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Radio Atlantic - The Atlantic
"We're living in historic times. Who better than a 160-year-old magazine to help you make sense of them? Each week, The Atlantic's top editors—Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief; Matt Thompson, deputy editor; and Alex Wagner, contributing editor and CBS anchor—sit down with leading voices to explore what's happening in the world, how things became the way they are, and where they're going next. Take a listen to our trailer for a sneak preview:"
mattthompson  alexagner  jeffreygoldberg  podcasts  radio  politics  currentevents 
july 2017 by robertogreco
A Doll Cabinet in Iowa / Snarkmarket
"To know the future … that’s the dream, right? But it’s a dream that makes sense only if the future is merely revealed, rather than being constructed bit by bit from the traces of the present, which we still have the ability to shape. Let me argue instead for seeking future history — the ability to consider the present through the lens of the future, to find imminent anachronisms hidden in plain sight. What do we take for granted today that will come to seem remarkable tomorrow? What will the history books say about us?

A few months ago, my friends Andy, Amanda, and Amy, and I decided to build a weekend around these questions. And now I’m seeing future history everywhere.

Like all right-thinking people, I’ve been infected with Hamilton fever. The theme of the show that resonates most loudly is the obsession of all the central characters with their place in history. After one recent replay of the score, I found myself tearfully re-reading Washington’s farewell address, a message sent across the ages, to us. Of course, nearly every Presidential farewell has that time-capsule quality — it’s the last best chance for a President to spin his legacy. But fast-forward through more recent ones, and Washington’s stands out all the more. Other Presidents are aware of the watchful eyes of history, but they spend most of their parting speeches dwelling on the recent past — what they saw, what they did, why they did it. Consequently, moments in these speeches can seem parochial or short-sighted, just decades later. “There hasn’t been a failure of an insured bank in nearly 9 years,” Truman says. “The Persian Gulf is no longer a war zone,” Reagan says. We’re “on track to be debt-free by the end of the decade,” Clinton says.

Washington, though, scours his Presidency for lessons that would reverberate across centuries: Cherish your union, he tells us. “It is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which you so highly prize.”

It’s not just lofty Presidential speeches; tiny gestures can mark a break with the past. When Tom Vilsack ascended to the Iowa governor’s mansion, his wife Christie broke slightly with tradition: she elected to have her doll identified by her own name in the cabinet. “I’ve never called myself ‘Mrs. Tom Vilsack,’ ever,” she said. Iowa’s next first lady echoed Christie Vilsack’s choice; her doll is called “Mrs. Mari Culver.”

In 2012, Christie Vilsack tried to change another longstanding Iowa tradition: she ran for Congress. Not only had a woman never been governor of Iowa in 2012, no woman had ever represented the state in either the House or the Senate. “We really have a wonderful history,” the state’s Democratic Party chair said when Vilsack announced her exploratory committee. “With this one problem.”

Vilsack’s run failed; she was defeated by Steve King in 2012. But then something happened, just last year. A streak unbroken since Iowa entered the union in 1846 — nearly 170 years in which a long succession of men exclusively represented Iowa in Congress — ended. Joni Ernst, the daughter of the same Mrs. Mari Culver whose doll sits in a cabinet in the Iowa statehouse, became Iowa’s first ever Congresswoman.

For a weekend in Baltimore in April, we’re going to look for moments like this, and scour our own experiences for ideas and lessons that will endure. We’ll make a time capsule, and we’ll end with a prom; we couldn’t think of two better ways to bring a far-seeing lens to the present. It will be massive fun and I hope you join us if you can. But most of all, I want to know: What do you see around you today that will come to seem remarkable?"
mattthompson  2016  future  history  anachronisms  futurehistory  futurehistoryfestival  events  perspective  legacy  posterity  georgewashington  iowa  change 
february 2016 by robertogreco
The Bravery of Clementa Pinckney and the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church - The Atlantic
"The Reverend Clementa Pinckney, of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, knew he was in a dangerous line of work. He may not have known that particular Wednesday evening would be his last, but he was the rock of a church that had been baptized in blood and fire.

Pinckney certainly knew the story of Denmark Vesey, one of the founders of Emanuel A.M.E., whose church was razed to the ground and whose life was ended because of his efforts to set blacks free. Vesey himself was a free man, and wealthy, and yet he marched boldly and knowingly toward the peril of death by trying to lead a slave revolt. The judges who sentenced him to death remarked on this:
“It is difficult to imagine,” says the sentence finally passed on Denmark Vesey, “what infatuation could have prompted you to attempt an enterprize so wild and visionary. You were a free man, comely, wealthy, and enjoyed every comfort compatible with your situation. You had, therefore, much to risk and little to gain.” Is slavery, then, a thing so intrinsically detestable, that a man thus favored will engage in a plan thus desperate merely to rescue his children from it?
Is slavery so intrinsically detestable that a free and wealthy man will risk death merely to rescue his children from it?

Vesey’s answer? Yes. One of Vesey’s co-conspirators recounted his sentiments: “He was satisfied with his own condition, being free, but, as all his children were slaves, he wished to see what could be done for them."

Vesey’s chief co-conspirator was Peter Poyas, another man who marched boldly toward the peril of death. While in prison, Poyas and a cellmate were tortured and threatened by their jailors to extract the names of their accomplices:
[Poyas’s] companion, wearied out with pain and suffering, and stimulated by the hope of saving his own life, at last began to yield. Peter raised himself, leaned upon his elbow, looked at the poor fellow, saying quietly, “Die like a man,” and instantly lay down again.

Like these men, Pinckney felt his work was both necessary and not safe. “Freedom, equality and the pursuit of happiness,” Pinckney had said to a room of visitors to his church two years prior, “that's what church is all about. Freedom to worship, and freedom from sin, freedom to be fully what God intends us to be, and freedom to have equality in the sight of God. And sometimes you gotta make noise to do that. Sometimes, you maybe have to die, like Denmark Vesey, to do that.”

If you have not yet listened to Pinckney’s recounting of his church and its history, spare 10 minutes and watch.

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XP35_JVnP6g ]

Clementa Pinckney knew the history of his own city. He probably knew the name Benjamin Franklin Randolph, another black minister and state senator from Charleston to have died at the hands of angry white men, 147 years prior.

He may not have suspected that the person who had joined his small fellowship of believers at Mother Emanuel that night would sit with these few people for an hour, listen to their prayers and their blessings, then take up a gun and end their lives. But he knew that humankind had been cursed from its beginnings by hatred so potent it could be lethal—the third human mentioned in Pinckney’s Bible, after all, had killed another man out of jealousy for what he had.

Much attention will be given to tracing the motives that gave rise to these murders. There will be news broadcasts and lengthy stories about the mind of the killer. At the end, we’ll probably conclude—as Karl Ove Knausgaard did when he reported on the Norwegian killer Anders Breivik—that those motives, whether you call them “hate” or “illness” or “terrorism,” are petty, ancient, and banal.

So let’s spare a thought for those who undertook the dangerous work of prayer and fellowship, and were killed for it. For Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, Cynthia Hurd, Tywanza Sanders, DePayne Middleton-Doctor, Susie Jackson, Ethel Lee Lance, Myra Thompson, the Reverend Daniel Lee Simmons Sr., and the Reverend Clementa Pinckney.

And I don’t know whether they got to say it when their meeting was abruptly and violently ended, so I’ll say it now.

Amen."
mattthompson  2015  us  race  history  activism  clementapinckney  ammanuelame  amechurch  racism  denmarkvesey  peterpoyas  benjaminfranklinrandolph  bravery  courage  fellowship 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Whitney Houston and the music of loneliness / Snarkmarket
[via a small collection on loneliness by Tim Carmody: https://twitter.com/tcarmody/status/609837487414988800 ]

"After the death of Whitney Houston, our reflections on Twitter included these thoughts on pop music, loneliness and connection."



"So many of Whitney Houston's hits, even the happy ones, are about loneliness."

"Yes. I've been nursing a theory that some of the best pop songs - dance songs particularly - have loneliness at their core."

"I mean, it's also ultimately about desire being the cause of loneliness and the engine that overcomes it. But the appeal to loneliness is how the song gets into your head. It's how you suture yourself into its world."

"We bind ourselves most strongly to characters that seem to express our particular vulnerabilities."

"Yeah, that's kind of what I mean by "suture" -- it's how we stitch ourselves into, imagine/identify ourselves in that world."

"Whitney is really about loneliness, shyness, insecurity, uncertainty -- and hope."

"It's like Proust; the other person doesn't really matter as much as the emotion, the memory, the first-person resolution."
loneliness  timcarmody  2013  mattthompson  whitneyhouston  music  desire  beachboys  royorbison  vulnerability  insecurity  shyness  uncertainty  emotions  love  connection  humans  beinghuman  hope  proust 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: A Concise History of the Future
"Tim: I used to have a rule, that I would never just link to stuff. I always had to comment just as much.
That’s why in my first year, I had about fifteen posts.
Robin: a blog is like an article of clothing. a weird one, like a futuristic pointy hat or silver pants.
you don’t know how to wear it at first…
but then you break it in — you get comfortable with it
Tim: but suddenly you go to a party where everyone’s rocking it
and you say… oh, that’s how you do it
Matt: when we started, I just thought it would be a good way to keep in touch w/ Robin. which it has been. but it ended up much awesomer, which was a plus.
Robin: well i credit snarkmarket to essentially changing my trajectory in journalism entirely.
because, almost overnight,
it was so much more FUN than writing normal articles,
and getting feedback in the normal way.
which is to say, not at all.
your party metaphor applies here, tim.
Tim: Snarkmarket easily made me much more interested in, um, now than I ever would have been.
Reminds me of the Nietzsche quote — the trouble with scholars is that by thinking backward, eventually you believe backward too.
Robin: mmm i like that!
Tim: SM has helped me orient my thinking forward.
Robin: a blog — and all the things that surround & support it, like a well-stocked rss reader, and commenters — are an anchor to the present
sometimes to a fault
but even so
Tim: The real trouble is thinking that backwards is the last forwards
like, the real break is the printing press
or the french revolution
or the advent of the computer
some epoch-making change that fixes everything forever
so you don’t see how things are changing now
Matt: it took me a moment to process “backwards is the last forwards.”
Tim: thinking backwards to find beginnings
rather than closures or ruptures
Matt: I eventually got it. I like it.
Tim: which in a way is a blinder to optimism
Matt: I’m going to toss that at a curmudgeonly academic one of these days.
Robin: honestly we’ve waited too long to refresh/reboot/rethink snarkmarket —
partly as a result of, you know, having jobs and lives and things —
but at its ideal it is changing a lot more frequently, a lot more fluidly.
so we should think of this evolution not as an epoch-maker
but the first beat in a new, faster tempo
Matt: amen.
Tim: right, throwing the finish line ahead so you can run past it
Matt: the other day, I was thinking about how I’ve never kept a diary. and there was a moment of regret - all those thoughts and memories that have just been scattered to the ages.
but then I remembered Snarkmarket. which is the oddest type of diary. ‘cause it’s not about me, but it’s about how I view the world.
Robin: yes! actually matt, you just linked to an old 2006 post of mine today —
and i clicked over and went: “wait… who wrote this?”
it struck me in the best possible way
Tim: a diary of public preoccupations
So, like, what are the big moments in SM history?
It seems like Robin targeting Al Gore TV is a big one
EPIC is undoubtedly a big one
which, in a way, is more consequential.
Matt: I remember four years ago, a while after Dean’s Presidential candidacy went up in flames, when I posted about a story I intended to report in ten years. (when his records from office in VT would be made public.)
Robin: love that. i feel that we must endeavor to make snarkmarket a reliable repository for ten-year ideas.
Matt: Snarkmarket seemed the most enduring document in which to declare that intent. there was no better way to send a message to myself in 10 years.
Robin: we’re halfway there already which isn’t bad.



Matt: blogging = destiny.
Robin: welcome to the snarkmatrix officially, tim
Tim: thanks kids.
Matt: yes, we are very glad to have you.
Tim: good to be aboard this leaky rocketship into the future."
snarkmarket  2008  timcarmody  mattthompson  robinsloan  blog  blogging  optimism  writing  howwewrite  howwethink  forwardthinking  backwardthinking  evolution  progress  inventingthefuture  genesis  future 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Mastering the Art of Sparking Connections
"1. People are the key ingredients.

2. The more varied the group, the more valuable the connections and outcome.

3. To foster a spirit of improvisation, create a comfortable environment.

4. We value discussion over presentation

5. Each camp is a series of small and loosely-joined events.

6. We value intimacy over publicity.

7. Productive discussions happen more easily with thoughtful, informed facilitation.

8. End — don't start — with a trust fall.

9. The better the planning, the smoother and more spontaneous the outcome.

10. We value experimentation and evolution over perfection.



How Spark Camp Will Evolve"
events  sparkcamp  amandamichel  andypergam  mattthompson  amywebb  planning  values  diversity  improvisation  comfort  conferences  discussion  conversation  howto  loosely-joined  intimacy  publicity  facilitation  eventplanning  unconferences  experimentation  perfection  trust  inclusion  conferenceplanning  accessibility  inclusivity  inlcusivity 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Matt Thompson on NPR's Code Switch on Vimeo
"NPR’s Code Switch team manager Matt Thompson discusses the newly launched race, ethnicity, and culture initiative, and how it seeks to enrich NPR coverage while also bringing new audiences to public media.

July 12, 2013 at the Public Media Development and Marketing Conference (PMDMC) in Atlanta, GA. This session was sponsored by NPR."
mattthompson  2013  codeswitch  race  ethnicity  journalism  culture  npr  radio  blogging 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Code Switch : NPR
"Remember when folks used to talk about being "post-racial"? Well, we're definitely not that. We're a team of journalists fascinated by the overlapping themes of race, ethnicity and culture, how they play out in our lives and communities, and how all of this is shifting."

[Explained: http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/04/08/176064688/how-code-switching-explains-the-world

About and team: http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/04/07/176351804/about-us

FAQ: http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/04/07/176352338/faq ]
codeswitching  culture  language  relationships  npr  mattthompson  katchow  luisclemens  genedemby  karengrigsbybates  shereenmarisolmeraji  2013  hansilowang  behavior  perspective  codeswitch  blogs  interactions  race  ethnicity 
april 2013 by robertogreco
The Internet of ghosts « Snarkmarket
""Surfing Napster was a completely unfamiliar feeling, like walking into a giant library filled with the bookcases of strangers. It created a social space that felt (and still feels) unique to the Internet, a space where you’re interacting not with people themselves, or even with avatars of people, but with traces of them. This sensation suffuses the entire Web, but I’ve never seen it remarked on, and I’m curious if you all have."

"I call this the Internet of ghosts. So often online, we interact in ways that are intimate enough to feel significant, but so disconnected they’re essentially mysterious. Sometimes on Napster, you’d begin downloading a file only to see its owner sever the connection. For rarer files, I remember this being every bit as devastating as it must have been for Sam Anderson, watching these shades flit onto his screen and then, without a word, click away."
via:tealtan  socialsoftware  pseudonyms  anonymity  social  discovery  sharing  internet  web  online  del.icio.us  napster  mattthompson  2010 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Update | Contents Magazine
"More and more, what we post to the internet isn’t brand new: it’s an update—new information that builds on something posted earlier. Updates are everywhere… it’s time to give the update its due.
An update is simply a post with a history. But because data plus time almost always reveals a story, that history is rich with possibility. …

…the ascendancy of the update means that our content is increasingly likely to have a future. When we build the relationship between a post and its updates into our code, we allow our users to follow the development of our content over time. …

…the more we enhance our ability to follow ideas and stories over time, the more complex those ideas can become…

…what’s disorienting about our media today isn’t that our stories fail to end, but that we often sever the connections between them…

I leave these thoughts unfinished; I’ve summoned ideas and left them in suspense. Surely we’ll develop these ideas over time, but how are you ever to know?"
contentsmagazine  facebook  sbnation  changes  corrections  twitter  paulford  media  change  persistence  online  web  future  time  journalism  news  contents  2012  unfinished  updates  mattthompson 
august 2012 by robertogreco
What constitutes a “bloggy sensibility”? | Argo, the Blog
"They’ve got voice.…

They cut to the chase…

Distillation, synthesis and hierarchy are all prized qualities in online writing. Where a newspaper story might demand a narrative transition, readers on the Web are perfectly all right with bullet points. Great long-form writers package mountains of information into an elegantly shaped, smooth and flowing story. Great bloggers, on the other hand, unpack complex information into discrete points and lay those out in concise and orderly fashion. If he weren’t busy being President, I imagine Barack Obama would have made a terrific blogger. Danah Boyd is an extraordinarily nuanced thinker, yet her writings and speeches are marvelously easy to parse… [Quoted here: http://contentsmagazine.com/articles/field-report-project-argo/ ]

They’re constant communicators…

They command your attention…

They’re the life of the party."
florilegium  howto  2010  conversation  communication  attention  mattthompson  ezraklein  danahboyd  socialmedia  writingfortheweb  web  online  journalism  classideas  projectargo  blogging 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Field Report: Project Argo | Contents Magazine
"Project Argo’s Thompson is among those explaining why more open sharing of processes, code, and theory is good for everyone, for reasons both selfish and altruistic…

The gift of Project Argo’s resources and practices marks an opportunity to move more industries toward openness, but this sort of public learning and teaching doesn’t schedule or pay for itself. Genuinely helpful public resources appear when we recognize their value and set aside resources to make them happen. Whether we’re coding, editing, or running projects, that’s something each of us can work toward in the year to come."
florilegium  npr  cv  howweshouldwork  howwework  publicresources  altruism  collectivegood  2012  workinginpublic  publicteaching  publiclearning  processes  process  theory  code  opensource  sharing  journalism  mattthompson  projectargo  argo  contentsmagazine  erinkissane 
january 2012 by robertogreco
5 provocative ideas sparked by women in media | Poynter.
"From the many, many ideas Popova has sparked in my brain, one has stuck more stubbornly than any other: We need to start treating discovery, connection and sharing as creative acts."

"Why do these heady observations on nostalgia matter for busy media professionals? Because I’d argue there’s real opportunity in our affinity for nostalgia. Think of Instagram: I’d argue it’s taken off partly because its filters lend an artificial veneer of nostalgia to those in-the-moment digital photos; they instantly make a moment seem more distant or unrecoverable."

[via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/16433811360 ]
humor  comedy  longform  homicidewatch  discovery  connections  curation  instagram  2012  nostalgia  connection  sharing  cv  media  journalism  mariapopova  mattthompson  creativity 
january 2012 by robertogreco
The Storm Collection | RJI
"Matt Thompson and Robin Sloan, co-creators of the hugely popular web video "Epic 2014," released their newest video today, "SND Storm", at the annual convention of the Society of News Design in St. Louis."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/storm/ ]
robinsloan  mattthompson  snarkmarket  news  journalism  2011  storms  socialmedia  communication 
october 2011 by robertogreco
If I could keep just three - Noteworthy and Not
"I’ve been almost completely off line for the last three weeks. It’s a long story but I am now drinking coffee and connected at my local Kroger. Ah, the 21st century.<br />
<br />
I am sitting overloaded with interestingness in my reader feeds. I recalled a past comment from Matt Thompson about the pain of clicking mark as read when you firmly  realize you will never catch up on your reading. Just let it go!<br />
<br />
I have pondered over this coffee on the fantasty of keeping just three feeds for my connection source. They would be:<br />
<br />
Tim O’Reilly’s Twitter feed, 50 Watts, Snarkmarket, and the third would be Roberto Greco at Delicious<br />
<br />
The focus of these thought artists is enriching and enlightening and they would provide long reaching tentacles to the rest of the universe."
ego  bettyannsloan  del.icio.us  infooverload  mattthompson  snarkmarket  timoreilly  markalleread  rss  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
A noteworthy feed « Snarkmarket
"I would like to take a moment to recommend an eclectic tumblr called Noteworthy and Not. I would then like to take another moment to note that its author is my mom.

Over the last few years, my parents have both jumped into the bright bubbling conversation of the internet with both feet—reading lots and lots of stuff, across a whole spectrum of subjects, and increasingly sharing a bit of what they find. My dad is more of a Google Reader sharer, so I won’t out him here. But my mom has been posting to a tumblr for a while now, and you know, wow—it’s really good!

This fun, meditative little video was a recent find. I like the short, stirring comment on this post. This is a trip. Here’s homage to A Journey Round My Skull… and of course, Fuckyeahfrankchimero.

Highly recommended." [As is the comments thread on this post too.]
bettyannsloan  robinsloan  handmeups  handmedowns  generations  snarkmarket  commenting  timcarmody  tumblr  mattthompson  frankchimero  steppingout  snarkmarketcommentertoblogger 
march 2011 by robertogreco
A 5-minute framework for fostering better conversations in comments sections | Poynter.
Five key principles of online conversations: Don’t blame (or credit) “The Internet.”; For better outcomes, use better filters; The very best filter is an empowered, engaged adult; The difference between conversation and graffiti; The output of a great community is great content.

Five key aspects of online commenting environments: Authentication; Reputation and scoring; Moderation; Policies; Threading

Five tips for fostering great conversations: Learn the ladder of escalation; Practice aikido; You don’t have to prove anything; Assume good faith; Be accountable."
mattthompson  comments  community  conversation  journalism  web  blogs  interaction  moderation  threading  escalation  communitymanagement  management  relationships  goodfaith  accountability  respect  2011  metafilter  content  reputation  scoring  policies  online  internet  commenting 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Was Marc Ambinder actually a blogger? « Snarkmarket
"But there’s an equally excellent genre of journalism that foregrounds the author’s curiosities, concerns and assumptions — James Fallows’ immortal foretelling of the Iraq War, Atul Gawande’s investigation of expenditures in health care. This is ego-driven reporting, in the best possible way. For every Problem from Hell, there’s another Omnivore’s Dilemma. Far from demolishing counterarguments, Ambinder’s mention of “ego-free journalism” instantly summons to mind its opposite."

"I think this is what Ambinder’s experience reflects — his choices and his idiosyncrasies. He chose to blog about national politics — an extraordinarily crowded (and particularly solipsistic) field. To distinguish himself from the crowd, he chose to craft a persona known for its canny insider’s pose and behind-the-scenes insights. I think it was a terrific choice; I’ve enjoyed his Atlantic writing a lot. But there’s little essential about the format that compelled him to this choice."

[One of three Snarkmarket posts on Marc Ambinder's "I Am a Blogger No Longer", links to them all here: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6396 ]
snarkmarket  mattthompson  blogging  journalism  objectivity  writing 
november 2010 by robertogreco
The Ruleless Road « Snarkmarket
"In the long list of books I’ll never write, there’s one that’s about a the­ory of risk. The the­ory is that there’s a thresh­old of risk aver­sion beyond which our attempts to extin­guish risk actu­ally exac­er­bate it. It would be filled with the case stud­ies you might expect — things like the overuse of antibi­otics and how a finan­cial insur­ance prod­uct short-circuited the econ­omy. But the open­ing anec­dote would be about roads. And I’d basi­cally copy and paste it from from this Decem­ber ’04 Wired story: …"
comments  mattthompson  snarkmarket  risk  behavior  roads  driving  antibiotics  insurance  finance  riskaversion  helicopterparents  handmoderman  complexity  simplicity  helicopterparenting 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Matt « Argo, the Blog
Described by Robin [http://snarkmarket.com/2010/6021] as: "Psst. Matt is run­ning a secret course on web media awe­some­ness over at NPR’s Argo Project. It feels kinda like a col­lege class you’re not allowed to take yet because you’re only a sopho­more and you don’t have the pre­reqs… but you sneak in and sit in the back row and take notes any­way, because this is why you came to col­lege in the first place, to take classes like this! And the prof is so great!"
mattthompson  tips  writing  journalism  onlinetoolkit  howto  tutorials  web  internet  online  argoproject  webmedia 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: The Era of Slow News
"But you’re not saying anything new, you might say. We all know blogs have been successful at breathing life into some underreported stories. Then why do we keep repeating these canards about “The age of the Internet and the 24-hour news cycle”?
mattthompson  news  journalism  time  timestretching  timeshifting  online  digital  change  slownews  futureofjournalism  continuity  follow-up 
august 2010 by robertogreco
First Crack 101. Time Traveling Journalism with Matt Thompson « First Crack Podcast with Garrick Van Buren
"Matt Thompson (Snarkmarket, vita.mn) and I discuss one of Matt’s most compelling memes – telling stories over time. via:

* The rise and fall of monoculture
* Newspaper circulation – 1967 to 1991
* Future of journalism and the power of hyperlinks
* Joshua Micah Marshall vs. Trent Lott
* Google Finance"
mattthompson  time  journalism  newspapers  googlefinance  future  timeshifting  continuity  follow-up  futureofjournalism 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: The Attention Deficit: The Need for Timeless Journalism
"Journalism can now exist outside of time. The only reason we’re constrained to promoting news on a minutely, hourly, daily or weekly basis is because we’ve inherited that notion from media that really do operate in fixed time cycles. But we now have the potential to signal importance on whatever scale you might imagine — the most important stories of the year, of the decade, of the moment. What are the most important issues facing this community at this time? What would our sites look like if we asked ourselves that question? What would our journalism look like?"

[Robin's comment reminds me of http://wrongtomorrow.com/ and http://www.kottke.org/tag/post%20updates ]
2007  futureofjournalism  onlinejournalism  innovation  journalism  news  media  time  snarkmarket  mattthompson  robinsloan  timcarmody  follow-up  crisis  continuity  timeshifting  timestretching 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Following up on the need for follow-up » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Which ends up translating, less elegantly but more specifically, to the tyranny of the news peg. In our current approach to news, ideas and connections and continuities — context, more generally — often become subsidiary to “now” itself. Newness trumps all, to occasionally devastating effect. There’s an economic reason for that, sure (the core of it being that audiences like nowness just as much as journalists). But we also now have tools that invite an intriguing possibility: new taxonomies of time. We have Twitter’s real-time news flow. We have Wikipedia’s wide-angle perspective. We have, above all, the web itself, a platform that’s proven extraordinarily good at balancing urgency with memory. We’d do well to make more of it — if for no other reason than the fact that, as Thompson puts it, “a journalism unfettered by time would align much more closely with timeless reality.”"

[referes to: http://snarkmarket.com/blog/snarkives/journalism/the_attention_deficit_the_need_for_timeless_journalism/ ]
news  mattthompson  snarkmarket  magangarber  timcarmody  robinsloan  journalism  media  cycles  2010  context  crisis  reporting  time  research  follow-up  continuity  timeshifting  timestretching  futureofjournalism 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The Places I Have Come to Fear the Most « Snarkmarket
"I have a reflex­ive dis­like of sub­urbs. I grew up in Orlando, in one of its sub­urbs stacked on sub­urbs, all in dis­tant orbit around a tiny cen­ter of faux-urbanity we called down­town. (Which in turn hov­ered in dis­tant orbit around a giant cen­ter of faux-reality we called Dis­ney World.)

Orlando feels hor­ri­bly life­less to me. I often say that in Orlando, you have to drive 20 min­utes to get to the con­ve­nience store. I can’t think of a sin­gle good Mom-&-Pop shop around where I grew up. When I go back to visit, there are no places where my friends and I can sit idly and chat until the wee hours. For a while, we seri­ously took to fre­quent­ing the lob­bies of the nicer hotels...How could any­one choose a sub­urb over a city? I ask myself. Cities engen­der cre­ativ­ity and comity & effi­ciency. The Renais­sance could never have taken place in a sub­ur­ban­ized Europe.

But I occa­sion­ally get jolted out of my city-worship when I encounter a bit of real­ity like..."
mattthompson  snarkmarket  cities  suburbs  2005  orlando  boston  washingtondc  schools  parenting  urban  sustainability  nyc  suburbia  vibrancy  efficiency  invention  renaissance  creativity  dc 
may 2010 by robertogreco

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