recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : mattwebb   109

« earlier  
A lengthy ramble through many responses to that FaceTime Attention Correction tweet (4 Jul., 2019, at Interconnected)
"Rachel Coldicutt’s response sums it up for me. Auto-correct for facial expressions is Attention Correction is a nutshell. Not only because auto-correct has both positive and negative consequences, but also because — in this case — an idea of “correctness” in face-to-face communication is invented, and the idea that there is or should be “correctness” here is something I would push back on very strongly.

Coldicutt’s final point, which is to bring in power, is the most important point in all of this: looking through the lens of power is where discussion of this feature should begin and end.

And so my question is this:

since the category of “unreal” (deep fake, fictional, mediated) video is here to stay, and only going to grow, and knowing that gaze awareness is important and, yes, something that should be available to design with; listening to the many concerns and always sensitive to the dynamics of power and vulnerability; how could Apple present this Attention Correction feature differently today (it may be nothing more than displaying an icon on the receiving end) in order to help us develop the best cues and social norms to not only minimise damage, but to best position us for an inclusive, collaborative, technology-positive future?"
mattwebb  2019  video  videochat  facetime  apple  ai  manipulation  realism  bias  autism  attention  eyecontact  technology  deepfakes  mediation  rachelcoldicutt  communication  norms  correctness  power 
6 weeks ago by robertogreco
No one’s coming. It’s up to us. – Dan Hon – Medium
"Getting from here to there

This is all very well and good. But what can we do? And more precisely, what “we”? There’s increasing acceptance of the reality that the world we live in is intersectional and we all play different and simultaneous roles in our lives. The society of “we” includes technologists who have a chance of affecting the products and services, it includes customers and users, it includes residents and citizens.

I’ve made this case above, but I feel it’s important enough to make again: at a high level, I believe that we need to:

1. Clearly decide what kind of society we want; and then

2. Design and deliver the technologies that forever get us closer to achieving that desired society.

This work is hard and, arguably, will never be completed. It necessarily involves compromise. Attitudes, beliefs and what’s considered just changes over time.

That said, the above are two high level goals, but what can people do right now? What can we do tactically?

What we can do now

I have two questions that I think can be helpful in guiding our present actions, in whatever capacity we might find ourselves.

For all of us: What would it look like, and how might our societies be different, if technology were better aligned to society’s interests?

At the most general level, we are all members of a society, embedded in existing governing structures. It certainly feels like in the recent past, those governing structures are coming under increasing strain, and part of the blame is being laid at the feet of technology.

One of the most important things we can do collectively is to produce clarity and prioritization where we can. Only by being clearer and more intentional about the kind of society we want and accepting what that means, can our societies and their institutions provide guidance and leadership to technology.

These are questions that cannot and should not be left to technologists alone. Advances in technology mean that encryption is a societal issue. Content moderation and censorship are a societal issue. Ultimately, it should be for governments (of the people, by the people) to set expectations and standards at the societal level, not organizations accountable only to a board of directors and shareholders.

But to do this, our governing institutions will need to evolve and improve. It is easier, and faster, for platforms now to react to changing social mores. For example, platforms are responding in reaction to society’s reaction to “AI-generated fake porn” faster than governing and enforcing institutions.

Prioritizations may necessarily involve compromise, too: the world is not so simple, and we are not so lucky, that it can be easily and always divided into A or B, or good or not-good.

Some of my perspective in this area is reflective of the schism American politics is currently experiencing. In a very real way, America, my adoptive country of residence, is having to grapple with revisiting the idea of what America is for. The same is happening in my country of birth with the decision to leave the European Union.

These are fundamental issues. Technologists, as members of society, have a point of view on them. But in the way that post-enlightenment governing institutions were set up to protect against asymmetric distribution of power, technology leaders must recognize that their platforms are now an undeniable, powerful influence on society.

As a society, we must do the work to have a point of view. What does responsible technology look like?

For technologists: How can we be humane and advance the goals of our society?

As technologists, we can be excited about re-inventing approaches from first principles. We must resist that impulse here, because there are things that we can do now, that we can learn now, from other professions, industries and areas to apply to our own. For example:

* We are better and stronger when we are together than when we are apart. If you’re a technologist, consider this question: what are the pros and cons of unionizing? As the product of a linked network, consider the question: what is gained and who gains from preventing humans from linking up in this way?

* Just as we create design patterns that are best practices, there are also those that represent undesired patterns from our society’s point of view known as dark patterns. We should familiarise ourselves with them and each work to understand why and when they’re used and why their usage is contrary to the ideals of our society.

* We can do a better job of advocating for and doing research to better understand the problems we seek to solve, the context in which those problems exist and the impact of those problems. Only through disciplines like research can we discover in the design phase — instead of in production, when our work can affect millions — negative externalities or unintended consequences that we genuinely and unintentionally may have missed.

* We must compassionately accept the reality that our work has real effects, good and bad. We can wish that bad outcomes don’t happen, but bad outcomes will always happen because life is unpredictable. The question is what we do when bad things happen, and whether and how we take responsibility for those results. For example, Twitter’s leadership must make clear what behaviour it considers acceptable, and do the work to be clear and consistent without dodging the issue.

* In America especially, technologists must face the issue of free speech head-on without avoiding its necessary implications. I suggest that one of the problems culturally American technology companies (i.e., companies that seek to emulate American culture) face can be explained in software terms. To use agile user story terminology, the problem may be due to focusing on a specific requirement (“free speech”) rather than the full user story (“As a user, I need freedom of speech, so that I can pursue life, liberty and happiness”). Free speech is a means to an end, not an end, and accepting that free speech is a means involves the hard work of considering and taking a clear, understandable position as to what ends.

* We have been warned. Academics — in particular, sociologists, philosophers, historians, psychologists and anthropologists — have been warning of issues such as large-scale societal effects for years. Those warnings have, bluntly, been ignored. In the worst cases, those same academics have been accused of not helping to solve the problem. Moving on from the past, is there not something that we technologists can learn? My intuition is that post the 2016 American election, middle-class technologists are now afraid. We’re all in this together. Academics are reaching out, have been reaching out. We have nothing to lose but our own shame.

* Repeat to ourselves: some problems don’t have fully technological solutions. Some problems can’t just be solved by changing infrastructure. Who else might help with a problem? What other approaches might be needed as well?

There’s no one coming. It’s up to us.

My final point is this: no one will tell us or give us permission to do these things. There is no higher organizing power working to put systemic changes in place. There is no top-down way of nudging the arc of technology toward one better aligned with humanity.

It starts with all of us.

Afterword

I’ve been working on the bigger themes behind this talk since …, and an invitation to 2017’s Foo Camp was a good opportunity to try to clarify and improve my thinking so that it could fit into a five minute lightning talk. It also helped that Foo Camp has the kind of (small, hand-picked — again, for good and ill) influential audience who would be a good litmus test for the quality of my argument, and would be instrumental in taking on and spreading the ideas.

In the end, though, I nearly didn’t do this talk at all.

Around 6:15pm on Saturday night, just over an hour before the lightning talks were due to start, after the unconference’s sessions had finished and just before dinner, I burst into tears talking to a friend.

While I won’t break the societal convention of confidentiality that helps an event like Foo Camp be productive, I’ll share this: the world felt too broken.

Specifically, the world felt broken like this: I had the benefit of growing up as a middle-class educated individual (albeit, not white) who believed he could trust that institutions were a) capable and b) would do the right thing. I now live in a country where a) the capability of those institutions has consistently eroded over time, and b) those institutions are now being systematically dismantled, to add insult to injury.

In other words, I was left with the feeling that there’s nothing left but ourselves.

Do you want the poisonous lead removed from your water supply? Your best bet is to try to do it yourself.

Do you want a better school for your children? Your best bet is to start it.

Do you want a policing policy that genuinely rehabilitates rather than punishes? Your best bet is to…

And it’s just. Too. Much.

Over the course of the next few days, I managed to turn my outlook around.

The answer, of course, is that it is too much for one person.

But it isn’t too much for all of us."
danhon  technology  2018  2017  johnperrybarlow  ethics  society  calltoaction  politics  policy  purpose  economics  inequality  internet  web  online  computers  computing  future  design  debchachra  ingridburrington  fredscharmen  maciejceglowski  timcarmody  rachelcoldicutt  stacy-marieishmael  sarahjeong  alexismadrigal  ericmeyer  timmaughan  mimionuoha  jayowens  jayspringett  stacktivism  georginavoss  damienwilliams  rickwebb  sarawachter-boettcher  jamebridle  adamgreenfield  foocamp  timoreilly  kaitlyntiffany  fredturner  tomcarden  blainecook  warrenellis  danhill  cydharrell  jenpahljka  robinray  noraryan  mattwebb  mattjones  danachisnell  heathercamp  farrahbostic  negativeexternalities  collectivism  zeyneptufekci  maciejcegłowski 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Gratitude and a possibly inappropriate technological intervention (25 Aug., 2017, at Interconnected)
"I was reading Melanie Klein's Envy and Gratitude and Other Works (which I still haven't finished) and there's something about Kleinian gratitude which is crucial in developing the primal relationship between mother (the good object) and child. It is also the basis for the child perceiving goodness in others and herself.

Conscious gratitude seems to be more focused on the other (rather than a self-centred idea of being the cause of goodness or its reverse): developing gratitude might allow for greater capacity for appreciation, acceptance, and sharing of love.

Gratitude is inherently outwards looking. And surprisingly hard! It touches all kinds of other feelings like deservedness, and is easily corrupted with responses like entitlement.

So I was thinking: a habit of gratitude would be an interesting thing to foster. Gratitude being a component of prayer, I know, but I don't pray. So. I need to get it somewhere else.

Anyway.

We can fix this with technology. I know, I know. Forgive me.

What I do is I have a folder in Ulysses, which is a writing app I have on my iPhone (and I use for everything). The folder is called: What I Am Grateful For.

Please also forgive the ugly dangling preposition. It upsets me too.

In that folder are tons of notes. Each note has a date, and a line of text: the thing I am grateful for that day. Sometimes big, mostly small. Sometimes easy to observe, sometimes really, really difficult. Always interesting to note when I’m going through a phase where gratitude is a challenge to attain, and with what that correlates.

Back to the tech.

Once a day, at midday, I get a notification which says "What are you grateful for today?" I tap the notification, and a text box opens up on my phone. I type into the text box and it gets saves into the folder.

Here's how that bit of automation works:

• I use an app called Workflow which is like a way to link together different apps and program them in a flowchart sort of way

• I've written a particular workflow called "Grateful Daily" that does all the work of opening the text input box and saving it to Ulysses. You can get the workflow here. If you copy the workflow, you'll have to update the special Ulysses code bit to make sure it saves to the right folder

• Another app called Launch Center Pro is able to trigger workflows on a timer. I have it set to run Grateful Daily at midday

Cross-app automation is a nascent but interesting area. I'm finding myself able to do pretty complex workflows from my phone now (I also have a process to edit and deploy code, using multiple different apps). It's got a way to go as a pattern of user behaviour, but I'd like to see iOS or Android take automation more seriously. To see where it could go. It has a different nature to automation on PCs, and I think there's the opportunity for these automation scripts to unbind from the smartphone and move into the cloud (somehow). Maybe use a bit more intelligence too. Centaur automation.

Yeah but so: gratitude.

To receive - and to be open to receiving! - something which is good, and to take it that goodness and to internalise it, but to also appreciate the goodness itself, and its source and the source’s reasons. A tricky business.

I don't even pretend to have even half a handhold on Klein, or Kleinian gratitude, or hell even gratitude, but her words opened something in me. (Thanks!)"
mattwebb  2017  gratitude  melanieklein  technology  relationships  goodness  entitlement  prayer  spirituality  receptiveness  appreciation  acceptance  love 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Art + tech (13 Oct., 2015, at Interconnected)
"There's something about art + tech which is niggling at me. The process I'm interested in is when a technology organisation commissions or supports art as a way to understand itself.

I don't quite understand this itch or why I've got it, so I've spent a day looking at examples."
mattwebb  art  design  technology  1951  belllabs  1960s  1990s  lilianschwartz  rachelduckhouse  kitchens  amtrak  randcorporation  1971  andywarhol  advertising  marketing  davidchoe  eames  eamesoffice  2011  1968  electricobjects  eo1  brendandawes  mailchimp 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Tomtown ( 8 Oct., 2015, at Interconnected)
"The web is busy now. No bad thing. But much too busy to have a single place to gather my friends around photos, another around status updates, etc. I used to have one community online, and now I've got a hundred. And while I can shard them by app (business on LinkedIn, family on Facebook, my global village on Twitter), it's a lot of effort to maintain that. And it doesn't make any sense.

Until:

Tom Coates invited me to join a little community of his in Slack. There are a handful of people there, some old friends, some new friends, all in this group messaging thingy.

There's a space where articles written or edited by members automatically show up. I like that.

I caught myself thinking: It'd be nice to have Last.FM here too, and Dopplr. Nothing that requires much effort. Let's also pull in Instagram. Automatic stuff so I can see what people are doing, and people can see what I'm doing. Just for this group. Back to those original intentions. Ambient awareness, togetherness.

Nobody says very much. Sometimes there's a flurry of chat.

It's small, human-scale. Maybe it's time to bring all these ambient awareness tools back, shared inside Slack instances this time.

You know what, it's cosy. I've been missing this. A neighbourhood."
2015  mattwebb  ambientawareness  ambient  community  culture  presentationofself  twitter  flickr  slack  tomcoates  email  neighborhoods  scale  groups  groupsize  glancing  jaiku  dopplr  im  instantmessenger  last.fm  openplans  offices  attention  socialmedia  noise 
october 2015 by robertogreco
actually (27 Oct., 2003, at Interconnected)
"Dunbar contends that humans evolved vocal grooming (language) as a more efficient form of bonding. Assuming that our closest ancester, the chimpanzee, has hit the time budget limiting factor, and that our extra efficiency has all come about with the transition to vocal grooming, this means language is 2.8 times more efficient for bonding than the mechanism nonhuman primates use. That is, "a speaker should be able to interact with 2.8 times as many other individuals as a groomer can. Since the number of grooming partners is necessarily limited to one, this means that the limit on the number of listeners should be about 2.8. In other words, human conversation group sizes should be limited to about 3.8 in size (one speaker plus 2.8 listeners)." (Which makes sense if you think about the different qualities of a conversation with three versus four participants. A study is quoted to back this up.)"
mattwebb  2003  dunbar  dunbarnumber  grooming  primates  humans  groups  groupsize  conversation  speaking  interaction 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Small groups and consultancy and coffee mornings ( 7 Oct., 2015, at Interconnected)
"One permanent pattern in our workshop culture:
Best design consultancy tip I know: Don't criticise without offering something better. Called the Ahtisaari Manoeuvre after an early client


Always have something on the table.

Another: Always use fat pens.

Another: It's important to have the right people in the room -- representing knowledge of technical possibilities, business needs, and market insights. But at the same time, the ideal number of people to have in the room is five or six. Any more than that, you can't continue a single conversation without it turning into a presentation.

Another: The one who understands the client's business best is the client."



"There are a couple of things I'm investigating:

1. That a small group is a powerful way of thinking, and of creating action. That repetition matters, and informality.

2. It might be possible to help with strategy without providing original thought or even active facilitation: To consult without consulting. The answers and even ways of working are inherent in the group itself.

My hunch is this: To answer a business's strategic questions, which will intrinsically involve changing that business, a more permanent solution than a visiting consultant might be to convene a small group, and spend time with it, chatting informally."




"Once a week we get together -- a half dozen students, often Durrell, whoever is teaching the course with him which was Stuart before and Oscar now, plus a special guest.

It's just for coffee somewhere or other, on Friday mornings, and we chat. It's super casual, sharing ideas and references, talking about the brief and design in general.

I'm curious about informality.

The lunchtimes at BERG, everyone around the table with such a broad range of skills and interests... and after Friday Demos - part of the weekly rhythm - the sparked conversations and the on-topic but off-topic sharing... this is where ideas happen too. Between projects but not outside them.

And I think informality as part of the design process is under-communicated, at least where I've been listening. So much work is done like that. The students are great at speaking about their work, sure. But mainly I'm interesting in how we induct someone into a worldview, quickly; how we explain ideas and then listen carefully for feedback, accepting ideas back -- all conversationally, without (and this is the purpose of the special guest) it turning into a seminar or a crit.

I think the best way to communicate this "lunch table" work informality is to rehearse it, to experience it. Which is what the coffee mornings are about.

I try to make sure everyone speaks, and I ask questions to see if I can encourage the removal of lazy abstraction -- words that get in the way of thinking about what's really going on. I'm a participant-observer.

Tbh I'm not sure what to call this. Visiting convener? It's not an official role.

I think (I hope!) everyone is getting something out of the experience, and everyone is becoming more their own kind of designer because of it, and meanwhile I get to explore and experience a small group. A roughly consistent membership, a roughly regular meeting time, an absence of purpose, or rather a purpose that the group is allowed to negotiate at a place within itself.

~

These RCA coffee mornings grew out of my experiment with hardware-ish coffee mornings, a semi-irregular meetup in London having a vague "making things" skew... Internet of Things, hardware startups, knitting, the future of manufacturing and distribution, a morning off work. That sort of thing. People chat, people bring prototypes. There's no single conversation, and only rarely do we do introductions. This invite to a meet in January also lists my principles:

• Space beats structure
• Informality wins
• Convening not chairing
• Bonfires not fireworks

I've been trying to build a street corner, a place to cultivate serendipity and thoughts. Not an event with speakers, there are already several really good ones."



"My setup was that I believed the answer to the issue would come from the group, that they knew more about their business than me.

Which was true. But I also observed that the purpose of the business had recently changed, and while it could be seen by the CEO that the current approach to this design problem wasn't satisfying, there was no way for the group to come together to think about it, and answer it together. Previously they had represented different strands of development within the startup. Now the company was moving to having a new, singular, measurable goal.

So I started seeing the convened discussions as rehearsing a new constellation of the team members and how they used one-another for thinking, and conscious and unconscious decision making. The group meetings would incubate a new way to think together. Do it enough, point out what works, and habits might form.

~

Consulting without consulting."



"I'm not entirely sure where to take these experiments. I'm learning a lot from various coffee mornings, so I'll carry on with those.

I had some conversations earlier in the year about whether it would be possible to act as a creative director, only via regular breakfast conversations, and helping the group self-direct. Dunno. Or maybe there's a way to build a new division in a company. Maybe what I'm actually talking about is board meetings -- I've been a trustee to Startup Weekend Europe for a couple of years, and the quarterly meetings are light touch. But they don't have this small group aspect, it might be that they haven't been as effective as they could be.

There might be something with the street corners and serendipity pattern... When I was doing that three month gig with the government earlier this year, it felt like the people in the civil service - as a whole - had all the knowledge and skills to take advantage of Internet of Things technologies, to deliver services faster and better. But often the knowledge and opportunities weren't meeting up. Maybe an in-person, regular space could help with that.

At a minimum, if I'm learning how to help companies and friends with startups in a useful way that doesn't involve delivering more darn Powerpoint for the meat grinder: Job done.

But perhaps what's happening is I'm teaching myself how to do something else entirely, and I haven't figured out what that is yet.

~

Some art. Some software."
mattwebb  small  groups  groupsize  2015  collaboration  consulting  vonnegut  kurtvonnegut  organization  howwewrite  writing  meaningmaking  patternrecognition  stevenjohnson  devonthink  groupdynamics  psychology  wilfredbion  dependency  pairing  serendipity  trickster  doublebinds  informality  informal  coffeemornings  meetings  crosspollination  conversation  facilitation  catalysts  scenius  experienceingroups 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Home (Machine Supply)
"I'm making Machine Supply so I can easily share book recommendations.

e.g. you can see a book recommendation on this website here, and here's what one looks like on Twitter:"

[About: http://interconnected.org/home/2015/07/22/machine_supply

"I read a bunch of books -- here are the books I read in 2008 which was a particularly good year. Some books are comfort blankets (Red Mars, Kim Stanley Robinson), some are like the best hikes: a steady workout on the muscles accompanied by epiphany after epiphany after epiphany (Philosophy & Simulation, Manuel DeLanda). Ursula le Guin makes me forget where I am. Three Men in a Boat (Jerome K. Jerome) makes me laugh out loud, and was the first book recommended to me by Angela. We're now married. So.

Last week I was having a beer with Ben and Tom (literally everyone in this industry is called Ben or Tom or Matt), swapping sci-fi recommendations. It wasn't for finding new books, or at least not exclusively -- knowing what books someone loves is to know a person. I read 104 books in 2008, that was tough going. In the maybe 70 reading years I have available - mod a life-extending singularity cascading its way into reality - I could read a maximum 7,280 books. At all, ever. There are 6,000 books published every day. Knowing what books someone loves is to know their perspective and their journey, to have something special in common, to share a language.

I heard once that geeks come in two flavours: those who read A Thousand Plateaus; those who read Godel, Escher, Bach.

I'm ATP through and through. It changed my life. Here's chapter 1 as a PDF, I used to keep it printed by the door to give out to Jehovah's Witnesses. It's a philosophy roller coaster, a call to arms. Didn't get on with GEB.

I'm Starship Troopers not Dune, The Beatles not the Stones.

Recommendations
Anyway, I like to collect book recommendations. Sometimes I even read the books. At conferences, for years, I've asked people for their 3 recommendations.

Not favourites. Not the books they think I ought to read. Just 3 recommendations, whatever's on their mind. I try to find a board and some post-its and get people to share. Here are some recommendations from Design Engaged in 2004 where I met so many friends for the first time. Here's Matt Jones' version of the same question from Foo in 2014 -- I wasn't there, but touchingly the board is titled "The Matt Webb question: What 3 books should I read this year?" Thank you! I'll be at Foo in a couple of weeks, let's do the same session.

I love to share my recommendations with other people. Here are the books I read in April and May 2015.

So I made a website.

Machine Supply
At Machine Supply I can make a book recommendation by pasting in an Amazon link and writing a short paragraph. Then when I share a link to that (on my blog or on Twitter), my reason comes joined together with two Amazon links... one to the US site and one to the UK site. That's always been a niggle for me, to bundle those things together, to make a recommendation which is easy to share.

I'm classing this as a hobby, which means I'm trying to make the kind of website that I'd use. I'm not a hugely early adopter generally. I don't spend much time kicking the tyres of online services, I need encouragement to keep using things because I'm enormously forgetful, and I'm hugely sceptical about putting words I write into other people's databases rather than plain text on my own laptop.

All of which means -- that's what I'm making. A website to make it easy for me to share book recommendations. Here's my recommendation for The Peripheral (William Gibson), and here it is again as it appears on Twitter.

What was amazing -- and honestly what I hoped would happen, and what I'll make sure the site encourages to happen, but didn't know whether it would happen or not - what was amazing is that a few friends tried out Machine Supply when I tweeted about it yesterday.

And already I've seen @blech recommended Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo. (Now bought on Amazon.) And @chrbutler recommended The Book of Strange New Things - which I also love - and by the way mentioned four other books, one of which is a deeply loved favourite of mine, and the other three I hadn't heard of. So those are now on my books-to-check-out list.

What next?
As it says on the front page, Current status: Pre-pre-alpha, hobby. Links will break. Cities will fall.

I've got a hobby! Haven't had one of those in a while.

Have a play. Let me know if anything breaks. My aim is to make a handy, finely-tuned little crystal. Any and all ideas welcome.

Machine Supply is over here."]
mattwebb  books  recommendations  webdesign  webdev 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Consensus cosmogony ( 2 Feb., 2015, at Interconnected)
"I'm glad I stumbled across the term cosmogony because it gives a name to what I do when I find myself in a new organisation, socio-economic network, consultancy gig, value chain, whatever. I call it mapping or orienting, but really I'm not doing that. I'm looking for something:

What is the consensus cosmogony of the Internet of Things? What is its future? What does the consensus understand are the first steps?

I'm not trying to figure out the rights and wrongs. I'm just trying to understand the grain of what we understand and what we expect."
mattwebb  cosmogongy  2015  understanding  systemsthinking  consensusconsmogony  sensemaking  grain  howwething  howwework 
february 2015 by robertogreco
The best event I've ever attended ( 6 Feb., 2015, at Interconnected)
"I've been to a ton of events. Weekend campouts where, like Fight Club, everyone presents. Conferences which are a bundle of laughs with my friends I see once a year, and a massive mental accelerant. That one that James took me to in the basement under a shop that was all about magic and Plato and made me see the universe behind this one for like a month. Everyone in my world now knows how to make slides and give a talk; it used to be super raw and I loved that. Now talks aren't an hour, they're 18 minutes and everyone has the TED guidelines engraved on their soul: Black turtleneck and start with a personal story. Not bad, just different.

By the best event, I mean the one that has had the longest lasting effect on my thinking. And sure that's mostly about the content and the time in my life, but also a ton about the format:

Nature, space, society at Tate Modern, London, ran across three successive Fridays in 2004. Each started at 2.30pm, and took the same format: a lecture for one hour - with few or zero slides - followed by 90 minutes of panel discussion and audience questions. Then: done, go home.

The videos of the three speakers are online:

• Manuel DeLanda [http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/manuel-delanda-nature-space-society ]
• N. Katherine Hayles [http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/n-katherine-hayles-nature-space-society ]
• Bruno Latour [http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/video/bruno-latour-nature-space-society ]

The lectures are long by 2015 standards -- the speakers were captivating.

But the format! There was something about the weekly rhythm which meant that there was time for me to digest each download of new thoughts. The session stayed with me for the week... and the ideas were then multiplied by the following lecture.

Over the two weeks I was taken somewhere... somewhere not accessible in a dense day of short talks. An hour is time to explore and speculate, time for poetry. A week is time to discuss with friends, contemplate, see the deeper patterns. The repetition pumps the swing. But only three talks: Not a lengthy course, contained enough that it's still a single event.

And - honestly - Friday afternoons are a good time to take away from work. No getting distracted and anxious about email.

So over a decade later I look back, and I realise that these thinkers have guided me. Change happened in me.

If I was putting on an event now, this is what I'd want to do."
mattwebb  conferences  2015  events  pace  time  manueldelanda  ncatherinehayles  brunolatour  reflection  conferenceplanning  eventplanning  repetition  patternsensing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Filtered for top-notch long reads ( 5 Dec., 2014, at Interconnected)
"1.

This well-illustrated piece on Chinese Mobile UI trends [http://dangrover.com/blog/2014/12/01/chinese-mobile-app-ui-trends.html ] is full of great nuggets.

My favourite is that companies have adopted automated "chat" as their official public face. Each brand is a bot that runs inside one of the several apps that users in China have instead of Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, etc. How it works:
You can send any kind of message (text, image, voice, etc), and [the bot will] reply, either in an automated fashion or by routing it to a human somewhere. The interface is exactly the same as for chatting with your friends, save for one difference: it has menus at the bottom with shortcuts to the main features of the account.

A couple more features:
Other than that, every feature you can use in a normal chat is available here. WeChat even auto-transcribes the voice messages (mentioned before) into text before passing them to the third-party server running the account. Official accounts can also push news updates to their subscribers. Every media outlet operates one ...

I'm into this, I'm into this. Our western way for interacting with companies (assuming the shitty voice menu things are wildly out-dated) is websites, which we browse. But instead of browsing, a conversation?

So... cultural difference between China and the west, or just one of those forks in the road? Or a glimpse of the future?

2.

Hooked on Labs [http://thelongandshort.org/issues/season-two/hooked-on-labs.html ] (thanks Iain) draws a line between the practice of Robert Hooke in the 1660s and the modern trend for companies to have "labs."
Labs are places where people conduct experiments to test out theories. The new labs proliferating outside the hard sciences are a symptom of the spread of experimentalism as an ideology for how we should shape the future. Curiosity is at the core of experimentalist culture: it holds that knowledge should develop by being testable and therefore provisional ...

I like that the answer to "how should we invent?" can be not a process but a location. Other answers might be "a studio," and "the field," both of which suggest a variety of processes and practices without being pinned down.

I guess my recent preoccupation with coffee mornings is about the same thing. Can the "coffee morning" as a place, with all its informality (which I am desperate to preserve), be a way to dowse the scenius, to allow invention to occur without process?

Also coffee.

And this bit:
One vital source of this conversational approach to science was Copenhagen and the culture that Niels Bohr created around his institute for theoretical physics and his nearby home.

...which reminds me of this terrific story about the development of the theory of electron spin and how it came together as Bohr travelled across Europe by train.

At the beginning of the trip:
Bohr's train to Leiden made a stop in Hamburg, where he was met by Pauli and Stern who had come to the station to ask him what he thought about spin. Bohr must have said that it was very very interesting (his favorite way of expressing that something was wrong), but he could not see how an electron moving in the electric field of the nucleus could experience the magnetic field necessary for producing fine structure.

And as Bohr travels from town to town, he meets scientists, hears arguments, develops his view, and carries information. Great story.

I think of the interactions between scientists as the hidden particles that don't show up in the traces of a cloud chamber. They're there, busy - multiple - far denser and richer and messier than the clean interactions of the citations in scientific papers or at conferences - the invisible trillions of forks that are left out of Feynman diagrams. Those interactions are what really matter, and their stories are the most interesting of all."
mattwebb  2014  china  chinese  interface  input  chat  communication  internet  web  online  browsing  conversation  wechat  labs  openstudioproject  charlesleadbeater  nielsbohr  experiments  experimentation  experimentalism  curiosity  classideas  invention  place  studios  lcproject  informal  informallearning  informality  scenius  process  howwelearn  messiness  interaction  culture  difference  frontiers  us 
december 2014 by robertogreco
On BERG's hibernation
"Today BERG Cloud (Formerly BERG, formerly Schulze and Webb) announced it was shutting shop. I spent about 2 years all together working for or with BERG, so I wanted to share some thoughts on my time there. All of this is purely from my point of view, is not official, and I am certain the others would have differing opinions.

I never went to university, but after working with BERG on Mag+ my interest in interaction design grew. I nearly applied for the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design but when BERG offered me a full time position, my recurring theme of choosing experience over formal education got the better of me. And it was not a mistake.

To describe a company as a family is incredibly cheesy, but of everywhere I’ve worked it applies most to BERG. My favourite times were definitely on Scrutton Street, when the 13 (or there about) of us were squeezed into an office far too small for us. We had an airport express that anyone could play tunes on, and only one conversation could really happen at once. Of course there were times we would rub each other the wrong way, but one thing that never wavered was the immense respect I had for everyone.

This enabled us to work in a way I’ve never seen anywhere else, and what I half-jokingly dubbed ‘emotion driven development’. If Kanban is the more fluid state of a trusted and able team compared to scrum, then what we had was a step beyond that. We trusted in our own, and importantly each others, strong opinions and (this sounds cheesy again) feelings to drive us forward. This is probably a fragile and unscalable way of working, but without it, I think much of the work would be very different, and BERG wouldn’t have attracted the attention it did. We worked in a different way, and the work was often different because of it.

BERG had an interesting cult following. It certainly punched way above its weight in the design world for such a small company. It was able to create work that turned the heads of both the industry and mass audiences alike. One thing I was always impressed with was how easily new aesthetics were created, something that others spend entire careers developing was almost effortless to my colleagues. Making Future Magic (a project I had nothing to do with) perhaps most exemplifies this.

I am now focusing on working in the public sector, and I went into much detail as to why, but I will always miss my time at BERG. For me it will always feel like my university time; a time to spend learning and experimenting on what we found interesting with very few constraints.

For a group of people who were professionals on thinking about “what’s next”, I think we’re a bit knocked back as we truly don’t know what’s next. It’s an interesting (and scary in a very high up Maslow’s hierarchy kind of way) time. BERG was a major part of East London’s tech culture, and its demise is another blow to it. I imagine there are plenty of people wondering where their friends are going next. I know I am."

[See also: http://morning.computer/2014/09/for-berg-my-london-launchpad/ ]
berg  berglondon  autodidacts  srg  experience  learningbydoing  jamesdarling  2014  design  howwework  tcsnmy  families  workenvironments  teams  respect  groups  howwlearn  learning  mattwebb  emotions  feelings  culture  workculture  creativity 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Slide 1 of 50 (Sci-fi I like, Fictional Futures, Goldsmiths)
"This presentation isn’t about telling. Just read and look at the pictures, and maybe new ideas will come. That’s all it’s about."

"Climb up on the Moon? Of course we did."
http://interconnected.org/notes/2006/02/scifi/?p=8

"You point towards the galactic centre for two centuries then away for another two."
http://interconnected.org/notes/2006/02/scifi/?p=9

"Years are pretty arbitrary, and long periods to count. I can’t really conceive of them. But these stars come along every few months, which is a more human scale."
http://interconnected.org/notes/2006/02/scifi/?p=11

"To get to your house, you had to climb up on top of the city, walk along until you got to your chimney and climb down."
http://interconnected.org/notes/2006/02/scifi/?p=34

“When I hit the drum like this
I think the sound
was there from the beginning,
and everything has gone to make that sound,
and after it
everything is different.”
http://interconnected.org/notes/2006/02/scifi/?p=39
perception  scale  humanscale  moon  years  time  streets  turkey  cities  Çatalhöyük  ronherron  archigram  italocalvino  schul  schulzeandwebb  berg  berglondon  ursulaleguin  fictionalfutures  mattwebb  sciencefiction  fiction  culture  literature  science  technology  future  design  scifi 
december 2012 by robertogreco
I'm in love with the idea that the English word "hawk" is an import from crow language. Are there any other names that we've learnt from other species? | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"I'm in love with the idea that the English word "hawk" is an import from crow language. Are there any other names that we've learnt from other species?"

(2312, Kim Stanley Robinson. Robinson often gets ideas from scientific papers, so I'd love to read the one this came from.)
english  birds  kimstanleyrobinson  mattwebb  2012  interspecieslearning  animals  words  language  crows 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Week 371 – Blog – BERG
"A black start is (and let me quote from the article here) “the process of restoring a power station to operation without relying on the external electric power transmission network.”"

"And all this is tough, you know, starting up an autopoietic system from scratch, trying to get every single part to move simultaneously.

So getting a studio like this up-and-running feels like a black start.

One day we’ll be our own power station, humming along and lighting up a city of smart products, ones touched by particular BERG values — happiness and hope, whimsy, socialising, play, excitement, culture, invention.

In the meantime: we do what has to be done. Fire up the diesel generators! Jump start the heavy turbines by flashing the electricity grid with a solar flare to create a potential difference across 2,000 miles! (Can we arrange that? I suppose not, but it’s worth a go.)

You take on work to build capabilities to generate experience and expertise… You jumpstart…"

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/2012/7934 ]
newness  mattwebb  2012  starting  learning  startups  berglondon  berg  mattjones  blackstart  blackstarts 
august 2012 by robertogreco
After I die (22 Apr., 2012, at Interconnected)
"When I imagine the dead me, I imagine a body with a brain which is thinking really, really slowly. As my body and my brain decompose, these are simply changes in the structure—so decomposition would feel like learning and developing, in some sort of way. And as adjacent neurons break down and affect one-another, or as a worm burrows its way through my dead brain, maybe these would feel like occasional thoughts.

And so, during this time, the pattern which is my consciousness becomes absorbed into the pattern which is the world, & mingles w/ structures already there, new connections are made & others broken, just as thinking already is, & the changing me-pattern I experience as slow thoughts and slow developments of the self, & I become part of a wide, slow, thinking earth.

That's option one, to be buried and to decompose gently.

Option two:

I would like to be cremated, my ashes made into bread, and the bread shared out and eaten by all my friends. I think that would be wonderful."
brain  thinking  longnow  slow  consciousness  cremation  decomposition  2012  mattwebb  death 
april 2012 by robertogreco
“Sometimes the stories are the science…” – Blog – BERG
"About a decade ago – I saw Oliver Sacks speak at the Rockerfeller Institute in NYC, talk about his work.

A phrase from his address has always stuck with me since. He said of what he did – his studies and then the writing of books aimed at popular understanding of his studies that ‘…sometimes the stories are the science’.

Sometimes our film work is the design work.

Again this is a commercial act, and we are a commercial design studio.

But it’s also something that we hope unpacks the near-future – or at least the near-microfutures – into a public where we can all talk about them."
oliversacks  learning  deschooling  unschooling  education  berg  berglondon  mattjones  timoarnall  storytelling  design  understanding  newgrammars  conversation  meaning  meaningmaking  glvo  tcsnmy  classideas  art  paulklee  domains  interdisciplinarity  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  perspective  mindset  wbrianarthur  jackschulze  mattwebb  technology  future  dansaffer  rulespace  simulation  believability  materialquality  film  video  invention  creativity  time  adamlisagor  brucesterling  vernacularvideo  victorpapanek  jasonkottke  andybaio  johnsculley  apple  stevejobs  knowledgenavigator  prototypes  prototyping  iteration  process  howwework  howwelearn  communication  simulations 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Design Firm Seeks to Humanize Technology - NYTimes.com
“Historically, design has associated itself with utility and problem-solving, but we prefer the landscape of cultural invention, play and excitement,” Mr. Schulze said. “When technology is infinitely complex, and our attention increasingly finite, producing something you can act on and observe at a human and cultural level is hard.”
berg  berglondon  design  2011  mattwebb  jackschulze  culture  culturalinvention  glvo  human  technology 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The art of working in public « Snarkmarket ["Work in public. Reveal nothing."]
"…two very different dudes…different positions…different objectives…both written in essentially the same style, with common characteristics both superficial—a smart but very informal voice that reads like a long email from your smartest coolest friend ever—& structural:

…both conjure a sense that the piece is almost being written as you read it…slightly chaotic & totally thrilling…both let you inside their heads…But!—they don’t let you all the way inside. There’s plenty withheld…here’s the genius of the style: they don’t tell you much at all…

I tend to zero in on this kind of writing because I aspire to do more of it myself, & to do it better. Working in public like this can be a lot of fun, for writer & reader alike, but more than that: it can be a powerful public good…When you work in public, you create an emissary (media cyborg style) that then walks the earth, teaching others to do your kind of work as well. And that is transcendently cool."

[See the great comments too.]

[See also Clive Thompson's post, which references this one: http://www.collisiondetection.net/mt/archives/2011/08/the_art_of_publ.php ]
writing  business  public  robinsloan  publicthinking  mattwebb  berg  berglondon  alexismadrigal  classideas  transparency  surprise  revelation  style  newliberalarts  chaos  publicgood  learning  teaching  mediacyborgs  sharing  web  internet  informality  balance  spontaneity  immediacy  thinkinginpublic  thinkingoutloud  2011  comments  questions  possibility  pondering  emptiness  workinginpublic 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Week 315 – Blog – BERG
"Your sensitivity & tolerance improve only with practice. I wish I’d been given toy businesses to play w/ at school, just as playing w/ crayons taught my body how to let me draw.

I’ve written in these weeknotes before how I manage three budgets: cash, attention, risk. This is my attempt to explain how I feel about risk, and to trace the pathways between risk and cash. Attention, & how it connects, can wait until another day…

I said I wouldn’t speak about attention, but here’s a sneak peak of what I would say. Attention is the time of people in the studio, & how effectively it is applied. It is affected by the arts of project & studio management; it can be tracked by time-sheets & capacity plans; it can be leveraged with infrastructure, internal tools, and carefully grown tacit knowledge; and it magically grows when there’s time to play, when there is flow in the work, and when a team aligns into a “sophisticated work group.”
Attention is connected to cash through work."
design  business  management  berg  berglondon  mattwebb  attention  flow  groups  groupculture  sophisticatedworkgroups  money  risk  riskmanagement  riskassessment  confidence  happiness  anxiety  worry  leadership  tinkering  designthinking  thinking  physical  work  instinct  frustration  lcproject  studio  decisionmaking  systems  systemsthinking  manufacturing  making  doing  newspaperclub  svk  distribution  integratedsystems  infrastructure  supplychain  deleuze  guattari  cyoa  failure  learning  invention  ineptitude  ignorance  deleuze&guattari  gillesdeleuze  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction  félixguattari 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Friday Links believes that the aliens are already among us – Blog – BERG
"Cats are parasites on the flows of social interaction between living things.

Between all particles in the universe, there is a constant interchange of exchange particles carrying force, virtual particles popping in and out of existence, negotiating interaction.

Between all people, there is a constant flow of favours, emotion, status, power, love, hate, redirected attention. Cats feed on these, like whales filtering plankton from the sea."
cats  communication  emotions  emotion  parasites  socialinteraction  mattwebb  love  hate  power  status 
june 2011 by robertogreco
books read feb to apr 2011 ( 7 May., 2011, at Interconnected)
"Bluebeard is probably my favourite Vonnegut… [Mine too!]

Anyway, at this moment Vonnegut puts into Karabekian's mouth a defence of this fictional art as fine as I have ever read:

"I now give you my word of honor that the picture your city owns show everything about life which truly matters, with nothing left out. It is a picture of the awareness of every animals--the 'I am' to which all messages are sent. It is all that is alive in any of us--in a mouse, in a deer, in a cocktail waitress. It is unwavering and pure, no matter what preposterous adventure may befall us. A sacred picture of Saint Antony alone is one vertical, unwavering band of light. If a cockroach were near him, or a cocktail waitress, the picture would show two such bands of light. Our awareness is all that is alive and maybe sacred in any of us. Everything else about us is dead machinery.""
mattwebb  vonnegut  bluebeard  abstractexpressionism  abstract  art  rabokarabekian  awareness  life  whatmatters  being  light  2011  books  kurtvonnegut 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Week 304 – Blog – BERG
"I’m looking forward to travel pausing for a bit, and having everyone back in the same room. There have been lots of changes recently, and the Room – which in my head I’ve started capitalising, Room not room – is nothing if not a culture – a particular stance to design and the world, and shared values – a way to work which is beautiful, popular and inventive – and a network of people in which ideas transmit, roll round and mutate, and come back in new forms and hit you in the back of the head. The Room is what it’s all about. It’s a broth that requires more investment than we’ve been giving it recently. So, yeah, that."
mattwebb  theroom  openstudio  work  howwework  networkedlearning  networks  berg  berglondon  sharedspace  space  place  learningplaces  learningspaces  2011  schooldesign  lcproject  tcsnmy  culture  sharedvalues  invention  creativity  cv  socialemotionallearning  shaedspace  sharedtime  community  communities  howwelearn  socialemotional 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Our experimental rockets are our people – Blog – BERG
"Our culture and way of working is what makes us BERG. And our culture is made by our people. Everyone here has a colossal impact on the life of the room. Nobody just “fits in,” we grow together — learning, teaching and developing as we go. Tom and Matt B are irreplaceable, we’ll miss them enormously!

That said, one of the things that makes me most pleased is that the studio is a place that people travel through and move on from. I’m proud of our alumni! When they achieve great things, I admit I take a good deal of satisfaction that a fellow traveller has carried a little bit of BERG into the world.

We keep it quiet, but the secret history of our name is that is stands for the British Experimental Rocket Group. Our experimental rockets are our people.

So what next?

The studio will grow and change. We’re established enough that we can treat these moments as opportunities."
berglondon  berg  mattwebb  culture  learning  openstudio  lcproject  howwework  howwelearn  people  hr  teaching 
february 2011 by robertogreco
space clearing (15 Jan., 2011, at Interconnected)
"Constrained walks and the dérive both reveal the city's psychogeography, and force the city to give up more of itself. It's funny to find, right on my doorstep, the streets I didn't know that I didn't know, the ones I'd got the unknown habit of avoiding. The city grows.

Space clearing makes visible and disrupts the psychogeography of my home. By standing in far corners, I find new perspectives. I strengthen rarely visited spots in my own mental map. Later, I find myself noticing the corners more. My house looks larger. The changed shape of my rooms encourages me to walk differently about the space. I stand in slightly unfamiliar spots, look at my bookshelves with a new-found unfamiliarity, and this prompts new combinations of titles to come to my attention, and new ideas.

I wonder if I could make something to do this for me? Maybe a robot vacuum cleaner programmed to find rarely visited corners and play an attention-grabbing sample, hey, over here, over here."
space  perspective  mattwebb  situationist  dérive  psychogeography  robots  constraints  flaneur  cities  homes  spaceclearing  mentalmaps  mapping  maps  attention  2011  derive 
january 2011 by robertogreco
being boring (14 Jan., 2011, at Interconnected)
"For me, writing seems to be a muscle. W/out doing it regularly, I feel I've lost my ability to express cogently complex ideas in interesting ways.

…because I haven't been regularly talking about the ideas that interest me, I've not given myself the time to reduce down those ideas into pithy, understandable statements.

Writing seems to be associated w/ my sense of pattern recognition. I'm missing the structures of abstraction it gives me, & the room for wiggly play I get while I do it.

So I'm trying to start writing regularly again. It's frustrating & a bloody pain. I feel incapable of expressing what I mean to say. There's no glitter to my words, & I have to force them out. I can see everything that's wrong with what I write. I don't like the structure, but improving it doesn't come naturally because I don't know what to do… There are no insights. I can't start or end things. I don't even sound like me. I'm boring. Okay, fine, do it anyway."
mattwebb  writing  classideas  cv  boring  boringness  thinking  reflection  criticalthinking  habit  flow  insight  ideas  2011 
january 2011 by robertogreco
books read in 2010 (1 January 2011, Interconnected)
"I didn't keep a comprehensive list of books I read in 2010 (as I did in 2007 and 2008), and I didn't make much time for reading. But here are the ones I can remember, in roughly chronological order."
mattwebb  books  lists  toread  science  sciencefiction  booklists  2010 
january 2011 by robertogreco
RORY HYDE PROJECTS / BLOG » Blog Archive » ‘Know No Boundaries’: an interview with Matt Webb of BERG London
"we attempt to invent things and create culture. It’s not just enough to invent something and see it once, you have to change the world around you, get underneath it, interfere with it somehow, because otherwise you’re just problem solving. And I wont say that design has an exclusive hold over this – you can invent things and change culture with art, music, business practices, ethnography, market research; all of these are valid too – design just happens to be the way we do it…our things should be hopeful, and not just functional…beautiful, inventive and mainstream…you could see our work as experimental, or science-fiction, or futuristic…our design is essentially a political act. We design ‘normative’ products, normative being that you design for the world as it should be. Invention is always for the world as it should be, and not for the world you are in…Design these products and you’ll move the world just slightly in that direction."
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  design  invention  hope  culture  change  purpose  innovation  scifi  sciencefiction  designfiction  beauty  future  inventingthefuture  speculative  speculativedesign  fractionalai  ai  brucesterling  evolutionarysoup  storytelling  isaacasimov  arthurcclarke  argoscatalog  schooloscope  behavior  evocativeobjects  collaboration  functionalism  technology  architecture  people  structure  groups  experience  interdisciplinary  tinkering  multidisciplinary  play  playfulness  crossdisciplinary  flip  gamechanging 
january 2011 by robertogreco
The following is from Bluebeard by Kurt Vonnegut (22 January 2003, Interconnected)
"Paul Slazinger has had all his clothes and writing materials brought here. He is working on his first volume of non-fiction, to which he has given this title: The Only Way to Have a Successful Revolution in Any Field of Human Activity.

For what it's worth: Slazinger claims to have learned from history that most people cannot open their minds to new ideas unless a mind-opening team with a peculiar membership goes to work on them. Otherwise, life will go on exactly as before, no matter how painful, unrealistic, unjust, ludicrous, or downright dumb that life may be.

The team must consist of three sorts of specialists, he says. Otherwise, the revolution, whether in politics or the arts of the sciences or whatever, is sure to fail.

The rarest of these specialists, he says, is an authentic genius -- a person capable of having seeminly good ideas not in general circulation. 'A genius working alone,' he says, 'is invariably ignored as a lunatic.'

The second sort of specialist is a lot easier to find: a highly intelligent citizen in good standing in his or her community, who understands and admires the fresh ideas of the genius, and who testifies that the genius is far from mad. 'A person working like that alone,' says Slazinger, 'can only yearn out loud for changes, but fail to say what their shapes should be.'

The third sort of specialist is a person who can explain anything, no matter how complicated, to the satisfaction of most people, no matter how stupid or pigheaded they may be. 'He will say almost anything in order to be interesting or exciting,' says Slazinger. 'Working alone, depending solely on his own shallow ideas, he would be regarded as being as full of shit as a Christmas turkey.'"

[Update 13 May 2013: Now also here: http://magicalnihilism.com/2013/05/13/i-can-never-find-this-quote-about-revolutions-by-vonnegut-so-im-sticking-it-here-for-safe-keeping/ and here http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/50358994041/the-mind-opening-team ]
mattwebb  bluebeard  vonnegut  genius  innovation  specialists  communication  translation  cv  revolutions  movements  mindchanges  via:tomc  humans  specialization  generalists  trust  explainers  explaining  testimony  2003  kurtvonnegut  mindchanging 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Media Surfaces: The Journey – Blog – BERG
"These little inventions have hopefully got you to your train (Arthur, remember?) on time, and in a more of a relaxed state of mind…

In one of our concept sketches below we’re exploring that first case – could your ticket be the missing jigsaw piece to the reservation stub?

A bit Willy Wonka magic ticket!…

We know that we’re going to be passing certain places at certain times, to some accuracy, during our journey.

The burgeoning amount of geo-located data about our environment means we could look to provide snippets from Wikipedia perhaps, with timings based on how they intersect with your predicted journey time – alerting you to interesting sights just as they pass by your window.

These tiny, personalised, collectable paper-spimes provide a kind of papernet augmented-reality – giving a routine journey an extra layer of wonder and interest."
berg  berglondon  papernet  paper  trains  augmentedreality  2010  displays  everyware  spimes  design  information  future  ubicomp  mediasurfaces  dentsu  transport  surfaces  mattwebb  timoarnall  jackschulze  ar 
november 2010 by robertogreco
The Do Lectures | Matt Webb
"Matt Webb is MD of the design studio BERG, which invents products and designs new media. Projects include Popular Science+ for the Apple iPad, solid metal phone prototypes for Nokia, a bendy map of Manhattan called Here & There, and an electronic puppet that brings you closer to your friends.

Matt speaks on design and technology, is co-author of Mind Hacks - cognitive psychology for a general audience - and if you were to sum up his design interests in one word, it would be “politeness.” He lives in London in a flat with a wonky floor."
mattwebb  design  designfiction  computing  ai  scifi  sciencefiction  berg  berglondon  future  futurism  retrofuture  space  speculativedesign  2010  dolectures  books  film  thinkingnebula  nebulas  history  automation  toys  productdesign  iphone  schooloscope  redlaser  mechanicalturk  magic  virtualpets  commoditization  robotics  anyshouse  twitter  internetofthings  ubicomp  anybots  faces  pareidolia  fractionalai  fractionalhorsepower  andyshouse  weliveinamazingtimes  spacetravel  spaceexploration  spimes  iot 
october 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - Matt Webb - What comes after mobile
"Matt Webb talks about how slightly smart things have invaded our lives over the past years. People have been talking about artificial intelligence for years but the promise has never really come through. Matt shows how the AI promise has transformed and now seems to be coming to us in the form of simple toys instead of complex machines. But this talks is about much more then AI, Matt also introduces chatty interfaces & hard math for trivial things."
mattwebb  mobile  phones  future  scifi  toys  2010  berg  berglondon  momo17  productinvention  invention 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Matt Webb – What comes after mobile « Mobile Monday Amsterdam
"Matt Webb talks about how slightly smart things have invaded our lives over the past years. People have been talking about artificial intelligence for years but the promise has never really come through. Matt shows how the AI promise has transformed and now seems to be coming to us in the form of simple toys instead of complex machines. But this talks is about much more then AI, Matt also introduces chatty interfaces & hard math for trivial things."

[via: http://preoccupations.tumblr.com/post/1157711285/what-comes-after-mobile-matt-webb ]
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  future  mobile  technology  ai  design  productinvention  invention  spacebinding  timebinding  energybinding  spimes  internetofthings  anybot  ubicomp  glowcaps  geography  context  privacy  glanceableuse  cloud  embedded  chernofffaces  understanding  math  mathematics  augmentedreality  redlaser  neuralnetworks  mechanicalturk  shownar  toys  lanyrd  iot  ar 
september 2010 by robertogreco
The life of products – Blog – BERG
"Products are not nouns but verbs. A product designed as a noun will sit passively in a home, an office, or pocket. It will likely have a focus on aesthetics, and a list of functions clearly bulleted in the manual… but that’s it.

Products can be verbs instead, things which are happening, that we live alongside. We cross paths with our products when we first spy them across a crowded shop floor, or unbox them, or show a friend how to do something with them. We inhabit our world of activities and social groups together… a product designed with this in mind can look very different."

[Related: http://berglondon.com/blog/2010/09/03/patina/ ]
products  use  actions  experience  engagement  berg  berglondon  meaning  apple  interaction  2006  design  mattwebb  beausage  patina 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Week 272 – Blog – BERG [Matt's description of "gardening a studio" sounds very much like gardening a classroom, especially the studio classroom that we have at TCSNMY.]
"One of the things that was easier, writing these notes about the studio back in 2009, was that the room was smaller. There’s something about stewing in each other’s pheromones. You share moods. If the week was tiring, you were all tired. If you had the sherbet fizz of excitement in your belly, you knew that was the collective unconscious of the studio at large.

[Now] we’re too big for that. We’re not big by any means! Eight people, a network of experts, and just taken on a ninth, but big enough for different moods and senses to sit together in the same space…

Mood transmission follows lines of physical proximity, conversations, & collaboration.

Part of the job of gardening a studio – a community of people – is to encourage the right transmissions and tides. By weaving together sources of energy, in reinforcing loops, a collective exuberance may take place…

I monitor three budgets: attention; cash; risk. All are flows to be directed…"
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  teaching  cv  management  studiogardens  studioclassroom  collaboration  conversation  proximity  mood  moodtransmission  attention  risk  cash 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Chimeric Thinking in the Trough of Disillusionment « Snarkmarket
"We obvi­ously love hybrids and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary think­ing here at Snark­mar­ket. But you know, I think we might love chimeras even more.
snarkmarket  robinsloan  chimeras  chimericthinking  recombinant  interdisciplinary  mashups  hybrids  hacking  patterns  patternrecognition  hacks  theadjacentpossible  recombinantgizmos  classideas  mattjones  mattwebb  berg  berglondon 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Week 245 – Blog – BERG
"found ourselves having to refer very precisely to weird abstract concepts that arose from data. To have conversations w/out misunderstandings, made up words & put long dictionary on wall w/ title “Teach yourself Dutch.”...project lingo... ...not really Dutch...But to English speaker listening in...wouldn’t be comprehensible. ...never just shorthand...expresses things that cannot be fully expressed in regular English...ends up having its own grammar...team end up having to become fluent speakers... ...Timo is learning...practises every day....we’ve written dictionary, he’s inventing idioms. He might need new words...revise the dictionary...in a few weeks we’ll have a much larger team & everyone will need to speak it. It’ll start to carry meanings of its own, & its structure will encourage particular kinds of new Dutch poetry that we never imagined. ...ecological management...invention of right kind of Dutch can steer project creatively w/out explicit directing."
culture  language  berg  berglondon  mattwebb  community  management  leadership  ecologicalmanagement  conversation  invention  creativity 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Week 241 – Blog – BERG
"always put something on the table, no matter how half-formed the concept, and then it’s perfectly okay to critique it and pull it to bits… but only if you can replace it with something better. It’s a strategy that means you’re always left with a working concept, and not something about which you know everything that’s wrong but nothing that’s right. ... As to what I do care about, it’s the gestalt: happiness, growth, and direction, and not how I do it but how we do it, together. I’m not sure I’m terribly good at it yet (it requires a level of self-awareness that I’ve yet to develop), and in fact I slip an awful lot, but maybe it’s because I find it so hard that I find it so fulfilling."
iteration  howwework  berg  berglondon  mattwebb  doing  critique  glvo  working  tcsnmy  happiness  collaboration  self-awareness 
january 2010 by robertogreco
when richard feynman (3 January 2010, Interconnected)
"When Richard Feynman refuses to explain how magnets work he fidgets and bounces and puffs in a way I recognise from a friend with long-term mental illness, who does this when he gets excited and gets really into explaining a topic. ... The repulsion of magnets is the same as the repulsion you get when you push your hand against the sofa and it pushes back.
richardfeynman  physics  magnets  definitions  explaining  magneticforce  brain  excitement  mattwebb  mentalillness  2010  mentalhealth 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Week 235 – Blog – BERG
"When a studio is really working, people & ideas feed off one another. Code or design will reveal an opportunity or problem. An idea will be floated. Someone will take it, reference something they know (an unusual style of photography; rare game format from 80s; nature of time & space), spin it & throw it back. Ideas fold & stretch. & then, somehow, something simple and to the point will appear, & that’ll be the new direction. It doesn’t matter what people are working on, everyone has something to do. There a kind of multiplier effect, the more people are in flow, in the studio. What I try to concentrate on is enabling this studio-wide flow. When it’s working well I’m buoyant, exuberant. What blocks it? Concerns about direction, time, support, money; overwork; unhappiness; lack of confidence in the work; lack of openness to critique. How can it be steered? Enthusiasm & passion, examples & influences, shared values. What do we value? That which is: Popular. Inventive. Beautiful."
berg  berglondon  mattwebb  management  administration  leadership  flow  work  mission  tcsnmy  passion  morale  enthusiasm  well-being  motivation  happiness  confidence 
december 2009 by robertogreco
UX Week 2009 » Blog Archive » VIDEO: Matt Webb
"Smart products bring their own design challenges. Internet-connected devices and plastic filled with electronics behave in unexpected ways: what does it means for a physical thing to side-load its behaviour, or for a toy to have its own presence in your social network? What we’ve learned about user experience on the Web is a great place to start: social software, adaptation, designing for action creating action — these are principles familiar on the Web, and still valuable when design is not on the screen but in your hands."
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  design  mobile  ux  process  product  manufacturing  adaptation 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Escalante (Slide 1) - Talks - BERG
"The 21st century is a participatory culture, not a consumerist one. What does it mean when small teams can be responsible for world-size effects, on the same playing field as major corporations and government? We can look at the Web – breaking down publishing and consuming from day zero – for where we might be heading in a world bigger than we can really see, and we can look at design – playful and rational all at once – to help us figure out what to do when we get there."
berg  berglondon  mattwebb  design  future  creativity  maps  trends  web  sciencefiction  stewartbrand 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Why social matters – Blog – BERG
"now feels natural to incorporate our friends into photo management, encyclopaedias & tracking our finances...social software are part of everyday Web design discourse. But it’s important to remember that for 10 years the Web was not a naturally social space, where conversations & creativity could flourish...and for many, now, it’s still not. That we’re prepared to give away our rights & privacy in exchange for leaving comments or joining a chat system in a game tells me that we’re still starved for social connection online. The fact that our hobbies are social again is great. Flickr builds social capital, Twitter builds social capital. The fact that are hobbies are social again is important. Social means showing off & sharing, & politeness & play. But social also means healthier, wealthier & happier & that’s a big, big deal. I believe that’s why social matters."
mattwebb  socialnetworking  health  socialcapital  socialmedia  media  software  social  web2.0  web  berg  berglondon 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Week 223 – Blog – BERG
"We in the main split the work of the company in half. Matt Jones looks after client services, and Schulze looks after new product development. It’s not clear cut, of course, because we’re small and so much is shared. But I think that general wellbeing, agency, the development of unconscious expertise, and structure without management are rooted in areas of responsibility that belong to individuals, are clearly demarcated and known by the group. It took me a while to come to this – Schulze noticed it first – but I’m a believer in roles now."
management  hierarchy  roles  organization  responsibility  berg  mattwebb  berglondon  well-being  structure  sharing  distributed  tcsnmy  lcproject  glvo 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Be selective with your innovation, and other wisdom from GameLayers – Blog – BERG
"I’m always impressed with good, hard decisions. If you’ve ever had a sleepness night over a project, you can imagine how tough it must be to, a year or even more later, walk away from it. Projects are tangled thickets of history and emotion. Corner turns are hard, and killing your babies doubly so. GameLayers have displayed good strategy."
strategy  ux  gamedesign  mattwebb  pmog  decisionmaking  harddecisions  killingaproject 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis » BERG
"I sort of accidentally named BERG. Because when Matt Jones laughingly asked me for company name suggestions, I said BRITISH EXPERIMENTAL ROCKET GROUP. And I guess it kind of stuck. Upon the announcement of the new company name, and the activation of the COMPLIMENTARY RE-ADJUSTMENT SEMINAR video projection, all principals of BERG donned blue lab coats with the BERG logo and their surname embroidered underneath. I like BERG because, if nothing else, they understand Mythic Resonance on their long Science-Factory Floor walk to the Future with mugs of tea in their hands."
names  naming  berg  berglondon  schulzeandwebb  jackschulze  mattwebb  warrenellis  mattjones  future 
august 2009 by robertogreco
The British Experimental Rocket Group « Matthew Sheret Online
"Last night I had the pleasure of attending Schulze & Webb’s ‘complimentary re-branding seminar’, as the design firm entered a new phase and blossomed into BERG: the British Experimental Rocket Group. Decked out in customised lab-coats, the team looked and sounded excited, terrified, enthusiastic, and nostalgic. To a man they also wound up being inspirational. ... To place a distance, a logo, an idea between the conception, execution and reception of a product means, for the first time in five years, that he [Matt webb] no longer lives or dies on his name alone. What an incredible thing. He and The British Experimental Rocket Group have become ideas – vague, powerful concepts that have all the potential to change the world or dissipate trying. Who wouldn’t want to be a part of that?"
berg  mattwebb  schulzeandwebb  berglondon  warrenellis  tomarmitage  mattjones  jackschulze  design  future  identity  indeas  gamechanging  worldchanging  tcsnmy  glvo  branding 
august 2009 by robertogreco
This is BERG – Blog – BERG
"Schulze & Webb Ltd isn’t the original name of the company. Schulze and I renamed an off-the-shelf company we bought in summer 2005...for a while the company was called Z.V.B. Ltd..."Zero Version Behaviour?” said Schulze’s dad...that particular company was formed 1 June 2005. I like that it pre-dates us, if only by a few weeks...summer of 2008 we began the Dayuejin. It’s important to name the eras of a company. It gives a sense of purpose, and of history. The Dayuejin is also known as the Great Leap Forward...To make the products we wanted, we needed more money petrol, which needed bigger projects, which needed more people & a bigger studio, which needed more money, which needed our own projects to build confidence. Everything had to move forward at once. It took a year, more or less, to find the right way to do it and lock it in. The current era started last week. It’s the Escalante, the Grand Staircase...This is an invention, strategy and new product development design company."
schulzeandwebb  berg  berglondon  design  jackschulze  mattwebb  mattjones  tomearmitage  change  evolution  growth  tcsnmy  glvo  agency  uk  business  gamechanging  naming  time  perspective  branding  names 
august 2009 by robertogreco
BERG - "The new name for Schulze & Webb"
"BERG is a design consultancy, working hands-on with companies to research and develop their technologies and strategy, primarily by finding opportunities in networks and physical things." [introduction here: http://berglondon.com/blog/2009/08/19/this-is-berg/]
mattwebb  jackschulze  design  uk  invention  berg  berglondon  development  products  schulzeandwebb 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Here I see the ants on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"I think of my words, scattered over the world, where they are seen by other people but the mysterious order is only known to myself, the meaning of their placements, and then I think of something previously unconsidered: the far more intricate hollow in my own mind, created as the words have been excavated. What shape is that nest? How do I live there?"
mattwebb  ants  words  memes  ideas  structures  comments 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Scope (Schulze & Webb) [Slide 43 is his "100 hours challenge"]
"Design, culture, scale, space, superpowers. Key concepts: design and contributing to culture; ourselves as individuals and the big picture; taking action." From slide 43: "put aside 100 hours over this summer...Now for the next two days, go to talks and start conversations with people you don’t know, and choose what to spend your 100 hours on. I guarantee that everyone in this room can produce something or has some special skill, and maybe they’re not even aware of it. Ask them what theirs is, find out, because you’ll get ideas about what to learn yourself, and decide what to spend your 100 hours on. Do that for me. Because when you contribute, when you participate in culture, when you’re no longer solving problems, but inventing culture itself, that is when life starts getting interesting."

[video here: http://video.reboot.dk/video/486775/matt-webb-scope ]
mattwebb  design  culture  glvo  cv  schulzeandwebb  superpowers  imagination  creativity  tcsnmy  make  do  diy  definitions  books  wholeearthcatalog  stewartbrand  brunomunari  macro  bigpicture  generalists  risk  macroscope  ideas  thinking  designthinking  jackschulze  change  gamechanging  invention  futurism  reinvention  perspective  johnthackara  iterative  victorpapanek  informallearning  learning  zefrank  cognitivesurplus  plp  berg  berglondon 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Pulse Laser: What if GPS worked like Here & There?
"You get used to the Here & There projection really fast. ... It starts feeling weird that you can’t see over rooftops. And while these prints we’ve shown so far are tied to two intersections (one looking from 3rd and 7th, and the other from 3rd and 35th), yes we are working on doing it on the fly, and yes we’re looking at generating projections from all kinds of places for one-off prints.

The natural question is, what would this look like driving round Manhattan? (If you forget about the traffic.) As Fast Company and Gizmodo said, Garmin should do it. They totally should. And so here it is."
maps  schulzeandwebb  visualization  mattwebb  jackschulze  gps  geography  3d  mapping  nyc  berg  berglondon 
may 2009 by robertogreco
YouTube - Ignite ETech 2008: Matt Webb
"A science fictional tour of the solar system from alternative earths to the space-spiders of Saturn."
sciencefiction  scifi  mattwebb  etech  planets  solarsystem  humor  science 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Last night on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"we've always, historically lived with the idea of the omniscient observer. Post the death of god, we've had to construct a technological society to make real this belief: mass surveillance and sharing. Privacy is a blip."
privacy  history  religion  surveillance  society  panopticon  cctv  technology  mattwebb  belief  omniscience  observation  psychology 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Waking Up from the 'Nightmare on Tech Street' - O'Reilly Radar
"In a recent conversation with my daughter Arwen and son-in-law Saul Griffith, Matt Webb remarked that he'd like 2008 to be remembered as the year of "peak consumption." Saul pointed out, though, that the term "peak waste" is perhaps more accurate. In an analogy to peak oil, he suggested that maybe we've reached the pinnacle of waste in our consumer culture. I do wonder if we will look back at the past few decades as a kind of sick aberration rather than a golden age, with good times we want to get back to. Like Saul, I'm hopeful that we can get rid of the waste, and get back to creating things of lasting value."
timoreilly  sustainability  green  consumerism  consumption  capitalism  failure  2008  mattwebb  ecology  plannedobsolescence  value  waste  peakwaste  peakconsumption  illusion 
december 2008 by robertogreco
so heres what (12 December 2002, Interconnected)
"And I wanted to howl like a wolf and grow and smash everything up, and I wanted not to be there, stuck in this Now, and what I did was curl up and lie on the sofa and not speak and not cry until mother said "Are you alright?"
mattwebb  death  life  identity  singularity  definingmoments  memory  childhood  2002 
december 2008 by robertogreco
so ive been reading (3 September 2002, Interconnected)
"What if you didn't know all the rules when you started? ... what if the only win-state was that your opponent agreed you'd won? ... in the real world it is possible to break the rules, and the fact that's done changes the nature of the game. ... there are certain rules that can't be broken in the real world ... But there are rules ... which are more mutable. ... It seems to me that rules are an approximation of pushes and pulls; that if this was linguistics then the real world would be optimality theory. Rules are just the bottom of potential wells. ... How to make a game ... that has no rules except geography and a mutable incentive space that changes based on past moves, and no win-state except your opponent agreeing you've won? And how to make a game which uses present-day technology effectively to change the axis we can play along, one that has a mutable morality?"
via:preoccupations  videogames  gaming  games  constraints  rules  time  ethics  mattwebb  2002 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Pulse Laser: Adaptive interfaces
"Steven Chapman has created a way to control his DSLR camera with a custom interface on his Nintendo DS....The power of adaptation. Imagine Canon had meant for this to happen. Imagine they had an App Store to allow people to share and to build businesses around this kind of activity. Users are in a better position than designers to discover better products and experiences and, increasingly, better positioned to create them too. (Of course the best situation is that designers are also users… which is surprisingly often not the case.) Adaptive design is not just an approach but an opportunity."
mattwebb  electronics  customization  ds  canon  photography  interface  usergenerated  adaptation  schulzeandwebb  berg  berglondon 
september 2008 by robertogreco
volition (13 September, 2008, Interconnected)
"I understand that what I'm facing now is a decision: to connect or to not connect, that there is no default choice, there is no momentum or inertia or carrying on as you were before; that every millisecond is a choice, an opinion, an act, and it can't be avoided because volition fills us, floods us, drowns the ghosts: and I look at your neck, and my hand, and I have a choice to make."
mattwebb  2008  volition  choice  connecting 
september 2008 by robertogreco
two kinds of training (3 July, 2008, Interconnected) - ""a couple dating should have available manufactured, reciprocal, variable-interval operant conditioning, ...
"...with a pay-off timed to the artificially produced extinction burst, to trigger mutual addition, and they should be able to buy this in a shop...I am aware that talking like this makes me sound like a sociopath."
mattwebb  training  conditioning  behavior  dating  human  interaction  design  2008 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Slide 1 of 12 (Patagonia, Interesting08)
"Now let’s say that the laws of physics are more like habits of nature. It almost doesn’t matter what they are, so long as they’re consistent when they meet. So long as humanity was separated by the Atlantic, it’s possible for the old world – Eu
mattwebb  patagonia  physics  perception  fiction 
june 2008 by robertogreco
let me speak seriously (2 June, 2008, Interconnected)
"Time is a little planet with close horizons. I find myself in the middle generation, almost cut loose with a single rope now. Let go. And it's my job to carry the torch and god help me if I stumble, because I'm it now, those towering experiences behind m
age  blogs  children  time  mattwebb  generations  death  health  life  2008 
june 2008 by robertogreco
the geometry of music (26 May, 2008, Interconnected)
"Causists, dirty causists, filthy causists, are unable to see that the world is almost entirely exceptional."
music  math  geometry  future  causists  mattwebb  2008 
may 2008 by robertogreco
@ETech: Matt Webb's Tour of a Fictional Solar System - O'Reilly Radar
"We began ETech with a series of Ignite talks. As usual Matt Webb weaved together beautiful images, kinetic energy and keen insights. Enjoy the talk."
mattwebb  sciencefiction  pseudoscience  scifi  science  space  fiction  etech  oreilly  astronomy 
april 2008 by robertogreco
From Pixels to Plastic, Matt Webb - O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference 2007
"As the internet sensibility hits the stuff in our homes, our product world is undergoing a massive transformation. But once there, what will we build?" see slides and notes at: http://schulzeandwebb.com/2007/plastic/
mattwebb  etech  technology  presentations  design  web  internet  social  software  interaction  products  physical  objects  networking  fabrication  socialsoftware  interactiondesign  wow  hardware  usability  future  manufacturing  diy  make 
april 2008 by robertogreco
It's hazardous to relate any stories about my birth seeing as putting my town of birth and the exact date online gives you two of the three facts you need to steal my identity on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"holding onto facts-metering them out, being cautious-is as bad as trying to save the planet by flying a little less, or avoiding heartache by the refusing of falling in love. Let's make more facts, so many, as many as we can, and be profligate with the o
mattwebb  information  caution  fear  progress  philosophy 
april 2008 by robertogreco
getting older (18 February, 2008, Interconnected)
"general, often contradictory life principles...be less tolerant; care more; care less; speak and do without thinking first, but consider afterwards; do what I want and if it's toxic, move on; don't avoid being wrong or foolish...everything is interesting
mattwebb  wisdom  listening  creativity  work  aging  learning  unschooling  people  2008 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Slide 40 of 41 (Movement, S&W)
"You know, what if the art of Web design was not to design applications, but to design kits of parts for other, other differently creative people to design applications, in ways that we don’t expect."
mattwebb  future  web  online  internet  democracy  popular  webdev  development  webapps  api  laypeople  webdesign 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Matt Webb on movement as a metaphor for the web (Webb 2.0?) (kottke.org)
""resistance in contemp society to trying out ideas...New ideas...accepted or rejected...choices vigorously defended. If it's going to help figure something out, why not look at problem from every possible angle? kottke.org = big part of my process of idea scaffolding. I don't necessarily agree or disagree with everything I link to1 but reading articles and then describing them to others is a good way to continually wonder, "Gosh, isn't it interesting to think about the world this way?"
kottke  design  mattwebb  ideas  ideascaffolding  analogy  metaphor  cv  howwework  thinking  generalists  translation  gamechanging  acting  faking  fraud  science  society  risk  failure  experimentation  approach  openminded  perspective 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Slide 1 of 41 (Movement, S&W)
"more I work with designers who have been through design school – trained particular way of thinking – more I know I’m not one...have to fake being designer quite a lot...how to articulate approaches designers take for granted...constantly make myself idea scaffolding.

Fortunately what I do have is a background in science, so I’m good at watching, hypothesising, and trying stuff out. That helps a lot.

It’s some of that idea scaffolding I want to talk about today, a particular way of thinking about the Web. And what that way of thinking is going to lead to is a proof of concept application, and a design method of how to put it all into practice."
design  mattwebb  ideas  ideascaffolding  analogy  metaphor  cv  howwework  thinking  generalists  translation  gamechanging  acting  faking  fraud  science  society  risk  failure  experimentation  approach  openminded  perspective 
february 2008 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read