recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : lifestream   7

The Truth of Fact, the Truth of Feeling by Ted Chiang — Subterranean Press
"We don’t normally think of it as such, but writing is a technology, which means that a literate person is someone whose thought processes are technologically mediated. We became cognitive cyborgs as soon as we became fluent readers, and the consequences of that were profound.

Before a culture adopts the use of writing, when its knowledge is transmitted exclusively through oral means, it can very easily revise its history. It’s not intentional, but it is inevitable; throughout the world, bards and griots have adapted their material to their audiences, and thus gradually adjusted the past to suit the needs of the present. The idea that accounts of the past shouldn’t change is a product of literate cultures’ reverence for the written word. Anthropologists will tell you that oral cultures understand the past differently; for them, their histories don’t need to be accurate so much as they need to validate the community’s understanding of itself. So it wouldn’t be correct to say that their histories are unreliable; their histories do what they need to do.

Right now each of us is a private oral culture. We rewrite our pasts to suit our needs and support the story we tell about ourselves. With our memories we are all guilty of a Whig interpretation of our personal histories, seeing our former selves as steps toward our glorious present selves.

But that era is coming to an end. Remem is merely the first of a new generation of memory prostheses, and as these products gain widespread adoption, we will be replacing our malleable organic memories with perfect digital archives. We will have a record of what we actually did instead of stories that evolve over repeated tellings. Within our minds, each of us will be transformed from an oral culture into a literate one.

It would be easy for me to assert that literate cultures are better off than oral ones, but my bias should be obvious, since I’m writing these words rather than speaking them to you. Instead I will say that it’s easier for me to appreciate the benefits of literacy and harder to recognize everything it has cost us. Literacy encourages a culture to place more value on documentation and less on subjective experience, and overall I think the positives outweigh the negatives. Written records are subject to every kind of error and their interpretation is subject to change, but at least the words on the page remain fixed, and there is real merit in that.

When it comes to our individual memories, I live on the opposite side of the divide. As someone whose identity was built on organic memory, I’m threatened by the prospect of removing subjectivity from our recall of events. I used to think it could be valuable for individuals to tell stories about themselves, valuable in a way that it couldn’t be for cultures, but I’m a product of my time, and times change. We can’t prevent the adoption of digital memory any more than oral cultures could stop the arrival of literacy, so the best I can do is look for something positive in it.

And I think I’ve found the real benefit of digital memory. The point is not to prove you were right; the point is to admit you were wrong."
fiction  future  lifestream  tedchiang  2013  scifi  sciencefiction  memory  lifelogging  storytelling  language  writing  truth  facts  emotions 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Unlink Your Feeds - There’s a better way.
"I have a vision of a new social networking paradigm. Handcrafted social networks.

I imagine a world where people take each network for what it is and participate (or not) on those terms. Instead of a firehose slurry of everything buckets, I imagine separate streams of purified whatever-it-is-each-service-does. I envision users that post when they’re inspired & don’t mind skipping a few days if nothing particularly interesting comes up…

I imagine people taking the extra 10 seconds to reformat a post for each service if the message is so relevant and important that it needs to show up more than once. I imagine being able to choose who I follow and what subset of their postings I get with a high degree of granularity.

There may come a day when this vision gets implemented on the server side. When all the social networks give me fine grain control for hiding subsets of the updates sent out by my contacts. But until that day comes, it’s gotta be solved on the client side."
lifestream  cv  distributed  socialnetworking  socialmedia  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  timmaly  formatting  context  del.icio.us  twitter  tumblr  vimeo  flickr  etiquette  howto  internet  web  online  tutorials  utopia 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Memolane | Your time machine for the web
"Keep your memories alive. Capture photos, music, tweets, posts, and much more. View and share your entire online life in one place. Explore and search your history."
socialmedia  tools  lifestream  timeline  visualization  flickr  facebook  twitter  spotify  rss  lastfm  tripit  foursquare  picasa  memolane  search  archives  archiving  backup  aggregator  timelines  last.fm 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Backupify :: Secure Online Backup and Archiving for Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, and Wordpress
"Your company has important data locked up in cloud based applications. Backupify provides daily automatic backups, archiving, and export for all your social media and SaaS data. Take back control of your online data with Backupify."
backup  cloud  data  facebook  flickr  gmail  google  googledocs  del.icio.us  wordpress  picasa  webservice  twitter  lifestream  media  online  services 
april 2010 by robertogreco
: Flavors.me
"Flavors.me allows anyone to create an elegant website using personal content from around the web. Ideal for personal homepages, lifestreaming, splash and microsites, celebrity fan pages, commercial promotion, brand marketing – and everything in between."
flavors.me  webdesign  portfolio  diy  mashup  trends  lifestreaming  lifestream  aggregator  profile  design  glvo  webdev 
january 2010 by robertogreco
I Am Here: One Man's Experiment With the Location-Aware Lifestyle
"To test whether I was being paranoid, I ran a little experiment. On a sunny Saturday, I spotted a woman in Golden Gate Park taking a photo with a 3G iPhone. Because iPhones embed geodata into photos that users upload to Flickr or Picasa, iPhone shots can be automatically placed on a map. At home I searched the Flickr map, and score -- a shot from today. I clicked through to the user's photostream and determined it was the woman I had seen earlier. After adjusting the settings so that only her shots appeared on the map, I saw a cluster of images in one location. Clicking on them revealed photos of an apartment interior -- a bedroom, a kitchen, a filthy living room. Now I know where she lives."
mathewhonan  mapping  twitter  fireeagle  geotagging  geolocation  socialnetworking  iphone  gps  mobile-computing  mobile  internet  web  culture  etiquette  android  location  privacy  mobility  location-aware  lifestream 
january 2009 by robertogreco
DAYTUM
"Daytum is a home for collecting and communicating your daily data. Begin tracking anything you can count and display the results immediately... or just look around and see what other members are recording."
datavisualization  lifestream  visualization  infographics  statistics  personalinformatics  life  charts  tracking  self  onlinetoolkit 
january 2009 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read