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Jonathan Kozol: Joe Biden Didn’t Just Praise Segregationists. He Also Spent Years Fighting Busing | Democracy Now!
[See also:

"Part 2: Jonathan Kozol on “When Joe Biden Collaborated with Segregationists”"
https://www.democracynow.org/2019/6/26/jonathan_kozol_on_when_joe_biden

and

"When Joe Biden Collaborated With Segregationists: The candidate’s years as an anti-busing crusader cannot be forgotten—or readily forgiven."
https://www.thenation.com/article/joe-biden-education-busing-opposition/

"Unlike Bernie Sanders, who recently proposed a Thurgood Marshall Plan for public education that calls for a renewal and expansion of desegregation plans by means of transportation, Biden still believes his original position was correct and, according to one of his aides, Bill Russo, sees no reason to revise it. No matter how he tries to blur the edges of his past or present beliefs, no matter how he waffles in his language in order to present himself as some kind of born-again progressive, Biden has not shown that he can be trusted to confront our nation’s racist past and one of its most urgent present needs.

As the mainstream media repeatedly reminds us, Biden is a likable man in many ways. Even his critics often speak about his graciousness. But his likability will not help Julia Walker’s grandkids and her great-grandchildren and the children of her neighbors go to schools where they can get an equal shot at a first-rate education and where their young white classmates have a chance to get to know and value them and learn from them, as children do in ordinary ways when we take away the structures that divide them."]
jonathankozol  2019  joebiden  racism  race  elections  2020  education  schools  schooling  busing  segregation  integration  fannielouhamer  thrurgoodmarshall  juneteenth  corybooker  desegregation  amygoodman  newyork  california  illinois  delaware  maryland 
june 2019 by robertogreco
Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong. - The Washington Post
"History is the polemics of the victor, William F. Buckley allegedly said. Not so in the United States, at least not regarding the Civil War. As soon as Confederates laid down their arms, some picked up their pens and began to distort what they had done, and why. Their resulting mythology went national a generation later and persists — which is why a presidential candidate can suggest that slavery was somehow pro-family, and the public believes that the war was mainly fought over states’ rights.

The Confederates won with the pen (and the noose) what they could not win on the battlefield: the cause of white supremacy and the dominant understanding of what the war was all about. We are still digging ourselves out from under the misinformation that they spread, which has manifested in both our history books and our public monuments.

Take Kentucky. Kentucky’s legislature voted not to secede, and early in the war, Confederate Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston ventured through the western part of the state and found “no enthusiasm as we imagined and hoped but hostility … in Kentucky.” Eventually, 90,000 Kentuckians would fight for the United States, while 35,000 fought for the Confederate States. Nevertheless, according to historian Thomas Clark, the state now has 72 Confederate monuments and only two Union ones.

Neo-Confederates also won western Maryland. In 1913, the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) put a soldier on a pedestal at the Rockville courthouse. Montgomery County never seceded, of course. While Maryland did send 24,000 men to the Confederate armed forces, it sent 63,000 to the U.S. Army and Navy. Nevertheless, the UDC’s monument tells visitors to take the other side: “To our heroes of Montgomery Co. Maryland / That we through life may not forget to love the Thin Gray Line.”

In fact, the Thin Grey Line came through Montgomery and adjoining Frederick counties at least three times, en route to Antietam, Gettysburg and Washington. Lee’s army expected to find recruits and help with food, clothing and information. They didn’t. Maryland residents greeted Union soldiers as liberators when they came through on the way to Antietam. Recognizing the residents of Frederick as hostile, Confederate cavalry leader Jubal Early demanded and got $300,000 from them lest he burn their town, a sum equal to at least $5,000,000 today. Today, however, Frederick boasts what it calls the “Maryland Confederate Memorial,” and the manager of the Frederick cemetery — filled with Union and Confederate dead — told me in an interview, “Very little is done on the Union side” around Memorial Day. “It’s mostly Confederate.”

In addition to winning the battle for public monuments, neo-Confederates also managed to rename the war, calling it “the War Between the States.” Nevermind that while it was going on, no one called it that. Even Jeopardy! accepts it.

Perhaps most perniciously, neo-Confederates now claim that the South seceded for states’ rights. When each state left the Union, its leaders made clear that they were seceding because they were for slavery and against states’ rights. In its “Declaration Of The Causes Which Impel The State Of Texas To Secede From The Federal Union,” for example, the secession convention of Texas listed the states that had offended them: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan and Iowa. These states had in fact exercised states’ rights by passing laws that interfered with the federal government’s attempts to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act. Some also no longer let slaveowners “transit” through their states with their slaves. “States’ rights” were what Texas was seceding against. Texas also made clear what it was seceding for: white supremacy.

We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable.

Despite such statements, during and after the Nadir, neo-Confederates put up monuments that flatly lied about the Confederate cause. For example, South Carolina’s monument at Gettysburg, dedicated in 1965, claims to explain why the state seceded: “Abiding faith in the sacredness of states rights provided their creed here.” This tells us nothing about 1863, when abiding opposition to states’ rights as claimed by free states provided South Carolinians’ creed. In 1965, however, its leaders did support states’ rights. Indeed, they were desperately trying to keep the federal government from enforcing school desegregation and civil rights. The one constant was that the leaders of South Carolina in 1860 and 1965 were acting on behalf of white supremacy.

[The racist assumptions behind how we talk about shootings]

So thoroughly did this mythology take hold that our textbooks still stand history on its head and say secession was for, rather than against, states’ rights. Publishers mystify secession because they don’t want to offend Southern school districts and thereby lose sales. Consider this passage from “The American Journey,” the largest textbook ever foisted on middle-school students and perhaps the best-selling U.S. history textbook:
The South Secedes

Lincoln and the Republicans had promised not to disturb slavery where it already existed. Nevertheless, many people in the South mistrusted the party, fearing that the Republican government would not protect Southern rights and liberties. On December 20, 1860, the South’s long-standing threat to leave the Union became a reality when South Carolina held a special convention and voted to secede.

Teachers and students infer from that passage that slavery was not the reason for secession. Instead, the reason is completely vague: [white] Southerners feared for their “rights and liberties.” On the next page, however, “Journey” becomes more precise: [White] Southerners claimed that since “the national government” had been derelict “by refusing to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act and by denying the Southern states equal rights in the territories — the states were justified in leaving the Union.”

“Journey” offers no evidence to support this claim. It cannot. No Southern state made any such charge against the federal government in any secession document I have ever seen. Presidents Buchanan and before him, Pierce, were part of the pro-Southern wing of the Democratic Party. For 10 years, the federal government had vigorously enforced the Fugitive Slave Act. Buchanan had supported pro-slavery forces in Kansas even after his own minion, the Mississippi slave owner Robert Walker, ruled that they had won only by fraud. The seven states that seceded before February 1861 had no quarrel with “the national government.”

Teaching or implying that the Confederate states seceded for states’ rights is not accurate history. It is white, Confederate-apologist history. It bends — even breaks — the facts of what happened. Like other U.S. history textbooks, “Journey” needs to be de-Confederatized. So does the history test we give to immigrants who want to become U.S. citizens. Item 74 asks, “Name one problem that led to the Civil War.” It then gives three acceptable answers: “slavery, economic reasons, and states’ rights.” If by “economic reasons” it means issues about tariffs and taxes, which most people infer, then two of its three “correct answers” are wrong! No other question on this 100-item test has more than one “right” answer. The reason is not because the history is unclear, but because neo-Confederates still wielded considerable influence in our culture and our Congress until quite recently, when a mass of politicians rushed to declare the Confederate flag unsuitable for display on government grounds.

Now the dean of the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., has noted that the cathedral needs to de-Confederatize its stained glass windows. That would be a start for D.C., which also needs to remove its statue of Albert Pike, Confederate general and leader of the Arkansas Ku Klux Klan, from Judiciary Square. The Pentagon also needs to de-Confederatize the Army. No more Fort A.P. Hill. No more Fort Bragg, named for a general who was not only Confederate but also incompetent. No more Fort Benning, named for a general who, after he had helped get his home state of Georgia to secede, made the following argument to the Virginia legislature:
What was the reason that induced Georgia to take the step of secession? This reason may be summed up in one single proposition. It was a conviction … that a separation from the North was the only thing that could prevent the abolition of her slavery…. If things are allowed to go on as they are, it is certain that slavery is to be abolished. By the time the north shall have attained the power, the black race will be in a large majority, and then we will have black governors, black legislatures, black juries, black everything. … The consequence will be that our men will be all exterminated or expelled to wander as vagabonds over a hostile earth, and as for our women, their fate will be too horrible to contemplate even in fancy.

With our monuments lying about secession, our textbooks obfuscating what the Confederacy was about, and our army honoring its generals, no wonder so many Americans supported the Confederacy until last week. We can literally see the impact Confederate symbols and thinking had on Dylann Roof, but other examples abound. In his mugshot, Timothy McVeigh, who bombed the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City in 1995, wore a neo-Confederate T-shirt showing Abraham Lincoln and the words… [more]
history  myths  confederacy  civilwar  slavery  whitesupremacy  2015  racism  race  kentucky  maryland  noe-confederates  misinformation  jamesloewen 
july 2015 by robertogreco
School For Tomorrow
"To effectively and efficiently prepare every student to thrive in college, the workplace, and life in the decades ahead."



"Research and educa­tional philos­ophy over the last half-​​century inform our under­standing of psychology, neural devel­op­ment, and the learning process. We use the most up-​​to-​​date research and best prac­tices from the field of educa­tion and beyond to ensure that our students master every­thing they need to succeed throughout their lives.

How we do it
Our Curriculum is:

• Integrated
We intertwine content, academic skills, and socio-emotional skills into each course, unit and lesson.

• Transdisciplinary
We integrate the natural and social sciences with the humanities to create a fuller, deeper understanding of the world.

• Targeted
We ensure that our course material and assessment methods are clearly linked to the academic and socio-emotional benchmarks of our SFT Outcome Curriculum Guide.

Our Classrooms are filled with:

Role Model Faculty

• Teachers model our core academic and soci0-emotional skills in their interactions with students, colleagues, and parents.

• Customization
Students co-create plans that include goals and pacing that makes sense for them and allows for meaningful tracking of accomplishments.

• Innovative ways to teach and learn
Classes use projects connected to real world problems to engage students in critical and creative thinking and innovative problem solving.

• Mentoring
Each student is assigned a faculty member who serves as his or her advisor and advocate. The teacher is the main conduit of information between the school and the parent and is the “expert” on the student’s growth.

All of this takes place within the context of:

• A Respectful and Caring School Community
We foster a culture that reflects the values and the skills we desire to impart to our students. We value each of our faculty members, parents, and students as human beings, and while we may not always agree, we treat each other with respect.

• Interaction with the Surrounding Community
We do not want to engender an “SFT bubble,” instead we want to share our knowledge, gifts, and talents with the world around us. As such, we incorporate community service and outreach into our learning and into our daily lives.

This yields a school that develops:

• Academic Skills and Abilities
Problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity, conceptual linkages, writing, speaking, organization, numerical literacy

• Socio-emotional Skills and Abilities
Compassion, Confidence, Empathy, Growth mindset, Openmindedness, Kindness, Resilience, Respect for self and others, Social conscience

And, ultimately, allows us to fulfill our mission:

To efficiently and effectively prepare every student to thrive in college, the workplace, and life in the decades ahead."



"Inno­v­a­tive educa­tors concerned with improving student learning and achieve­ment are seeking ways to create rigorous, rele­vant, and engaging curriculum. One highly successful method is inte­grated curriculum. In its simplest concep­tion, inte­grated curriculum is about making connec­tions. SFT uses the trans­dis­ci­pli­nary approach of inte­grated curriculum.

The trans­dis­ci­pli­nary approach has many bene­fits and advan­tages over single-​​discipline learning. Among other things, it:

• Increases students’ moti­va­tion and engage­ment by providing impor­tant context, meaning, and value to their learning;
• Advances crit­ical thinking and cogni­tive development;
• Helps students to uncover precon­cep­tions or recog­nize bias;
• Helps students tolerate and embrace ambiguity;
• Teaches students to apply knowl­edge or skills learned in one context to other contexts in and out of school; and
• Makes the learning process more efficient.

All SFT students take TDP, a discussion-based transdisciplinary seminar with a focus on writing and presentational skills. This two hour course is the cornerstone of our curriculum. While each TDP is loosely focused on a particular topic, all TDPs integrate essential skills and content from, first, English Literature and Language and Social Sciences, and second, from Mathematics, Arts, and Natural Sciences.

Students round out their schedule with our rigorous, lab-based three-year Integrated Science (combination of chemistry, biology, physics, and earth/space science) sequence, individualized instruction in math to include Algebra II and Statistics (with encouragement to continue), foreign language, in-depth academic electives from any discipline, arts electives, and movement electives."
schools  education  schoolfortomorrow  reston  virginia  rockville  maryland  dc  washingtondc  privateschools  curriculum  mentoring  lcproject  openstudioproject  socialemotional  community  socialemotionallearning 
april 2015 by robertogreco
SCHOOL for TOMORROW - Reinventing Secondary Education
"School for Tomorrow (SFT) is a ground­breaking, model inde­pen­dent nonprofit school serving a diversity of D.C.-area students in grades 4–12 in Rockville, Maryland.

SFT is a school unlike any other. Educa­tion experts, informed by exten­sive research, have been increasingly writing and talking about the paradigm-​​shifting school of the future that our nation needs as soon as possible, one that effec­tively provides the educa­tion neces­sary for today’s youth to thrive in the rapidly changing adult world they’ll be entering. SFT is committed to creating that school of the future — now. Accord­ingly, SFT students learn what’s neces­sary to achieve success and satis­fac­tion in today’s and tomorrow’s world, and they learn in ways and in a struc­ture that opti­mizes each student’s devel­op­ment, accom­plish­ment, and growth. In short, SFT is providing a rele­vant, customized, holistic educa­tion for all students — and the results are extraordinary!

SFT has been high­lighted in arti­cles in The Wash­ington Post and the Gazette. It has also been recog­nized as a model school on the website connected with the education-​​focused docu­men­tary Race to Nowhere. Founder and Head of School Alan Shus­terman has been inter­viewed on the local cable show Forward Motion as well as on Parents’ Perspec­tive, an award-​​winning weekly radio program which airs on radio stations across the country. He has been also inter­viewed by the website Stop Home­work.
SFT holds open houses throughout the year, for it is only through seeing SFT first­hand that you can begin to truly under­stand what sepa­rates us from all other schools."



"School for Tomorrow was founded in response to a crit­ical need for change in secondary educa­tion. SFT uses the most current and compelling research, resources, and prac­tices from the field of educa­tion and beyond to prepare students for life in the 21st century.

SFT’s cutting-​​edge, customiz­able educa­tion model allows our faculty to be flex­ible and respon­sive to the needs of our students. Our student-​​​​centered, entre­pre­neurial, inter­dis­ci­pli­nary approach to learning supports the inherent right of each student to learn in ways that best suit him or her. As a result, our students are given the oppor­tu­nity to foster the skills they will need to support their success and fulfill­ment in learning and in life.

Our methods encourage constant inves­ti­ga­tion, analysis, crit­ical thinking, collab­o­ra­tion, and problem solving. We respect and support students as they take risks, learn from mistakes, and stretch them­selves in a safe envi­ron­ment. Ulti­mately, SFT primes each of its students to thrive in college, the work­place, and life in the decades ahead."
schools  education  lcproject  maryland 
may 2014 by robertogreco

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