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robertogreco : mapbox   18

Explore your world through field mapping with OpenStreetMap | Mapbox
"Now that you have started mapping the world on OpenStreetMap from the comfort of your chair, let’s see how to add addresses, street names, and amenities using first-hand observations with field mapping. Field mapping is a survey technique to capture the details of one’s physical surroundings. Let’s use a simple paper map to survey the location of a waste basket in a neighborhood.

Mapping tools

To get started, gather the following items:

• A printed map from field papers, or a notepad
• Pencil or pen
• Camera (optional)
• Fellow explorers (optional)

Begin your journey

Make sure you are in an area that is safe for field mapping. A residential neighborhood, shopping street or a park are all great places to start. Doing this as a group activity with friends makes it even more interesting to compare notes after you are done.

The general idea with field mapping is to collect the details of what you observe around you while navigating a space. Details could include anything that catches your attention: shops and street signs, public amenities like benches and ATMs, street information like cycle lanes and pedestrian crossings or important facilities like hospitals and police stations.

Here are some tips:

• When mapping in groups, make sure to divide the area to cover maximum ground.
• It helps to think about what you are interested in mapping to allow you to be more focused on the field.
• If you are taking photos or recording an audio narration, make sure to note the locations on a paper map or using a GPS.
• Above all else, enjoy your walk!

Mapping on paper

Pen and paper are the most convenient way to capture observations from the field. It is simple, low cost and helps build a stronger sense of space and distance. The important aspect of paper mapping is to maintain a consistent scale. To help maintain scale, you can print an existing map and use it as a reference to add missing details on top. A tool called field papers allows you to conveniently make a printable atlas for this purpose.

While field mapping:

• Always begin by marking your starting point on paper. This could be anything from a house address, a known landmark or a shop.
• To orient yourself, make sure to keep an eye out for navigational aids like street signs, building names and addresses.
• Use symbols to represent common features like a medical store or a post box that do not have a name. Specifically, note features that you wish to map.
• If you are using field papers, you can upload your scan and use it as a background in iD or JOSM to map the missing details on OpenStreetMap.

Once you have become comfortable with basic field mapping using a pen and paper, you can explore other tools for collecting data and mapping on OpenStreetMap.

Other tools for field mapping

Collecting data for field mapping can also be done by taking photographs and recording GPS traces. For example, you could:

• Capture crowdsourced street view imagery with your phone using Mapillary.
• Accurately record GPS locations and trails using apps like OSMTracker for Android or Pushpin for iOS.

For more mapping techniques take a look at the OpenStreetMap Wiki."
aarthychandrasekhar  mapbox  osm  openstreetmap  fieldmapping  maps  mapping  exploration  2016  fieldpapers  howto  tutorials 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Office dog | Mapbox
"We’re looking for an office dog who loves to cuddle and accept back rubs to join the Mapbox team. You’ll be joining a seasoned team of Mapbox dogs that are excited to smell you. You’ll help us start every day by happily jogging towards us as we enter the office.

You should have some experience in laying in the sun. We’ll help you get accustomed to the office by providing you with treats and walks around the neighborhood.

This role is based in either our Washington, DC. or San Francisco office.

Qualities we’re looking for

• Exercises loyalty. You’ll visit the office at least once a week and get excited when it’s a three dog day at Mapbox.

• Knows when to use a barking voice. You’ll bark if someone is at the door and know that one bark is enough.

• Exhibits compassion. You know the team works hard and cannot pet you all day long, so you’ll jump into a lap or curl around our feet.

To apply

Please have your human apply for a position at Mapbox. We have a variety of positions from sales and business to engineering and support. We’d love to hear how your human can help us build the future of mapping.

(And once your human joins the team, we’ll automatically accept your application!)"
animals  pets  multispecies  companions  dogs  mapbox  via:vruba  2016  human-animalrelationships  human-animalrelations 
february 2016 by robertogreco
San Francisco, Super Bowl Sunday | Mapbox
"We don’t often see pictures like this one. The problem is haze: as a camera in space looks toward the horizon, it sees more water vapor, smog, and other stuff in the atmosphere that obscures the Earth. But our friends at DigitalGlobe built WorldView-3 with a sensor suite called CAVIS, which lets it quantify and subtract haze – making atmospheric effects virtually invisible. Only WorldView-3 can see so clearly at this angle.

The satellite is about 17° above the horizon from San Francisco, and it is looking about 60° away from the point directly under it. At first I thought there was a typo, because 17° off horizontal should be 73° off vertical, not 61°. But while sketching it out, I realized I was assuming the ground is flat. WorldView-3 is way out over the Pacific – more than 1300 km or 800 miles to the west, and over that distance the Earth curves by about 12°!"
charlieloyd  mapbox  sanfrancisco  digitalglobe  aerialimagery  satelliteimagery  photography  satellites  2016 
february 2016 by robertogreco
OpenStreetMap | pratikyadav's diary | Mapbox Mapping Project Guide
"Over the last few months, we've begun and completed several mapping projects. As our team has grown, we've needed clear guidance for the team to run a lead a mapping task from inception to completion in line with the best practices of mapping and ensuring the highest quality of contributions to the map.

We have put together a simple guide to how the data team approaches a mapping project on OSM.

Broadly the guide provides a checklist for a project lead to work through during the different phases of a mapping project:

• Inception : Background research on the project and identify the Why? question.

• Getting Started : Capture scope, tools and mapping workflow on a ticket.

• Trial Workflow : Involve the community in a clear and effective mapping workflow. Do a trial run with a small team to find do's and don't.

• Scale Up : Train the whole team for scaling up the project.

• Mapping : Publicise the project on relevent channels and involving active members of local OSM community. Constantly monitor progress, and identify tools and process to improve the workflow.

• Wrap Up : Improve mapping documentation, capture statistics and publish a final report on the OSM diary.

We invite everyone to have a look at our Mapping Project Guide [https://gist.github.com/pratikyadav/21e86a309733423bb844 ], and give us feedback, or track any of our recent and ongoing projects in the Mapbox mapping repository."
mapbox  osm  via:unthinkingly  2015  openstreetmap  mapping  maps 
december 2015 by robertogreco
MapTab: A Chrome extension for viewing beautiful maps | Mapbox
"I open new browser tabs every few minutes and didn’t want to look at a blank page anymore, so I built MapTab: a Chrome extension for viewing beautiful maps when opening a new tab.

MapTab is simple: every time you open a new tab, a random map and interesting location is loaded.

You can choose from Mapbox Satellite or some of our crazy designs, or even add your own map design.

The project is open source and leverages Mapbox.js and React behind the scenes. If you’d like to fork or contribute to the project, check it out on GitHub. Beta users are loving MapTab."

[Available here: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/maptab/dmabflbokojjfjicmbjjfnmodihciemo ]
extensions  chrome  maps  mapping  2015  mapbox  browsers  browser 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Mapbox's Landsat-live Ushers In a New Era for Online Cartography, Using Satellite Imagery to Show the Earth as It Is Now - CityLab
[RE: https://www.mapbox.com/bites/00113/

See also: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/landsat-live-live/ ]

"On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday, a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite. Above is an embedded version you can explore.

The USGS has controlled operations of the satellite since 2013. That Landsat's images are freely and rapidly available is to the credit of USGS, as well as to Amazon Web Services, which hosts and shares the data at no charge to the public.

"This is really new in terms of what’s been available," says Camilla Mahon, a satellite-imagery engineer at Mapbox who helped spearhead the project. "This is one of the fastest ways we can grab imagery, and that’s what's allowing us to do this in real time."

Virtually every spot displayed on this map is 16 days old or younger (occasionally, weather or maintenance will mean some displays will be up to 32 days old). Labels indicating cities and highways are layered onto Landsat's ribbons of imagery using open-source OpenStreetMap data (as most Mapbox projects do).

"Anyone has the data to make this kind of map," says Charlie Loyd, also a Mapbox imagery engineer. But the project is key to the company's larger aims. "We’re trying for an ecosystem where any geo-spatial image can go on a map and be useful immediately."

That's also the philosophy behind this other, truly astonishing experiment in cartography—a moving California coastline. "That's actually drone imagery," Loyd says nonchalantly of the video that's layered on the satellite image map. Five years from now, real-time maps might be as ubiquitous as YouTube videos—but for now, they feel as futuristic as movies might have to Victorians.

They might also seem as superfluous, to the average map user. Yet Landsat-live has the potential for all kinds of applications, says Mahon, including environmental and agricultural monitoring.

Plus, there's that whole awe and wonder of the planet thing. "I think there is an intrinsic value and beauty to this," says Loyd. "Everyone has an inherent interest in seeing the world as it is.""
mapbox  imgery  seasons  change  time  landsat  charlieloyd  2015  drones  video  osm  openstreetmap  camillamahon  usgs  laurabliss 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Mapbox Satellite gets 48TB facelift | Mapbox
"We just added 48 terabytes of updated aerial imagery for the entire continental United States. Starting today users will see the updated imagery at zoom levels 13-17 on Mapbox Satellite. The new imagery is beautiful -- and it's all made possible by open data from the USDA's National Agriculture Imagery Program.

Our image processing pipeline, built on top of Amazon Web Services' cloud infrastructure, ingested the 24 hard drives worth of orthoimagery and perform a series of image calibration and adjustment routines to produce a seamless mosaic basemap that is fast, accurate, and beautiful. We'll be going into more detail about the processing pipeline and how this relates to Satellite Live in a few days."



[includes]

"The Elwha Dam, on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula, was demolished in 2011. What used to be its lake is turning into meadows and sandy riverbanks."
mapbox  satellite  imagery  2014  usda  elwha  elwhariver  washingtonstate  olympicpeninsula  rivers  rewilding  nature  dams 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Don't Fly Drones Here
"This map represents areas where it is not recommended to fly drones due to regulations. If you'd like to add a source to the map, submit an issue in the GitHub repository or read more on our blog."
maps  mapping  us  drones  droneproject  mapbox 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Introducing Mapbox Outdoors | Mapbox
[See also: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/outdoors-design/ ]

"A beautiful new map designed for outdoor adventures.

Mapbox Outdoors is ready for anything: it includes thousands of biking, hiking, and skiing trails on top of detailed terrain with elevation data. Off the beaten path, find marked creeks, mountain peaks, and other geological features. What would your activity tracker or travel website look like if it cared about more than just highways?

The magic of Mapbox Outdoors is refined, curated data from dozens of sources --- combined into a seamless layer. Then with Mapbox's customization technology, the visual possibilities are endless.

Outdoors is the result of incredible improvements to our raw data sources and rendering technology. To make the map globally accurate, we improved elevation data in 9 countries. Even at the highest zoom levels, elevation lines and labels show every summit and crag. Landcover data colors every part of the surface to show the shape of the woods or a marsh in the valley.

Unlike most other maps, we store and render terrain as vector data, so it's highly customizable: you can change colors, fonts, and labels to match brands, apps, and experiences. For instance, you can render contour lines transparently to show elevation on top of satellite imagery.

As of today, Mapbox Outdoors is available for Enterprise. This summer we will roll it out for all Mapbox plans."
maps  mapbox  via:steelemaley  mapping  outdoors  topographicalmaps  topography  terrain 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Drone Imagery for OpenStreetMap | MapBox
"Last weekend we captured 100 acres of aerial imagery at 4cm resolution. It took less than an hour to fly, and it was easy to publish the imagery on the web using TileMill and then trace in OpenStreetMap. Autonomous flying platforms like Sensefly's eBee paired up with a nimble software stack are changing aerial mapping. Drones like the eBee can cheaply and accurately photograph medium-sized areas, and then the imagery can be made immediately available to everyone.

The drone operates less like an RC plane and more like a Roomba. You can define an area of interest on a laptop, beam it to the eBee, and then just toss the drone in the air where it will autonomously collect imagery. Within 40 minutes, the drone took 225 photos covering 100 acres from an altitude of 120 meters. Larger areas of 2,500 acres and more are possible, but this was sufficient for our needs.

As soon as the drone landed, the images were loaded into Postflight/Pix4D for georeferencing and mosaicing and then into TileMill for resampling and tiling for the web. Afterward the imagery is easily added as a custom layer in OpenStreetMap's iD editor for tracing.

The high resolution of the stitched mosaic is really useful for editing in iD. As you can tell, we're excited about what Sensefly's eBee means for the future of open-source mapping. Small autonomous aircraft are excellent for capturing timely imagery or where other aerial imagery is not available."
mapbox  maps  mapping  drones  droneproject  osm  openstreetmap  2013  gis 
november 2013 by robertogreco
geojson.io: Edit GeoJSON
[About: http://www.mapbox.com/blog/geojsonio-announce/ ]

"We are trying to make it easier to draw, change, and publish maps. Some of the most important geospatial data is the information we know, observe, and can draw on a napkin. This is the kind of data that we also like to collaborate on, like collecting bars that have free wifi ✎ or favorite running routes.

geojson.io aims to fix that. It's an an open source project built with MapBox.js, GitHub's powerful new Gist and GeoJSON features, and an array of microlibraries that power import, export, editing, and lots more.

The project is moving and improving fast - you can get in on the development process on GitHub and we'd love to hear feedback after you kick the tires. Stay tuned."
geo  maps  mapping  geojson  tommacwright  mapbox  diy  tools  onlinetoolkit  2013 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Tupperwolf - An History of the Cloudless Atlas
"I’m writing this in a single pass. If I went back I would think of people I’m obviously leaving out. Pretty much everyone I know had something kind or useful to say to me about this project. But I think you see my point here – this project worked out well not because of anything special I did, but because I was surrounded by supportive and brilliant people. I think that if more people were as lucky in their friends as I am, we would see a lot more cool work in the world.

So. I’ve seen people say some really flattering things about me in comments over the last week. They are kind, but they’re mostly based on misunderstandings of the facts. If you’re tempted to celebrate me personally for this highly collaborative work, may I ask that you direct your attention instead to noticing people around you who could use a hand on some little project."
charlieloyd  humility  collaboration  2013  mapbox  cloudlessatlas  ego  glvo  wdg  srg  noticing  support  help  friends  howwelearn  howwework  kindness 
may 2013 by robertogreco
iD
"iD is a new, friendly editor for OpenStreetMap. It offers newcomers an easy way into editing OSM and is intended to complement existing editing software."

[via: http://mapbox.com/openstreetmap/#live ]
javascript  mapping  openstreetmap  maps  osm  mapbox 
may 2013 by robertogreco
OpenStreetMap + MapBox | MapBox
"OpenStreetMap is constantly improved in real time by thousands of volunteers around the world. Here's what they're doing now."
maps  live  editing  mapbox  osm  openstreetmap  mapping  realtime  via:vruba 
may 2013 by robertogreco

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