – confused of calcutta
"Knowledge management is not really about content, it is about creating an environment where learning takes place. Maybe we spend too much time trying to create an environment where teaching takes place, rather than focus on learning."

[This + part 6 + http://bit.ly/b04OaH have me thinking about Tumblr and other online tools at TCSNMY, and how we use it to learn, model, and observe.]
knowledgemanagement  2007  jprangaswami  collaboration  learning  lifelonglearning  socialnetworking  facebook  knowledge  social  sharing  bookmarking  socialsoftware  tcsnmy  progressive  mentoring  time-shifted  place-shifted  searchability  archivability  retrievability  retrieval  search  transparency  mentorships  mentors  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  learningbydoing  letmeshowyou  modeling  lcproject  online  internet  web  hierarchy  experience  enterprise  business  organizations  leadership  management  administration  toshare  topost  mentorship 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Musing about learning by doing – confused of calcutta
"the Maker Generation could be in for a fantastic time when it comes to learning by doing, and when it comes to being able to augment that experiental learning with observation of example. Why do I think that? Serendipity. A number of things are coming together: Experience-capture tools are getting better, cheaper and more ubiquitous...Communal tools for sharing are getting better...The Maker Generation is more inclined to share..The need for experience-based learning in the marketplace has never been greater...There’s an increasing focus on education worldwide, with more appetite for radical approaches...Trust in historical command-and-control “broadcast mode” institutions has never been lower...A change is gonna come." [This + Parts 5 and 6 of "Facebook and the Enterprise" (http://bit.ly/5ECGKp AND http://bit.ly/ay8IXP ) have me thinking about Tumblr and other online tools at TCSNMY, and how we use it to learn, model, and observe.]
jprangaswami  education  make  making  makers  experience  experientiallearning  learning  participatory  schools  change  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  via:cervus  learningbydoing  toshare  topost  constructivism  doing  resilience 
june 2010 by robertogreco
"DIY U": The end of university prestige - Nonfiction - Salon.com
"A whole DIY movement — exemplified by sites like Boing Boing — comes from people going online to learn about something, going offline and trying it out, and then going back online to report what they did."
learning  boingboing  online  diy  glvo  tcsnmy  sharing  opensource  learningbydoing  trialbyfailure  unschooling  autodidacts  books  deschooling  colleges  universities  highered 
march 2010 by robertogreco
parade of kites . catherine herdlick .
"My name is Catherine Herdlick. I make cross-media games and game-like things to entertain and delight. I have designed games that last 20 minutes and games that last 2 months about things like bicycles, perfume, and ghosts. You can find out more about all of my projects right here on this website! [...] After Wesleyan, I worked at the Boston Children's Museum where I caught the learning-while-doing bug while creating hands-on activities and programs for the museum's community outreach initiatives."
play  games  gamedesign  catherineherdlick  design  gaming  learningbydoing  handson 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Faking It as a Productivity Tip - ProfHacker.com
"Faking it is a crucial way to get anything accomplished. Many abstracts for conferences or proposals for books or sabbaticals or anything else are written before the project described therein is finished, or sometimes even started. You build a constituency for a new course in part by positing its existence, and then trusting that a successful iteration of it will lead to even more interested students. Al Filreis gave an excellent example of this on Twitter the other day: “In the late 90s univ’s had big plans for ‘distance learning’ but it all fell through (not enough $). Now it simply happens.” It happens through getting out there and doing the work–even if, or perhaps especially when, you’re not 100% sure of what you’re doing."

[via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/3698 ]

[now at: http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/faking-it-as-a-productivity-tip/22762 ]
productivity  cv  doing  do  sabbaticals  diggingin  tcsnmy  iteration  making  thinking  process  academia  learning  learningbydoing  gtd  autodidacts  unschooling  faking  fakingit  michaelchabon  kiostark  brepettis  nobodyknowswhatthey'redoing 
october 2009 by robertogreco
How We Know § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM
"Moses spent the next five years developing a completely new curriculum. He called it the Algebra Project. Instead of confronting students with abstract equations, Moses took them out into the real world, traveling around Boston in search of experiences that could demonstrate the practical uses of math. A ride on the T became a lesson in coordinate graphing and negative numbers. Neighborhood landmarks stood in for integers. When Moses taught students about displacement, he had them measure the dimensions of their own bodies. The first rule of Moses’ math class was that students always had to “participate in a physical event.”
learning  research  intelligence  human  math  algebra  learningbydoing  education  tcsnmy  schools  curriculum  realworld  experience 
september 2009 by robertogreco
The design genius of Charles + Ray Eames | Video on TED.com - “Beyond the age of information is the age of choices.” - Chales Eames
"The legendary design team Charles and Ray Eames made films, houses and classic midcentury modern furniture. Eames Demetrios, their grandson, shows rarely seen films and archival footage in a lively, loving tribute to their creative process."
eames  design  children  creativity  innovation  choice  furniture  film  video  vision  ted  eamesdemetrios  process  glvo  iterative  tcsnmy  learning  learningbydoing  organic  handson 
july 2009 by robertogreco
the rural studio – architecture students learn by designing and building in rural alabama
"the rural studio is different from other university architecture programs. instead of sitting in a classroom, students gain first hand experience by designing and constructing buildings in rural alabama. these buildings are the result of collaborating with the clients and community directly. students in the rural studio actually live in the same community they are working with, understanding the context first hand. the mission of the rural studio is to ‘enable each participating student to cross the threshold of misconceived opinions by putting their educational values to work as citizens of a community’. their belief is that architecture should be created from within, not from outside."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rural_Studio AND http://www.cadc.auburn.edu/soa/rural-studio/
ruralstudio  alabama  learning  lcproject  learningbydoing  mockbee 
november 2008 by robertogreco

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