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robertogreco : malls   7

Episode 562: A Mall Divided : Planet Money : NPR
"The Westfield Valley Fair Mall in California is like any other mall except for one thing: half of the mall is in the city of San Jose and the other half is in the city of Santa Clara. The boundary line runs right through the mall.

For a long time, this didn't matter. But in 2012, one city — San Jose — raised its minimum wage from $8 an hour to $10 an hour. This change created two economic worlds within a single, large building. Employees doing more or less the same work, just steps away from each other, started making different wages.

On today's show: minimum wage stories from a single mall. What happens when some stores suddenly have to pay their workers more — and others are still paying less."
borders  santaclara  sanjose  labor  policies  salary  2012  2014  malls  via:caseygollan  work  minimumwage  employment  salaries  economics 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Shopping Mall Turns 60 (and Prepares to Retire) - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities
"About a third of our malls are still thriving, and those are the biggest, newest ones. But America is no longer building many new highways, which means we’ve stopped creating prime new locations for mall development. Some of the earliest amenities of the enclosed mall—air-conditioning!—no longer impress us. And the demographics of suburbia have changed dramatically. Malls draw the largest share of their customers from teenagers, and the baby boomers who largely populate suburbia no longer have teenagers at home.

For all these reasons, the suburban mall of Gruen’s plan appears to be victim of more than just the recession. Dunham-Jones, who has tracked this trend in her book Retrofitting Suburbia, estimates that more than 40 malls nationwide have been targeted for significant redevelopment. And she can count 29 that have already been repurposed, or that have construction underway."

[via and more: http://www.laphamsquarterly.org/deja_vu/2012/07/mall-madness.php ]
grueneffect  dayton  detroit  ellendunham-jones  2012  consumptionpatterns  consumption  victorgruen  cities  architect  architecture  urbanism  urban  trends  shopping  suburbs  us  malls  shoppingmalls  via:maxfenton 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Gruen transfer - Wikipedia
"In shopping mall design, the Gruen transfer is the moment when a consumer enters a shopping mall and, surrounded by an intentionally confusing layout, loses track of their original intentions. It is named for Austrian architect Victor Gruen (who disavowed such manipulative techniques). Recently, the Gruen transfer has been popularised by Douglas Rushkoff.

The Gruen transfer is the moment when consumers respond to "scripted disorientation" cues in the environment. Spatial awareness of their surroundings plays a key role, as does the surrounding sound, art, and music. The effect of the transfer is marked by a slower walking pace."
design  culture  architecture  psychology  retail  shopping  via:bopuc  manipulation  disorientation  confusion  behavior  victorgruen  gruentransfer  malls  douglasrushkoff  scripteddisorientation 
august 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - China's Ghost Cities and Malls
"Documentary by SBS Dateline (Australian TV) about the Chinese real estate market.

Original link to SBS Dateline video: http://www.sbs.com.au/dateline/story/watch/id/601007/n/China-s-Ghost-Cities "
china  economics  ghosttowns  ghostcities  cities  2011  bubbles  malls  growth  building  infrastructure  ghostmalls 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Consumed - Repurpose-Driven Life - NYTimes.com
"A recent book, “Retrofitting Suburbia,” by Ellen Dunham-Jones and June Williamson, notes that in 1986, the United States had about 15 square feet of retail space per person in shopping centers. That was already a world-leading figure, but by 2003 it had increased by a third, to 20 square feet. The next countries on the list are Canada (13 square feet per person) and Australia (6.5 square feet); the highest figure in Europe is in Sweden, with 3 square feet per person. “Retrofitting Suburbia,” as its title suggests, is concerned with projects that address problems stemming from “leapfrog”-style development — the constant expansion of new housing, and new stores, farther away from city centers. As Dunham-Jones, an associate professor of architecture at Georgia Tech, told me when we spoke recently, one of those problems is that we’ve gotten “overretailed.”"
adaptivereuse  reuse  architecture  retail  space  change  crisis  adaptive  suburbia  malls  us  suburbs  books  via:adamgreenfield 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Eurozine - Simulated cities, sedated living - Robert Misik The shopping mall as paradigmatic site of lifestyle capitalism
[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20160403012830/http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2006-12-15-misik-en.html ]

“Shopping malls simulate city centres and create an atmosphere appropriate for consuming…planned in advanced and controlled…rebounds on city centres: prettified, scrubbed, and tidied…adopt the mall aesthetic…final twist, malls have begun building
architecture  capitalism  consumerism  culture  design  experience  planning  cities  society  streets  malls  shopping 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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