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robertogreco : lms   33

Mαtt Thomαs on Twitter: "Gonna try to live-tweet @Jessifer’s talk at @uiowa today: “Designing Assignments: Redesigning Assessment.”"
"Gonna try to live-tweet @Jessifer’s talk at @uiowa today: “Designing Assignments: Redesigning Assessment.”

.@Jessifer begins by talking about some personal stufff, as a deliberate tactic to situate himself as a human being amongst other human beings. Something to also do on the first day of class, etc.

.@Jessifer says he doesn’t use the LMS at his school because he doesn’t want students to encounter and interface with it before him, a person.

.@Jessifer points out that today syllabuses are often generated from required, stock, auto-generated templates. This sort of “scaffolding,” however, presumes a lot of things about how learning happens that might not be useful.

For instance, many of us (read: teachers) are designing courses and assignments for students we don’t even know yet. To bring in the work of @saragoldrickrab, we need to design for the students we have, not the students we wish we had.

What happens, for instance, when you learn that 1 in 2 students face food insecurity issues? How might that change how you design courses/assignments?

.@Jessifer moves on to talk about grades. They’re not some universal constant, but rather a technology that we have to learn to use, or perhaps not use.

Grading reduces learning to a transaction instead of a set of human relationships.

College teachers have often internalized ways of grading that they can perhaps free themselves from. @Jessifer says we need to “raise a critical eyebrow” at our own grading practices — e.g., our rubrics. He argues against scale, for a return to subjectivity!

In the gradebook students are reduced to rows, in the rubric reduced to columns.

Especially important things to think about, @Jessifer points out, now that almost all colleges have adopted Learning Management Systems, course “shells,” and standardized syllabuses.

.@Jessifer has recently moved to shorter-worded assignments that ask for non-traditional products. Reconceptualize the internet using analog tools, re-order the words of a poem — then document your process!"
jessestommel  mattthomas  2019  rubrics  grading  teaching  syllabus  assessment  howweteach  howwelearn  colleges  universities  highered  highereducation  humanism  lms  templates  standardization  writing  howwewrite  form  alternative  syllabi 
9 weeks ago by robertogreco
Databite No. 76: Neil Selwyn - live stream - YouTube
"Neil Selwyn presents (Dis)Connected Learning: the messy realities of digital schooling: In this Databite, Neil Selwyn will work through some emerging headline findings from a new three year study of digital technology use in Australian high schools. In particular Neil will highlight the ways in which schools’ actual uses of technology often contradict presumptions of ‘connected learning’, ‘digital education’ and the like. Instead Neil will consider ….

• how and why recent innovations such as maker culture, personalised learning and data-driven education are subsumed within more restrictive institutional ‘logics’;

• the tensions of ‘bring your own device’ and other permissive digital learning practices • how alternative and resistant forms of technology use by students tend to mitigate *against* educational engagement and/or learning gains;

• the ways in which digital technologies enhance (rather than disrupt) existing forms of advantage and privilege amongst groups of students;

• how the distributed nature of technology leadership and innovation throughout schools tends to restrict widespread institutional change and reform;

• the ambiguous role that digital technologies play in teachers’ work and the labor of teaching;

• the often surprising ways that technology seems to take hold throughout schools – echoing broader imperatives of accountability, surveillance and control.

The talk will provide plenty of scope to consider how technology use in schools might be ‘otherwise’, and alternate agendas to be pursued by educators, policymakers, technology developers and other stakeholders in the ed-tech space."

[via: "V interesting talk by Neil Selwyn on ed-tech and (dis)connected learning in school"
https://twitter.com/audreywatters/status/718900001271783424 ]

"the grammar of schooling"
neilselwyn  edtech  byod  via:audreywatters  logitics  technology  teaching  learning  howweteacher  power  mobile  phones  ipads  laptops  pedagogy  instruction  resistance  compliance  firewalls  making  makingdo  youth  schools  design  micromanagement  lms  application  sameoldsameold  efficiency  data  privacy  education  howweteach  regimentation  regulation  rules  flexibility  shininess  time  schooliness  assessment  engagement  evidence  resilience  knowledge  schedules  class  leadership  performativity  schooldesign  connectedlearning  surveillance  control  accountability  change  institutions  deschooling  quest2play  relationships  curriculum  monitoring  liberation  dml  liberatorytechnology  society  culture  ethnography  schooling  sorting  discipline 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Digital Pedagogy as Empowered Choice | bavatuesdays
"The shift towards the vision of a personal cyberinfrastructure must be accompanied by a shift in pedagogy that is centered around this idea of creative experimentation. I think this might also open up all sorts of questions surrounding the the role of the domain as an individual versus communal space; the benefits of the traditional stream-driven web versus an alternative, federated vision preached by Mike Caulfield with Smallest Federated Wiki; whether the true revolution at the center of digital pedagogy is to surrender any sense of unilateral power in the classroom, etc.

What I like about this line of discussion is that it frames the questions of digital pedagogy around issues of agency that pertain to both ownership of data as well as ownership of one’s education. Digital pedagogy as a pathway to empowered choice. Both of these shifts require a relinquishing of centralized control, deep faith in collaboration, mutual respect, and a vision of education as empowerment. All things I dig, and a conversation that starts to move us away from discussions around open vs closed that seem increasingly overdetermined."
jimgroom  digitl  digitalpedagogy  pedagogy  2015  adomainofone'sown  cyberinfrastructure  mikecaulfield  andrewrikard  audreywatters  kinlane  choice  empowerment  education  technology  ownership  open  lms  decentralization  power  highered  experimentation 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Questioning the Conformity Curve | bavatuesdays
"The folks involved in Cal State University, Channel Islands’s domains project known as CI Keys, wrote a series of really thoughtful posts about the projects from a variety of vantage points. Michelle Pacansky-Brock wrote about the project as a catalyst for teaching on the open web. Jill Leafstedt wrote about the possibilities for faculty at CSU to create connected learning spaces for their courses. Jaimie Hoffman breaks down lessons learned after a year of building numerous classes out using CI Keys. And Michael Berman offers a broader rationale as to why an investment in CI Keys made sense. I love that each of them explained the impact of this pilot through their own lens, and it captures a nice cross-section of the possibilities and limits of such an initiative.

One of the things I think Berman totally nails is the willingness to question the adoption curve of a project like CI Keys. He notes the following:
I am coming to question the usefulness of the innovation diffusion curve in Ed Tech. First of all there’s an implicit value judgment that early adopters are better than late adopters – not to mention the infamous laggards. Not all technology adoption is useful, to say the least, and some is downright harmful. Second, why is success measured as universal adoption? If 20% of the faculty at my campus find CI Keys to be a useful and even transformational tool for encouraging student learning, does that necessarily mean that the other 80% are missing something by not using it? Perhaps, but I’m not so sure. It’s nice to think that we can provide a single tool for everyone to use but we can see where that’s gotten us. Instead, some will use institutional tools, some will use open source, some will use commercial tools, and faculty and students will use different tools (really, media) to accomplish different things. Is that hard from an ed tech support position? No doubt! But I think that’s the world we live in, not one where we always think in terms of scale-up and universal adoption – that ship has sailed.

I can’t possibly have said it better, and it really frames beautifully the predicament at many campuses. Someone throws out the stat that 85% of faculty are using the LMS and the conversation stops there. The various constituents who need resources beyond the LMS are poorly served, if at all. The adoption curve is actually a conformity curve used to justify supporting fewer and fewer tools on campus. So what should be seen as a pretty basic resource like web hosting/publishing are all but absent on many campuses. As Brian Lamb noted in the “Reclaiming Innovation” piece for EDUCAUSE Review:
…institutional leaders may refuse to support alternative systems….lest they draw attention and users away from the “serious” enterprise learning tool, diverting resources and endangering investments. If a technology is sufficiently large and complex, it can dictate policy, resource allocation, and organizational behavior far beyond its immediate application.

And the investment-based logic that can breed an aversion to alternatives often fails to comprehend that they’re not only significantly cheaper than any given system, but often complementary to that system. So, rather than endangering investments, it provides alternatives that make the system that much less monolithic. What’s more, it serves a portion of a campus community that has been forced to fend for themselves for almost a decade.
jimgroom  technology  toolbelttheory  2015  brianlamb  michaelberman  education  adomainofone'sown  cikeys  jaimiehoffman  michellepacansky-brock  jillleafstedt  universality  lms  complexity  diversity  onesizefitsall  edtech  via:audreywatters 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Is It Time to Give Up on Computers in Schools?
"This is a version of the talk I gave at ISTE today on a panel titled "Is It Time to Give Up on Computers in Schools?" with Gary Stager, Will Richardson, Martin Levins, David Thornburg, and Wayne D'Orio. It was pretty damn fun.

Take one step into that massive shit-show called the Expo Hall and it’s hard not to agree: “yes, it is time to give up on computers in schools.”

Perhaps, once upon a time, we could believe ed-tech would change things. But as Seymour Papert noted in The Children’s Machine,
Little by little the subversive features of the computer were eroded away: … the computer was now used to reinforce School’s ways. What had started as a subversive instrument of change was neutralized by the system and converted into an instrument of consolidation.

I think we were naive when we ever thought otherwise.

Sure, there are subversive features, but I think the computers also involve neoliberalism, imperialism, libertarianism, and environmental destruction. They now involve high stakes investment by the global 1% – it’s going to be a $60 billion market by 2018, we’re told. Computers are implicated in the systematic de-funding and dismantling of a public school system and a devaluation of human labor. They involve the consolidation of corporate and governmental power. They involve scientific management. They are designed by white men for white men. They re-inscribe inequality.

And so I think it’s time now to recognize that if we want education that is more just and more equitable and more sustainable, that we need to get the ideologies that are hardwired into computers out of the classroom.

In the early days of educational computing, it was often up to innovative, progressive teachers to put a personal computer in their classroom, even paying for the computer out of their own pocket. These were days of experimentation, and as Seymour teaches us, a re-imagining of what these powerful machines could enable students to do.

And then came the network and, again, the mainframe.

You’ll often hear the Internet hailed as one of the greatest inventions of mankind – something that connects us all and that has, thanks to the World Wide Web, enabled the publishing and sharing of ideas at an unprecedented pace and scale.

What “the network” introduced in educational technology was also a more centralized control of computers. No longer was it up to the individual teacher to have a computer in her classroom. It was up to the district, the Central Office, IT. The sorts of hardware and software that was purchased had to meet those needs – the needs and the desire of the administration, not the needs and the desires of innovative educators, and certainly not the needs and desires of students.

The mainframe never went away. And now, virtualized, we call it “the cloud.”

Computers and mainframes and networks are points of control. They are tools of surveillance. Databases and data are how we are disciplined and punished. Quite to the contrary of Seymour’s hopes that computers will liberate learners, this will be how we are monitored and managed. Teachers. Students. Principals. Citizens. All of us.

If we look at the history of computers, we shouldn’t be that surprised. The computers’ origins are as weapons of war: Alan Turing, Bletchley Park, code-breakers and cryptography. IBM in Germany and its development of machines and databases that it sold to the Nazis in order to efficiently collect the identity and whereabouts of Jews.

The latter should give us great pause as we tout programs and policies that collect massive amounts of data – “big data.” The algorithms that computers facilitate drive more and more of our lives. We live in what law professor Frank Pasquale calls “the black box society.” We are tracked by technology; we are tracked by companies; we are tracked by our employers; we are tracked by the government, and “we have no clear idea of just how far much of this information can travel, how it is used, or its consequences.” When we compel the use of ed-tech, we are doing this to our students.

Our access to information is constrained by these algorithms. Our choices, our students’ choices are constrained by these algorithms – and we do not even recognize it, let alone challenge it.

We have convinced ourselves, for example, that we can trust Google with its mission: “To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” I call “bullshit.”

Google is at the heart of two things that computer-using educators should care deeply and think much more critically about: the collection of massive amounts of our personal data and the control over our access to knowledge.

Neither of these are neutral. Again, these are driven by ideology and by algorithms.

You’ll hear the ed-tech industry gleefully call this “personalization.” More data collection and analysis, they contend, will mean that the software bends to the student. To the contrary, as Seymour pointed out long ago, instead we find the computer programming the child. If we do not unpack the ideology, if the algorithms are all black-boxed, then “personalization” will be discriminatory. As Tressie McMillan Cottom has argued “a ‘personalized’ platform can never be democratizing when the platform operates in a society defined by inequalities.”

If we want schools to be democratizing, then we need to stop and consider how computers are likely to entrench the very opposite. Unless we stop them.

In the 1960s, the punchcard – an older piece of “ed-tech” – had become a symbol of our dehumanization by computers and by a system – an educational system – that was inflexible, impersonal. We were being reduced to numbers. We were becoming alienated. These new machines were increasing the efficiency of a system that was setting us up for a life of drudgery and that were sending us off to war. We could not be trusted with our data or with our freedoms or with the machines themselves, we were told, as the punchcards cautioned: “Do not fold, spindle, or mutilate.”

Students fought back.

Let me quote here from Mario Savio, speaking on the stairs of Sproul Hall at UC Berkeley in 1964 – over fifty years ago, yes, but I think still one of the most relevant messages for us as we consider the state and the ideology of education technology:
We’re human beings!

There is a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part; you can’t even passively take part, and you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop. And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it, that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all!

We’ve upgraded from punchcards to iPads. But underneath, a dangerous ideology – a reduction to 1s and 0s – remains. And so we need to stop this ed-tech machine."
edtech  education  audreywatters  bias  mariosavio  politics  schools  learning  tressuemcmillancottom  algorithms  seymourpapert  personalization  data  security  privacy  howwteach  howwelearn  subversion  computers  computing  lms  neoliberalism  imperialism  environment  labor  publicschools  funding  networks  cloud  bigdata  google  history 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Continuous learning : it’s a mindset not a technology or product | Learning in the Modern Workplace
"In this fast-moving world, we constantly need to learn new stuff. In the workplace, this is particularly important, as I showed in an earlier blog post, where Jacob Morgan talks of the future employee moving from “knowledge worker” (knowing stuff) to “learning worker” (learning new stuff).

So how can organisations support continuous learning at work?

1. It doesn’t mean creating more training or e-learning and force-feeding it to people. It means encouraging and supporting individuals to continuously learn for themselves.

2. It doesn’t mean trying to manage everyone’s learning for them – and trying to track it all in a LMS, It means everyone taking responsibility for their own learning, and managers measuring success in terms of job and team performance.

Of course, many individuals are already doing this – as a natural part of who they are – and that is what is giving them a personal competitive edge at work (as well as in life). They are always aware of what they learning, they seek out new opportunities to do so, and they share their thoughts (often in their blogs).

Although many organizations are implementing social technologies to support sharing at work, it takes more than technology to underpin continuous learning

Continuous learning is a mindset not a product or technology.

It means ..

• working with managers to help them build a learning mindset in their teams, and to provide the time and space to do so – and to measure success by changes in job and team performance.

• working with individuals to encourage and support independent (self-organised, self-managed) learning, e.g. showing them how

-- to extract the “learning” from their daily work

-- to discover the wide range of learning opportunities on offer – not just internally but also on the Web through professional networking, “learning the new”– through both people and content, formal and informal; and

-- to share the good stuff with their colleagues

• working with teams to support valued (rather than indiscriminate) sharing of learning and experiences

Whereas there is still a need for a L&D department to provide training (and manage that it has been done), continuous learning is not the sole responsibility of the L&D department – everyone has a part to play."
learning  lms  janehart  2015  via:willrichardson  self-organization  technology  mindset  management  leadership  administration 
june 2015 by robertogreco
The Course Hath No Bottom: the 20,000-Person Seminar
"A few years ago, Sean Michael Morris and I wrote, “Meaningful relationships are as important in a class of three as they are in a class of 10,000.” In the rest of that article, we wonder at questions of scale: how to scale up, when to scale down, and what it might mean to scale sideways. My question here: is it possible to scale up and down simultaneously — to create more and more intimate learning experiences for larger and larger groups of learners?

I’m currently co-teaching Shakespeare in Community, a Massive Open Online Course from University of Wisconsin-Madison. The goal of the course is to bring thousands of learners into conversation. While I’ve taught MOOCs since 2012 on several platforms, this is the first time I’ve developed a Coursera MOOC. Coursera is a platform well-oiled for content-delivery. In fact, when I sat down with Daphne Koller, the founder and president of Coursera, she used the word “content” several dozen times. I asked about “conversation”, “dialogue”, and “community”. Her responses showed that these are, for Coursera, an afterthought. And after playing around inside the guts of the tool, it remains clear to me that these are, indeed, an afterthought. All the proof I need is that it’s about ten times easier to upload a video, and track the watching of that video, than it is to administer the discussion forum. But Coursera does content-delivery incredibly well. My content feels stroked and adored by the platform. It feels genuinely loved. As learning management systems go, I am happy to go on record saying that Coursera is one of the best.

However, I remain certain that learning is not something that ought to be managed. The better we become at managing learning, the more damage we do to learning. This is the cruel irony of the learning management system. The better designed it is for doing its core function, the worse off the learning that happens inside of it. As a technology, the learning management system is genuinely Orwellian. I like best the learning management system when it is still a baby, before it has fully grown up, before it has earned its stripes. But every learning management system is almost immediately on its way toward extinction. They die quick deaths at the point they forget that learning is an encounter, not a spreadsheet. The gradebook, and the demands it places on every single other feature, ultimately kills the learning management system. (Thus, I wouldn’t blame the technological systems so much as I’d blame the institutional and political climates that drive them.)

If we are to use these systems, we need to carve out more space in them for nuance — fashioning simpler platforms that serve as launching pads to places outside their own orbit (both physical and virtual). And every course inside a learning management system should ask students to reflect on the “rhetoric of the room” — the ways the shape of the room affects the learning we do inside of it. We either critically interrogate our tools or are subject to them. There is no middle ground between these two."
coursera  mooc  moocs  2015  jessestommel  management  learning  howwelearn  howweteach  teaching  lms  technology  edtech  conversation  contentdelivery  relationships  pedagogy 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Structure is Not Sacrosanct:  A Pedagogical How-to | Keep Learning
"More and more of the mainstream news conversation about educational technology and online learning drapes the efforts of software developers, politicians and venture capitalists in terms of revolution, calling out a structure they claim has not changed in 200 or even 1000 years. Despite their dissatisfaction with existing learning structure and a groundswell for innovation, the vision of higher education they offer continues to involve designing system software based around the centralization of content and the consolidation of administrative systems. Having content at the forefront of an education system dates back over 2500 years to the schools of ancient Greece. 2500 years ago it made sense to design based around content; information was neither free nor ubiquitous, and the role of a school was in part to share information but also to collect, curate and preserve content and artifacts, elements equal in importance at the time. Today’s schools no longer must serve four objectives, yet the so-called revolutionary online learning design continues to adhere to this arcane structure.

Why is true innovation so hard? There is a lesson to be learned in narrative structure. The authorized method of teaching narrative structure in K-12 education is to employ Freytag’s Pyramid, a narrative example conceptualized by 19th Century German realist poet Gustav Freytag. The structure is simple and has symmetry: stories have a conflict, rising action, a climax, falling action and a resolution. Today we use this structure to teach narrative in elementary schools (often calling it the witch’s hat based on its appearance), help students study for standardized tests, and depend on it as a frame of reference for college admission testing.

There are two significant problems with Freytag’s Pyramid, however. First, it does not work at all. Outside of Greek tragedies and neoclassical drama such as Shakespeare, story and narrative does not fit the pyramid; users of the structure are forced to stretch, contort and maul either the pyramid or the story to attempt to find a fit. This is because of the second problem with Freytag’s Pyramid: Freytag himself did not believe it was a universal fit for narrative structure. The pyramid was an effort to connect the German realism movement to classical antiquity, an attempt to distinguish realism from other artistic and cultural movements at the time by attaching it to a well-respected structure. Said Freytag, “That the technique of the drama is nothing absolute and unchangeable scarcely need be stated.” By 1913, his work was seen as waxing nostalgic, an effort to remain relevant despite time having passed him by. A much better example of structure comes from Kurt Vonnegut, who used an axis for time and fortune to plot various story structures, each one able to exist on the simple coordinate plane but unique based on its specific needs. Vonnegut allowed the story to dictate the kind of structure used, but built it in a similar space so there is a point of reference despite difference. This representation of structure sees it as fluid, dynamic and story-driven rather than Freytag’s Pyramid which is rigid, static and structure-driven.

The axis-as-structure motif is a fitting analogy for a student-centered conversation about digital structure. With the Internet as the coordinate plane, imagining the manner in which digital structure can aid student learning becomes an expansive conversation. That breadth can be frightening, and its infinite scope could be the reason many people adhere to singular and static structure. But the openness is necessary, and when seen from a place of opportunity rather than obstacle, it is liberating in terms of knowledge creation, communication and collaboration. Rather than putting a wiki in an LMS and neutering its open purpose with a closed space, students can engage existing wikis or take ownership and utilize Smallest Federated Wiki. Instead of flipping the classroom and sending students home to watch video lectures, teachers can scramble the classroom and have students reuse, remix, revise and redistribute objective-based learning artifacts on the subject at hand. Rather than turning in an assignment to Dropbox or an LMS, students can use a document share service or host them on a personal web space, creating a place of digital ownership and digital identity. The structure can fit the need of the student rather than the student twisting and bending to attempt to match the structure.

Change is difficult to massage in any space, and academia is no exception. Faculty speak of challenges in implementing such initiatives due to resistance from faculty affairs, information technology and the registrar, for starters. These scholastic elements are charged with ensuring rigor, support and accreditation, so their concerns are valid. It is important to remember, however, that our schools are no longer in ancient Greece, and no matter the lenses we use to do our duties, every person’s objective is to assist the learner in their journey to wisdom. The opportunity to speak to these entities about the obstacles in implementing cutting-edge digital pedagogy should be relished, and the perspectives of these departments are an important contribution to furthering our field. Educating a citizenry has a history of over 2500 years, and conversations about teaching and learning have only become popular over the past generation, so let us have all perspectives at the table and be willing to engage in the difficult discussions of scale, access, support and cost, as long as we always keep the student at the forefront. Change happens with action, but it starts with dialogue."
structure  storytelling  writing  narrative  2014  pedagogy  teachingwriting  gustavfreytag  kurtvonnegut  change  technology  lms  systems  vonnegut 
december 2014 by robertogreco
On Not Silencing Students: A Pedagogical How-to | Keep Learning
"Why do students submit writing to their teachers? Many writing-intensive courses at all levels of education center on student-created, teacher-graded writing assignments. Such a system streamlines the production process, letting students know what tools they should use to create and submit their work, and letting them write to a familiar audience. After all, if students write to a teacher every year, they should be good at guessing what teachers expect by the time they get to college. By always writing to a teacher for a grade, students implicitly learn that writing exists for the benefit of that audience, and that readers assess the quality of writing…and do nothing else in response. All their work creating words falls silent after we issue a grade.

Compare that scenario with the small-scale writing goals of students outside the classroom: They send text messages to coordinate activities with friends, craft Facebook updates to garner likes and tweets to garner retweets or followers, or post yaks to get upvotes or attention. When students write content on social platforms, no matter how public their voices become, their writing is purposeful. Outside the classroom, students write to do things. Inside the classroom, students write to get a grade. What I’ll call the “purpose disparity” immediately renders classroom writing less meaningful and less real to our students. To reverse that imbalance, we need to see student writing in a different context.

Student writing should be made public whenever possible. Students should write in real situations, for real audiences, with real intended actions. Real writing situations exist all around us, but we rarely bring them into the fold of our classes. If we want writing to matter, we need to show students the situations in which it actually does — and our desks are not those situations. In a recent post on Keep Learning, Rolin Moe hints at this sort of shift, suggesting that instead of “turning in an assignment to Dropbox or an LMS, students can use a document share service or host them on a personal web space, creating a place of digital ownership and digital identity.” Moe identified several benefits of this approach, mostly from the perspective of student-centered learning: “The structure [of the writing] can fit the need of the student rather than the student twisting and bending to attempt to match the structure.” We can go another step further if we think specifically about composition pedagogy. Student writing should fit the need of the audience, not just the student that Moe is justifiably concerned about.

I challenge writing teachers to examine their assignments. If the assignment ends with “turn in your work”, ask why that’s the ultimate goal. Why are students writing to you? Why are you the final judge of success? More importantly, who else is a more-appropriate audience for the thinking your students are doing? If those questions elicit a dearth of ready answers, this could be an opportunity for some community building. You (or your students) aren’t the only one thinking about the issues inside your classroom. You probably already have a personal learning network (commonly called a PLN — learn more from Alison Seaman and Michelle Kassorla) built around your field or the issue at hand. Employ that community, either as an audience or as a resource. If appropriate, have students engage the community. If not (say, if you have an elementary classroom and a network of R1 researchers), then find out how the work being done with the issue manifests in daily life. Or, if there is no community, make one. I’m not sure how many secondary students would want to discuss the intricacies of King Lear in their free time, but if students at different schools, in different contexts, can access one another’s perspectives on the work, you might find that a complex network — what Henry Jenkins calls a “participatory culture” — can form from the combination of viewpoints. Suddenly, students would write to other students, rather than a teacher. Set some general goals, then set them free.

Bringing together geographically separated students brings to mind the Generative Literature Project currently underway from Hybrid Pedagogy Publishing. With this project, a handful of teachers across the globe have brought their students together to create their own tale of the murder of a fictional school’s president. The nature of the distributed work requires them to keep in mind dual audiences—their collaborators and the eventual readers—and the work students do has value because it connects with, or is used by, the work other students are doing. The Generative Literature Project has been a substantial undertaking, but it works as a broader implementation of a relatively simple principle: Make students’ writing matter.

Assessment, the elephant in this particular room, deserves to be addressed. When students write for someone other than the teacher, they have to be aware of the needs of the audience. They also need to be aware of the stakes involved and potential consequences of their work. Learning to write may be hard work, but learning to write for specific circumstances and to specific ends becomes a more complex and valuable experience. In real-world writing situations, students should be able to see the effect their writing has on people. That effect could be simply to draw attention and get page hits, or it could be to make authorities change positions, address issues, or make statements. Maybe students could convince others to hold a view or take action. In short, students could use our assignments to make changes to the world around them. Their voices would be heard, and their writing would be purposeful."
writing  teaching  howwewrite  purpose  assessment  meaning  2014  chrisfriend  audience  teachingwriting  pedagogy  publishing  lms  identity  communication 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Risk, Reward, and Digital Writing - Hybrid Pedagogy
"Digital writing is political because in every pixel, every DNA-like strand of code, we are placing ourselves into the public. Even if we are not writing for a wide audience, even if we make no plans to disseminate our work, the craft of writing now takes place within other people’s software, in other people’s houses. This page the borrowed sheets. Me the writer a couch surfer.

Owning our own homes in the digital requires an expertise that this writer does not have. I don’t own my own server, I haven’t learned to code, I haven’t designed my own interfaces, my own web site, nor even my own font. I must content myself to rent, to squat, or to ride the rails. But in this I find a certain freedom, a resistance in the willy-nilly. I cannot build my own home in the digital, but I can mark my territory.

In November, Hybrid Pedagogy — along with the UW-Madison Division of Continuing Studies — will once again host Digital Writing Month, a 30-day writing challenge that asks participants to create works of text, image/video, and sound. The form these works take, and what they say, do, expose, problematize, or solve, is entirely up to the author(s) and artist(s) who join the fray. The work should be challenging, inventive, and should give the digital writer a chance to do something they’ve always wanted to do.

Here, in this piece, I am offering an additional challenge: to make the act of digital writing truly political. To rouse and incite, to question and provoke, to mark our territories on the spaces delimited by their designers. By creating, hack; by writing, rebel. We must make the sites of our work little bitty Bastilles, our tweets and Vines and sound clips tiny marches on Versailles. Imagine a blog that flies the Jolly Roger, a podcast that bows to no one, a Vimeo channel that riots and runs amok. These are the ways the insurgence begins.

In this, I recognize I speak of rebellion playfully, when in truth most revolutions are terrible, bloody affairs. That playfulness, though, is the invitation. We are creating a revolution of digital handicraft, of makers and shakers. We shall not throw our bodies upon the machines, but we shall throw our words there — and our images — and our voices. The approach may look joyous and celebratory, and the fervor may delight and inspire, and the result will have meaning.

Hybrid Pedagogy has been accused of being Pollyanna, our work too blithe and easy, our seriousness not nearly serious enough. Our editors on the tenure track have been reminded to publish with traditional journals, lest their academic work wither under the glare of rigor and double-blind peer review. But there is nothing casual about Hybrid Pedagogy, just as there is nothing casual about any other digital work. What digital work does is change the landscape of all work. When we write in the digital, our words behave differently; when we broadcast our ideas, the reception re-broadcasts and re-purposes those ideas. Digital publishing, digital writing, digital humanities, digital literacy, digital citizenship — these are not terms à la mode, but rather they are new components of very real human communities, very real human craft. We may approach them with equal part suspicion and exaltation, but approach them we must.

Insisting on such requires a certain risk, especially in academia. We must be prepared to look back in the faces of those who think our digital work lacks merit and tell them otherwise. And we must do so to the ends of our wits.

To change the perception that the digital is not as consequential as work in traditional media we must participate in it. We must put our best work there, and eschew the paper-bound, readerless journals that grow mold in library basements. We must reinhabit libraries, as sites for conference and debate, crafting and creation, community and not simply curation. We must likewise redefine what matters, what has impact factor, and grow the traditional so it’s not so obsolete. We must show up in digital places in throngs and masses. No algorithms will change unless we move against them. The LMS will not die its death until we put it in the ground. Our work in the digital will not begin if we never recognize that it is work that must begin.

Digital Writing Month, and digital writing at any time, is never frivolous. In doing things differently, we sow difference. “Essays quake and tremble at the digital,” I said. “They weep in awe and fascination. And they throw themselves into the abyss … Digital writing is a rebellion. An uprising against our sense and sensibility. Différance.” By refusing to do what’s expected, we frame a space of new expectations, new possibilities. When we recognize the oppression of autocorrect, the hegemony of the algorithm, the charade of rigor, we light the fires of revolution. And though they may glow softly at first, enough of them gathered together will burn down towers."
seanmichaelmorris  2014  writing  digitalwriting  communication  pirates  squatting  hobos  nomads  digitalnomads  adomainofone'sown  blogs  blogging  googledocs  renting  creation  conversation  vine  twitter  photography  podcasts  lms  revolution  academia  participatory  participation  howwewrite  digiwrimo  culturecreation 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Learning and Performance Support System
"The NRC Learning and Performance Support Systems (LPSS) will enable you to develop your own learning program from the ground up. Working with a range of industry, technology and academic partners, we are researching and developing a dynamic personal learning environment with enhanced access to resources, activities and credentials from multiple providers around the world.

Your learning, your time, your way.

Thank you for your interest in the pre-release of LPSS."
lpss  via:sebastienmaroin  lms 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Known: a social publishing platform
"For you
Tell your story any way you'd like. Known is a simple platform for publishing words, pictures, podcasts and more to a site that you control. Choose to share it on networks like Twitter and Facebook, or the software you already use.

For your group
Whether you're sharing quotes with your neighborhood book club or starting a grassroots campaign to change the world, Known is built around group collaboration and social publishing. Public or private, big or small; with Known, your platform is powered by people.

For your organization
Meet your colleagues around a digital water cooler. With Known you can run a private social network for your company, campus or organization. Today's teams don’t always work in the same room, but now you have a way to share inspirations, chat with colleagues, and send around company BBQ pics without getting lost in endless email threads.

Wherever you are
You already spend enough time in front of a computer, and inspiration can strike anywhere. Known is fully responsive and works on whatever device you’ve got in your hand. Whether you’re sharing a sunset picture from the beach or blogging from the road, real-time publishing is real.

Open and extensible.
Known is a fully installable platform based on an open source engine with a complete plugin architecture, an easy template system, and access control support.

Roll your own network.
You can install Known yourself if you have a server, and you can easily extend its functionality. It's your site: you're in control.

No server? No problem.
You don’t have to worry about the technical stuff if you don’t want to. Sign up for a website above, and we'll take care of the details."
via:audreywatters  opensource  publishing  indieweb  blogging  webdev  lms  known  adomainofone'sown  ownership  webdesign 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Beyond the LMS
"Let’s move beyond the LMS, back to and forward to an independent Web and let’s help our students take full advantage of it."
adomainofone'sown  lms  openweb  web  mooc  moocs  vle  indieweb  online  internet  edtech  education  2014  audreywatters  technology  learning  reclaimhosting 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Reclaiming Innovation
"Udell notes: "There's a reason I keep finding novel uses for these trailing-edge technologies. I see them not as closed products and services, but rather as toolkits that invite their users to adapt and extend them.""

"Rather than framing everything at the course level, we should be deploying these technologies for the individual."

"Viewed as a whole, the web today bears little resemblance to the innately democratic and decentralized network that seduced and enticed us a decade ago."

"Railing against the academy's failure to embrace a perceived risk can be dismal fun for many of us, but an honest appraisal of our own missteps has to be in the mix."
2014  jimgroom  brianlamb  audreywatters  internet  web  highered  highereducation  it  ict  technology  mooc  moocs  disruption  open  edupunk  lms  openpublishing  publishing  adomainofone'sown  diy  decentralization  anildash  georgesiemens  stephendownes  jonudell  benjaminbratton  vendors  silos  security  privacy  venturecapital  tonyhirst  timberners-lee  bryanalexander  openness  reclaimhosting  indieweb 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Buzz Andersen — I suppose I understand the perspective of these...
I suppose I understand the perspective of these engineers, though I don’t think their fear is of abstraction. It is a fear of improper abstraction, which is often the product of trying to create an abstraction before you even understand the problem; you know sit around and talk aimlessly for a couple of hours driven development. Good abstractions start very simple and evolve overtime to become useful mental models for a particular problem.

—Abstraction - A Tool For Collective Thought [Merrick Christensen https://dayone.me/8WwzfO ]

"I’ve been wanting for awhile now to write a post about programmatic abstractions that would be very much along these lines. I think this is a really important insight that separates great abstractions that hold up over time from lousy ones that are fashionable for a season until people start to understand their limitations. Good abstractions start simply—often close to the minimal solution possible—and evolve over time in a way that is always informed by specific use cases encountered in the wild. Abstractions that start out as monolithic, seamless, end-all-be-all solutions tend to break down very quickly when exposed to anything but the textbook use cases their creators anticipated, whereas more humble efforts, judiciously managed, tend to grow more organically into true general purpose tools with real staying power."
buzzanderson  tools  abstraction  2014  small  scale  simple  simplicity  problemsolving  toolmaking  lms  purpose 
april 2014 by robertogreco
LMS Metaphors | Bionic Teaching
"It seems to me that the LMS is a fast-food franchise kitchen. It does exactly what it is meant to do. It is built for people with minimal skills to make cheap food quickly at scale. It isn’t meant to be a training ground so people can move up to gourmet cooking. These skills don’t transfer. You aren’t even meant to graduate to being a line cook at Friday’s.

The LMS reaches the minimum quality people will tolerate in exchange for convenience and low cost.1 The LMS focuses on making the very things I find most problematic easy. Blackboard tells you what it thinks is most important for teachers with their own lead copy.
Efficient Teaching Tasks
Blackboard Learn enhances basic teaching tasks like grading and creating assessments. And with an intuitive design, this is one LMS that will save you time in and out of the classroom. – love Bb

It’s pretty clear why Bb exists. Every bit of that language reeks of unpleasant things done efficiently at scale.

Now you can take fast food and do big campaigns about serving up some semi-healthy stuff. You even have people with energy and creativity using fast food ingredients to make gourmet food. But when it comes down to it, the ingredients, the hardware, the thinking behind the layout is focused entirely on a scale delivery of certain kind of “food” and that purpose drives most everything that will ever happen in a fast food kitchen.2

It’s also pretty clear that our society is perfectly ok with fast food. We eat liquid meat paste after all. Putting multiple hundreds of students in a class, the wild popularity of video/quiz MOOCs, certainly indicate we have a very low bar for education. Most people have not had much but fast food education and any move away is likely to create dissatisfaction of various kinds.

Anyone can put content online now. I think YouTube comments prove that conclusively. If not, there’s always Literally Unbelievable or your 2nd grader of choice. So the technical threshold the LMS was supposed to get faculty over isn’t really there but the LMS ceiling remains. There’s no real bump coming into the LMS but be prepared to stoop the entire time you’re in it. It does make scale assessment easy. It does put the focus clearly on grades and an ever tightening feedback loop. It does allow us to scale faculty to greater and greater numbers of students.

The LMS tool shapes what faculty think they can and should do both online and off. It shapes how courses are designed,3 how assessments are designed. It shapes what students and parents expect. It shapes how Universities structure course loads and enrollment. It shapes far too many things in a reciprocal loop of “practical” choices and low bars. That’s a terrible thing to standardize. The LMS is a symptom of larger issues, a cause of larger issues, and a way of understanding these issues. That scares me. The “solution” that contributes to the problem it solves is a hard one to untangle when it’s enmeshed in the understanding of the problem like this. Yet we keep bringing more people into it, becoming more reliant while simultaneously limiting the understandings and aspirations that would enable us to do something different."
lms  edtech  teaching  education  tomwoowdward  blackboard  control  scale  scaling  standardization  learning  online  internet  dehumanization  fastfood  metaphors  assessment  systemsthinking  tools  onlinetoolkit  toolbelttheory 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Chalkstar to Rockstar #05 - ds106 Is The 5th Dimension of Teaching and Learning - EdReach
[Linkrot, so here is the audio: http://ds106.us/2013/10/02/chalkstar-to-rockstar-05/ ]

"Have you ever taken an online course and wondered if you were really doing work that was worth the effort? How much did you interact with other people in your class? Did you feel alone?

Unfortunately, that’s how a lot of online courses tend to be. But not this one. Meet Jim Groom and Alan Levine, two of the minds behind what is now known simply as ds106. In this episode, I talk with Alan and Jim about how ds106 is different from anything you’ve ever heard about. We’ve got open learning platforms, criticisms of MOOCs, and shameless self promotion. You won’t be disappointed."

Some quotes:

"There's probably very little more exciting teaching happening in online learning than ds106. And that's why it's not a MOOC as Alan has made more than clear. It is a community and I think it has learned from the MOOCs and I'm not sure its roots are completely divorced from them, but it's about experimenting with online education rather than accepting the model of 'we're gonna broadcast a lecture and there's gonna be questions every five seconds and it's gonna be awesome because it's an LMS, it's just much bigger and I'm gonna have 150 thousand people and this is the future of ed.'"



"That's the other thing about edtech — it's the stupidest field ever. Everybody in it is stupid. They're like 'oh, my god, MOOCs, this is great!' and then for two years people are like 'This great, MOOCs we're gonna blow the…' No, it's an LMS with more people and completely uncompelling as it stands right now with all these corporate Udacitys and Courseras. You know, there's something that was learned from those early experiments from Downes and Siemens and they're awesome, but I think the point got missed real quick."



"It lost its status as a class, and it gained the status as a community."



"When the class started to jump the shark, the students knew it, and so the fractioned off and they created their own class called ds107 as a kind of like revolutionary moment. But it's like what you want — you want your students revolting, you want them to say you're full of crap, you know, go and it was kind of this amazing moment."



"In the end, more than anything, ds106 isn't a class, it's a community. It's a group of people coming together to share stories and ideas on an open platform and openly accessible anytime, anywhere. So that brings us back to that original questions. What is it? It is what you make it. And I think that's the thing that Jim and Alan want you to take away from it. Your story is what you make it and ds106 can be a way for you to learn how to tell that story."

"If it's nothing else it's a place where people can experiment with what online learning could look like and might look like and the more it looks like the web, the better."

[via: http://bavatuesdays.com/developing-story-ds106-explained/ ]
ds106  online  education  edtech  jimgroom  alanlevine  mooc  community  teaching  moocs  opensource  learningnetworks  sharing  storytelling  openweb  lms  brianbennett  openness  decentralization  messiness  open  openlearning 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Rise Above The LMS #4C13 [video & transcript] - betajames
"If we acknowledge that writing often constitutes public work, if we are interested in enhancing the status of first-year composition, we should rethink housing our courses in learning management systems."



"Blackboard wasn't written for me. Blackboard wasn't written for me as an educator or for that person as a student. Blackboard was written for the Blackboard company to dominate education in a very particular way. Blackboard was created to help create an equivalence between distance learning and real-life learning so that in your classroom you're actually using this technology as much as you would long distance...It's created not to promote the user's agency, but to decrease the user's agency and increase the institution's dependence on this piece of software."



"For as much as Blackboard may be about preserving itself as the top LMS option, it is also about preserving the traditional aspects of higher education."



"I also agree with Matthew Gold’s perspective that the problem with learning management systems ‘lies in the conjunction of three words that should not appear together. Learning is not something that can be “managed” via a “system.”’ Given how we may use Blackboard or another platform, our course banners might as well read “Under Old Management.” Many of the faults of traditional LMS platforms are also the faults of higher education.

Still, the title of this talk isn’t “Rage Against The LMS.” Well, it was, but it isn’t anymore. In fact, my co-panelist Brian McNely has, in his words, “backed away from a militant anti-LMS perspective in everyday practice, in large part because it’s simply not conducive to getting things done with what we have…I don’t have the energy or influence to overturn my university’s LMS policy; I can offer my students interesting workarounds to the limitations of the LMS.” Like him, I’m more interested in how we might rise above the LMS, either through alternatives or by other means."



"we need to see the LMS as an opportunity to reconsider how and what it is we do as teachers.

This diagram is part of a blog entry by Lisa M. Lane in which she looks at how and where courses begin. According to Lane, starting in an LMS implies a teacher-centric model, closer connection with the college and its structures, greater concern for security and privacy, and emphasis on presentation and content over interactivity and community. Starting on the open web or a social media site implies a learner-centric model, greater connection with the outside world, and emphasis on community over content. "



"This diagram is part of a blog entry by D’Arcy Norman in which he sees a role for the LMS in higher education “if for no other reason than the simple reality that most instructors, and many students, aren’t ready, willing, or able to forge their own solutions." Norman also acknowledges that “even a grassroots No-LMS environment eventually grows to resemble an LMS-like space." Through these diagrams, we can come to see the LMS in general as less of a learning management system and more of a learning mediated system."
lms  education  blackboard  highereducation  highered  management  control  openweb  cv  jamesschirmer  institutions  institutionware  douglasrushkoff  2013  henryrollins  punk  edupunk  open  hierarchy  organizations  zachdelarocha  matthewgold  d'arcynorman  howweteach  howwelearn  brianmcnely  blackflag  lisamlane  williambeasley  ds106 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Technology Integration in K-12
Q: I'm curious as to what you think the three most important things for new
teachers to know about technology integration in k-12?

"1. Community - teaching can be a lonely profession, and it's easy to think you face problems nobody else faces. One of the greatest aspect of the internet is its ability to connect people who are isolated in just that way. A teacher who is able to find an online network will find support and resources. The exact technology doesn't matter much, and has evolved over the years, from the days of email mailing lists, to community bulletin boards, to social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook.

2. Educational Resources - you want your use of the internet to be of practical value, and typically that means finding a quick and easy way to find resources for your classes. It is often a lot easier to find something than to create something. But it's important to do something better than just searching on Google; that can drain more time than you can imagine. Communities often support resource-sharing sites, or members can at least point to one.

3. Course Tools - the original LMS was called 'Web Course Tools' and the name was apt, because the desire here is to provide access to tools that make teaching in a class easier. Simple course tools can be one of the teacher's greatest assets - a place to store course documents and handhouts, to keep records and possibky grades, to develop a profile over time on each student. These tools *may* be accessible by students, in classes that have good technology integration, but the greatest value will be to help the teacher stay organized.

You'll note that I haven't included any presentation tools, like online video, or talked about having the whole class use blogs or Facebook. That's because of the question you asked, which focuses on new teachers and technology integration in the classroom. It is in my mind unwise to attempt to use technology to teach until after you have already learned to use technology for personal development and productivity.

This is partially because it is essential to develop an easy facility with technology before using it in the classroom, and partially because teachers without that experience tend to use technology as a type of television (or presentation tool). But as can be seen from the three points above, technology for personal learning and development is about connecting to community, leaning to find resources, and supporting improved productivity."
community  tools  lms  education  teaching  learning  technology  professionaldevelopment  presentations  stephendownes 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Will · Educon 2.5-ish Random-ish Reflections
"But the one thing we kind of danced around that I wish we’d had more time for was the “ok, so what do we do about it.” Two snippets spoke to that. First, at one point we began talking about the inroads that companies had made into education via the Apple Distinguished Educator or Google Certified Teacher brands, and whether or not there was a downside to helping to market companies that at the end of the day may not have the best intentions or visions for the type of progressive reforms that many of us are calling for."

WILL ASKS:

"We don’t need textbooks anymore. We can make our own with our kids. But textbook companies need us to need textbooks. Other companies need us to need LMSs even though we don’t really need them. Etc. What, at the end of the day, are the products that really serve the vision of teaching and learning that we’re now talking about?"

MY COMMENT:

"I. Self-organized learning

This is something I've been thinking about lately. If we are not given true control (when, how, what, etc.) of our own education then we can always blame others for our education. We become victims. This is the problem with compulsory schooling and predetermined curriculum.

On the other hand, if we are given complete control of our education then we can only blame ourselves for its shortcomings. We are allowed self-determination. That is empowering.

II. The tools at our disposal

"What, at the end of the day, are the products that really serve the vision of teaching and learning that we’re now talking about?"

Same as they've always been (though not really products): the people and places in our communities. That includes libraries and museums, of course.

And from recent years: broadband connections (connecting to people, ideas and resources from around the world) and maker spaces (in many ways, those are not really new)."
willrichardson  educon  educon2.5  2013  self-organizedlearning  education  learning  tools  empowerment  blame  victimization  teaching  schools  schooling  textbooks  lms  audreywatters  comments 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Why the Facebook Group My Students Created for Themselves is Better than the Discussion Forum I Created for Them. « Douchy’s Weblog
"While at first, the control-freak in me wanted to send them all back to the “official class discussion forum”,  The advantages of the Facebook group have become increasingly compelling and I’m wondering whether it’s time to let the forum I created go the way of cassette tapes and typewriters.  Why is a Facebook group better? For one thing, Facebook is a digital home for many students.  So a group based there is comfortable to them – it’s on their virtual turf. Because of this, the Facebook group is even more of a desire path than my discussion forum is.

Some other advantages of the Facebook group over the discussion board I created are: …"
facebook  teaching  interaction  learning  collaboration  students  2011  ict  lms  studentcentered  discussion  forums 
november 2011 by robertogreco
The Ed Techie: Eportfolios - J'accuse [Or why we [TCSNMY] encourage use of off-the-shelf tools rather than rolling our own or spending on some ed-tech crap]
"An institution has a very different set of requirements to an individual. However, if you want eportfolios to work, then it’s individuals that need to like them and be motivated to use them. This emanates from an institutional tic, which is the need to own and control systems and data…<br />
Educational arrogance – maybe arrogance is too strong a term, but eportfolios demonstrate a common mistake (in my view) in educational technology, which goes something like “Here’s some interesting software/tool/service which does most of what we want. But it’s not quite good enough for higher education, let’s develop our own version with features X and Y”. In adding features X and Y though they lose what was good about the initial tool, and take a long time. Blogs are good enough for eportfolios, if what you want from an eportfolio is for people to actually, you know, use them. "
education  technology  elearning  portfolios  eportfolios  tcsnmy  onlinetoolkit  lms  via:steelemaley  cv  edtech  open  it'saboutthecontent  control  closedsystems  blogs  blogging  learning  lcproject  rss  portability  mobility 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Networked Study at bavatuesdays
Great discussion in the comments including this: "It’s hard to change the culture of education without getting the kids before their thinking processes begin to ossify, but in order to do that, you have to contend with their parents who, however well-intended, didn’t have the benefit of the kind education you’re trying to provide their kids and often see it as more of a threat than an opportunity."

[via: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/opportunity-not-threat/ ]
education  edupunk  diy  future  highered  learning  lms  networkedlearning  students  parenting  teaching  tcsnmy  lcproject  change  reform  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling 
april 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Easy. Fun. Free.
"If [x] is going to change teaching practice at scale, then [x] needs to be easy, fun, and free for both the teacher and her students. [x] needs to be all three of those things at the same time. ... I don’t have any hope in the scalable transformational power of any tool that requires anything more than ten minutes of professional development."
tumblr  technology  interteaching  professionaldevelopment  learning  googlereader  schools  education  tcsnmy  lms  pln  ples  schooling  danmeyer 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Israel’s Time To Know Aims To Revolutionize The Classroom
"Time To Know designs and produces what it calls ‘full digital curriculum coverage,’ which is a complete year’s worth of lesson plans, learning activities, and homework assignments. To grasp just what an immense undertaking this is, multiply these by the four subjects matters Time To Know targets—math, science, language arts and social studies—and now multiply that by 13 year’s worth of education (kindergarten plus 12 formal years of schooling). To put this into perspective, in a single year Time To Know produces animation with a combined length of one and a half feature films." [Sites constructivism, but doesn't sound like it.]
constructivism  learning  technology  innovation  curriculum  computers  elearning  entrepreneurship  e-learning  techcrunch  1:1  israel  lms  startup  education  laptops  classroom  differentiatedlearning  timetoknow  classrooms  1to1 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The End in Mind » The CMS and the PLN
"This is far from a comprehensive list, but it begins to clarify the picture in my mind. If we persist in an either-or debate about the CMS versus the PLN, we will be falling victim to what Jim Collins calls the “tyranny of or.” When faced with difficult decisions, we often cast them–artificially–as dichotomies. We must do this *or* that. Collins argues that the alternative is to find ways to leverage the “genius of and,” to bring together the best of both alternatives and create a chimerical best-of-both-worlds solution."
pln  cms  ples  lms 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Flexknowlogy – Jared Stein » Strengths and Weaknesses of PLN/PLE & CMS/LMS
"To be clear, we don’t really know what a model PLN looks like, or how it works, or if it’s efficient; we may not even know what the difference between a PLE and a PLN is. It may be that the one thing we can say definitively is we don’t know what a PLN looks like, for any two are unlikely to be the same. It may be that we want a PLN to resist being reified. When I think of a PLN/PLE I try to keep it open-ended; I conjecture that it is shaped by habits formed in the accomplishment of daily tasks, is connected to resources for discovery of new information, and is fostered by social relationships that may be authentic and trusting or merely incidental, built by one-to-one/one-to-many communications. Many of the facets of a PLN–but especially the social aspects–are increasingly open to the world."
lms  cms  ples  pln 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: The Most Important Question (2)
"From my own perspective, I don't see constructivist methodology to be a whole lot more liberating than traditional instruction. Students still receive a great deal of direction from the instructor. They are not free to pursue an alternative learning methodology. This is especially the case when the students are younger, but still applies in adult learning." ... "The models we learn from need not be human. There is, for example, a long and viable history of learning from, and studying, and emulating, nature. Much of my own learning takes place in this way. Other forms of learning even in social contexts may be supported not by interaction, but simply by observation."
education  learning  ideas  control  lms  stephendownes  constructivism  interaction  observation  modeling 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Harold Jarche » Learning socially and being social
“@BFchirpy “The killer learning management system is the Web – silly” [in case anyone is still wondering]” ... "Are we too professional: has professionalism gone too far?" ... "Great slide presentation by @sachac on how to be a shy connector – Shows that it’s not necessary to behave like arrogant self-aggrandizing jerks"
learning  education  professionalism  haroldjarche  self-promotion  introverts  presentations  networking  socialnetworking  tcsnmy  shyness  ples  lms 
january 2010 by robertogreco
» This ain’t yo mama’s e-portfolio, part 1 WPMu Ed
"Schools should be in business of managing data flows rather than supporting end to end user experience. We can only dream what might result if the energy going into the campus-wide LMS’s would go into creating flexible, easy to use “syndication buses
blogging  blogs  education  lms  eportfolios  ples  online  schools  it  walledgardens 
may 2008 by robertogreco
HotChalk - Connecting Teachers, Student and Parents - Featuring NBC News Global Studies Collection Videos
"learning environment for K-12 teachers, students and parents that includes a learning management system (LMS), a rich library of teacher-contributed lesson plans, premium digital content like NBC News video, and professional development for teachers in a
education  lms  content  nbc  video  archives  teaching  online  internet  web  lessons  curriculum  reference 
april 2008 by robertogreco

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