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robertogreco : markllobrera   6

iOS Continuity | dirtystylus
"I’ve been doing a lot of daily writing in Day One, mostly as a form of exercise. Today I started a post on the iPad and realized that the photo I wanted to use was only on my iPhone (it hadn’t synced to Dropbox yet). So I picked up the phone and finished the post there. I think that’s pretty cool, and it says something about how I expect my tools to be immediately in sync and transparently so.

I’m enjoying Day One, but boy do I wish I could adjust the leading in the editor (as well as the rendered posts). The lines are too tightly packed, and it just irks me every time I start to write."
continuity  ios  ipad  iphone  markllobrera  2015  writing  dayone  dropbox  syncing 
march 2015 by robertogreco
But Sleep *is* Work | dirtystylus
"I once asked my wife why she didn’t nap when our kids took their afternoon nap. “Because that’s my only time to get things done”, she replied. And this is true, except that we don’t sleep much in the evenings, either. Parents make kids take naps because we know that they don’t function well without them, yet somehow we convince ourselves that those same physical/cognitive/emotional limits don’t apply to us. We’re adults. We’ll power through."



"Bluecadet is moving to a new office this fall, and there’s been lots of half-jokes about the need for a nap room. We laugh, because we know it would never happen. But what if it did? I’d wager we’d see more productive people. The danger that I see is if people use the nap as a way to shortchange themselves even further from their evening sleep.

Perhaps our true weakness lies not in our inability to push ourselves past limits, but in our refusal to take care of our very selves."
sleep  self-care  markllobrera  naps  napping  2013  parenting  idleness  well-being  productivity  limits 
august 2013 by robertogreco
We Didn’t Even Bother with a Funeral | dirtystylus
The guys who were quiet? They were the ones who realized that Flash was still good for a great many things, but for mobile it was going to be native apps or open web technologies. So they put their heads down and went to work, picking up new skills or brushing up old ones. Meanwhile, some of their colleagues shook their fists at Apple and played the waiting game, promising that each new release on Android would finally bring the “full web experience”. It was late to arrive, and never delivered on the promise. So now comes the inevitable news, and everyone shrugs. The ones who got a head start are busy learning and growing elsewhere; the blowhards have probably just found another symbolic divide to rally their banners around.
internet  apple  working  flash  markllobrera  2012  mobile  design  adobe  android  iphone  ios  ipod  learning  change  adaptability  via:tealtan 
august 2012 by robertogreco

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