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robertogreco : mashups   8

Do Not Track: revolutionary mashup documentary about Web privacy - Boing Boing
"Brett "Remix Manifesto" Gaylor tells the story of his new project: a revolutionary "mashup documentary" about privacy and the Web."

[This article refers to:
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/1
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/2
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/3
https://donottrack-doc.com/en/episode/4 ]

"I make documentaries about the Internet. My last one, Rip! A Remix Manifesto, was made during the copyright wars of the early 2000s. We followed Girl Talk, Larry Lessig, Gilberto Gil, Cory and others as the Free Culture movement was born. I believed then that copyright was the Internet's defining issue. I was wrong.

In the time since I made Rip, we’ve seen surveillance from both corporate and state actors reach deeper into our lives. Advertising, and the tracking that goes with it, have become the dominant business model of the web. With the Snowden revelations, we've seen that this business model has given the NSA and other state agencies access to the intimate details of our online lives, our location, our reading lists, and our friends.

So with my colleagues at Upian in Paris, the National Film Board of Canada, AJ+, Radio-Canada, RTS, Arte and Bayersicher Rundfunk, I decided to make a documentary series about this. The trouble is, privacy is a difficult issue for most people. They either quickly pull out the "nothing to hide" argument, or they give the shruggie ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. We wanted to find a way to make this personal for people, so we decided to use the viewer's own data to create each episode.

When you open Episode One, the narrator you hear will depend on your location. You'll likely see me if you link from Boing Boing -- I'm the English narrator on desktop. But if you connect on mobile, you'll meet Francesca Fiorentini from AJ+. In Quebec, you'll meet Sandra Rodriguez. In France, it'll be journalist Vincent Glad. The tone is conversational. You'll meet someone who speaks your own language discussing their online sharing addiction.

Once you've met us, we'll say different things to you. If it's raining where you are, we'll know it, because we've plugged into a weather API. This API will communicate with Giphy's API and present different GIFs. It's all edited together like a movie, but a movie that is created on the spot, just for you.

To go further, we ask you to tell us a bit more about you. If you tell us where you go for your news, we've partnered with the service disconnect.me to show you the third party trackers that advertisers and analytics folks place on your computer to follow you around the Web.

In Episode Two, we then take this data to create personalized ads within the program - while we talk to Ethan Zuckerman and Julia Angwin about how advertising came to dominate the Web. We'll ask you how much you would be willing to pay for a version of Facebook or Google that didn't have ads, and compare that with how much they make from you.

In Episode Three, we created a a corporation called Illuminus that practices "future present risk detection". If you log in with your Facebook profile, the corporation uses an API developed at the University of Cambridge, "Apply Magic Sauce," to determine which one of the "Big Five Personality Traits" applies to you. We discover how lenders are dipping their toes into making risk assessments based on your social media activity.

We varied our style in Episode Four and made a privacy cartoon. Journalist Zineb Dryef spent months researching what information she discloses on her mobile phone, and then Darren Pasemko animated what she learned. We meet Kate Crawford, Julia Angwin, as well as Harlo Holmes and Nathan Freitas from the Guardian project. It’s an episode told in four parts, and you can watch the first part in the video below.

If you watch the rest of this episode on donottrack-doc.com, it will be geo-located and interactive.

Our next episode, available May 26th, is produced by the National Film Board of Canada's digital studio, who have a well deserved reputation for creating beautiful interfaces for new types of documentaries. In this episode, we'll explore big data - by making correlations as you watch, you'll determine the outcome, while you meet danah boyd, Cory Doctorow, Alicia Garza and Kate Crawford.

We’re still catching our breath while we produce the final two episodes. One thing we know - we want these to be personal. As we learned in our first episodes, people understand the issues around privacy and surveillance when we let them explore their own data. Depending on how you behaved during the series, we want these final episodes to adapt. We’ll be exploring how the filter bubble shapes your view of the world in our 6th episode, and how our actions can shape the future in our 7th. What these episodes look like is up to you."
brettgaylor  film  interactive  interactivefilm  mashups  documentary  towatch  privacy  web  online  internet  2015  nfbc  nfb  katecrawford  corydoctoow  aliciagarza  danahboyd  location  zinebdryef  darrenpasemko  harloholmes  nathanfreitas  juliaangwin  ethanzuckerman  advertising  tracking  francescafiorentini  sandrarodriguez  giphy  api  trackers  cookies 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Les Petites Échos, The Kids Are All Right// The Meaning is the...
"In the end, the film worked for the same reasons any piece of art works: it was very well made. The handheld shots and playful editing seamlessly accompanied the whimsical pop navigations of Girl Talk’s music; the movie built up a slow, compelling love triangle between Marsen and the two nameless male dancers as they drifted through the urban landscape, meeting and parting, meeting and parting. This gave me hope: craft still matters. Despite the evening’s hispterish veneer, despite all of its Web 2.0 trappings, a piece of art must still stand on its own. An audience will still respond to quality and shun mediocrity."
reiflarsen  kickstarter  film  art  glvo  making  generations  socialnetworking  mashups  meaning  facebook  millennials  communication  sharing  inbetweeness  girltalk  girlwalk  annemarsen  2011  audience  craft  quality  mediocrity  happiness 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Steve Jobs and the Rewards of Risk-Taking - NYTimes.com
"The academics identify five traits that are common to the disruptive innovators: questioning, experimenting, observing, associating and networking. Their bundle of characteristics echoes the ceaseless curiosity and willingness to take risks noted by other experts. Networking, Mr. Gregersen explains, is less about career-building relationships than a search for new ideas. Associating, he adds, is the ability to make idea-producing connections by linking concepts from different disciplines — intellectual mash-ups."
questioning  experimenting  experimentation  observation  observing  association  associating  networking  curiosity  disruptiveinnovation  stevejobs  2011  risktaking  tcsnmy  ideas  mashups  mashup  interdisciplinary  generalists  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  halgregersen 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Chimeric Thinking in the Trough of Disillusionment « Snarkmarket
"We obvi­ously love hybrids and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary think­ing here at Snark­mar­ket. But you know, I think we might love chimeras even more.
snarkmarket  robinsloan  chimeras  chimericthinking  recombinant  interdisciplinary  mashups  hybrids  hacking  patterns  patternrecognition  hacks  theadjacentpossible  recombinantgizmos  classideas  mattjones  mattwebb  berg  berglondon 
july 2010 by robertogreco
sevensixfive: But Today We Collect Gizmos
"The application of a heuristic gizmo is an act of pattern recognition - the intuition that some set of undifferentiated circumstances is isomorphic to some other set that was previously encountered, even if the context was wildly different. ... It has been said that things hardly "exist" before the fine artist has made use of them, they are simply part of the unclassified background material against which we pass our lives. The application of gizmo metaheuristics requires a certain kind of approach to interdisciplinary work and expertise: try it first, then read the manual. Like a western tourist using chopsticks, there is an attitude of being cheerfully out of one's depth, but willing to learn, and eager to add this new technique to the repertoire and impress the folks back home."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/5803 ]
fredscharmen  architecture  cities  collecting  patterns  urbanism  patternrecognition  tcsnmy  classideas  art  science  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  recombinantgizmos  gadgets  gizmos  theadjacentpossible  hacking  hacks  glvo  mashups  frankenstein  robertsmithson  reynerbanham  vernacular  collections  objects  folkart  closed-loop  ecosystems 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Bing - New Bing Maps Application: Destination Maps - Bing Maps Blog - Bing Community
"Need to give people directions to your house, business or party (yeah, baby!). Use the Destination Maps application just specify a place (such as Club XS in Las Vegas); set the area of interest by dragging the sides of the on-map square to include all the areas people are coming from; then give the map a title. You can select multiple map styles such as Sketchy, European, American or Treasure (a la pirate! – featured). Very reminiscent of the Line Drive maps from my Vicinity days...only way fricking cooler!"
maps  mapping  bing  tcsnmy  directions  geo  piratemaps  papernet  mashups 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Mashup DJ Girl Talk Deconstructs Samples From Feed the Animals
"In the modern laptop era, any monkey with Pro Tools can make a mashup. But Pittsburgh-based computer maestro Girl Talk (known to the IRS as Gregg Gillis) has turned the cut-and-paste process into a jams-packed jigsaw puzzle. His latest album, Feed the Animals (released digitally in June with hard copies out September 23), brims with 300 song snippets in just over 50 minutes (compared to around 250 in his previous effort). "People want to see the bar raised," Gillis says. Below, a beat-by-beat breakdown of a single track."
music  infographics  visualization  mashups  samples  diagram  charts 
june 2009 by robertogreco

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