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robertogreco : localization   12

ℳatt on Twitter: "1. So, each episode of the Simpsons is dubbed into two different versions for French markets. There's a Quebec French version, and a France French version. Fans of the Quebec dub hate the European dub, and vice versa. https://t.co/W4di
“1. So, each episode of the Simpsons is dubbed into two different versions for French markets. There’s a Quebec French version, and a France French version.

Fans of the Quebec dub hate the European dub, and vice versa.

[video]

2. In the France dub, the Simpsons all speak in typical Parisian accents. A few other characters have regionalized accents, like the Van Houtens who speak with a Belgian accent, but it’s mostly Parisian, and they don’t try to regionalize the US-specific jokes.

3. In the Quebec dub, the Simpsons family speaks with a thick working-class dialect of Montreal French called joual. They also do something the France dub doesn’t do: they regionalize the scripts, subbing in Quebecois politicians or places for the more US-centric references.

4. Here’s an example of the Quebec French Simpsons dub localizing references: this is a scene you might know, but they added a local twist. (I’ve done my best to provide translated subtitles.)

[video]

5. Now, something I always wonder when I watch movies or TV where the plot revolves around a character speaking a second language: how do they handle dubbing it into that second language? This is where we get to the Quebec Simpsons’ masterpiece.

6. Classic episode, season 1’s “The Crepes of Wrath”, Bart goes to France and foils an antifreeze wine scam by learning French. There’s no way to dub around it being some other language Bart learns, it’s very clearly France. Seems impossible to translate into French, right?

7. In the Quebec dub, Bart starts speaking to the French police officer in Quebecois slang, and can’t be understood. (Bart: “I thought they spoke French in France”). It’s only when he learns to talk like a stereotypical Parisian that he can get through to the cop. Perfection.

[video]“
language  french  thesimpsons  2019  translation  localization  quebec  humor  words 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
EarthBound / MOTHER 2 Translation Comparison « Legends of Localization
"I was a big fan of EarthBound when it was released in 1995. It’s silly to admit, but even though it’s just a game it’s been a big part of my life. In fact, comparing EarthBound with its original Japanese counterpart, MOTHER 2, was one of my earliest EarthBound projects and eventually led to the creation of Legends of Localization!

Naturally, in this sub-section of Legends of Localization we’ll be exploring how MOTHER 2 was localized into EarthBound. It’s more than just comparing simple graphical changes – we actually dig deep into the text to see what was changed, why it might have been changed, and how it was an improvement (or the opposite) over the original version.

For what it’s worth, I’m a professional translator and translating games, anime, movies, etc. is what I do for a living (see my list of my translations here), which also gives me a unique and detailed view of how EarthBound’s translation was handled. Some of the stuff I point out might seem super-picky or uninteresting, but don’t pay it too much mind, that’s just how translation analyzing tends to be 😛

If you’d like a quick taste of the kinds of differences between the two games, here are just a handful of interesting changes that Nintendo of America made:"

[There is a 432-page book about this:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1945908904/ ]
earthbound  mother2  localization  translation  videogames  games  gaming 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Minority languages: Cookies, caches and cows | The Economist
"OUSMANE sweats under a tin roof as he thumbs through a Chinese smartphone that he is selling at the technology market in Bamako, Mali. Words in French, Mali’s official language, scroll down the screen. “A ka nyi?” (Is it good?) a customer asks him in Bambara, Mali’s most widely used tongue.

Mozilla, the foundation behind Firefox, an open-source web browser, wants Ousmane’s customers to have the option of a device that speaks their language. Smartphones with its operating system (OS) are already on sale in 24 countries, including Bangladesh, India and Mexico, for as little as $33. Other countries will be added as it makes more deals with handset manufacturers. And Bambara is one of dozens of languages into which volunteer “localisers” are translating the OS.

Mozilla has 230 localisation teams, says Jeff Beatty, who co-ordinates some from his office in Utah. Their work takes both time and ingenuity. Firefox for a computer uses about 40,000 words; for the phone OS, 16,000. Translators must express technological terms in languages shaped by livestock, farming and fishing, and choose alternatives for culture-specific words such as “cookie”, “file” and “mouse”.

Ibrahima Sarr, a Senegalese coder, led the translation of Firefox into Fulah, which is spoken by 20m people from Senegal to Nigeria. “Crash” became hookii (a cow falling over but not dying); “timeout” became a honaama (your fish has got away). “Aspect ratio” became jeendondiral, a rebuke from elders when a fishing net is wrongly woven. In Malawi’s Chichewa language, which has 10m speakers, “cached pages” became mfutso wa tsamba, or bits of leftover food. The windowless houses of the 440,000 speakers of Zapotec, a family of indigenous languages in Mexico, meant that computer “windows” became “eyes”.

The world speaks nearly 7,000 languages. Mali, with a population of 15m, has 13 national languages and 40-60 smaller ones, depending on where the border between language and dialect is drawn. Firefox is available in 90 languages, which serve almost all of the 40% of the global population already online. Apple’s most recent computer OS offers 33 languages out of the box, and the new iPhone, 35. Google offers 150, including dialects (and some spurious ones such as “Pirate”). But some languages spoken by millions are excluded, including Tibetan (3m-4m speakers) and Bambara (10m, including those for whom it is a second tongue). Bringing the rest of the world online is not just a technical challenge, but a linguistic one.

As a non-profit, Mozilla can put effort into languages that offer no prospect of a quick return. Songhai and Fulah, recently made available in Firefox, are spoken mainly by poor, illiterate herders and farmers in the Sahel, who do not have smartphones. But when such people eventually get online, they will benefit more if they can do so in their own tongues.

As more languages are added, the Firefox OS will create a sort of global Rosetta stone. It uses all parts of speech, and older, colourful words are pressed into service. Mozilla has created a statistical tool for linguistic analyses. And though 40,000 words is not a whole vocabulary, it is a significant part. As well as bringing the linguistically excluded online, localisation may keep small languages alive."
language  localization  mozilla  code  coding  2014  firefox  senegal  fulah  africa  nigeria  technology  metaphor 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Ubiquitous Learning - a critique - Wikiversity
"Ubiquitous learning as in situated learning, across platforms, devices, locations and jurisdictions, and including neglected historical references[1], ignored present initiatives[2], and acknowledging the risks of a darker future of corporate power over information, communication and medium[3].

So this is a critique of "Ubiquitous Learning", rejecting the notion as central content repository, or devices and software that favour such. Looking instead to that which supports and enhances peer to peer connection, contextualisation, localisation, device independence, and lowering barriers of cost, distraction, or central control."
leighblackall  ubiquitouslearning  conviviality  situatedlearning  contentrepositories  peertopeer  networks  networkedlearning  contextualization  distraction  centralization  localization  local  independence  unschooling  deschooling  critique  decentralization  software  communication  crossplatform  corporatism  information  control 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Cote D'Ivoire makes its own damn buses - Core77
"Anyone who's traveled by bus in sub-Saharan Africa is probably familiar with the curious combination of modern and ancient technology this entails. The buses, usually purchased second-hand from European or Asian manufacturers, are subjected to loads and road conditions for which they were never designed while being detached from the maintenance infrastructure for which they're intended, resulting in a lot of very spiffy, falling-apart vehicles.
africa  buses  homegrown  transportation  nationalpride  localization  localism  handmedowns 
january 2009 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Could Globalization Be Going In Reverse?
"For the first time in recent decades, it seems there are now real reasons to question the logic underlying the official future of ever-increasing global trade. The biggest, of course, is the rapidly mounting cost of transportation...But transportation costs are not the only reasons why globalization as we know it might be in for some rapid evolution. Consider: *Far-flung supply chains may drop costs (even with higher oil prices), but the multiply climate change emissions. *Manufacturers and others are already increasingly aware of, and worried about, supply chain diversity. *transparency activism has blown the cover of secrecy off [skirting labor and environmental laws by doing business in countries with high levels of political corruption]...*Globalization suffers from some big disruptive vulnerabilities"
climatechange  worldchanging  gamechanging  deglobalization  globalization  globalwarming  trends  sustainability  environment  economics  future  society  oil  peakoil  localization  local  localism  money  futurism  shipping  transportation 
august 2008 by robertogreco
apophenia: musing about social networks and g/local cultures
"People are expected to be outraged that box stores are costing neighbors jobs, but what if you don't know your neighbors...local store [owners]? Lacking personal connection or liberal guilt, doesn't it make sense to save money instead of support local?"
community  localization  suburbia  suburbs  socialmedia  socialnetworking  trends  networks  local  activism  economics  groups  association 
april 2008 by robertogreco
News Events, User Events, People >> all categories :: rejoices - pakistan - wisconsin
"goal: create a global community that shares news, videos, images and opinions tied to events and people that have impact. Unlike a traditional news portal, our style of presentation creates new contexts in which stories are tied together in order to prov
allvoices  citizen  currentevents  global  journalism  media  news  citizenjournalism  mobile  phones  texting  sms  vidoe  photography  images  maps  mapping  context  blogs  blogging  local  localization  unmediated  crowdsourcing 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Emily’s Playground » AllVoices Launches Participatory News Hybrid
"Providing multiple points of view by inviting mobile voice & text messages, images & videos from field & weaving them with local & regional news stories, wire services & blog posts, Allvoices creates context around local events & begins to make clearer p
allvoices  citizenjournalism  journalism  mobile  phones  texting  sms  vidoe  photography  images  maps  mapping  news  context  blogs  blogging  local  localization  unmediated  crowdsourcing 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Do not localize – make your own - FLOSSE Posse
"Content is infrastructure only when it is made locally. The key is not localizing some existing content but doing unique local content. To produce local content you need access to other resources starting from local oral tradition to written documents an
content  localization  infrastructure  education  conferences  contribution  wikis  wikipedia  wikimedia  homophily 
october 2007 by robertogreco
McDonald’s Strange Menu Around the World
"So you think you know the McDonald's menu like the back of your hand? Think again. From McDonald's international, here are some menu items you have probably never tried before."
food  global  culture  localization  mcdonalds  business  travel  world  international 
july 2007 by robertogreco

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