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robertogreco : logos   65

Different by Design | Rachel Hawley
"Beyond the realm of electoral politics, design plays an important role in spreading leftist messages and catching the attention of the potentially persuadable. Leftist media, still emerging from the cocoon of the subcultural, is now faced with the challenge of synthesizing their messaging with visual interest—without reverting to the all style, no substance aesthetics of liberalism. Since 2011, Jacobin’s covers and spreads have worked to reclaim the minimalist, kinetic style that big tech has spent the better part of a decade laying claim to, while Current Affairs (as well as this magazine) meets Jacobin’s minimalist elegance with its own brassy opulence and lush illustration. Over on the cesspit that is YouTube, Natalie Wynn of the sometimes controversial ContraPoints channel delivers anti-right-wing diatribes while performing camp extravagance, with high production-value costume, set, and lighting design in the mix.

The challenge for leftist design is to chart a visual course distinct from both the garishness of the right and the empty sleekness of the center.

Some of the more grassroots-level innovations in leftist political design can be found in the orbit of the Democratic Socialists of America, whose membership has grown exponentially since 2015. The DSA embraces its socialist legacy with a black, white, and red color palette. Its iconography—the quintessential red rose, hands clasped in unity or raised in a fist, bread and/or grain (a reference to the iconic 1912 Bread and Roses Strike, during which textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, fought for better wages and overtime pay)—is presented across myriad DIY pamphlets, posters, and booklets, in just as many styles, freeing it from the fuss endemic to a design system like Pete Buttigieg’s.

“It turns branding on its head,” says Pressman. “Whereas usually branding is about a consistency of application and approach, this is about a consistency of intent and spirit.”

But the most revolutionary aspect of the DSA’s design is not so much what appears on the page or poster or screen, but how it came to be there. With the visual assets made widely available across the organization, the brand attributes limited in number and easy to build off of, and the pressure for perfection or strict consistency absent, the realm of design is open to a wider range of perspectives while remaining rooted in the goal of facilitating political action. “People talk about democratizing design tools, and usually they mean making it so that anybody can make a pamphlet or a poster, and that’s great,” says Pressman, “but I think the more interesting part of democratizing design is that participants in political action are themselves designing the stuff that’s being used by those actions and those people.”

Today, many of America’s young leftists are working to bring about a more radical continuation of the New Deal ethos. Should that history serve as any indication, the proliferation of art and design will play a crucial role in the years to come, as we find our footing and grow our ranks. For it is bread we fight for, as the song goes—but we fight for roses, too."
design  elections  dsa  control  graphicdesign  socialism  leftists  jacobin  liberalism  illustration  logos  2020  rachelhawley  elitism  centrism  grassroots  democraticsocialistsofamerica  alexandriaocasio-cortez  organizing  unions  labor  petebuttigieg  2026  hillaryclinton  berniesanders 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
@ukrainian_logos • Instagram photos and videos
"🇺🇦 Archive of graphic marks designed by Ukrainian designers in the 20th century. Project: @hupa.lo, @maryan.ivasyk
fb.com/ukrainian.logos "
instagrams  ukraine  logos  design  graphidesign 
august 2019 by robertogreco
not a contrarian | sara hendren
"From this series of questions to Zadie Smith [https://losarciniegas.blogspot.com/2018/01/zadie-smith-i-have-very-messy-and.html ] comes Teju Cole’s question:

Cole: You must be under some pressure to be agreeable, to agree with the right opinions. But I notice that you think through things, rather than just agreeing to them. How do you defend that space of independent thought?

Smith: I don’t think of myself as a contrarian. I’m useless at confrontation. But I also can’t stand dogma, lazy ideas, catchphrases, group-think, illogic, pathos disguised as logos, shoutiness, ad hominem attacks, bombast, liberal piety, conservative pomposity, ideologues, essentialists, technocrats, preachers, fanatics, cheerleaders or bullies. Like everybody, I am often guilty of some version of all of the above, but I do think the job of writing is to at least try and minimise that sort of thing as much as you can."
zadiesmith  tejucole  sarahendren  2018  confrontation  opinions  pressure  contrarians  contrarianism  thinking  dogma  laziness  catchphrases  groupthink  logic  pathos  logos  adhominenattacks  pomposity  ideology  essntialism  technocrats  preachers  preaching  fanaticism  cheerleading  bullying  writing  howwewrote  howwwethink 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Businessweek - Bloomberg
"We asked leading designers to brand the proposed agency."



"Ever since Richard Danne and Bruce Blackburn’s classic NASA logo, graphic design has helped blend our sci-fi dreams with the reality of space exploration. On June  18, President Trump said he wanted the Pentagon to form a “Space Force.” We asked eight leading designers to create logos for this new institution and explain the thinking behind them."
spaceforce  logos  2018  humor 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Kenya Hara Unveils Rejected 2020 Tokyo Olympics Logo Proposal | Spoon & Tamago
"In September the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Committee announced that they would scrap Kenjiro Sano’s logo amid plagiarism claims and redo the entire process. But when they did that they also effectively scrapped the other 103 proposals, each created by professionals who spent a decent amount of time and resources perfecting their concept.

Now, renowned designer and one of the foremost faces of Japanese design, Kenya Hara, is speaking out. And in doing so, he has released his proposal from the Hara Design Institute.

“Removing the curtain from the design competition will help graphic design become more widely understood,” says Kenya Hara, explaining why he decided to publish his team’s propals. “It will serve as a valuable resource in contemplating our future Olympics logo.” He notes that the Olympics symbol and “Tokyo 2020” have been obscured so as to avoid any copyright claims.

Hara’s proposal is one that symbolizes “our planet making great strides,” “a beating heart” and the “summit.” The two planetary logos reference the sun, the moon and an arena where humans can transcend any bickering and come together for the great games.

In today’s world of design planning it’s no longer sufficient to simply come up with a beautiful logo. Various applications and forms of communication must also be considered. And in that sense, Hara’s design team has created a remarkable proposal that adaptable to various needs.

But in a surprising and rather confounding decision, the Olympics committee has opened up the new round of proposals to the public, allowing anyone over 18 to submit their idea. They’re accepting entries through December 7, 2015. The competition will undoubtedly bulge into a marathon with thousands of runners. We stand with designer Kenya Hara in hopes that this next race, whatever it turns out to be, is more transparent."
kenyahara  design  graphicdesign  logos  olympics  via:tealtan  graphics  japan  tokyo  2020 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Instagram’s Endangered Ephemera - The New Yorker
"The best accounts, like @graphilately, present a basic, steady stream of beautiful things, often against a neutral background. “I want it to be solely about the stamps—raising the profile of stamps and beauty in simple, modernist values,” Blair Thomson, the account’s creator, told me. “They’re about simple, graphic ideas conveyed through a highly visible yet tiny medium.” The husband-and-wife pair behind @purveyors_of_packaging present vintage boxes, bottles, and cans in the same vitrine-like format, making the reds, yellows, and blues really glow.

For some, Instagram has been an easy way to deal with personal collections. If you are the proud owner of thousands of vintage Valentines, embroidered tourist patches, or personalized book plates, digitizing them can feel overwhelming. The dailyness of Instagram—one photo, one day at a time—breaks the task down, and the endorphin boost of likes and followers keeps you rolling. A number of the collectors I spoke to originally included their ephemera in their personal feed, but spun the material off into a dedicated channel after a positive response. This also gave them a chance to polish their presentation. Bill Rose (@junktype) says, “Most of the objects in my feed are no bigger than a couple of inches wide. They are often so small that my phone has trouble focussing given the close range of my subject.” Charles Clarke (@matchbookdiaries) shoots his matchbooks against a white background. “I use the white background because it looks clean, and because you can scroll my profile page and it doesn’t look like there are any dividers between the photos. It looks like a big poster.”

These accounts also provide inspiration for working professionals and act as an early warning system for design revivals. Several of the ephemera accounts that I’ve spotted have turned out to be run by designers. Ara Devejian (@LetterGetter), a creative director, started his when he moved to Los Angeles’s superlatively-signed Theatre District. “Every day, I try to take a new route to work or wherever, especially going way out my way to discover new places on my bike or in the car, and in turn LetterGetter is the happy byproduct of that curiosity.” At first Devejian wanted to document typographic nightmares—the illegible, the mishandled—but, as with most Instagram accounts, things swung over to the positive. The platform’s users have such a strong preference for things that are pretty (however you define it) that it’s difficult to swim against the tide of posting “bests” rather than “worsts.” “@LetterGetter helps inform some of the typographic projects I work on,” Devejian said, “like the title card I designed for Gymkhana 7. The style of the photos is intentionally flat or sparse in order to see the letterforms as they were conceived.”"



"Business cards are probably next on the endangered list. In ten years, that drawer full of business cards could be Instagram gold. The Art Nouveau designer Hector Guimard’s business card, for example, part of the Cooper Hewitt collection, is beautifully out of date. But putting something on Instagram isn’t always the end result. These pieces can have different meaning in real life. “People have yelled at me—thinking I’m about to steal or break something—and then afterwards, realizing that I’m only taking pictures and admiring their car or whatever, tell me their life story,” Devejian says. “I’ve become painfully accustomed to just how fleeting signage is. It’s made me wonder whether I should become some sort of advocate for preservation, in attempt to postpone their inevitable disappearance.”"
instagram  culture  alexandralange  2015  design  businesscards  graphicdesign  graphics  photography  collections  inspiration  stamps  postagestamps  matchbooks  labels  clothinglabels  ephemera  everyday  objects  internet  socialmedia  packaging  typography  lettering  logos 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Aaron Draplin Takes On a Logo Design Challenge on Vimeo
"Most logos aren't designed in fifteen minutes, but most designers aren't Aaron Draplin. Aaron's a Portland fixture by way of the Midwest, the owner of Draplin Design Co., and an advocate of "blue collar" design: design that works. Here he takes our logo design challenge, creating a dozen iterations of a logo for a fictional construction company. Not inspired? Just wait. Watch as he sketches, brings his ideas into Illustrator, and tests and tunes the different iterations. The logos Aaron creates prove design can elevate any company or brand. Along the way, he provides tips for freelancing, finding inspiration, and providing clients context for logos that won't just live in PDFs."
aarondraplin  logos  design  branding  process  graphicdesign  graphics  2014 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Blog - Wolff Olins Blog - A new flag for Britain
"We approached the challenge in a few ways:

Weather responsive flag
Similar to the physical version that flaps in the wind, our new flag responds to the British weather.

[image]

Patchwork flag
The old flag was designed as a two-colour solution because of reproduction constraints. What if we use different colours and materials to create a flag that represents the different people and communities that make up Britain? Plastic, gold and new threads are woven into the design. Some of the colours have been taken from the Royal Standard.

[image]

Designer flag
The UK is full of brilliant designers. Let’s collaborate with Peter Saville or Paul Smith to design an iconic flag.

[image]

Please note, these have not been designed by Peter or Paul—they are nasty ripoffs.

3D flag
Who needs a flag anyway? The Romans had a golden eagle on a pole and they ran the world for 500 years. What about a 3D flag based on the angles proposed in the original Union Jack? Imagine our victorious athletes holding aloft Britain’s orb.

[image]

Internet flag
What about all those little flags that are flown across the internet? We need a flag that has been optimised for a new digital context. Our animated gif flag symbolises Britain as the meeting place for people from anywhere in the digital and physical realm.

[image]

Cool flag
And what about a flag that is just cool.
Pink = Northern Ireland
Green= Wales
Red= England

[image]

Serious flag
Okay… so we’ve had some fun with this brief. But seriously… the original flag is mega cool and it also appears in the corner of loads of other countries flags (like Australia). And it’s a really great brand – blue, red and white triangles have become a defining graphic language of Britain. So with that in mind we propose this flag.

[image]

It’s a simplified version of the original that removes the crosses and keeps the iconic elements - a central focus, angles and colours. It’s easier to draw and it looks great.

As much as we’d love to see one of these little beauties flying out in the world – Scotland, as you cast your vote today just remember what affect your vote could have on that lovely Union Jack."
2014  flags  wolffolins  via:lizette  britain  uk  scotland  weather  symbols  symbolism  evolvinglogos  design  identity  logos 
october 2014 by robertogreco
seblester on Instagram
"Letterform art & design. Typefaces & logos, limited edition prints & original works."

[via: https://twitter.com/vuokko/status/519187564339941376 ]
letterforms  lettering  instagram  typography  logos  calligraphy  seblester  handlettering 
october 2014 by robertogreco
How three marketers would sell Canada’s brand - The Globe and Mail
"The federal government will soon be asking for input on the best way to market Canadian goods. Included in this week’s budget was a new project designed to enhance “consumer awareness of Canadian-made products.” Canada will be following the lead of other countries, such as Australia, which have used their national brand to compete in export markets. The idea: “Branding products ‘Made in Canada’ is a potentially powerful tool to encourage consumers – both in Canada and internationally – to choose such products.”

So, how do you sell consumers both here and abroad with “made in Canada” marketing? We asked some Canadian experts to weigh in on how to design our national brand.

No maple, moose, or mounties
“[It] needs to avoid the stereotypical Canadian 3Ms – Maple, moose and mounties. The deeper story can be found within what Canada represents in the global community. Canada is increasingly well-regarded around the world. This is about adding a premium component to the product. We should drop the apologetic, unassuming Canadian voice and tell a story of progress through fresh and modern visual language.” – Vito Piazza, president and partner at Sid Lee Toronto

Forget the logo, send a message
“It’s interesting to see everything that comes up [in a quick Google search, for example] that you can do visually with the Made in Canada concept. … I think it would be wiser to tend towards a state of mind, more than a simple logo. More of a way of thinking and buying. A logo doesn’t change anything if the brand’s promise is not understood. I would tend more towards something in the lines of Think Canada – more than a logo, it should be a motto that would accompany the products. Something to inspire people to get to know the products, to understand the history and then to buy Canadian.” – Claude Auchu, partner, vice-president and creative director of design at Montreal agency lg2.

Don’t get stuck with one image
“One of the things I would argue for, if I had the ear of the government, would be to make the Canadian brand, as expressed through this platform, really dynamic. The brand should feel forward-looking. One of the things you see on these types of projects – the Australia one and the U.S. counterpart – they’re fairly uninspired. They tend to fall back on historic or nationalistic themes or colour palettes, as opposed to 21st-century themes. I would use this brand initiative as a platform to showcase all the really innovative things that are happening here, as opposed to having a really static design. So there’s not a single logo of the Made in Canada brand, but a kind of system of logos. It should have unified messaging of course, but one way to express dynamic institutions is to use variability or difference within how the visual identity is expressed, as opposed to a stamp “Made in Canada.” If we’re talking about it being the same thing on a rail car and learning software being used in leading universities, that forces the question: Does the same branding apply to both things? You may be talking to different audiences. You want flexibility.” – Hunter Tura, president and chief executive officer of Bruce Mau Design in Toronto."
canada  marketing  logos  bmd  huntertura  claudeauchu  vitopiazza  identity  branding  names  naming  design  madeincanada  2014 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Eye Magazine | Opinion | Are you sure you need that new logo?
"Item: Last year, in the remote town of Sylhet, in the north-east corner of Bangladesh, I hailed a cycle-ricksha and asked to be taken to the house of my friend Abdul Khaled Kayed in the district of Ambar Khana. I didn’t even know the street he lived in, let alone the number of the house. ‘No problem,’ said the ricksha driver, though he had never heard of my friend and was not familiar with the district. We proceeded by means of a series of encounters with shopkeepers, cafe waiters and fellow ricksha drivers, each one taking us a little closer to our destination. It was a leisurely, somewhat erratic journey. Each conversation was interesting and enjoyable, including invitations to take tea, to describe my house in Camden Town and to discuss the meaning of life; I was almost sorry when we finally arrived at my friend’s house. If there were any street signs to be seen during the journey I didn’t notice them, nor did my driver consult them.

Item: In her book New Lives, New Landscapes (1970), the late Nan Fairbrother showed two photographs of the main street of Suffolk village of Lavenham. The first is of the street festooned with telephone wires and power cables. The second shows exactly the same viewpoint, taken after a successful campaign to remove the overhead wires. The improvement is startling. The Civic Trust Award, so often given to commemorate the application of lettering to shopfronts and offices, or the addition of suitably designed concrete tubs with suitable plants to enhance the village square, was here given to a scheme whose sole purpose was subtraction."



"Item: When I set up my Graphic Design business 30 years ago, one of our first clients was a prestigious furniture maker who wanted a complete graphic styling job: stationery range, information sheets, showroom graphics, vehicle livery and promotional pieces. When we presented our proposals, the managing director was duly impressed and gave us an immediate go-ahead. Then he said, ‘I particularly like the name style for the company, but perhaps we’ll hold on to that until you come up with your proposal for the symbol to go with it.’ When I told him we considered the name style to be quite adequate as an identity device and had no plans for including a symbol, he was much taken aback. ‘But we’ve always had a symbol,’ he said, ‘and anyway, I thought you would insist on us having one.’ After some to-ing and fro-ing we agreed he would think about it. At the end of a nail-biting week, he phoned back to say he was entirely reconciled to not having a symbol. ‘A much more elegant solution,’ he said. ‘And it kills two birds with one stone. We won’t have to bother about all the problems of symbols – when to use them and when not, how small can they be without becoming mere blobs, how big without looking bloated. And we save the sizeable fee you’d be charging us if you did design it.’

There’s the rub. How do we charge for convincing our clients not to have some graphic indulgence they have set their hearts on? And even more difficult, how do we get them to remove something that is unhelpful, or intrusive, or superfluous, or downright misleading? Who is going to pay for something they are not going to get? And who is going to pay for having something they do not need taken from them?"
legibility  design  wayfinding  kengarland  unproduct  notbuilding  bigidea  1993  branding  logos  simplicity  navigation  cities  graphicdesign 
august 2013 by robertogreco
The Age of the Anti-Logo: Why Museums Are Shedding Their Idenities
"This month, the Whitney Museum… unveiled a newly revamped identity courtesy of Experimental Jetset (and a website designed by Linked by Air), a trio of Dutch designers known for their theory-based work. Experimental Jetset describe their design as a “toolkit,” which is easily adaptable to contexts ranging from buttons to stationary to games. The sparse logomark itself is based on a heavy black Neue Haas Grotesk text, while a system of jagged lines forming a “W” change based on context.

According to the designers, the “responsive W” is meant to fit around news, artwork, and other pieces of content, like a simple black-and-white frame. “One of the main subjects we tried to explore was the notion of a graphic identity that wouldn't consists of a static, single logo,” they told me over email, “but one that would be able to change shape, reacting to ever-changing proportions and surfaces.”



But these days, developing a museum “brand” is a complicated chore. The visual identity of an arts institution has attract visitors and donors, and it also has to say something about the curatorial stance of a museum. That’s a difficult thing to convey in a single shape or form—and many museums, instead, are turning to “flexible” identities.

For example, the Brooklyn Museum of Art adopted a flexible logomark in 2004, designed by 2x4 to “better reflect the visitor-centered goals of the Museum.” Then there’s the Museum of Arts and Design, which adopted a Pentagram-designed customizable logotype in 2008. Perhaps the most famous—and successful—example of a flexible identity is MIT Media Lab’s algorithmic logo, designed by E Roon Kang and Richard The. Sure, Media Lab isn't an arts institution, but the logo set the tone for dozens of identities that came after it. The design is based on three spotlights, which change according to each permutation—there are over 40,000 unique logos available—and it was so successful because it spoke to what makes Media Lab so successful.

The notion of adaptivity and flexibility in graphic design seems to appeal particularly to the art world, which makes a modicum of sense: galleries and modern museums focus on visual culture as it evolves, and their graphic representation should reflect that. But as logos and identities get less specific and more scalable, is something lost in the exchange?

The original purpose of arts organizations like the Whitney was to guide the unwitting public through the currents of contemporary art with an unpretentious, decisive voice. As far as we can intuit anything about a museum from its identity, are we witnessing a curatorial crisis of confidence? Maybe, but maybe not. Either way, it’ll be interesting to see whether this elegant new identity outlasts its predecessor."
whitney  branding  design  museums  identity  art  medialab  mit  experimentaljetset  brooklynmuseumofart  museumofartsanddesign  pentagram  customization  2x4  adaptability  flexibility  graphicdesign  2013  logos  mitmedialab 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Brand Relaunch at JohnMcneilStudio
"On the occasion of their 50th anniversary, The Berkeley School wanted to refresh their brand positioning to capture the elementary school’s inventive approach to education. We created a marketing and branding effort that included a new identity, website, messaging, original photography, print collateral, signage, art installations and a new color palette for the buildings. All these efforts mapped to the theme: “What matters in education matters in life.” We also developed a digital communication strategy deeply rooted in social media engagement. Through the “Bulletin Board” blogs, we helped bridge the gap between the classroom and a student’s home life."
design  branding  theberkeleyschool  johnmcneil  berkeley  logos  evolvinglogos  2012  schools  schooldesign  identity  marketing  tbs 
may 2013 by robertogreco
AIGA | The UC logo controversy: How 54,000 people, the mainstream press and virtually every designer got it wrong
"“Designers too often judge logos separate from their system…without understanding that one can’t function without the other,” noted Paula Scher, when I asked her views on the controversy."

Previously:
http://articles.latimes.com/2012/dec/12/news/la-ol-uc-logo-letters-20121212
http://www.sfgate.com/opinion/openforum/article/The-UC-logo-It-s-all-about-the-branding-4113439.php
http://web.archive.org/web/20131210054621/http://www.thinkingwithshakespeare.org/index.php?id=1261
http://www.sacbee.com/2012/12/16/5055646/keeper-dont-let-viral-mob-dictate.html
http://www.thinkingwithshakespeare.org/index.php?id=697
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/12/17/how-could-university-california-have-avoided-logo-mess
http://www.underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/follow-up_university_of_california.php
http://www.underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/ic_uc_we_all_c_for_california.php
http://thenewinquiry.com/blogs/zunguzungu/let-us-eat-cake/
http://thenewinquiry.com/blogs/zunguzungu/a-different-baton/

And for reference:
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/visual-identity.html
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/identity-elements.html
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/color.html
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/official-university-fonts.html
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/the-uc-seal.html
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/photography.html
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/editorial.html
http://brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/guidelines/executing-the-brand.html

Onward California:
https://vimeo.com/50793162
https://vimeo.com/48040935

original video (with controversial logo)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARWWDEhGP8o ]

[Related sites:
http://universityofcalifornia.edu/
http://achieve.universityofcalifornia.edu/
http://lograr.universityofcalifornia.edu/
http://www.onwardcalifornia.com/ ]
julialupton  arminvit  brandnew  aaronbady  vanessacorrea  controversy  design  highered  education  criticism  christophersimmons  marketing  logos  2013  2012  identity  branding  logo  uc  paulascher  universityofcalifornia 
january 2013 by robertogreco
BIS Publishers: Dynamic Identities: How to create a living brand
This visual book looks into design systems for living brand identities that can change in colour, pattern or shape. These identities often follow a system created by the designer but are sometimes created by data which is not controlled by the designer. These open identities generate new versions of themselves by external data feeds. The identity of the weather company, for example, is fuelled by the ever-changing weather conditions in real time.

Corporate identity is one of the major in graphic design - and branding and dynamic identities are the latest trends in that field. Dynamic Identities is the first BIS Publishers book to cover the topic.

The book offers a systematic process for creating living brand identities and gives the reader a wealth of examples, describing international identities that were built on the systems discussed. The cover has a lenticular effect with dynamic identities that change from one version to another while you move the book in your hands.
identity  design  books  dynamicidentities  logos  evolvinglogos 
november 2012 by robertogreco
anarchitecture: Morphing Logo - WORKac
"Dynamic / morphing logo by Project Projects for the New York city based architectural practice WORKac. The moving shapes playfully reflect the multidisciplinary strategies of the design firm. A grid of nodes is continuously used in different forms, shaping a black filled outline with the company name: WORKac. For print, the studio picks from twelve forms they use. Visionary."
2012  projectprojects  logos  evolvinglogos  worksc 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Brand New: USA TODAY for Tomorrow
"Overall, this is a fantastic redesign for a very complex project and it’s quite amazing that, on the client’s end, everything was delivered and presented at the same time, and done so clearly and with excitement. The launch campaign images above show a kind of confidence rarely seen in major redesigns, as if everyone is waiting for the mob to attack…"

[See also: http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2012/september/usa-today-redesign and http://2x4.org/work/7/New+York+City+Opera/ both via @soulellis ]
graphicarts  graphicdesign  2012  evolvinglogos  logos  logo  identitysystem  webdesign  via:greg  usatoday  branding  typography  design  wolffolins  webdev 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Brand New: Why Microsoft Got its Logo Right
"There are two interesting threads that build into this logo. The first is Microsoft’s decision to push aside its corporate logo history and not try to revive or recycle any of the previous stylings… nstead they have chosen to build the new logo around the history of Windows, building on the four-color square arrangement first seen in the form of a flag and most recently as a single-color, tilted version in the Windows 8 logo. This is smart. …

The second thread is, obviously, the evolution into the Metro system and the reason why this new logo feels so underwhelming and like not such big news at all. For the past two, three, and perhaps four years, Microsoft has been slowly deploying different interfaces, advertisements, and products that feature this simplified approach helmed by the Segoe font that has become as distinctive of Microsoft as Myriad of Apple."

[Read on for "the interesting reversal of roles between Apple and Microsoft."]
windowsphonemetro  metro  2012  windows  design  branding  logo  logos  apple  microsoft 
september 2012 by robertogreco
atipus: identity for rítmia music therapy center
"spanish studio atipus designed this identity for the music therapy center 'rítmia' in spain.

the patterns are based on the rhythmic sound waves of music that is played to patients during their therapy sessions."
identity  soundwaves  audio  rhythms  patterns  visualization  sound  evolvinglogos  2012  logos  rítmia 
july 2012 by robertogreco
In Brief: Saul Bass' Bell System Pitch - Brand New
"This is a video prepared by Saul Bass as a presentation to executives of his identity system for Bell System in the early 1970s. The first half is a fantastic primer on identity design and the second half (starting at around 13:00) is the identity pitch. A little long for today’s video-viewing standards but totally worth it."
srg  1970s  logos  belltelephone  design  saulbass 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Paul Rand + Steve Jobs — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers
"Below is a scan of the NeXT logo book (which Jobs loved so much, he reprinted it and gave it out as a keepsake/textbook). The pages are scanned as it appears in an original French-bound copy, although the color gray is not faithful to the original.  Also, here is a 1993 video interview between Jobs and Alan Pottasch about Rand."
design  stevejobs  paulrand  logos  next  apple  history  graphicarts  glvo 
november 2011 by robertogreco
MIT Media Lab's Brilliant New Logo Has 40,000 Permutations [Video] | Co.Design
"An algorithm can create 40,000 logo shapes in 12 different color combinations, providing the Media Lab an estimated 25 years' worth of personalized business cards."
mit  design  logos  medialab  evolvinglogos  mitmedialab 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Under the hood of the Cognitive Cities Conference. – Your Neighbours
"The logo can be interpreted in many ways, and that is exactly what the conference is all about. Some interpret the C as a map of a city, others see it has a circuit board, or even a collection of Lego blocks. Whatever you see in it, the logo reflects a certain playfulness and level of depth that you’ll also see at the event itself. All the shapes in the “C” are based on a grid which has similar proportions to the New York City Grid Plan. The colors of the logo are randomly generated from a hand picked color palette. Through the use of Scriptographer, we were able to generate many different color combinations that could be used for different purposes. All the colors work on both black and white backgrounds. The type we used for the logo is Forza, a font that was originally commissioned by Wired. Coincidentally, the moderator of the Cognitive Cities conference is Editor at Large of Wired."
cocities  cognitivecities  design  yourneighborhood  graphics  graphicdesign  logos  evolvinglogos  colors  map  mapping  cities  2011  forza 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Mule Design Studio’s Blog: Dear Gap, I have your new logo.
"And for the sake of full disclosure I should let you know that I’ve also frequently shopped at your stores. You sell good stuff. But never in my experience has any of your employees offered me a free pair of pants because the ones I was wearing looked bad. I wouldn’t expect them to. Their job is to sell me clothes.

My job is to sell design.

I believe we understand each other. I anxiously await your call and look forward to negotiating a fair value for the greatest logo on Earth."
gap  business  design  economics  redesign  crowdsourcing  logos  money  competitions 
october 2010 by robertogreco
COOEE | Graphic Design | Art Direction
"Identity for a division of GNP+ (the Global Network of PeopleLiving with HIV) called NPT (New Prevention Technologies). The various layers (stroke styles) of prevention are the foundation for this identity. These layers can be combined in various ways. The cover and chapter pages of the booklet contain a summary image as consisting of these layers."
via:ethanbodnar  evolvinglogos  identity  patterns  branding  design  logos 
september 2010 by robertogreco
bruketa & zinic: kvarner visual identity
"the new visual identity for kvarner county tourism office has been developed by advertising agency bruketa & zinic. throughout history, kvarner located in croatia has been known as an intersection of four transport routes. according to bruketa & zinic, the very name kvarner evokes this quadrant, navigational spatial orientation. this is why the source of this visual identity proposal begins with the familiar symbol of the wind rose, which also includes references to navigation, four-sided spatial orientation and wind direction. this motif is then divided into simple geometrical visual elements, their simple forms and colors creating a kind of 'toolbox' for further development of the visual identity of the kvarner region and each one of its individual parts."
relationships  evolvinglogos  design  identity  graphics  logos  branding  croatia  spatial  navigation  geometry  visual 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Por Amor a la Bandera
"Mucho se ha debatido acerca del nuevo logo del Gobierno de Chile. Muy pocas opiniones están a favor del mismo. Si crees que el nuevo logo de Chile no te representa o si derechamente crees que es feo, te invitamos a hacer algo al respecto: cambiarlo. Porque para criticar, cualquiera critica. Pero muy pocos agarran el lápiz (o el Mouse) y se ponen a proponer alternativas. Si de verdad sientes amor por la bandera, exprésalo con lo que tienes dentro y sabes hacer. Pon manos a la obra, sácate las ganas de mostrar lo que sientes del nuevo logo de gobierno, pero de una forma proactiva y creativa.
chile  government  logos  branding  graphics  design 
april 2010 by robertogreco
n o o n . c a s e s
"Analysis of the research garnered some key brand attributes that expressed the organization’s ambitions; the primary ones being ‘visceral’, and ‘engaged’. Our positioning strategy focused on differentiating the Center and one’s encounter with it as being ‘juicy’, or more colorfully, as ‘dripping with humanity’. The positioning statement, “Life Amplified”, formed the foundation of the branding program that would guide all marketing communications and was ultimately used as the organization’s tagline and monthly Newsletter title.
ybca  logos  identity  branding  tcsnmy  design 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Hello, Ojito! – Blog – BERG
Ojito --> "ojito, eh" --> Maradona, Kirchner, Gabriel Favale --> Supplemento al dizionario italiano --> Bruno Munari --> barbarakruger
comments  brunomunari  mattjones  berg  berglondon  logos  ojito  ojo  argentina  italian  language  gestures  barbarakruger  art  photography  design  glvo  books 
september 2009 by robertogreco
The World’s First Generative Logo? | The Daily Clique
"Although the post claims the Rhizome logo is generated anew with each page view, it doesn’t seem to work anymore. Other generative logos: Casa da Música, Max Planck Institute, Nada, Renderspace, Seed Media Group, Technics"
logos  design  evolvinglogos  generativelogos  branding  image 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: There's Nothing There
"“A logo is less important than the product it signifies; what it represents is more important than what it looks like.” This holds true not just for logo marks specifically, but also in the broader, more abstract sense of brands in general. No brand is better or stronger than the products and experiences it represents. A good brand is strong because it is true, not because it is clever." Led to this: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/50802877/branding-and-authenticity-and-schools
daringfireball  branding  logos  façades  missionstatements  schools  administration  management  authenticity  product  leadership  business  organizations  marketing 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Dopplr Blog » Blog Archive » In rainbows
"We get asked a lot about the colour-coding we give to places in Dopplr: what it represents, why we did it, how are the colours assigned."
dopplr  color  logos  evolvinglogos  sparklogo  cities  location 
july 2008 by robertogreco
TODO interaction & media design : NADA [now at: http://www.todo.to.it/#projects/logonad]
"We designed a dynamic graphic identity system that embodies the concepts of change and innovation, together with a deep underlying coherence. The result is an always changing logotype designed by a random/generative process."
logos  evolvinglogos  graphics  generative  identity  design  todo.it  dynamic  generativelogos 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Vintage Logos - a photoset on Flickr
"Collection of vintage logos from a mid-70's edition of the book World of Logotypes."
logos  brand  graphics  history  branding  icons  identity  design  database  typography 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Stumper : Expertinent: Why the Obama "Brand" Is Working
"I'm not sure that the commander-in-chief proves his mettle by getting everyone at his rallies to set their signs in the same typeface, but as someone who knows how hard that is, I'm very impressed."
barackobama  elections  2008  advertising  branding  identity  graphics  design  typography  logos  fonts  politics  us  marketing  hillaryclinton 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Next Nature -- Mieke Gerritzen's vision of a nature overtaken by corporatism - Boing Boing
Gerritzen's talk "Next Nature"...way that corporatism & nature will mesh more & more -- think of butterflies gengineered w/ corporate logos...heady mix of what-if and have-you-seen...manages to make my head swim every time I watch it."
miekegerritzen  design  corporatism  logos  nature  future  now  images  video  lift  presentations 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Design Observer: Wilhelm Deffke: Modern Mark Maker
"modern corporate logo was born in Germany shortly after the turn of the twentieth century, the direct descendent of burgher crests, coats of arms, trade and factory marks. In the 1920s members of the Bauhaus and the Ring Neuer Webegestalter (circle of ne
design  history  logo  logos  typography  branding  brands  identity  graphics  wilhelmdeffke 
january 2008 by robertogreco
sprout: symbols to cultivate change: MFA Thesis Exhibition at California State University, Fullerton.
"series of universal pictographic symbols to raise consciousness about environmental issues facing global community. Amidst complexity of accelerated lives, these simplified visual interpretations act as concise abbreviations promoting awareness."
design  logos  icons  pictographs  sustainability  environment  activism  green 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Brand New: The 17 Sides of a Cultural Identity
"By using the building as a visual source, Stefan Sagmeister created a dynamic, faceted and endlessly varied identity — all literally speaking. The resulting logo is perhaps, well, not pretty, but as a vessel for the complete identity and adaptable exec
algorithms  branding  brand  design  dynamic  logos  graphics  portugal  casademusica  oma  remkoolhaas  identity  stefansagmeister  generativelogos  graphicdesign  architecture  music  creativity 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Made in China on the Sly - New York Times
"Tuscan town of Prato, just outside of Florence and long the center for leather-goods production for brands like Gucci and Prada, has the second-largest population of Chinese in Europe, after Paris. More than half of the 4,200 factories in Prato are owned
business  consumerism  culture  italy  china  marketing  branding  logos  population 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Dopplr Blog » In rainbows
"As you add trips to different destinations, Dopplr’s logo becomes your logo, reflecting what you’re doing - right the way through to the ‘favicon‘ that shows up in the address field of most browsers."
algorithms  color  design  graphics  infographics  logos  programming  dynamic  dopplr  sparklines  evolution  sparklogo  favicons  place  ambient  location-based  locative  location  glancing  evolvinglogos 
october 2007 by robertogreco
The Helmet Project
"The "Helmet Project" web site is an attempt by its creator, a completely amateur graphic artist and a long-time fan of football at all levels, to create and maintain an on-line "catalog" or "atlas" of uniform-sized, accurate, and up-to-date images repres
graphics  design  sports  colleges  americanfootball  football  logos  history  reference 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Ironic Sans: Terrorist organization logos
"While I hate to give terrorists any more attention, I still think it’s interesting to see the various approaches they took in their logos, and wonder what considerations went into designing them. Does the logo successfully convey the organization’s m
brands  branding  advertising  terrorism  logos  graphics  design 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Search for "Logo-a-Gogo" | Scribd
"Logo-a-Gogo is an exhaustive collection of logos, wordmarks, and insignia from corporations, entertainment venues, resorts, sports, brands, product campaigns, and other sources from countries around the world."
design  graphics  reference  logos  identity 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Symbols.com - Home
"Symbols.com contains more than 1,600 articles about 2,500 Western signs, arranged into 54 groups according to their graphic characteristics."
archaeology  art  communication  definitions  encyclopedia  graphic  graphics  iconography  icons  infographics  images  ideas  language  linguistics  logos  meaning  symbols  signs  typography  visual  visualization  shapes  semiotics  religion 
june 2007 by robertogreco
the johnson banks thought for the week
"The age of the static brand is coming to an end. Organisations, companies, institutions, even charities are realizing that having identity schemes that ‘flex’ and adapt to circumstances are more appropriate in the multi-channel, multi-lingual world t
branding  design  logos  identity  marketing  graphics  business  media  visual  trends 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Architectradure: You need a brand?
"A nice set of slides about branding a logo, a product or a company created by Neutronllc."
books  brands  branding  logos  design  names  naming  business  marketing  identity  cativaucelle 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Boing Boing: Russia spy HQ has giant batman mural in floor
"Here's another photo of the logo. It's from the Glavnoye Razvedyvatelnoye Upravlenie (GRU), or Main Intelligence Directorate."
comics  superheroes  politics  spy  intelligence  russia  humor  logos  identity 
december 2006 by robertogreco
Evolving Logo
"Different logos are being "bred" and then picked ... Thus, everytime the logo is displayed on a website as an animated icon or printed out on a letter, it reflects the current state of the lab as a living organism."
biology  design  evolution  genetics  life  living  science  logos  graphics  information  infographics  glvo  identity  art  evolvinglogos  algorithms  organic  branding  brand 
december 2006 by robertogreco
things magazine - SpaceShipTwo issue
"When one considers the architects and designers who have theorised extensively on the shape of the future (ever since Raymond Loewy's work on Skylab), it seems strange not to reward those for whom space has long held an aesthetic fascination."
space  design  future  history  skylab  rockets  tourism  logos  interiors  travel 
october 2006 by robertogreco

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