recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : learningnetworks   18

Learning Gardens
[See also: https://www.are.na/blog/case%20study/2016/11/16/learning-gardens.html
https://www.are.na/edouard-u/learning-gardens ]

"Learning Gardens is a meta-organization to support grassroots non-institutional learning, exploration, and community-building.

At its simplest, this means we want to help you start and run your own learning group.

At its best, we hope you and your friends achieve nirvana."



"Our Mission

It's difficult to carve out time for focused study. We support learning groups in any discipline to overcome this inertia and build their own lessons, community, and learning styles.
If we succeed in our mission, participating groups should feel empowered and free of institutional shackles.

Community-based learning — free, with friends, using public resources — is simply a more sustainable and distributed form of learning for the 21st century. Peer-oriented and interest-driven study often fosters the best learning anyway.

Learning Gardens is an internet-native organization. As such, we seek to embrace transparency, decentralization, and multiple access points."



"Joining

Joining us largely means joining our slack. Say hello!

If you own or participate in your own learning group, we additionally encourage you to message us for further information.

Organization

We try to use tools that are free, open, and relatively transparent.

Slack to communicate and chat.
Github and Google Drive to build public learning resources.

You're welcome to join and assemble with us on Are.na, which we use to find and collect research materials. In a way, Learning Gardens was born from this network.

We also use Notion and Dropbox internally."



"Our lovely learning groups:

Mondays [http://mondays.nyc/ ]
Mondays is a casual discussion group for creative thinkers from all disciplines. Its simple aim is to encourage knowledge-sharing and self-learning by providing a space for the commingling of ideas, for reflective conversations that might otherwise not be had.

Pixel Lab [http://morgane.com/pixel-lab ]
A community of indie game devs and weird web artists — we're here to learn from each other and provide feedback and support for our digital side projects.

Emulating Intelligence [https://github.com/learning-gardens/_emulating_intelligence ]
EI is a learning group organized around the design, implementation, and implications of artificial intelligence as it is increasingly deployed throughout our lives. We'll weave together the theoretical, the practical, and the social aspects of the field and link it up to current events, anxieties, and discussions. To tie it all together, we'll experiment with tools for integrating AI into our own processes and practices.

Cybernetics Club [https://github.com/learning-gardens/cybernetics-club ]
Cybernetics Club is a learning group organized around the legacy of cybernetics and all the fields it has touched. What is the relevance of cybernetics today? Can it provide us the tools to make sense of the world today? Better yet, can it give us a direction for improving things?

Pedagogy Play Lab [http://ryancan.build/pedagogy-play-lab/ ]
A reading club about play, pedagogy, and learning meeting biweekly starting soon in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

[http://millennialfocusgroup.info/ ]
monthly irl discussion. 4 reading, collaborating, presenting, critiquing, and hanging vaguely identity-oriented, creatively-inclined, internet-aware, structurally-experimental networked thinking <<<>>> intersectional thinking

Utopia School [http://www.utopiaschool.org/ ]
Utopia School is an ongoing project that shares information about both failed and successful utopian projects and work towards new ones. For us, utopias are those spaces and initiatives that re-imagine the world in some crucial way. The school engages and connects people through urgent conversations, with the goal of exploring, archiving and distributing collective knowledge throughout this multi-city project.

A Pattern Language [https://github.com/learning-gardens/pattern_language ]
Biweekly reading group on A Pattern Language, attempting to reinterpret the book for the current-day."

[See also: "Getting Started with Learning Gardens: An introduction of sorts"
http://learning-gardens.co/2016/08/13/getting_started.html

"Hi, welcome to this place.

If you’re reading this, you’re probably wondering where to start! Try sifting through some links on our site, especially our resources, Github Organization, and Google Drive.

If you’re tired of reading docs and this website in general, we’d highly recommend you join our lively community in real time chat. We’re using Slack for this. It’s great.

When you enter the chat, you’ll be dumped in a channel called #_landing_pad. This channel is muted by default so that any channels you join feel fully voluntary.

We’ve recently started a system where we append any ”Learning Gardens”-related channels with an underscore (_), so it’s easy to tell which channels are meta (e.g. #_help), and which are related to actual learning groups (e.g. #cybernetics).

Everything is up for revision." ]
education  learninggardens  learningnetworks  networks  slack  aldgdp  artschools  learning  howwlearn  sfsh  self-directed  self-directedlearning  empowerment  unschooling  deschooling  decentralization  transparency  accessibility  bookclubs  readinggroups  utopiaschool  apatternlanguage  christopheralexander  pedagogy  pedagogyplaylab  cyberneticsclub  emulatingintelligence  pixellab  games  gaming  videogames  mondays  creativity  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  ai  artificialintelligence  distributed  online  web  socialmedia  édouardurcades  artschool 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Jen Delos Reyes | Rethinking Arts Education | CreativeMornings/PDX
[video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXWB7A1_zWA ]

"On the complex terrain of arts education today and expanded ways of valuing knowledge.

What should an arts education look like today? Can education change the role of artists and designers in society? How does teaching change when it is done with compassion? How does one navigate and resist the often emotionally toxic world of academia? With the rising cost of education what can we do differently?

Bibliography:

Streetwork: The Exploding School by Anthony Fyson and Colin Ward

Teaching to Transgress by bell hooks

Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope by bell hooks

Education Automation: Comprehensive Learning for Emergent Humanity by Buckminster Fuller

Talking Schools by Colin Ward

Learning By Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit by Sister Corita Kent and Jan Steward

The Open Class Room by Herbert Kohl

Deschooling Society by Ivan Illich

Why Art Can’t Be Taught by James Elkins

Education and Experience by John Dewey

Freedom and Beyond by John Holt

Notes for An Art School edited by Manifesta 6

Black Mountain: An Exploration in Community by Martin Duberman

Teaching as a Subversive Activity by Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner

We Make the Road By Walking by Myles Horton and Paulo Friere

Education for Socially Engaged Art by Pablo Helguera

Rasberry: How to Start Your Own School and Make a Book by Sally Rasberry and Robert Greenway

This Book is About Schools edited by Satu Repo

Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century) edited by Steven Henry Madoff"
via:nicolefenton  jendelosreyes  2014  art  arteducation  education  booklists  bibliographies  anthonyfyson  colinward  bellhooks  buckminsterfuller  sistercorita  coritakent  jansteward  herbertkohl  ivanillich  jameselkins  johndewey  johnholt  manifesta6  martinduberman  blackmountaincollege  bmc  unschooling  deschooling  informal  learning  howwelearn  diy  riotgirl  neilpostman  charlesweingartner  paulofriere  pablohelguera  sallyraspberry  robertgreenway  saturepo  stevenhenrymadoff  lcproject  openstudioproject  standardization  pedagogy  thichnhathahn  teaching  howweteach  mistakes  canon  critique  criticism  criticalthinking  everyday  quotidian  markets  economics  artschool  artschoolconfidential  danclowes  bfa  mfa  degrees  originality  avantgarde  frivolity  curriculum  power  dominance  understanding  relevance  irrelevance  kenlum  criticalcare  care  communitybuilding  ronscapp  artworld  sociallyendgagedart  society  design  context  carnegiemellon  social  respect  nilsnorman  socialpracticeart  cityasclassroom  student-centered  listening  love  markdion  competition  coll 
january 2015 by robertogreco
The Paper Town Academy: John Green at TEDxIndianapolis - YouTube
"John Green is the New York Times bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, and The Fault in Our Stars. He is also the coauthor, with David Levithan, of Will Grayson, Will Grayson. He was 2006 recipient of the Michael L. Printz Award, a 2009 Edgar Award winner, and has twice been a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Green's books have been published in more than a dozen languages.

In 2007, Green and his brother Hank ceased textual communication and began to talk primarily through videoblogs posted to YouTube. The videos spawned a community of people called nerdfighters who fight for intellectualism and to decrease the overall worldwide level of suck. (Decreasing suck takes many forms: Nerdfighters have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to fight poverty in the developing world; they also planted thousands of trees around the world in May of 2010 to celebrate Hank's 30th birthday.)

Although they have long since resumed textual communication, the brothers continue to upload two videos a week to their YouTube channel, Vlogbrothers. Their videos have been viewed more than 200 million times, and their channel is one of the most popular in the history of online video. Green has more than 1.2 million followers.

Big Idea: "The Paper Town Phenomenon"

When we think of education as a school-based phenomenon, we do a disservice both to students and to the rest of us. Green argues that we should imagine education as a kind of cartography, and discuss how online communities are helping to build learning maps that will encourage students. From YouTube to tumblr to the Khan Academy, the line between education and entertainment is blurring, and as these tools reach more and more people. The youth of today are quietly becoming the best-informed, most intellectually engaged generation in world history."
via:lukeneff  johngreen  papertowns  trapstreets  learning  zefrank  youtube  curiosty  education  opportunitycost  howwelearn  communities  online  web  internet  community  conversation  passion  enthusiasm  schools  schooliness  maps  mapping  cartography  exploration  learningspaces  vlogbrothers  2012  lifelonglearning  unschooling  deschooling  learningnetworks  nerdfighters 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Chalkstar to Rockstar #05 - ds106 Is The 5th Dimension of Teaching and Learning - EdReach
[Linkrot, so here is the audio: http://ds106.us/2013/10/02/chalkstar-to-rockstar-05/ ]

"Have you ever taken an online course and wondered if you were really doing work that was worth the effort? How much did you interact with other people in your class? Did you feel alone?

Unfortunately, that’s how a lot of online courses tend to be. But not this one. Meet Jim Groom and Alan Levine, two of the minds behind what is now known simply as ds106. In this episode, I talk with Alan and Jim about how ds106 is different from anything you’ve ever heard about. We’ve got open learning platforms, criticisms of MOOCs, and shameless self promotion. You won’t be disappointed."

Some quotes:

"There's probably very little more exciting teaching happening in online learning than ds106. And that's why it's not a MOOC as Alan has made more than clear. It is a community and I think it has learned from the MOOCs and I'm not sure its roots are completely divorced from them, but it's about experimenting with online education rather than accepting the model of 'we're gonna broadcast a lecture and there's gonna be questions every five seconds and it's gonna be awesome because it's an LMS, it's just much bigger and I'm gonna have 150 thousand people and this is the future of ed.'"



"That's the other thing about edtech — it's the stupidest field ever. Everybody in it is stupid. They're like 'oh, my god, MOOCs, this is great!' and then for two years people are like 'This great, MOOCs we're gonna blow the…' No, it's an LMS with more people and completely uncompelling as it stands right now with all these corporate Udacitys and Courseras. You know, there's something that was learned from those early experiments from Downes and Siemens and they're awesome, but I think the point got missed real quick."



"It lost its status as a class, and it gained the status as a community."



"When the class started to jump the shark, the students knew it, and so the fractioned off and they created their own class called ds107 as a kind of like revolutionary moment. But it's like what you want — you want your students revolting, you want them to say you're full of crap, you know, go and it was kind of this amazing moment."



"In the end, more than anything, ds106 isn't a class, it's a community. It's a group of people coming together to share stories and ideas on an open platform and openly accessible anytime, anywhere. So that brings us back to that original questions. What is it? It is what you make it. And I think that's the thing that Jim and Alan want you to take away from it. Your story is what you make it and ds106 can be a way for you to learn how to tell that story."

"If it's nothing else it's a place where people can experiment with what online learning could look like and might look like and the more it looks like the web, the better."

[via: http://bavatuesdays.com/developing-story-ds106-explained/ ]
ds106  online  education  edtech  jimgroom  alanlevine  mooc  community  teaching  moocs  opensource  learningnetworks  sharing  storytelling  openweb  lms  brianbennett  openness  decentralization  messiness  open  openlearning 
october 2013 by robertogreco
I’m just a working-class guy trying to take part in the conversation that all the smart people are having. What books should I read?
QUESTION (in part):

"I’m just a working-class guy trying to take part in the conversation that all the smart people are having. This brings me to my question: What books should I read? There are so many books out there worth reading, that I literally don’t know where to start."

ANSWER (in parts):

"We’re not on a ladder here. We’re on a web. Right now you’re experiencing a desire to become more aware of and sensitive to its other strands. That feeling you’re having is culture. Whatever feeds that, go with it. And never forget that well-educated people pretend to know on average at least two-thirds more books than they’ve actually read."

"Come up with a system of note-taking that you can use in your reading. It’s okay if it evolves. You can write in the margins, or keep a reading notebook (my preference) where you transcribe passages you like, with your own observations, and mark down the names of other, unfamiliar writers, books you’ve seen mentioned (Guy D. alone will give you a notebook full of these). Follow those notes to decide your next reading. That’s how you’ll create your own interior library. Now do that for the rest of your life and die knowing you’re still massively ignorant. (I wouldn’t trade it!)"

"Ignore all of this and read the next cool-looking book you see lying around. It’s not the where-you-start so much as the that-you-don’t-stop."

SEE ALSO: the books recommended

[Orginal is here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/08/31/dear-paris-review-john-jeremiah-sullivan-answers-your-questions/ ]
books  reading  literacy  2013  advice  learning  lifelonglearning  canon  wisdom  ignorance  readinglists  lists  recommendations  curiosity  booklists  notetaking  notes  observations  education  religion  libraries  truth  howilearnedtoread  readingnotebooks  notebooks  howwelearn  culturalliteracy  culture  hierarchy  hierarchies  snobbery  class  learningnetworks  oldtimelearningnetworks  webs  cv  howweread  borges  film  movies  guydavenport  huntergracchus  myántonia  willacather  isakdinesen  maximiliannovak  robertpennwarren  edithwharton  denisjohnson  alberterskine  karloveknausgaard  jamesjoyce  hughkenner  richardellmann  stephengreenblatt  harukimurakami  shakespeare  vladimirnabokov 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Twitter for Teachers: an Experiment in Openness | theory.cribchronicles.com
"Academia tends to be one of those (literally) old-school closed structures. Education is about and has always been about systems of power. It’s also about learning and transformation and all those things, but the traditional classroom system privileges the teacher as authority.

Because if I’d walked away, by the time I came back, the requests would have built to a clamour. And by the time there’s a clamour, people have dug in.

That’s the thing about working in the open. You can’t simply dim the lights and hush everyone. You’re part of something, and you may be guiding something, but you don’t control that thing. You’re in it with the network you’ve built. If that network includes your students, then they have public voices within it. If they mutiny, the mutiny will be active and loud and confusing unless you understand what’s going on. They’re not being insubordinate (usually). Networks are not hierarchies. And the medium encourages overt performance of discontent or questioning in a way that the classroom simply doesn’t, unless you’re in Dead Poets’ Society."
modeling  babysteps  collaboration  sharing  networks  learningnetworks  cv  deschooling  unschooling  education  learning  howweteach  tcsnmy  open  participatorylearning  authority  hierarchy  microblogging  networkedlearning  teaching  via:tealtan  2012  twitter  bonniestewart  openness 
november 2012 by robertogreco
/mentoring
"What is it, exactly?

Anyone can be a part of /mentoring. All it takes is a few lines of text on the internet, expressing your openness to mentoring and offering a specific invitation to get in touch. You might create a dedicated page at 'yourdomain.com/mentoring', write an individual blog post, or even just mention it in a sidebar. Beginning, not formatting, is what matters."

[See also: http://revolution.is/diana-kimball/ AND https://github.com/dianakimball/mentoring AND http://www.twitter.com/mentoring ]
github  gamechanging  distributed  distributedmentoring  templates  learning  education  learningwebs  learningnetworks  networkedlearning  deschooling  unschooling  dianakimball  mentoring 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Community as Curriculum – vol 2. The Guild/Distributed Continuum » Dave's Educational Blog
"The answer is to stop trying so hard, to stop looking for a systemic solution, and to return to a human-based knowledge plan. We need to return to community as a valid repository for knowledge, and away from a packaged view of knowledge and expertise. Knowledge can be fluid; it can be in transition, and we can still use it. We need to tap into the strength provided by communities and see the various forms of community literacy as the skills we need to acquire in order to be effective members of those communities."
davecormier  rhizomaticlearning  learning  knowledge  communities  education  guilds  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learningnetworks  2011  inquiry  relationships  conversation  networks 
november 2011 by robertogreco
P2PU (beta) | Learning for everyone, by everyone, about almost anything
"LEARN ANYTHING WITH YOUR PEERS. IT'S ONLINE AND TOTALLY FREE.

At P2PU, people work together to learn a particular topic by completing tasks, assessing individual and group work, and providing constructive feedback."

"The Peer 2 Peer University is a grassroots open education project that organizes learning outside of institutional walls and gives learners recognition for their achievements. P2PU creates a model for lifelong learning alongside traditional formal higher education. Leveraging the internet and educational materials openly available online, P2PU enables high-quality low-cost education opportunities. P2PU - learning for everyone, by everyone about almost anything."
education  learning  p2p  p2pu  hourschool  teachstreet  schoolofeverything  universities  highereducation  highered  peertopeer  teaching  unschooling  learningnetworks  networkedlearning  networks  lcproject  online  constructivecriticism 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Skillshare — Classes to learn anything from anyone
"Skillshare is a community marketplace to learn anything from anyone. We believe that everyone has valuable skills and knowledge to teach and the curiosity to keep learning new things. This means our neighborhoods, communities and cities are really the world's greatest universities. Our platform helps make the exchange of knowledge easy, enriching, collaborative, and fun.

All of the classes happen in the real world (that means offline, despite what we nerds may consider to be “real”). We believe that learning should happen in groups around shared interests and passions. When you bring together a variety of voices and hands-on instruction, something truly spectacular happens. This magic just can't be replicated over a webcam and chatroom. We're here to spread this magic and increase the gross happiness index around the world!"
education  learning  teaching  design  skillshare  internet  networkedlearning  hourschool  deschooling  unschooling  schoolofeverything  teachstreet  learningnetworks  classes  community 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Learning Generalist: Social Media in Learning and Social Learning are just not the same thing
"…true social learning has a few important characteristics…this is where the 'new' social learning is different from old…non-negotiable criteria to dub any learning as social:

1. Democratic: To me the classic example of social interaction is gossip at a watercooler. Gossip emerges from the ground up…doesn't need someone to lead…crowd decides the agenda…the conversation…Learning is truly social when individuals can decide what they want to learn & how they wish to collaborate on it.

2. Autonomous: …it moves by itself & is not controlled by a facilitator…facilitator can help make the flow of the interaction smoother, but in no way does the facilitator become responsible for the direction of these interactions…

3. Embedded: …it's about life in general…not a separate exercise…'just in time' learning.

4. Emergent: …structure emerges from the natural interactions of a participating group. A big problem w/ enterprise social learning is the desire to structure before you start…"
education  sociallearning  networkedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  cv  learning  learningnetworks  deschooling  unschooling  emergent  emergentcurriculum  autonomy  hierarchy  wirearchy  social  democratic  democraticschools  grassroots  embedded  reallife  meaningmaking  engagement  justintime  justinintimelearning  2011  sumeetmoghe  structure 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Moving beyond self-directed learning: Network-directed learning « Connectivism
"To address the information and social complexity of open courses, learners need to be network-directed, not self-directed learners. Social networks serve to filter and amplify important concepts and increase the diversity of views on controversial topics. This transition is far broader than only what we’ve experienced in open courses – the need for netwok-centric learning and knowledge building is foundational in many careers today…

Most importantly network-directed learning is not a “crowd sourcing” concept. Crowd sourcing involves people creating things together. Networks involve connected specialization – namely we are intelligent on our own and we amplify that intelligence when we connect to others. Connectedness – in this light – consists of increasing, not diminishing, the value of the individual."
learning  connectivism  networkedlearning  cck11  via:steelemaley  georgesiemens  self-directedlearning  self-directed  learningnetworks  deschooling  ivanillich  chaos  messiness  cv  amplifiers  specialization  mooc  cck  specialists  moocs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Deschooling and the Web: Ivan Illich 30 Years On - Educational Media International
"In 1971 the anarchist philosopher Ivan Illich published a slim volume that advocated the unthinkable: ridding the world of schools. His arguments were so persuasive that the book caused many people to question the assumptions on which we base our ideas of education. Illich advocated the replacement of institutionalised schooling by community-driven "opportunity webs" that would enable learners to be in control of their own learning and teachers to offer their services in an entrepreneurial fashion. As persuasive as his ideas were, they were not really practical given the technology of the 1970s, but perhaps Illich was ahead of his time as today the World Wide Web has created opportunities for both learners and teachers to do exactly what he described. This paper examines Illich's propositions in terms of their antecedents in the free education movements of the past century and their potential in the global anarchy of the World Wide Web."
deschooling  2010  via:steelemaley  learningnetworks  learning  lcproject  cv  schools  society  opportunitywebs  technology  unschooling  tcsnmy  education  www  web  online  internet 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Formal vs informal education - Joi Ito's Web
"[My sister an I] were discussing formal learning vs informal learning & how I probably survived because I had the privilege of having access to smart people & mentors, support of an understanding mother, an interest driven obsessive personality & access to the Internet. I completely agree that improving formal education & lowering dropout rates is extremely important, but I wonder how many people have personalities or interests that aren't really that suited for formal education, at least in its current form.

I wonder how many people there are like me who can't engage well w/ formal education, but don't have mentors or access to Internet & end up dropping out despite having a good formal education available to them. Is there a way to support & acknowledge importance of informal learning & allow those of us who work better in interest & self-motivated learning to do so w/out the social stigma & lack of support that is currently associated w/ dropping out of formal education?"
joiito  mimiito  formal  informal  informallearning  informaleducation  networkedlearning  formaleducation  tcsnmy  support  lcproject  learning  unschooling  deschooling  mentorship  apprenticeships  learningstyles  learningnetworks 
february 2010 by robertogreco
What You Really Need To Learn - Stephen Downes
"Outline of ten things you really need to learn (the basics of an education), some discussion of how we have traditionally learned them and some things to watch for, and a description of how new technologies are helping us learn them now."
stephendownes  education  elearning  presentation  pedagogy  learning  homeschool  unschooling  lifelonglearning  learningnetworks  philosophy  lcproject  classideas  life  lifeskills  well-being 
june 2008 by robertogreco
How to Save the World - The Future of Education: A Conversation with Rob Paterson
'I think we have a complete mismatch between the education establishment and the kind of people we will need to get through peak oil, overpopulation, all those kind of things."
education  learning  future  schools  apprenticeships  children  students  deschooling  unschooling  johnholt  homeschool  society  lcproject  technology  knowledge  skills  business  colleges  universities  military  organizations  credentials  testing  social  socialnetworks  networks  learningnetworks  boys  peakoil  overpopulation 
november 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read